History SoYouWantTo / WriteTheNextDoctorWho

21st Aug '15 7:45:58 AM Sapphirea2
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* Violence is the Doctor's ''last'' choice, and he nearly never uses guns himself. That the Doctor prefers to keep his hands clean by letting other people do his dirty work is a fair criticism. The Doctor is at best a TechnicalPacifist; he doesn't like to fight, but he ''will'' if he has to, and whilst he might not use guns personally he's found plenty of ways to get around that in the past.
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* Violence is the Doctor's ''last'' choice, and he nearly never uses guns himself. That the Doctor prefers to keep his hands clean by letting other people do his dirty work is a fair criticism.criticism (brought up in the Twelfth Doctor's character arc in Series 8, among other places). The Doctor is at best a TechnicalPacifist; he doesn't like to fight, but he ''will'' if he has to, and whilst he might not use guns personally he's found plenty of ways to get around that in the past.

* Each regeneration maintains true to the above rules, but personality traits vary wildly, particularly from the immediately previous regeneration.
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* Each regeneration maintains true to the above rules, but personality traits vary wildly, particularly from the immediately previous regeneration. regeneration. Elegant Three becomes the bohemian Four; gentle Five becomes abrasive Six; boyish, quirky Eleven becomes GrumpyOldMan Twelve, etc.

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* Companions who are witness to a regeneration must get to know their strange friend all over again due to his altered personality and appearance, which can take a while and provides a deep well of CharacterDevelopment for both sides. Examples include Peri's relationship with Five/Six, Rose's with Nine/Ten, and Clara's with Eleven/Twelve.

The Doctor values self-actualization and the realization of hidden potential as much as he values freedom: "there's no such thing as an ordinary human".
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The Doctor values self-actualization and the realization of hidden potential as much as he values freedom: "there's "There's no such thing as an ordinary human".

Being an obvious symbol of time (and hence time travel), clocks are also a potential; they were quite a motif in the 1996 telemovie, and it's worth mentioning that the new series has had plenty of shots of Big Ben (which formed a central part of the plot of at least one of them). The radically different opening for Season 8 has a clock theme. The new series has opened several episodes with a long zoom shot from Earth in orbit to an aerial view of London.
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Being an obvious symbol of time (and hence time travel), clocks are also a potential; they were quite a motif in the 1996 telemovie, and it's worth mentioning that the new series has had plenty of shots of Big Ben (which formed a central part of the plot of at least one of them). The radically different opening for Season Series 8 has a clock theme. The new series has opened several episodes -- including its very first -- with a long zoom shot from Earth in orbit to an aerial view of London.

* There has been a preponderance of plots in the new series about plots to destroy/take over the entire Earth, or the entire galaxy/universe. Or even just plots where destruction would be an unfortunate side-effect. * The season finales to the past few series notwithstanding, not ''every'' plot that puts the Doctor and his companions in danger, and makes for intriguing viewing, has to imperil a planet (or an entire race, or the universe...) Smaller stories were done plenty of times within the original run of the series: take "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani The Caves of Androzani]]", mentioned below. The Doctor and his companion find themselves caught in the middle of a drug war and spend the entire story just trying to get back to the TARDIS. It's widely regarded as one of the best stories in the show's history.
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* There has been a preponderance of plots in the new series about plots schemes to destroy/take over the entire Earth, or the entire galaxy/universe. Or even just plots where destruction would be an unfortunate side-effect. * The season finales to the past few series notwithstanding, not ''every'' plot that puts the Doctor and his companions in danger, and makes for intriguing viewing, has to imperil a planet (or an entire race, or the universe...) Smaller stories were done plenty of times within the original run of the series: take "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani The Caves of Androzani]]", mentioned below. The Doctor and his companion find themselves caught in the middle of a drug war and spend the entire story just trying to get back to the TARDIS. It's widely regarded as one of the best stories in the show's history.history, and it doubled as the Fifth Doctor's sendoff.

