History TabletopGame / Pokemon

30th Nov '16 9:49:28 PM Kayube
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* MiniGame: At the tail-end of Generation II, cards (including the ''Expedition'', ''Aquapolis'', and ''Skyridge'' sets) had dot codes that allowed minigames to be played on the Game Boy Advance e-Reader peripheral, as well as giving card game strategies. After that, while dot codes remained on the cards until the ''EX Dragon'' set, they consisted only of Pokédex information rather than including minigames.
26th Oct '16 11:38:27 AM BroticusMaximus
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** Also ''[[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Evolutions_(TCG) Evolutions]]'', another 2016 expansion that commemorates the franchise's 20th anniversary, this time featuring cards directly based on the layout of the original Base Set.
3rd Aug '16 6:20:03 AM Yugnat
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** [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Sabrina's_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) Sabrina's ESP]] lets you re-flip coins for the Pokémon it's attached to once. Trick Coin does the same thing, except it can be attached to any Pokémon, can be done once per turn, and will remain on that Pokémon on subsequent turns.

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** [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Sabrina's_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) net/wiki/Sabrina%27s_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) Sabrina's ESP]] lets you re-flip coins for the Pokémon it's attached to once. Trick Coin does the same thing, except it can be attached to any Pokémon, can be done once per turn, and will remain on that Pokémon on subsequent turns.
9th Jul '16 1:19:04 AM ChaosGallade
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** [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Sabrinas_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) Sabrina's ESP]] lets you re-flip coins.

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** [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Sabrinas_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) net/wiki/Sabrina's_ESP_(Gym_Heroes_117) Sabrina's ESP]] lets you re-flip coins.coins for the Pokémon it's attached to once. Trick Coin does the same thing, except it can be attached to any Pokémon, can be done once per turn, and will remain on that Pokémon on subsequent turns.
23rd May '16 11:51:41 AM ptcgmaurylover
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* CrackIsCheaper: Making a functional deck often costs hundreds and hundreds of dollars. Newer players can opt for so-called "Theme Decks" that run for about 10 dollars apiece but usually serve no actual competitive function and would most likely be destroyed by any professionally-made deck.
** On the casual side of the TCG, in terms of collecting, going for 100% completion of ''all'' of the released sets will be a serious challenge in terms of price. While the first few sets such as Jungle and Fossil (not Base Set, though) run for fairly reasonable amounts of money, other sets, especially those that are currently legal in competitive play and even first edition prints of the aforementioned older sets are hard to come by at a decent price. Certain sets, especially those from the original EX era, have secret rare cards that can run for hundreds of dollars in them, such as certain Gold Star cards. Collectors may attempt to mitigate these high costs by buying lots of assorted cards, but it would likely take a very long time to complete all of the sets this way, considering there have been thousands and thousands of individual cards released over 60+ sets (as of May 2016).
11th Apr '16 1:09:14 PM DracoKanji
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The game relies heavily on "Energy Cards", 9 (initially 6, later 8) cards representing the different Pokémon types (though there is an 11th Dragon-type with no Energy equivalent outside of Roaring Skies' Double Dragon Energy card, and the much earlier Colorless energy which has no Basic energy card, but serves as a "Wild Card", being fulfilled with the other energy types, as well as having the oft-reprinted Double Colorless Energy card), and the only cards the player is allowed to have more than four copies of in a deck. In general, a Pokémon of a specific type will have attacks that require Energy of that type, although some do have "Colorless" energy requirements, which can be fulfilled by any of the 11 types[[note]]There isn't a Colorless Basic Energy card, but some Special Energy cards are Colorless (i.e., Double Colorless Energy).[[/note]]. Because the player is limited to only playing one Energy Card per turn, it's important for them to manage their energy distribution wisely, as a benched Pokémon that already has energy on it will be able to start fighting much quicker than one that doesn't. Stronger attacks will require more energy, with the strongest attacks requiring the player to remove one or all of the Pokémon's attached energy, limiting their use. Pokémon also have retreat costs, the amount of energy cards that must be removed in order to switch out for a Pokémon in the bench, which is also (usually) proportional to the Pokémon's power.

