History Series / TheHollowCrown

23rd Sep '16 8:15:09 PM Thorion
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* HistoricalInJoke: The real Richard III had a shoulder that was higher than the other. In this series the hump of his hunchback is crooked making it directed to one of his shoulders.
23rd Sep '16 8:12:51 PM Thorion
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* HistoricalInJoke: The real Richard III had a shoulder that was higher than the other. In this series the hump of his hunchback is crooked making it directed to one of his shoulders.
21st Aug '16 3:59:17 AM Ciara25
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* PragmaticAdaptation: ''Henry VI Part I'' uses relatively little of the material from its corresponding play, since much of what happens-- fighting against Joan of Arc--has no relevance to what happens in the rest of the cycle.

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* PragmaticAdaptation: ''Henry VI Part I'' uses relatively very little of the material from its corresponding play, since much of what happens-- its plot -- fighting against Joan of Arc--has no relevance to what happens in the rest of the cycle.cycle. Plus there's the fact that Joan is a) not depicted very tastefully in this play and b) the patron saint of France, meaning the BBC didn't want to piss off the French.
12th Aug '16 6:52:19 AM Sagetsu
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* TheDungAges: JustifiedTrope, in that soldiers getting mud-caked only happens during the open-field battles, where blood and soil would churn and muddy up almost everybody (i.e., the Battle of Shrewsbury in ''Theatre/HenryIVPart1'', the Battle of Agincourt in ''Theatre/HenryV'', and the Battle of Bosworth in ''Theatre/RichardIII'').



* EvilFeelsGood: An actual central concept of Richard Gloucester's characterization here. In this we are shown Richard can enjoy very little in his life because of his deformity (as he bitterly notes in a speech near to the end of Henry VI Part 2), so when he does enjoy crushing his Lancaster enemies, he grows a tad overboard with it to overcompensate.

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* EvilFeelsGood: An actual central concept of Richard Gloucester's characterization here. In this we are shown Richard can enjoy very little in his life because of his deformity (as he bitterly notes in a speech near to the end of Henry ''Henry VI Part 2), 2''), so when he does enjoy crushing his Lancaster enemies, he grows a tad overboard with it to overcompensate.



** A literal case in Henry VI Part 1. As Richard of York calls his sons by name, we see each of them, until he gets to young Richard (future Theatre/RichardIII), in which we only see his distorted, shadowy silhouette approaching as ominous music plays, hinting of Richard's future villainess.

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** A literal case in Henry ''Henry VI Part 1. 1''. As Richard of York calls his sons by name, we see each of them, until he gets to young Richard (future Theatre/RichardIII), in which we only see his distorted, shadowy silhouette approaching as ominous music plays, hinting of Richard's future villainess.villainies.
26th Jul '16 12:08:10 PM Gaon
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* ArtifactOfDoom: The series's name comes from a speech where Richard II laments how the crown is an ArtifactOfDoom, bringing despair and sorrow to all those who wear it. Ergo, the choice of name and the fact the series keeps the same crown for Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V and Henry VI (coupled with the greater part of Shakespeare's monologues on the illusory nature of power are delivered whilst holding said crown) gives a non-supernatural sense of this trope to the Crown: all those who wear it, die.
24th Jul '16 3:29:39 PM Gaon
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* EvenEvilHasStandards: Buckhingham is alright with everything Richard III does, but when he suggests killing the Princes in the Tower, he freezes.
* EveryoneHasStandards: During Henry's graphic description of the city pillaging, the Duke of Exeter (the same guy who talked of Henry's thundering wrath shaking France) seems taken aback, almost shocked.


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* EvilFeelsGood: An actual central concept of Richard Gloucester's characterization here. In this we are shown Richard can enjoy very little in his life because of his deformity (as he bitterly notes in a speech near to the end of Henry VI Part 2), so when he does enjoy crushing his Lancaster enemies, he grows a tad overboard with it to overcompensate.


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** A literal case in Henry VI Part 1. As Richard of York calls his sons by name, we see each of them, until he gets to young Richard (future Theatre/RichardIII), in which we only see his distorted, shadowy silhouette approaching as ominous music plays, hinting of Richard's future villainess.


