History Theatre / TheMerryWivesOfWindsor

11th Apr '18 8:21:03 AM snichols1973
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* DogLatin: Played with during William's Latin exam and Mistress Quickly's comments throughout the lesson:
-->'''Hugh Evans''': What is he, William, that does lend articles?\\
'''William''': Articles are borrowed of the pronoun, and be thus declined: ''Singulariter, nominativo, hic, haec, hoc''.\\
'''Hugh Evans''': ''Nominativo'', ''hig, hag, hog''; pray you, mark: [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar ''genitivo:, hujus''.]] Well, what is your accusative case?\\
'''William''': ''Accusativo, hinc''.\\
'''Hugh Evans''': I pray you, have your remembrance, child; ''Accusativo, hung, hang, hog''.\\
'''Mistress Quickly''': "Hang hog" is Latin for bacon, I warrant you.


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** HilarityEnsues with quite a number of DoubleEntendre puns during the Latin pop quiz, bordering on DogLatin:
-->'''Hugh Evans''': What is your genitive case, William?\\
'''William''': Genitive case?\\
'''Hugh Evans''': Ay.\\
'''William''': Genitive, ''horum, harum, horum''.\\
'''Mistress Quickly''': Vengeance of Jenny's case! Fie on her! Never name her, child, if she be a whore.\\
'''Hugh Evans''': For shame, 'oman!\\
'''Mistress Quickly''': You do ill to teach the child such words! He teaches him to hick and to hack, which they'll do fast enough of themselves, and to call "horum", fie upon you!
6th Sep '17 1:04:54 PM fruitstripegum
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* AbhorrentAdmirer: Falstaff, Slender

to:

* AbhorrentAdmirer: Falstaff, SlenderSlender.
* ExactWords: "To Master Brook [i.e. Ford] you yet shall keep your word/For he tonight shall lie with Mistress Ford."



* ExactWords: "To Master Brook [i.e. Ford] you yet shall keep your word/For he tonight shall lie with Mistress Ford."
28th Jul '17 11:08:55 AM Kalaong
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* BeamMeUpScotty: This is the origin of the phrase, "The world is my oyster" - and of course, the phrase bears only a minor resemblance to the source;
-->'''Pistol''': Why, then the world's mine oyster. Which I with sword will open.
** ...and it ''doesn't'' mean "[[MoneyForNothing I can have anything I want]]", it means, "I can ''[[MightMakesRight take]]'' anything I want."
28th Jul '17 11:08:27 AM Kalaong
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* BeamMeUpScotty: This is the origin of the phrase, "The world is my oyster" - and of course, the phrase bears only a minor resemblance to the source;
-->'''Pistol''': Why, then the world's mine oyster. Which I with sword will open.
**...and it ''doesn't'' mean "[[MoneyForNothing I can have anything I want]]", it means, "I can ''[[MightMakesRight take]]'' anything I want."
8th Jun '17 5:46:09 AM Julia1984
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This appears to be one of the few plays for which Shakespeare came up with an original plot (''Theatre/TheTempest'' is the only other one of significance). At least three operas have been based on the play: one with music by Otto Nicolai, one by Ralph Vaughn Williams, and one, under the title of ''Falstaff'', by Giuseppe Verdi.

to:

This appears to be one of the few plays for which Shakespeare came up with an original plot (''Theatre/TheTempest'' is the only other one of significance).plot[[note]] along with ''Theatre/LovesLaboursLost'', ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'', and ''Theatre/TheTempest''[[/note]]. At least three operas have been based on the play: one with music by Otto Nicolai, one by Ralph Vaughn Williams, and one, under the title of ''Falstaff'', by Giuseppe Verdi.
5th Mar '16 10:42:40 AM Sonofstranger
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* TheMusical: Or rather, The {{Opera}}. It was adapted by both [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falstaff_(opera) Giuseppe Verdi]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falstaff_(Salieri) Antonio Salieri.]]
29th May '14 5:48:35 AM FuzzyBoots
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* FunetikAksent: Shakespeare writes out Hugh's Welsh accent.

to:

* FunetikAksent: Shakespeare writes out Hugh's Welsh accent and Doctor Caius's French accent.



* ExecutiveMeddling: If an urban legend is true, literally--and in the cause of {{shipping}}, to boot: The existence of the (most likely untrue) urban legend that [[TheVirginQueen Queen Elizabeth]] ordered Shakespeare to write a play where her favorite character Falstaff falls in love does at least show that fans meddling in fictional characters' love lives was not a foreign concept in the 1700s.



* PaperThinDisguise

to:

* PaperThinDisguisePaperThinDisguise: Falstaff as the Witch of Brentford and Ford as Brook.
7th Apr '14 6:45:34 PM Aiguille
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* ExecutiveMeddling: If an urban legend is true, literally--and in the cause of {{shipping}}, to boot: The existence of the (most likely untrue) urban legend that [[ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth]] ordered Shakespeare to write a play where her favorite character Falstaff falls in love does at least show that fans meddling in fictional characters' love lives was not a foreign concept in the 1700s.

to:

* ExecutiveMeddling: If an urban legend is true, literally--and in the cause of {{shipping}}, to boot: The existence of the (most likely untrue) urban legend that [[ElizabethI [[TheVirginQueen Queen Elizabeth]] ordered Shakespeare to write a play where her favorite character Falstaff falls in love does at least show that fans meddling in fictional characters' love lives was not a foreign concept in the 1700s.
9th Oct '13 7:32:05 PM PaulA
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This appears to be one of the few plays for which Shakespeare came up with an original plot (''Theatre/TheTempest'' is the the only other one of significance). At least three operas have been based on the play: one with music by Otto Nicolai, one by Ralph Vaughn Williams. The third is ''Falstaff'', with music by Giuseppe Verdi.

to:

This appears to be one of the few plays for which Shakespeare came up with an original plot (''Theatre/TheTempest'' is the the only other one of significance). At least three operas have been based on the play: one with music by Otto Nicolai, one by Ralph Vaughn Williams. The third is Williams, and one, under the title of ''Falstaff'', with music by Giuseppe Verdi.
9th Oct '13 3:54:42 PM UltimateParagon
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