History SomethingCompletelyDifferent / Music

7th Apr '18 5:38:34 PM bt8257
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* Music/OutKast did this twice in a row. 2003's ''Speakerboxxx/The Love Below'' was a double album with each disc being a solo effort from one half of the duo: Big Boi's ''Speakerboxxx'' a conventional hip-hop album and Andre3000's ''The Love Below'' being more experimental. In 2006 they released ''Idlewild'', the soundtrack to their 20's-era musical, meaning most songs were more of a jazz style, plus there were only a couple songs that Big Boi and Andre performed together. To recap, Outkast has not released a standard album since 2000's ''Stankonia''.

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* Music/OutKast did this twice in a row. 2003's ''Speakerboxxx/The Love Below'' was a double album with each disc being a solo effort from one half of the duo: Big Boi's ''Speakerboxxx'' is a conventional hip-hop album and Andre3000's Music/Andre3000's ''The Love Below'' being more experimental. In 2006 they released ''Idlewild'', the soundtrack to their 20's-era musical, meaning most songs were more of a jazz style, plus there were only a couple songs that Big Boi and Andre performed together. To recap, Outkast has not released a standard album since 2000's ''Stankonia''.
7th Apr '18 5:33:38 PM bt8257
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* Pat Boone's 1997 album, ''In A Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy'' was completely composed of covers of heavy metal songs, as opposed to his usual fare of R&B, country, and gospel (though they were still done in his milquetoast Big Band/Lounge-style, of course). The CD cover featured the normally clean-cut Boone in leather and chains, an outfit he would also wear at the 1997 American Music Awards. He looked ridiculous, but it didn't do him any favors with the MoralGuardians that make up his primary demographic, who thought he was being serious.

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* Pat Boone's 1997 album, ''In A a Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy'' was completely composed of covers of heavy metal songs, as opposed to his usual fare of R&B, country, and gospel (though they were still done in his milquetoast Big Band/Lounge-style, of course). The CD cover featured the normally clean-cut Boone in leather and chains, an outfit he would also wear at the 1997 American Music Awards. He looked ridiculous, but it didn't do him any favors with the MoralGuardians that make up his primary demographic, who thought he was being serious.



* "Colors by Between The Buried and Me has this in each song. For example, Ants of The Sky has a Music/PinkFloyd-esque guitar solo, thrashing a-la Metallica and Megadeth, intense speed-metal screaming, shredding sections that would make Music/JoeSatriani and Music/DreamTheater proud, and a '''hoedown''' ''In a single song.'' The thing is that the styles switch nearly immediately, and doesn't sound bad. This comes up in their post-Colors albums too, such as in "Disease, Injury, Madness" when it turns bizarrely into a swingy blues jam following a horse's whinny, or "Extremophile Elite" where all the metal instruments drop out giving way to a small orchestra backing a xylophone solo.

to:

* "Colors ''Colors'' by Between The the Buried and Me has this in each song. For example, Ants of The Sky has a Music/PinkFloyd-esque guitar solo, thrashing a-la Metallica and Megadeth, intense speed-metal screaming, shredding sections that would make Music/JoeSatriani and Music/DreamTheater proud, and a '''hoedown''' ''In a single song.'' The thing is that the styles switch nearly immediately, and doesn't sound bad. This comes up in their post-Colors albums too, such as in "Disease, Injury, Madness" when it turns bizarrely into a swingy blues jam following a horse's whinny, or "Extremophile Elite" where all the metal instruments drop out giving way to a small orchestra backing a xylophone solo.



* '''Roy Clark''': The host of ''Series/HeeHaw'' who'd have you cracking up with laughter one minute ("Thank God and Greyhound," "The Hee Haw-Lawrence Welk Counterrevolution Polka") would have you broken down in utter [[Music/{{Tearjerker}} tears]] the next ("Yesterday When I Was Young").

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* '''Roy Clark''': The host of ''Series/HeeHaw'' who'd have you cracking up with laughter one minute ("Thank God and Greyhound," Greyhound", "The Hee Haw-Lawrence Welk Counterrevolution Polka") would have you broken down in utter [[Music/{{Tearjerker}} tears]] the next ("Yesterday When I Was Young").



* '''Music/LedZeppelin''' set the gold standard for hard rock from the late 1960s onward, becoming famous for such legendary rockers as "Whole Lotta Love," "Black Dog," and most famously "Stairway To Heaven." In 1984, lead singer Robert Plant formed what could be considered Led Zeppelin's soft-rock alter ego: The Honeydrippers, which gave Plant his biggest hit ever as a vocalist: "Sea of Love," which hit No. 3 in early 1985.