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* HandicappedBadass: In this version, Richard III has a massive crooked hunchback, a withered arm, and mishapen legs which give him a gait. Despite all of this, he somehow manages to be a foreboding force in combat: He succefully outfences Clifford and later matches Henry Tudor blow for blow.


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* HypercompetentSidekick: Richard of York to his brother Edward. It's part of what sours Richard on his York brothers. He has to pull all the family's weight after their father's death whilst his brothers bicker.


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* ProtagonistJourneyToVillain: How Richard of Gloucester is presented. In Henry VI Part 2 we see a crippled young man be forced by circumstance of war into a mischevious backstabber, and finding out he likes it, thus embracing it.


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* TokenGoodTeammate: The Duke of Exetor consistently remains the most morally heroic character of the Lancastrian forces in Henry VI Part 1 and 2. Markedly, when the Lancastrians conspire to kill Humphrey, Exetor's their only member who has absolutely no part in the conspiracy and is thus shocked by when he's killed. He's even this in Henry V, as he seems appalled by some of Henry's more cruel moments.


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* TragicVillain: The series plus adds a lot of emphasis in how Richard UsedToBeASweetChild in Henry VI Part 2, so when we see him in full cackling villainy in Richard III, there's a sense of tragedy to it. In one of his last monologues in ''Part 2'', he also muses about happiness, and nearly breaks in tears when he observes his deformity robs him of all joy in life except his cruelty and ambition.
10th Jun '16 1:22:33 AM Sagetsu
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--->[[PunctuatedForEmphasis TALK'ST. THOU. TO ME. OF "IFFFSSSS?"!]] Thou art a traitor.--

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--->[[PunctuatedForEmphasis TALK'ST. THOU. TO ME. OF "IFFFSSSS?"!]] OF]] '''[[SssssnakeTalk "IFFFSSSS?"!]]''' Thou art a traitor.--
10th Jun '16 1:16:41 AM Sagetsu
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* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: Invoked by juxtaposing the assassination of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester with the adulterous bedding of Queen Margaret and the Duke of Somerset--a statement to how state power was centralized and per

