History SomethingCompletelyDifferent / Music

10th Apr '17 5:56:26 PM Briguy52748
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* '''DollyParton''', who did something completely different many times. The most notable time came in the years following her departure from "The Porter Wagoner Show," when she recorded an album called "New Harvest -- First Gathering." This album, issued in 1977, was significant for being Parton's first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop chart. The biggest single from the album was the one that signaled her switch from traditional and sometimes contemporary country to pop ... that song being "Light of a Clear Blue Morning." Although only a No. 11 country hit, it opened the door to even bigger things, as the next single, "Here You Come Again" became a No. 1 country and top 5 pop smash. Movie deals, television and much more followed. She never truly strayed from her country roots, but by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, she became an international, multi-media star.
* '''KennyRogers''', who much like Dolly (perhaps her most famous duet partner other than Porter Wagoner), began with his First Edition mates in psychedelic rock, with the hit "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In." By 1968 and wanting to diversify in case psychedelia wore out, the First Edition did something completely different: folk country, exemplified through "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town)," signaling the style that Rogers (both groupwise and solo) would continue with for the rest of his career: country, country-folk and country rock. As a soloist, Rogers often went into adult contemporary, and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent he had some of his biggest hits, including "She Believes In Me," "Lady" and "I Don't Need You."
10th Apr '17 5:45:10 PM Briguy52748
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* '''''Dick Feller''''', a singer-songwriter of the mid-1970s who was best known for writing JerryReed's No. 1 country hit "Lord, Mr. Ford" (a satirical look at the auto industry and how a simple invention grew to be so complicated) began with something completely different from his novelty hits. By the title, one might think that "Biff, the Friendly Purple Bear" might be a comic tale of an anthropomorphic bear's misadventures; however, it is actually a sentimental look back at childhood, through the eyes of an old rocking horse a little boy enjoyed through childhood, and how the title bear (a stuffed teddy bear) joined the fun. Depending on the perspective and the classic country music stations that have Dick Feller in their libraries, "Biff," which was actually his breakthrough hit, or follow-up novelty fare such as "Making the Best of a Bad Situation" and "The Credit Card Song" were the songs that fit the trope. (He also switched back to serious fare, penning "Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)," which Feller originally recorded but was later CoveredUp by JohnDenver.
* '''''Dave Dudley''''', a country music artist of the 1960s and 1970s, successfully switched back and forth from truck driving songs ("Six Days On the Road," "Truck Drivin' Son Of a Gun") to ballads ("Please Let Me Prove My Love For You") and patriotic fare ("What We're Fighting For").
* '''''Ray Price''''': An early pioneer of the raw honky-tonk sound and the 4/4 shuffle, he was closely identified as pure country with songs like "Crazy Arms," "I've Got a New Heartache" and "City Lights." Fans, then, were thrown for a loop when he began dabbling with the Nashville Sound, adding strings and pop-sounding backing vocals on songs like "Night Life" and "Make the World Go Away." Crazy thing is, he succeeded ... and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, he earned his biggest pop hit ever, the 1970 hit "For the Good Times." He did go back to honky tonk and pure country, earning still more respect with a string of early 1980s hits, the biggest being his duet top 5 hit with WillieNelson on "Faded Love."