With regard to the Doctor's costume a wide spectrum of outfits have been used through his current eleven lives, from Nine's simple leather jacket to Six's eye-searing Technicolor dreamcoat. Striking a balance between ordinary and odd is key, but since no one really seems to notice what the Doctor wears wherever/whenever he is, this balance can shift. [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Period clothes]] seem to be a favorite among the costume designers, but this has been kept within recent parts of history (19th to early 20th Centuries). The Doctor's outfit also gives chances to lampshade how strange it is sometimes (e.g. Four's scarf, Five's celery stick, etc.) ''No'' incarnation of the Doctor has been particularly self-conscious about the eccentricity of his sartorial choices -- if someone asks why he's dressed so strangely, he usually replies along the lines of "What's ''wrong'' with my outfit? I ''like'' my outfit." Despite the differences, certain fashion motifs tend to appear; a jacket with distinct (usually [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacket_lapel#Notched_lapel notched]]) lapels, something worn over the shirt (a waistcoat or sweater of some kind), a distinctive form of cravat or tie, the occasional NiceHat. Although the costuming of the new series made a distinct effort to get away from the more period styles of the classic series Doctors by clothing the Doctor in something more modern, some of these motifs still bled through, and the Eleventh Doctor's tweed jacket and bow-tie look -- rather like an {{Oxbridge}} don on holiday -- perhaps indicate something of a return to the classic series template of AwesomeAnachronisticApparel. One thing ''has'' emerged after eleven Doctors and fifty years: designing the Doctor's outfit ''without'' the active participation of the actor doesn't end well.
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With regard to the Doctor's costume a wide spectrum of outfits have been used through his current eleven lives, from Nine's simple leather jacket to Six's eye-searing Technicolor dreamcoat. Striking a balance between ordinary and odd is key, but since no one really seems to notice what the Doctor wears wherever/whenever he is, this balance can shift. [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Period clothes]] seem to be a favorite among the costume designers, but this has been kept within recent parts of history (19th to early 20th Centuries). The Doctor's outfit also gives chances to lampshade how strange it is sometimes (e.g. Four's scarf, Five's celery stick, etc.) ''No'' incarnation of the Doctor has been particularly self-conscious about the eccentricity of his sartorial choices -- if someone asks why he's dressed so strangely, he usually replies along the lines of "What's ''wrong'' with my outfit? I ''like'' my outfit." " (That said, in stories that have more than one incarnation of the Doctor encountering each other, they might poke fun at ''each other's'' choices.) Despite the differences, certain fashion motifs tend to appear; a jacket with distinct (usually [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacket_lapel#Notched_lapel notched]]) lapels, something worn over the shirt (a waistcoat or sweater of some kind), a distinctive form of cravat or tie, and the occasional NiceHat. Although the costuming of the new series made a distinct effort to get away from the more period styles of the classic series Doctors by clothing the Doctor in something more modern, some of these motifs still bled through, and the Eleventh Doctor's tweed jacket and bow-tie look -- rather like an {{Oxbridge}} don on holiday -- perhaps indicate something of a return to the classic series template of AwesomeAnachronisticApparel. AwesomeAnachronisticApparel. The basic costume might evolve over a Doctor's tenure to reflect his CharacterDevelopment -- going from bright to darker colors (Four, Seven), elegant to battle-worn (Eight), severe to soft (Twelve). One thing ''has'' emerged after eleven twelve Doctors and fifty fifty-plus years: designing Designing the Doctor's outfit ''without'' the active participation of the actor doesn't end well.