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* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: Invoked by juxtaposing the assassination of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester with the adulterous bedding of Queen Margaret and the Duke of Somerset--a statement to how state power was centralized and perperverted at the cost of innocent blood. Later on, Margaret seems to really enjoy her stabbing of Richard, Duke of York (before she orders him beheaded)--the man responsible for her lover Somerset's death.
* KarmaHoudini: Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester--the man responsible for the deaths of both Joan of Arc and Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester [[note]]the latter plotted together with Queen Margaret and Somerset[[/note]]--never gets his comeuppance[[note]]whereas Somerset was killed at St. Albans and Margaret dethroned[[/note]]. Albeit this may be more of a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse, as Winchester is portrayed dying in Shakespeare's original text (in a scene that's quite horrific, spiritually at least).
* KillEmAll: By the end of 2016 ''The Wars of the Roses'' cycle, almost every significant character in the series--good, ambiguous and evil--would have given up the ghost.
* KissingTheGround: Bolingbroke kisses the English sand after he returns from exile, as does Richard II after he returns from Ireland. Henry VI would himself do so after arriving in France to be crowned.
* LargeHam: Hotspur. Otherwise, mostly averted, which is surprising considering that it's Shakespeare. Speech is delivered as dialogue rather than verse. Even two great speeches of ''Theatre/HenryV'' are delivered in a more subdued way than usual.
** On the other hand, key characters from the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle would ham it up accordingly when given the spotlight (Joan of Arc, Richard of York, Queen Margaret, Somerset, Warwick and Edward, Prince of Wales).
** Humphrey of Gloucester, for someone who has served as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure and OnlySaneMan at court, was tipped over to SuddenlyShouting when the bickerings brought about by Henry VI's marriage to Margaret of Anjou become too much for him:
--> ''Lordings, farewell; and say, when I am gone,''
--> ''I prophesied France will be lost ere long!''
--> -- ''Henry VI Part 2'' I.1.152-153.
** Unsurprisingly, [[VillainProtagonist Richard III]] takes the cake out of everyone, with his soliloquies designed to unleash the hog as gloriously as possible. Choice examples would be:
*** As he walks towards Henry VI's prison to murder him (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' III.2.158-163):
--->To shrink mine arm up like a withered shrub;
--->To make an envious mountain on my back,
--->Where sits Deformity to mock my body;
--->To shape my legs of an unequal size;
--->To disproportion me in every part,
--->Like to a '''[[SuddenlyShouting CHAOOOSS]]!!!'''
*** As he holds his infant nephew while contemplating to destroy Edward IV's regime (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' V.7.34-35):
--->To say the truth, so Judas kissed his master
--->And cried “All hail!” whenas he meant '''[[EvilSoundsDeep ALL. HARM.]]'''
*** His "Winter of Discontent" monologue (''Theatre/RichardIII'' I.1.1-41) is probably dripping with far more contempt compared to previous productions (see, for example, Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/IanMckellen);
*** His condemnation of Lord Hastings (''Theatre/RichardIII'' III.4.75-78):
--->If? Thou... protector of this damnèd strumpet,
--->[[PunctuatedForEmphasis TALK'ST. THOU. TO ME. OF "IFFFSSSS?"!]] Thou art a traitor.--
--->OffWithHisHead! NOW BY ST. PAUL I SWEAR
--->I WILL NOT DINE UNTIL I SEE THE SAME!
*** His VillainousBreakdown at Henry, earl of Richmond's return to England (''Theatre/RichardIII'' IV.4.497-501):
--->[[ChewingTheScenery IS THE CHAIR EMPTY?I IS THE SWORD UNSWAAAAYEEEDDD?!]]
--->[[ThisCannotBe IS THE KING DEAD?! THE EMPIRE UNPOSSESSED?!]]
--->WHAT HEIR OF YORK IS THERE ALIVE BUT WE?!
--->AND WHO IS ENGLAND’S KING BUT GREAT YORK’S HEIR?
--->'''THEN TELL ME! [[PunctuatedForEmphasis WHAT. MAKES. HE. UPON. THE. SEAS?!]]'''
* LaserGuidedKarma: For the duration of the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle, most characters who have blood on their hands (either justified or not) would have been horrifically murdered or disgraced. It's almost positively similar to AkiraKurosawa's ''{{Film/Ran}}'' (itself an adaptation of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/KingLear'').
* LecherousLicking: Creator/BenedictCumberbatch does one over previous adaptations of ''Theatre/RichardIII'' by ''[[{{Main}} actively slurping Anne Neville's spit]].''
--> '''Richard:''' He that bereft thee, lady, of thy husband
--> Did it to help thee to a better husband.
-->'''Anne:''' His better doth not breathe upon the earth.
--> '''Richard:'''He lives that loves thee better than he could.
-->'''Anne:'''Where is he?
--> '''Richard:''' Here. (''Anne spits at his face.'') Why dost thou spit at me?
-->'''Anne:''' Would it were mortal poison for thy sake.
--> '''Richard:''' ''(wipes the spit and then licks his fingers)'' Never came poison from so sweet a place.
-->--''Theatre/RichardIII'', I.2.148-160.