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The game relies heavily on "Energy Cards", 9 (initially 6, later 8) cards representing the different Pokémon types (though there is an 11th Dragon-type with no Energy equivalent outside of Roaring Skies' Double Dragon Energy card, and the much earlier Colorless energy which has no Basic energy card, but serves as a "Wild Card", being fulfilled with the other energy types, as well as having the oft-reprinted Double Colorless Energy card), and the only cards the player is allowed to have more than four copies of in a deck. In general, a Pokémon of a specific type will have attacks that require Energy of that type, although some do have "Colorless" energy requirements, which can be fulfilled by any of the 11 types[[note]]There isn't a Colorless Basic Energy card, but some Special Energy cards are Colorless (i.e., Double Colorless Energy).[[/note]].types. Because the player is limited to only playing one Energy Card per turn, it's important for them to manage their energy distribution wisely, as a benched Pokémon that already has energy on it will be able to start fighting much quicker than one that doesn't. Stronger attacks will require more energy, with the strongest attacks requiring the player to remove one or all of the Pokémon's attached energy, limiting their use. Pokémon also have retreat costs, the amount of energy cards that must be removed in order to switch out for a Pokémon in the bench, which is also (usually) proportional to the Pokémon's power.
11th Apr '16 1:07:42 PM DracoKanji
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The game relies heavily on "Energy Cards", 9 (initially 6, later 8) cards representing the different Pokémon types (though there is an 11th Dragon-type with no Energy equivalent outside of Roaring Skies' Double Dragon Energy card, and the much earlier Colorless energy which has no Basic energy card, but serves as a "Wild Card", being fulfilled with the other energy types, as well as having the oft-reprinted Double Colorless Energy card), and the only cards the player is allowed to have more than four copies of in a deck. In general, a Pokémon of a specific type will have attacks that require Energy of that type, although some do have "Colorless" energy requirements, which can be fulfilled by any of the 9 types. Because the player is limited to only playing one Energy Card per turn, it's important for them to manage their energy distribution wisely, as a benched Pokémon that already has energy on it will be able to start fighting much quicker than one that doesn't. Stronger attacks will require more energy, with the strongest attacks requiring the player to remove one or all of the Pokémon's attached energy, limiting their use. Pokémon also have retreat costs, the amount of energy cards that must be removed in order to switch out for a Pokémon in the bench, which is also (usually) proportional to the Pokémon's power.

to:

The game relies heavily on "Energy Cards", 9 (initially 6, later 8) cards representing the different Pokémon types (though there is an 11th Dragon-type with no Energy equivalent outside of Roaring Skies' Double Dragon Energy card, and the much earlier Colorless energy which has no Basic energy card, but serves as a "Wild Card", being fulfilled with the other energy types, as well as having the oft-reprinted Double Colorless Energy card), and the only cards the player is allowed to have more than four copies of in a deck. In general, a Pokémon of a specific type will have attacks that require Energy of that type, although some do have "Colorless" energy requirements, which can be fulfilled by any of the 9 types.11 types[[note]]There isn't a Colorless Basic Energy card, but some Special Energy cards are Colorless (i.e., Double Colorless Energy).[[/note]]. Because the player is limited to only playing one Energy Card per turn, it's important for them to manage their energy distribution wisely, as a benched Pokémon that already has energy on it will be able to start fighting much quicker than one that doesn't. Stronger attacks will require more energy, with the strongest attacks requiring the player to remove one or all of the Pokémon's attached energy, limiting their use. Pokémon also have retreat costs, the amount of energy cards that must be removed in order to switch out for a Pokémon in the bench, which is also (usually) proportional to the Pokémon's power.
11th Apr '16 12:57:32 PM DracoKanji
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** Dialga EX from ''Phantom Forces'' has the attacks [[VideoGame/ChronoTrigger Chrono Wind]] and [[Manga/FullMetalAlchemist Full Metal Impact.]]

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** Dialga EX from ''Phantom Forces'' has the attacks [[VideoGame/ChronoTrigger Chrono Wind]] and [[Manga/FullMetalAlchemist Full Metal Impact.]]Wind]].
10th Apr '16 11:42:48 AM Togie
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* ShoutOut: The online simulator lets you give [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Aerith]]'s hairstyle to female avatars.

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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
The online simulator lets you give [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Aerith]]'s hairstyle to female avatars.avatars.
** Dialga EX from ''Phantom Forces'' has the attacks [[VideoGame/ChronoTrigger Chrono Wind]] and [[Manga/FullMetalAlchemist Full Metal Impact.]]
1st Mar '16 8:48:09 PM N.Harmonik
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** It also doesn't help that the fifth generation games added a separate attack named Psyshock,a MindOverMatter shockwave that runs off of Special Attack and physical Defense.

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** It also doesn't help that the fifth generation games added a separate attack named Psyshock,a Psyshock, a MindOverMatter shockwave that runs off of Special Attack and physical Defense.
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