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* '''Music/LedZeppelin''' set the gold standard for hard rock from the late 1960s onward, becoming famous for such legendary rockers as "Whole Lotta Love," Love", "Black Dog," Dog", and most famously "Stairway To Heaven." to Heaven". In 1984, lead singer Robert Plant formed what could be considered Led Zeppelin's soft-rock alter ego: The Honeydrippers, which gave Plant his biggest hit ever as a vocalist: "Sea of Love," Love", which hit No. 3 in early 1985.



** For '''Bing Crosby''', his pairing with Bowie was different as he had been primarily associated with vocal pop singers and groups, including Grace Kelly and the Andrews Sisters; no one had ever thought he would ever record with someone associated with progressive and art rock, and who adapted wild on-stage and musical personas associated with ''Space Oddity''. Yet, the result of their duet recording was a phenomenal success and in 1982, well over 50 years after his first national successes in which the musical world had vastly changed, "Peace On Earth/The Little Drummer Boy" became his last significant hit [[note]](the recording of "Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy" was made in 1977, just weeks before Bing Crosby's death, and included in his final TV special aired later that year; although released in 1977, the song did not become a major success, much less a staple of holiday radio, until 1982, five years after Bing's death and Bowie's return to hitmaking)[[/note]].

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** For '''Bing Crosby''', his pairing with Bowie was different as he had been primarily associated with vocal pop singers and groups, including Grace Kelly and the Andrews Sisters; no one had ever thought he would ever record with someone associated with progressive and art rock, and who adapted wild on-stage and musical personas associated with ''Space Oddity''. Yet, the result of their duet recording was a phenomenal success and in 1982, well over 50 years after his first national successes in which the musical world had vastly changed, "Peace On Earth/The Little Drummer Boy" became his last significant hit [[note]](the recording of "Peace On on Earth/Little Drummer Boy" was made in 1977, just weeks before Bing Crosby's death, and included in his final TV special aired later that year; although released in 1977, the song did not become a major success, much less a staple of holiday radio, until 1982, five years after Bing's death and Bowie's return to hitmaking)[[/note]].



* '''Music/DollyParton''', who did something completely different many times. The most notable time came in the years following her departure from "The Porter Wagoner Show," when she recorded an album called "New Harvest -- First Gathering." This album, issued in 1977, was significant for being Parton's first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop chart. The biggest single from the album was the one that signaled her switch from traditional and sometimes contemporary country to pop ... that song being "Light of a Clear Blue Morning." Although only a No. 11 country hit, it opened the door to even bigger things, as the next single, "Here You Come Again" became a No. 1 country and top 5 pop smash. Movie deals, television and much more followed. She never truly strayed from her country roots, but by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, she became an international, multi-media star.
* '''Music/KennyRogers''', who much like Dolly (perhaps her most famous duet partner other than Porter Wagoner), began with his First Edition mates in psychedelic rock, with the hit "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In." By 1968 and wanting to diversify in case psychedelia wore out, the First Edition did something completely different: folk country, exemplified through "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town)," signaling the style that Rogers (both groupwise and solo) would continue with for the rest of his career: country, country-folk and country rock. As a soloist, Rogers often went into adult contemporary, and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent he had some of his biggest hits, including "She Believes In Me," "Lady" and "I Don't Need You."

to:

* '''Music/DollyParton''', who did something completely different many times. The most notable time came in the years following her departure from "The ''The Porter Wagoner Show," Show'', when she recorded an album called "New ''New Harvest -- First Gathering." Gathering''. This album, issued in 1977, was significant for being Parton's first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop chart. The biggest single from the album was the one that signaled her switch from traditional and sometimes contemporary country to pop ... that song being "Light of a Clear Blue Morning." Although only a No. 11 country hit, it opened the door to even bigger things, as the next single, "Here You Come Again" became a No. 1 country and top 5 pop smash. Movie deals, television and much more followed. She never truly strayed from her country roots, but by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, she became an international, multi-media star.
* '''Music/KennyRogers''', who much like Dolly (perhaps her most famous duet partner other than Porter Wagoner), began with his First Edition mates in psychedelic rock, with the hit "Just Dropped In To (To See What Condition My Condition Was In." In)". By 1968 and wanting to diversify in case psychedelia wore out, the First Edition did something completely different: folk country, exemplified through "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town)," signaling the style that Rogers (both groupwise and solo) would continue with for the rest of his career: country, country-folk and country rock. As a soloist, Rogers often went into adult contemporary, and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent he had some of his biggest hits, including "She Believes In Me," in Me", "Lady" and "I Don't Need You." You".