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* '''''Dick Feller''''', '''Dick Feller''', a singer-songwriter of the mid-1970s who was best known for writing JerryReed's No. 1 country hit "Lord, Mr. Ford" (a satirical look at the auto industry and how a simple invention grew to be so complicated) began with something completely different from his novelty hits. By the title, one might think that "Biff, the Friendly Purple Bear" might be a comic tale of an anthropomorphic bear's misadventures; however, it is actually a sentimental look back at childhood, through the eyes of an old rocking horse a little boy enjoyed through childhood, and how the title bear (a stuffed teddy bear) joined the fun. Depending on the perspective and the classic country music stations that have Dick Feller in their libraries, "Biff," which was actually his breakthrough hit, or follow-up novelty fare such as "Making the Best of a Bad Situation" and "The Credit Card Song" were the songs that fit the trope. (He also switched back to serious fare, penning "Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)," which Feller originally recorded but was later CoveredUp by JohnDenver.
* '''''Dave Dudley''''', '''Dave Dudley''', a country music artist of the 1960s and 1970s, successfully switched back and forth from truck driving songs ("Six Days On the Road," "Truck Drivin' Son Of a Gun") to ballads ("Please Let Me Prove My Love For You") and patriotic fare ("What We're Fighting For").
* '''''Ray Price''''': '''Ray Price''': An early pioneer of the raw honky-tonk sound and the 4/4 shuffle, he was closely identified as pure country with songs like "Crazy Arms," "I've Got a New Heartache" and "City Lights." Fans, then, were thrown for a loop when he began dabbling with the Nashville Sound, adding strings and pop-sounding backing vocals on songs like "Night Life" and "Make the World Go Away." Crazy thing is, he succeeded ... and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, he earned his biggest pop hit ever, the 1970 hit "For the Good Times." He did go back to honky tonk and pure country, earning still more respect with a string of early 1980s hits, the biggest being his duet top 5 hit with WillieNelson on "Faded Love."
10th Apr '17 5:44:29 PM Briguy52748
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* '''''Dave Dudley''''', a country music artist of the 1960s and 1970s, successfully switched back and forth from truck driving songs ("Six Days On the Road," "Truck Drivin' Son Of a Gun") to ballads ("Please Let Me Prove My Love For You") and patriotic fare ("What We're Fighting For").
* '''''Ray Price''''': An early pioneer of the raw honky-tonk sound and the 4/4 shuffle, he was closely identified as pure country with songs like "Crazy Arms," "I've Got a New Heartache" and "City Lights." Fans, then, were thrown for a loop when he began dabbling with the Nashville Sound, adding strings and pop-sounding backing vocals on songs like "Night Life" and "Make the World Go Away." Crazy thing is, he succeeded ... and by doing SomethingCompletelyDifferent, he earned his biggest pop hit ever, the 1970 hit "For the Good Times." He did go back to honky tonk and pure country, earning still more respect with a string of early 1980s hits, the biggest being his duet top 5 hit with WillieNelson on "Faded Love."
10th Apr '17 5:37:00 PM Briguy52748
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* '''''Dick Feller''''', a singer-songwriter of the mid-1970s who was best known for writing JerryReed's No. 1 country hit "Lord, Mr. Ford" (a satirical look at the auto industry and how a simple invention grew to be so complicated) began with something completely different from his novelty hits. By the title, one might think that "Biff, the Friendly Purple Bear" might be a comic tale of an anthropomorphic bear's misadventures; however, it is actually a sentimental look back at childhood, through the eyes of an old rocking horse a little boy enjoyed through childhood, and how the title bear (a stuffed teddy bear) joined the fun. Depending on the perspective and the classic country music stations that have Dick Feller in their libraries, "Biff," which was actually his breakthrough hit, or follow-up novelty fare such as "Making the Best of a Bad Situation" and "The Credit Card Song" were the songs that fit the trope. (He also switched back to serious fare, penning "Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)," which Feller originally recorded but was later CoveredUp by JohnDenver.
23rd Mar '17 3:04:02 PM StarSword
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* Most of the output of Swedish band Music/{{Sabaton}} are PowerMetal ballads about military history, mainly UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, but their third album ''Metalizer'' has none of these. ''Metalizer'' was actually supposed to be the band's professional debut but [[ExecutiveMeddling their label at the time]] sent it into DevelopmentHell for five years, by which point the band had jumped ship to another label and started their current warfare theme.

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* Most of the output of Swedish band Music/{{Sabaton}} are PowerMetal ballads about military history, mainly UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, but their third album ''Metalizer'' has none of these.no war songs at all. ''Metalizer'' was actually supposed to be the band's professional debut but [[ExecutiveMeddling their label at the time]] sent it into DevelopmentHell for five years, by which point the band had jumped ship to another label and started their current warfare theme.
23rd Mar '17 3:02:26 PM StarSword
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Added DiffLines:

* Most of the output of Swedish band Music/{{Sabaton}} are PowerMetal ballads about military history, mainly UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, but their third album ''Metalizer'' has none of these. ''Metalizer'' was actually supposed to be the band's professional debut but [[ExecutiveMeddling their label at the time]] sent it into DevelopmentHell for five years, by which point the band had jumped ship to another label and started their current warfare theme.
20th Mar '17 5:59:31 AM Briguy52748
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* '''Herb Alpert''', leader of his eponymously named Tijuana Brass band, was the king of Tijuana instrumental brass music, and had many hits that had no vocals on them whatsoever. In 1968, he put down his trumpet, grabbed a microphone and belted out the Burt Bacharach-Hal David standard "This Guy's In Love With You." "This Guy's ... " went No. 1 in 1968 ... and in 1979, Alpert (who by that time returned to instrumental-only music) went to No. 1 with "Rise." In doing something completely different, Alpert had his biggest hit to that time, and would become the only artist to date (as of 2017) to have a No. 1 song as both a singer ("This Guy's ...") and an instrumental ("Rise").

to:

* '''Herb Alpert''', leader of his eponymously named Tijuana Brass band, was the king of Tijuana instrumental brass music, and had many hits that had no vocals on them whatsoever. In 1968, he put down his trumpet, grabbed a microphone and belted out the Burt Bacharach-Hal David standard "This Guy's In Love With You." "This Guy's ... " went No. 1 in 1968 ... and in 1979, Alpert (who by that time returned to instrumental-only music) went to No. 1 with "Rise." In doing something completely different, Alpert had his biggest hit to that time, and would become the only artist to date (as of 2017) to have a No. 1 song as both a singer ("This Guy's ...") and as an instrumental instrumentalist ("Rise").
17th Mar '17 7:22:32 AM Briguy52748
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* '''Herb Alpert''', leader of his eponymously named Tijuana Brass band, was the king of Tijuana instrumental brass music, and had many hits that had no vocals on them whatsoever. In 1968, he put down his trumpet, grabbed a microphone and belted out the Burt Bacharach-Hal David standard "This Guy's In Love With You." "This Guy's ... " went No. 1 in 1968 ... and in 1979, Alpert (who by that time returned to instrumental-only music) went to No. 1 with "Rise." In doing something completely different, Alpert became the only artist to date (as of 2017) to have a No. 1 song as both a singer ("This Guy's ...") and an instrumental ("Rise").

