History Theatre / RichardII

24th Sep '17 1:05:47 PM Malady
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* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by BenWhishaw and DavidTennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic, AmbiguouslyGay, and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.

to:

* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by BenWhishaw Creator/BenWhishaw and DavidTennant), Creator/DavidTennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic, AmbiguouslyGay, and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.
18th Sep '17 11:40:32 PM Kalmbach
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The play opens with Henry of Bolingbroke accusing Thomas Mowbray of treason and murder, with the issue to be settled [[DuelToTheDeath in single combat]]. Before they have a chance to fight, Richard II interrupts, banishing them both from England. John of Gaunt, Bolingbroke's father and the Duke of Lancaster, dies, and Richard decides to seize Bolingbroke's lands to fuel his war effort in Ireland. Bolingbroke returns, because he was banished as Duke of Hereford but is now Duke of Lancaster, and is rightfully pissed off that his land and wealth has been taken by Richard. He organizes a campaign against Richard. At first, the campaign's goal is merely to get Bolingbroke's land back, but it quickly becomes an opportunity to seize the throne of England. In a scene that was originally censored out, Richard is forced to abdicate. He is sent to prison, where he angsts about the loss of his throne, before being killed by an ambitious nobleman. Henry IV regrets the death, and vows to redeem himself by starting a crusade against Jerusalem.

to:

The play opens with Henry of Bolingbroke accusing and Thomas Mowbray accusing one another of treason and murder, with the issue to be settled [[DuelToTheDeath in single combat]]. Before they have a chance to fight, Richard II interrupts, banishing them both from England. John of Gaunt, Bolingbroke's father and the Duke of Lancaster, dies, and Richard decides to seize Bolingbroke's lands to fuel his war effort in Ireland. Bolingbroke returns, because he was banished as Duke of Hereford but is now Duke of Lancaster, and is rightfully pissed off that his land and wealth has been taken by Richard. He organizes a campaign against Richard. At first, the campaign's goal is merely to get Bolingbroke's land back, but it quickly becomes an opportunity to seize the throne of England. In a scene that was originally censored out, Richard is forced to abdicate. He is sent to prison, where he angsts about the loss of his throne, before being killed by an ambitious nobleman. Henry IV regrets the death, and vows to redeem himself by starting a crusade against Jerusalem.
18th Sep '17 11:37:59 PM Kalmbach
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* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by BenWishaw and DavidTennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic, AmbiguouslyGay, and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.

to:

* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by BenWishaw BenWhishaw and DavidTennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic, AmbiguouslyGay, and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.
18th Sep '17 11:16:18 PM Kalmbach
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The play opens with Bolingbroke and a rival challenging one another to a duel for their honour. Before they have a chance to fight, Richard II interrupts, banishing them both from England. John of Gaunt, Bolingbroke's father and the Duke of Lancaster, dies, and Richard decides to seize Bolingbroke's lands to fuel his war effort in Ireland. Bolingbroke returns, because he was banished as Duke of Hereford but is now Duke of Lancaster, and is rightfully pissed off that his land and wealth has been taken by Richard. He organizes a campaign against Richard. At first, the campaign's goal is merely to get Bolingbroke's land back, but it quickly becomes an opportunity to seize the throne of England. In a scene that was originally censored out, Richard is forced to abdicate. He is sent to prison, where he angsts about the loss of his throne, before being killed by an ambitious nobleman. Henry IV regrets the death, and vows to redeem himself by starting a crusade against Jerusalem.

to:

The play opens with Henry of Bolingbroke accusing Thomas Mowbray of treason and a rival challenging one another murder, with the issue to a duel for their honour.be settled [[DuelToTheDeath in single combat]]. Before they have a chance to fight, Richard II interrupts, banishing them both from England. John of Gaunt, Bolingbroke's father and the Duke of Lancaster, dies, and Richard decides to seize Bolingbroke's lands to fuel his war effort in Ireland. Bolingbroke returns, because he was banished as Duke of Hereford but is now Duke of Lancaster, and is rightfully pissed off that his land and wealth has been taken by Richard. He organizes a campaign against Richard. At first, the campaign's goal is merely to get Bolingbroke's land back, but it quickly becomes an opportunity to seize the throne of England. In a scene that was originally censored out, Richard is forced to abdicate. He is sent to prison, where he angsts about the loss of his throne, before being killed by an ambitious nobleman. Henry IV regrets the death, and vows to redeem himself by starting a crusade against Jerusalem.



A performance of the play can be seen [[http://pursuedbyabear.net/specials/514/ here.]] In 2012, the BBC produced ''Richard II'' as part of ''Series/TheHollowCrown'' series with Ben Whishaw as Richard, Rory Kinnear as Bollingbroke and Creator/PatrickStewart as Gaunt, and in 2013, a Royal Shakespeare Company production with Creator/DavidTennant in the title role was broadcast to cinemas internationally (and is [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03rkk2x available to stream for free internationally]] for much of 2016, part of the BBC's Shakespeare400 celebrations).

to:

A performance of the play can be seen [[http://pursuedbyabear.net/specials/514/ here.]] In 2012, the BBC produced ''Richard II'' as part of ''Series/TheHollowCrown'' series with Ben Whishaw Creator/BenWhishaw as Richard, Rory Kinnear Creator/RoryKinnear as Bollingbroke Bolingbroke and Creator/PatrickStewart as Gaunt, and in 2013, a Royal Shakespeare Company production with Creator/DavidTennant in the title role was broadcast to cinemas internationally (and is [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03rkk2x available to stream for free internationally]] for much of 2016, part of the BBC's Shakespeare400 celebrations).



* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by Ben Wishaw and David Tennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.

to:

* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by Ben Wishaw BenWishaw and David Tennant), DavidTennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic melodramatic, AmbiguouslyGay, and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims. claims.
6th Sep '17 1:13:23 PM fruitstripegum
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* PoorCommunicationKills: Played with. Richard and Bolingbroke are actually very plain about their thoughts and intentions when speaking to each other. Henry never actually demands the crown from Richard; at all times, he merely demands his inheritance back and insists Richard made a mistake by taking it from him. Richard, believing in his own infallibility as king, immediately thinks Bolingbroke is launching a coup and rants about it, because if a king is capable of fallibility, he is no longer king. Henry and Richard's vastly different mindsets turn what seems to be an honest conversation into an argument about what makes a king: [[DivineRightOfKings Divine right]] or their own actions.



* PoorCommunicationKills: Played with. Richard and Bolingbroke are actually very plain about their thoughts and intentions when speaking to each other. Henry never actually demands the crown from Richard; at all times, he merely demands his inheritance back and insists Richard made a mistake by taking it from him. Richard, believing in his own infallibility as king, immediately thinks Bolingbroke is launching a coup and rants about it, because if a king is capable of fallibility, he is no longer king. Henry and Richard's vastly different mindsets turn what seems to be an honest conversation into an argument about what makes a king: [[DivineRightOfKings Divine right]] or their own actions.
20th May '17 12:28:46 PM Dragon101
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Added DiffLines:

* SissyVillain: Richard, insofar as he ''is'' a villain, is portrayed this way in many modern productions (notably by Ben Wishaw and David Tennant), being effeminate, vain, melodramatic and embarrassing to many of his subjects, particularly the ones whose land he claims.
6th Nov '16 2:30:36 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Badass}}: Richard, at least in the ''Hollow Crown'' production. Despite being almost naked, completely unarmed and trapped in his prison, he manages to kill one of his assassins before the crossbows do the rest. Some versions of his death scene emphasize this more than others; at least one version of the text has him wresting a weapon from his assassins' hands (sometimes [[AnAxeToGrind an axe]]) and killing two of them, practically bleeding [[FacingTheBulletsOneLiner Facing The Bullets rebukes]]. At any rate, the death scene is Richard at his most [[TragicHero heroic.]]


Added DiffLines:

* VillainousValor: Richard, at least in the ''Hollow Crown'' production. Despite being almost naked, completely unarmed and trapped in his prison, he manages to kill one of his assassins before the crossbows do the rest. Some versions of his death scene emphasize this more than others; at least one version of the text has him wresting a weapon from his assassins' hands (sometimes [[AnAxeToGrind an axe]]) and killing two of them, practically bleeding [[FacingTheBulletsOneLiner Facing The Bullets rebukes]]. At any rate, the death scene is Richard at his most [[TragicHero heroic.]]
6th Aug '16 11:40:57 AM MasterofGalaxies4628
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Added DiffLines:

* RussianReversal:
-->'''Richard:''' I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.
12th Jun '16 8:40:29 PM PaulA
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* AmbiguouslyGay: Richard. This is possibly due to the fact that the play was heavily inspired by [[Creator/ChristopherMarlowe Marlowe's]] ''Edward II'', wherein Edward is ''very'' gay and has a canonical male lover.

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Richard. This is possibly due to the fact that the play was heavily inspired by [[Creator/ChristopherMarlowe Marlowe's]] ''Edward II'', ''Theatre/EdwardII'', wherein Edward is ''very'' gay and has a canonical male lover.
9th Jun '16 6:59:31 PM ManicDepressiveMouse
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A performance of the play can be seen [[http://pursuedbyabear.net/specials/514/ here.]] In 2012, the BBC produced ''Richard II'' as part of ''Series/TheHollowCrown'' series with Ben Whishaw as Richard, Rory Kinnear as Bollingbroke and Creator/PatrickStewart as Gaunt, and in 2013, a Royal Shakespeare Company production with Creator/DavidTennant in the title role was broadcast to cinemas internationally.

to:

A performance of the play can be seen [[http://pursuedbyabear.net/specials/514/ here.]] In 2012, the BBC produced ''Richard II'' as part of ''Series/TheHollowCrown'' series with Ben Whishaw as Richard, Rory Kinnear as Bollingbroke and Creator/PatrickStewart as Gaunt, and in 2013, a Royal Shakespeare Company production with Creator/DavidTennant in the title role was broadcast to cinemas internationally.internationally (and is [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03rkk2x available to stream for free internationally]] for much of 2016, part of the BBC's Shakespeare400 celebrations).
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