* By 1993, Music/{{REM}} had 2 massively successful albums with ''Out of Time'' (Shiny Happy People, Losing My Religion), and ''Automatic for the People'' (Everybody Hurts, Man on the Moon). Both albums, especially the latter, were relatively slow, emotional albums, with string and acoustic instruments everywhere. In 1994, however, they released ''Monster'', with loud, grunge-y, distorted guitar on nearly every single track [[note]]The lone exception was "Tongue", a piano-based ballad, albeit one with a very brief distorted guitar solo... And even that song sounded pretty different due to Michael Stipe singing most of it in a nearly-unrecognizable falsetto[[/note]].
** Incidentally, those two prior albums fit the trope as well, as the band's major label contract was triggered by the success of the 1987 album ''Document'' (It's the End of the World As We Know It, The One I Love), which consisted almost entirely of songs that were, by the band's standards, real rockers. The interceding album, 1989's ''Green'', seemed to be following that pattern, with just a few acoustic songs between upbeat rock songs like "Stand," "Orange Crush," and "Pop Song '89."
* [[Music/{{Keane}} Keane's]] first 2 albums were straight piano rock, very similar to Coldplay or Ben Folds. Their third album, ''Perfect Symmetry'', had a very 80's inspired sound featuring heavy synths, prominent basslines, a wide array of instruments, and, for the first time since well before the release of ''Hopes and Fears'', guitars. Their next album, ''Strangeland'', was straight-up piano rock in a similar style to ''Hopes and Fears''.

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* By 1993, Music/{{REM}} had 2 massively successful albums with ''Out of Time'' (Shiny ("Shiny Happy People, Losing People", "Losing My Religion), Religion"), and ''Automatic for the People'' (Everybody Hurts, Man ("Everybody Hurts", "Man on the Moon).Moon"). Both albums, especially the latter, were relatively slow, emotional albums, with string and acoustic instruments everywhere. In 1994, however, they released ''Monster'', with loud, grunge-y, distorted guitar on nearly every single track [[note]]The lone exception was "Tongue", a piano-based ballad, albeit one with a very brief distorted guitar solo... And even that song sounded pretty different due to Michael Stipe singing most of it in a nearly-unrecognizable falsetto[[/note]].
** Incidentally, those two prior albums fit the trope as well, as the band's major label contract was triggered by the success of the 1987 album ''Document'' (It's ("It's the End of the World As We Know It, The It (And I Feel Fine)", "The One I Love), Love"), which consisted almost entirely of songs that were, by the band's standards, real rockers. The interceding album, 1989's ''Green'', seemed to be following that pattern, with just a few acoustic songs between upbeat rock songs like "Stand," "Stand", "Orange Crush," Crush", and "Pop Song '89."
89".
* [[Music/{{Keane}} Keane's]] Music/{{Keane}}'s first 2 albums were straight piano rock, very similar to Coldplay or Ben Folds. Their third album, ''Perfect Symmetry'', had a very 80's inspired sound featuring heavy synths, prominent basslines, a wide array of instruments, and, for the first time since well before the release of ''Hopes and Fears'', guitars. Their next album, ''Strangeland'', was straight-up piano rock in a similar style to ''Hopes and Fears''.



** Minor example: ''A Day in the Life'' is a soft, sad-esque song about a guy who reads in the newspaper the story of an unlucky man, the war, a car crash, a suicide, etc. By the middle of the song, it starts an upbeat ballad about going late for work.

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** Minor example: ''A "A Day in the Life'' Life" is a soft, sad-esque song about a guy who reads in the newspaper the story of an unlucky man, the war, a car crash, a suicide, etc. By the middle of the song, it starts an upbeat ballad about going late for work.