to:

* '''Herb Alpert''', leader of his eponymously named Tijuana Brass band, was the king of Tijuana instrumental brass music, and had many hits that had no vocals on them whatsoever. In 1968, he put down his trumpet, grabbed a microphone and belted out the Burt Bacharach-Hal David standard "This Guy's In Love With You." "This Guy's ... " went No. 1 in 1968 ... and in 1979, Alpert (who by that time returned to instrumental-only music) went to No. 1 with "Rise." In doing something completely different, Alpert became had his biggest hit to that time, and would become the only artist to date (as of 2017) to have a No. 1 song as both a singer ("This Guy's ...") and an instrumental ("Rise").
17th Mar '17 7:19:48 AM Briguy52748
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* '''Music/RayStevens''', one of the most popular novelty singers of all time, was not afraid to release some more serious material in between. In fact, two of his biggest hits the sensitive ballad "Everything Is Beautiful" and a cover of Johnny Mathis' "Misty" were completely serious. Other notable serious songs in his catalog include "America, Communicate with Me", a cover of Albert E. Brumley's gospel standard "Turn Your Radio On", and "Would Jesus Wear a Rolex", all of which stand at odds to the goofier songs he is just as known for such as "Ahab, the Arab", "The Streak", or "Gitarzan".
* '''Jud Strunk''', a member of the comedy troupe that made up the latter days of ''Series/RowanAndMartinsLaughIn'', was known for recording comedic tunes on several of his albums. His biggest hit, however, was not comedy, but a gentle, sentimental ballad called "Daisy a Day," a song about a young boy and girl who meet early in their elementary school years, he gives her a daisy each day to show his undying love and devotion ... and repeats the process for the rest of their lives (70-plus years), including after her death. The song, a top 15 pop hit and also a top 40 country hit, had since become a country standard.
* '''Herb Alpert''', leader of his eponymously named Tijuana Brass band, was the king of Tijuana instrumental brass music, and had many hits that had no vocals on them whatsoever. In 1968, he put down his trumpet, grabbed a microphone and belted out the Burt Bacharach-Hal David standard "This Guy's In Love With You." "This Guy's ... " went No. 1 in 1968 ... and in 1979, Alpert (who by that time returned to instrumental-only music) went to No. 1 with "Rise." In doing something completely different, Alpert became the only artist to date (as of 2017) to have a No. 1 song as both a singer ("This Guy's ...") and an instrumental ("Rise").
* '''Billy Preston''' had both several instrumental-only hits ("Outta Space," "Space Race") and hits as a singer ("Will It Go 'Round in Circles," "Nothin' From Nothin'"), which is something completely different in itself. But also fitting the trope: Both "... Circles" (1973, soul and funk) and "... Nothin'" (1974, ragtime) were uptempo fare; he returned in 1980 with his only other top 10 hit as a vocalist, this time with a soulful ballad that was as different as his two vocal No. 1 hits from five or more years earlier: "With You I'm Born Again," a duet with StevieWonder's ex-wife, Syreeta Wright.



* Music/RayStevens, one of the most popular novelty singers of all time, was not afraid to release some more serious material in between. In fact, two of his biggest hits the sensitive ballad "Everything Is Beautiful" and a cover of Johnny Mathis' "Misty" were completely serious. Other notable serious songs in his catalog include "America, Communicate with Me", a cover of Albert E. Brumley's gospel standard "Turn Your Radio On", and "Would Jesus Wear a Rolex", all of which stand at odds to the goofier songs he is just as known for such as "Ahab, the Arab", "The Streak", or "Gitarzan".
* Jud Strunk, a member of the comedy troupe that made up the latter days of ''Series/RowanAndMartinsLaughIn'', was known for recording comedic tunes on several of his albums. His biggest hit, however, was not comedy, but a gentle, sentimental ballad called "Daisy a Day," a song about a young boy and girl who meet early in their elementary school years, he gives her a daisy each day to show his undying love and devotion ... and repeats the process for the rest of their lives (70-plus years), including after her death. The song, a top 15 pop hit and also a top 40 country hit, had since become a country standard.
17th Mar '17 7:00:54 AM Briguy52748
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** '''KC''' (stage name of Harry Wayne Casey, leader of KC and the Sunshine Band) was one of the kings of disco music in the 1970s, but yet in 1980 proved he was a smooth balladeer with his duet with [=Teri DeSario=], the two pairing on the top 5 duet hit "Yes, I'm Ready" (a remake of the 1965 Barbara Mason hit).

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** * '''KC''' (stage name of Harry Wayne Casey, leader of KC and the Sunshine Band) was one of the kings of disco music in the 1970s, but yet in 1980 proved he was a smooth balladeer with his duet with [=Teri DeSario=], the two pairing on the top 5 duet hit "Yes, I'm Ready" (a remake of the 1965 Barbara Mason hit).
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