Casting the Doctor is one of the hardest jobs. Whoever comes next will have many previous incumbents of the role to follow, all of them generally well thought-of. Your actor will need to be commanding when required, but always remain likeable; have the acting chops to pull off high drama and the timing for high comedy; and something to set him apart from the previous incarnations. Casting rumours surrounding the Eleventh Doctor in 2008 suggested he would be played by a black actor (either Paterson Joseph or Chiwetel Ejiofor), and although the casting was eventually that of white actor Creator/MattSmith, it is notable that the prospect of a black Doctor was met with little to no resistance. Furthermore, in Eleven's guest appearance in ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'', after regenerating since he last met the gang, he states that regeneration isn't always the same skin tone, and it can be anything. In the episode "The Doctor's Wife", the Eleventh Doctor mentions the Corsair, a Time Lord who had some incarnations in the form of a woman as well as a man.
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Casting the Doctor is one of the hardest jobs. Whoever comes next will have many previous incumbents of the role to follow, all of them generally well thought-of. Your actor will need to be commanding when required, but always remain likeable; have the acting chops to pull off high drama and the timing for high comedy; and something to set him apart from the previous incarnations. Casting rumours surrounding the Eleventh Doctor in 2008 suggested he would be played by a black actor (either Paterson Joseph or Chiwetel Ejiofor), and although the casting was eventually that of white actor Creator/MattSmith, it is notable that the prospect of a black Doctor was met with little to no resistance. Furthermore, in Eleven's guest appearance in ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'', after regenerating since he last met the gang, he states that regeneration isn't always the same skin tone, and it can be anything. In the episode "The Doctor's Wife", the Eleventh Doctor mentions the Corsair, a Time Lord who had some incarnations in the form of a woman as well as a man. man, and another example of this is [[spoiler: longtime arch-enemy The Master, who became The Mistress -- "Missy" for short -- in Series 8]].
5th Apr '15 8:02:51 AM ACW
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** ''Also'' note that fierce individuality has been shown to be the [[PlanetOfHats hat]] of both humans, and, more importantly, ''Time Lords''. A single Time Lord being involved in a plot is usually a very big deal while in groups they are usually [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Obstructive Bureaucrats]], or even {{Complete Monster}}s.
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** ''Also'' note that fierce individuality has been shown to be the [[PlanetOfHats hat]] of both humans, and, more importantly, ''Time Lords''. A single Time Lord being involved in a plot is usually a very big deal while in groups they are usually [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Obstructive Bureaucrats]], or even {{Complete Monster}}s.vile villains.
11th Mar '15 4:20:38 PM ThallianGold
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* The Doctor tends to be male. WordOfGod confirms that Time Lords may regenerate across gender lines, but whether it's appropriate for the Doctor to do so is less than universally accepted. * Each regeneration maintains true to the above rules, but personality traits vary wildly, particularly from the immediately previous regeneration.
11th Mar '15 4:01:21 PM ThallianGold
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** While the Valeyard himself is cruel and cowardly, it is also emphasized he is an aberration of some sort, not being a "proper" incarnation unto himself.
11th Mar '15 3:59:47 PM ThallianGold
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** Even when he HAS [[BatmanGrabsAGun taken up weapons]] against an enemy, it's always a) directly involved the Time War's participants (the Time Lords and Daleks), b) risked massive catastrophe (planet-wide genocide being the lower end of the scale), and c) still preferred the use of the weapon to cause indirect harm, such as Ten firing a pistol at an object or the War Doctor shooting down a wall. The Ninth Doctor alone attempted to directly use a weapon to kill an enemy, and failed, leading to a HeelRealization.
26th Aug '14 1:31:15 PM ScrewySqrl
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Being an obvious symbol of time (and hence time travel), clocks are also a potential; they were quite a motif in the 1996 telemovie, and it's worth mentioning that the new series has had plenty of shots of Big Ben (which formed a central part of the plot of at least one of them).
to:
Being an obvious symbol of time (and hence time travel), clocks are also a potential; they were quite a motif in the 1996 telemovie, and it's worth mentioning that the new series has had plenty of shots of Big Ben (which formed a central part of the plot of at least one of them). them). The radically different opening for Season 8 has a clock theme.
21st Jun '14 10:13:40 AM MrThorfan64
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* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened. Note that there can be plot in the Doctor not preventing something bad happening as history must take its course, starting in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]], which is one of the best thought of First Doctor stories despite being a pure historical, along to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]], one of the best-thought of Eleventh Doctor stories. This can provide a lot of plot even if the Doctor and the TARDIS are the only science-fiction elements.
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* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened. Note that there can be plot in the Doctor not preventing something bad happening as history must take its course, starting in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]], which is one of the best thought best-thought of First Doctor stories despite being a pure historical, along to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]], one of the best-thought of Eleventh Doctor stories. This can provide a lot of plot even if the Doctor and the TARDIS are the only science-fiction elements.
21st Jun '14 10:13:17 AM MrThorfan64
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* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened. Note that there can be plot in the Doctor not preventing something bad happening as history must take its course, starting in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]], which is one of the best thought of First Doctor stories despite being a pure historical, along to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]] one of the best-thought of Eleventh Doctor stories. This can provide a lot of plot even if the Doctor and the TARDIS are the only science-fiction elements.
to:
* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened. Note that there can be plot in the Doctor not preventing something bad happening as history must take its course, starting in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]], which is one of the best thought of First Doctor stories despite being a pure historical, along to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]] Doctor]], one of the best-thought of Eleventh Doctor stories. This can provide a lot of plot even if the Doctor and the TARDIS are the only science-fiction elements.
21st Jun '14 10:12:43 AM MrThorfan64
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* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened.
to:
* In addition to the old standby of "plop the Doctor in the middle of (or run-up to) some famous historical event that he must prevent (or not prevent)", plenty of events in Earth's history are kinda weird, even if we know what happened and there's a perfectly logical, natural explanation. Take one, and tell us what ''really'' happened. Note that there can be plot in the Doctor not preventing something bad happening as history must take its course, starting in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]], which is one of the best thought of First Doctor stories despite being a pure historical, along to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]] one of the best-thought of Eleventh Doctor stories. This can provide a lot of plot even if the Doctor and the TARDIS are the only science-fiction elements.
5th May '14 1:02:51 PM LongLiveHumour
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Plot Hook-wise, having the TARDIS answer a DistressCall is a fine old cliché that probably has plenty of milage left. You could do worse, anyway. But here's [[http://www.sfx.co.uk/2009/12/07/russell_t_davies_and_the_line_that_must_never_be_uttered/ some advice]] from [[RussellTDavies Uncle Rusty]]:
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Plot Hook-wise, having the TARDIS answer a DistressCall is a fine old cliché that probably has plenty of milage left. You could do worse, anyway. But here's [[http://www.sfx.co.uk/2009/12/07/russell_t_davies_and_the_line_that_must_never_be_uttered/ some advice]] from [[RussellTDavies [[Creator/RussellTDavies Uncle Rusty]]:

The standard excuse to the companion (and audience) for "why doesn't the Doctor just go back in time and..." is that once the TARDIS has landed, it has become part of the events. Something called the Blinovitch Limitation Effect was frequently name-dropped in previous series to imply that the Doctor going back in time and fixing things once he's already involved in them would have '''''Extremely'' Bad Results'''. (The RussellTDavies era brought out the ClockRoaches as just ''one'' of the ways things can go horribly wrong.)
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The standard excuse to the companion (and audience) for "why doesn't the Doctor just go back in time and..." is that once the TARDIS has landed, it has become part of the events. Something called the Blinovitch Limitation Effect was frequently name-dropped in previous series to imply that the Doctor going back in time and fixing things once he's already involved in them would have '''''Extremely'' Bad Results'''. (The RussellTDavies Creator/RussellTDavies era brought out the ClockRoaches as just ''one'' of the ways things can go horribly wrong.)

The main pitfall is in writing something that your effects budget can't create (leading to SpecialEffectsFailure), or a story too big to fit into the time allowed. StevenMoffat once observed that ''Who'' monsters tend to work best right up until the moment they're revealed. Judicious use of NothingIsScarier can really stretch an anemic budget.
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The main pitfall is in writing something that your effects budget can't create (leading to SpecialEffectsFailure), or a story too big to fit into the time allowed. StevenMoffat Creator/StevenMoffat once observed that ''Who'' monsters tend to work best right up until the moment they're revealed. Judicious use of NothingIsScarier can really stretch an anemic budget.
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