* Music/{{Outkast}} did this twice in a row. 2003's ''Speakerboxxx/The Love Below'' was a double album with each disc being a solo effort from one half of the duo: Big Boi's ''Speakerboxxx'' a conventional hip-hop album and Andre3000's ''The Love Below'' being more experimental. In 2006 they released ''Idlewild'', the soundtrack to their 20's-era musical, meaning most songs were more of a jazz style, plus there were only a couple songs that Big Boi and Andre performed together. To recap, Outkast has not released a standard album since 2000's ''Stankonia''.

to:

* Music/{{Outkast}} Music/OutKast did this twice in a row. 2003's ''Speakerboxxx/The Love Below'' was a double album with each disc being a solo effort from one half of the duo: Big Boi's ''Speakerboxxx'' a conventional hip-hop album and Andre3000's ''The Love Below'' being more experimental. In 2006 they released ''Idlewild'', the soundtrack to their 20's-era musical, meaning most songs were more of a jazz style, plus there were only a couple songs that Big Boi and Andre performed together. To recap, Outkast has not released a standard album since 2000's ''Stankonia''.



* Yes' 1984 comeback album, "90125", which focused more on shorter radio-friendly singles instead of the long, expansive, complex epics the band was known for in the 1970's.

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* Yes' 1984 1983 comeback album, "90125", ''90125'', which focused more on shorter radio-friendly singles instead of the long, expansive, complex epics the band was known for in the 1970's.1970s.
1st Mar '18 2:39:23 PM Briguy52748
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* '''Music/TheBeeGees''': Put this in the perspective of 1976 or 1977, when they had just started picking up steam as the premiere disco music act. Prior to 1975, they were primarily a pop rock trio, with smooth ballads and harmonies evident on such songs as "Lonely Days" and their biggest hit to that time, "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart." After a few years' sabbatical from the charts, they returned in 1975 with a different, funkier sound, reminiscent of the fast-growing-in-popularity disco sound, on the song "Jive Talkin'." Their record company didn't even put their name on the label when shipping this new song to radio stations, but it was a cool sound ... and one that literally saved their careers. If Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb hadn't ever done something completely different, disco might still have thrived ... but the Bee Gees would have been relegated to the history books and there likely would never have been a ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' or two of the 1970s biggest hits that came from said film: "Stayin' Alive" and "Night Fever." (Incidentally, they switched back to harmony pop in the 1980s, and although they never hit such a huge peak in popularity again, they still remained a very popular recording and concert act.)
13th Jan '18 4:01:05 PM nombretomado
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* '''KennyRogers''', who much like Dolly (perhaps her most famous duet partner other than Porter Wagoner), began with his First Edition mates in psychedelic rock, with the hit "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In." By 1968 and wanting to diversify in case psychedelia wore out, the First Edition did something completely different: folk country, exemplified through "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town)," signaling the style that Rogers (both groupwise and solo) would continue with for the rest of his career: country, country-folk and country rock. As a soloist, Rogers often went into adult contemporary, and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent he had some of his biggest hits, including "She Believes In Me," "Lady" and "I Don't Need You."
* '''Creator/{{Madonna}}''': She's since switched between uptempo dance and ballads, but at the time she released "Crazy For You" in early 1985, it was Something Completely Different as she had yet to release a ballad as a single. So different was the song from the movie ''Vision Quest'' that many trade magazines, from ''Variety'' to ''Billboard'' were quick to write articles hailing Madonna's new single and diversity.

to:

* '''KennyRogers''', '''Music/KennyRogers''', who much like Dolly (perhaps her most famous duet partner other than Porter Wagoner), began with his First Edition mates in psychedelic rock, with the hit "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In." By 1968 and wanting to diversify in case psychedelia wore out, the First Edition did something completely different: folk country, exemplified through "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town)," signaling the style that Rogers (both groupwise and solo) would continue with for the rest of his career: country, country-folk and country rock. As a soloist, Rogers often went into adult contemporary, and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent he had some of his biggest hits, including "She Believes In Me," "Lady" and "I Don't Need You."
* '''Creator/{{Madonna}}''': '''Music/{{Madonna}}''': She's since switched between uptempo dance and ballads, but at the time she released "Crazy For You" in early 1985, it was Something Completely Different as she had yet to release a ballad as a single. So different was the song from the movie ''Vision Quest'' that many trade magazines, from ''Variety'' to ''Billboard'' were quick to write articles hailing Madonna's new single and diversity.
10th Jan '18 10:11:26 PM Lullaby22
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* Anyone listening to Music/BridgitMendler's ''Hello My Name Is'' might be forgiven for thinking they'd strayed into a completely different album when they hit the last track, "Hold On For Dear Love": Every song before it (even [[BreakupSong "5:15"]]) had a catchy pop sound to it. "Hold On For Dear Love" is a slow, somber piano piece.
6th Jan '18 10:20:26 PM nombretomado
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* "Colors by Between The Buried and Me has this in each song. For example, Ants of The Sky has a Music/PinkFloyd-esque guitar solo, thrashing a-la Metallica and Megadeth, intense speed-metal screaming, shredding sections that would make JoeSatriani and Music/DreamTheater proud, and a '''hoedown''' ''In a single song.'' The thing is that the styles switch nearly immediately, and doesn't sound bad. This comes up in their post-Colors albums too, such as in "Disease, Injury, Madness" when it turns bizarrely into a swingy blues jam following a horse's whinny, or "Extremophile Elite" where all the metal instruments drop out giving way to a small orchestra backing a xylophone solo.

to:

* "Colors by Between The Buried and Me has this in each song. For example, Ants of The Sky has a Music/PinkFloyd-esque guitar solo, thrashing a-la Metallica and Megadeth, intense speed-metal screaming, shredding sections that would make JoeSatriani Music/JoeSatriani and Music/DreamTheater proud, and a '''hoedown''' ''In a single song.'' The thing is that the styles switch nearly immediately, and doesn't sound bad. This comes up in their post-Colors albums too, such as in "Disease, Injury, Madness" when it turns bizarrely into a swingy blues jam following a horse's whinny, or "Extremophile Elite" where all the metal instruments drop out giving way to a small orchestra backing a xylophone solo.
6th Dec '17 5:28:19 PM nombretomado
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* '''DavidBowie''' was the English singer known best for his progressive musical styles, visual presentations and on-stage personas with many unique characters (e.g., Ziggy Stardust) played it straight with his Christmas ballad duet with Music/BingCrosby, "Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy." The result is one of the great Christmas songs, sending a message of hope and peace in the greatest of all seasons.

to:

* '''DavidBowie''' '''Music/DavidBowie''' was the English singer known best for his progressive musical styles, visual presentations and on-stage personas with many unique characters (e.g., Ziggy Stardust) played it straight with his Christmas ballad duet with Music/BingCrosby, "Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy." The result is one of the great Christmas songs, sending a message of hope and peace in the greatest of all seasons.
19th Oct '17 8:28:39 AM WoodyAlien3rd
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* Music/AvrilLavigne's much-maligned ''Hello Kitty'' is an electro/rap/dubstep song with a bit of GratuitousJapanese which sounds totally different from anything else she had done up to that point. She's usually accused of mashing together everything that was "in" at that moment to pander to teen audiences. In the end it was only an isolated experiment.
11th Oct '17 1:13:44 PM Malady
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* '''Billy Preston''' had both several instrumental-only hits ("Outta Space," "Space Race") and hits as a singer ("Will It Go 'Round in Circles," "Nothin' From Nothin'"), which is something completely different in itself. But also fitting the trope: Both "... Circles" (1973, soul and funk) and "... Nothin'" (1974, ragtime) were uptempo fare; he returned in 1980 with his only other top 10 hit as a vocalist, this time with a soulful ballad that was as different as his two vocal No. 1 hits from five or more years earlier: "With You I'm Born Again," a duet with StevieWonder's ex-wife, Syreeta Wright.
* '''Dick Feller''', a singer-songwriter of the mid-1970s who was best known for writing JerryReed's No. 1 country hit "Lord, Mr. Ford" (a satirical look at the auto industry and how a simple invention grew to be so complicated) began with something completely different from his novelty hits. By the title, one might think that "Biff, the Friendly Purple Bear" might be a comic tale of an anthropomorphic bear's misadventures; however, it is actually a sentimental look back at childhood, through the eyes of an old rocking horse a little boy enjoyed through childhood, and how the title bear (a stuffed teddy bear) joined the fun. Depending on the perspective and the classic country music stations that have Dick Feller in their libraries, "Biff," which was actually his breakthrough hit, or follow-up novelty fare such as "Making the Best of a Bad Situation" and "The Credit Card Song" were the songs that fit the trope. (He also switched back to serious fare, penning "Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)," which Feller originally recorded but was later CoveredUp by JohnDenver.

to:

* '''Billy Preston''' had both several instrumental-only hits ("Outta Space," "Space Race") and hits as a singer ("Will It Go 'Round in Circles," "Nothin' From Nothin'"), which is something completely different in itself. But also fitting the trope: Both "... Circles" (1973, soul and funk) and "... Nothin'" (1974, ragtime) were uptempo fare; he returned in 1980 with his only other top 10 hit as a vocalist, this time with a soulful ballad that was as different as his two vocal No. 1 hits from five or more years earlier: "With You I'm Born Again," a duet with StevieWonder's Music/StevieWonder's ex-wife, Syreeta Wright.
* '''Dick Feller''', a singer-songwriter of the mid-1970s who was best known for writing JerryReed's Music/JerryReed's No. 1 country hit "Lord, Mr. Ford" (a satirical look at the auto industry and how a simple invention grew to be so complicated) began with something completely different from his novelty hits. By the title, one might think that "Biff, the Friendly Purple Bear" might be a comic tale of an anthropomorphic bear's misadventures; however, it is actually a sentimental look back at childhood, through the eyes of an old rocking horse a little boy enjoyed through childhood, and how the title bear (a stuffed teddy bear) joined the fun. Depending on the perspective and the classic country music stations that have Dick Feller in their libraries, "Biff," which was actually his breakthrough hit, or follow-up novelty fare such as "Making the Best of a Bad Situation" and "The Credit Card Song" were the songs that fit the trope. (He also switched back to serious fare, penning "Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)," which Feller originally recorded but was later CoveredUp by JohnDenver.Music/JohnDenver.



* '''Ray Price''': An early pioneer of the raw honky-tonk sound and the 4/4 shuffle, he was closely identified as pure country with songs like "Crazy Arms," "I've Got a New Heartache" and "City Lights." Fans, then, were thrown for a loop when he began dabbling with the Nashville Sound, adding strings and pop-sounding backing vocals on songs like "Night Life" and "Make the World Go Away." Crazy thing is, he succeeded ... and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, he earned his biggest pop hit ever, the 1970 hit "For the Good Times." He did go back to honky tonk and pure country, earning still more respect with a string of early 1980s hits, the biggest being his duet top 5 hit with WillieNelson on "Faded Love."
* '''DollyParton''', who did something completely different many times. The most notable time came in the years following her departure from "The Porter Wagoner Show," when she recorded an album called "New Harvest -- First Gathering." This album, issued in 1977, was significant for being Parton's first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop chart. The biggest single from the album was the one that signaled her switch from traditional and sometimes contemporary country to pop ... that song being "Light of a Clear Blue Morning." Although only a No. 11 country hit, it opened the door to even bigger things, as the next single, "Here You Come Again" became a No. 1 country and top 5 pop smash. Movie deals, television and much more followed. She never truly strayed from her country roots, but by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, she became an international, multi-media star.

to:

* '''Ray Price''': An early pioneer of the raw honky-tonk sound and the 4/4 shuffle, he was closely identified as pure country with songs like "Crazy Arms," "I've Got a New Heartache" and "City Lights." Fans, then, were thrown for a loop when he began dabbling with the Nashville Sound, adding strings and pop-sounding backing vocals on songs like "Night Life" and "Make the World Go Away." Crazy thing is, he succeeded ... and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, he earned his biggest pop hit ever, the 1970 hit "For the Good Times." He did go back to honky tonk and pure country, earning still more respect with a string of early 1980s hits, the biggest being his duet top 5 hit with WillieNelson Music/WillieNelson on "Faded Love."
* '''DollyParton''', '''Music/DollyParton''', who did something completely different many times. The most notable time came in the years following her departure from "The Porter Wagoner Show," when she recorded an album called "New Harvest -- First Gathering." This album, issued in 1977, was significant for being Parton's first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop chart. The biggest single from the album was the one that signaled her switch from traditional and sometimes contemporary country to pop ... that song being "Light of a Clear Blue Morning." Although only a No. 11 country hit, it opened the door to even bigger things, as the next single, "Here You Come Again" became a No. 1 country and top 5 pop smash. Movie deals, television and much more followed. She never truly strayed from her country roots, but by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, she became an international, multi-media star.
7th Oct '17 4:00:50 PM nombretomado
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* '''DavidBowie''' was the English singer known best for his progressive musical styles, visual presentations and on-stage personas with many unique characters (e.g., Ziggy Stardust) played it straight with his Christmas ballad duet with BingCrosby, "Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy." The result is one of the great Christmas songs, sending a message of hope and peace in the greatest of all seasons.

to:

* '''DavidBowie''' was the English singer known best for his progressive musical styles, visual presentations and on-stage personas with many unique characters (e.g., Ziggy Stardust) played it straight with his Christmas ballad duet with BingCrosby, Music/BingCrosby, "Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy." The result is one of the great Christmas songs, sending a message of hope and peace in the greatest of all seasons.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SomethingCompletelyDifferent.Music