* LooksLikeJesus: [[http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mijusui36y1rywehbo1_1361415343_cover.jpg Richard II.]] This is implied to be a calculated gesture to emphasize Richard's belief in the divinity of kingship.
** This was later unconsciously invoked by Henry VI himself. He starts off with the same long hair (albeit unkempt) and royal robes like Richard II. When he runs away from all the battles to become a mendicant, he eventually grows a beard and wears only a loincloth, much like Richard in his death. He ends in prison with gray robes and shaggy beard, consistent with the kind of robes the historical Jesus would wear. In contrast to Richard's megalomaniacal image-building, the evolution of Henry's image seems more consistent with first-century Christian imagery.
** Oddly enough, the one later to adopt the "Christ the King" image in Richard's vein would be Henry's rival, Edward IV.
* LoveRuinsTheRealm: In ''Henry VI Part 2,'' Edward IV chooses to marry Elizabeth Woodville, a relatively low-born widow.[[note]]For those who would want this plot point explored better (even if historically-inaccurately), PhilippaGregory's Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries and its TV adaptation ''The White Queen'' may be useful.[[/note]] This infuriates Warwick, who was arranging Edward's marriage to a French princess, and he promptly switches sides to join forces with Margaret of Anjou. Even worse, it alienates Edward's brothers, who are disillusioned with both him and his decisions. George flat out rebels and joins Warwick (if only for a little while before he comes crawling back) while Richard bides his time and waits...
* LoyalToThePosition: The Bishop of Ely is present in both the second ''Henry VI'' episode and in ''Richard III'' as the one presiding over the coronations of Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII--despite being loyal to Edward, fearful of Richard and Henry being the Lancastrian usurper to his previous Yorkist patrons. Interestingly, his continuing presence at court in all historical records probably makes this TruthInTelevision.
* MomentKiller:
** Deliberately invoked by Hal and Doll Tearsheet; they set up the sheriff to be a cockblocker as a way to 1. make the sheriff uncomfortable 2. [[FakeOutMakeOut give Hal a reasonable excuse]] for sending the sheriff and his men away without searching the house (and arresting Falstaff) and 3. make the sheriff ''extremely'' uncomfortable. It works.
** The sheriff also kills another moment that has nothing to do with sex: for the first time, Hal has let on to Falstaff that their friendship cannot and will not survive his ascent to the throne. Before Falstaff can properly respond, the sheriff arrives.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Across the series, some characters soliloquize on their complicity in a crime, and how it has marked them for retribution. Only a few have actually crossed the MoralEventHorizon.
** Henry Bolingbroke / Henry IV seems to see his unwitting role in ordering Richard II's execution as this.
** Richard, Duke of York, despite raining insults on Joan of Arc, does seem eventually disturbed after seeing her consumed by flames. It doesn't, however, come up again when he himself is at the mercy of the Lancastrians.
** George of Clarence remembers his sins and contributions to the Wars (especially his killing of the Duke of Exeter) at Tewkesbury while he is imprisoned, and seems to begin regretting his actions. Shame that it was at that point that Richard of Gloucester's assassins turn up for him.
** Edward IV's last lines alive exhibit his shock and despair at failing to prevent George of Clarence's execution. His being sickly pale only adds to his pathos and fear.
** The most stark exhibition of it, of course, would be Richard III's nightmare where is haunted by the ghosts of all he killed (Henry VI, George of Clarence, the Duke of Buckingham, Queen Anne Neville, Rivers and Gray, and the Princes in the Tower). That the still-living Margaret of Anjou appears as his "tour guide from hell" doesn't help.
* NarratorAllAlong: The narrator (Creator/JohnHurt) of Henry V is really Henry's squire as an old man.
* NeverMyFault: By this point a broken, haggard woman, Margaret of Anjou in ''Theatre/RichardIII'' still seems oblivious towards her own complicity in her downfall and curses the entire House of York for her misfortune[[note]]forgetting she definitely crossed the MoralEventHorizon when she oversaw the execution of Richard of York, gleefully stuffing a handkerchief with his son Edmund's blood on his mouth before chopping off his head[[/note]]. It's probably only at the very last scene, where she stands at the aftermath of the carnage at Bosworth, [[WasItReallyWorthIt that she begins to see the futility of it]].
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Perhaps the most central tragic figure of the ''Henry VI, Part I'' episode would be Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Lord Protector and uncle to King Henry VI. Despite his best efforts, trying to live a frugal life (even spending his own coffers to finance the war in France) and being well-loved by the public, his power, competence and loyalty became the object of jealousy. Through the manipulations of Queen Margaret, Somerset and the Bishop of Winchester, he sees his wife disgraced, he is forced to resign his titles, imprisoned and then assassinated. He pretty much has it as bad as [[Series/GameOfThrones Lord Eddard 'Ned' Stark]].[[note]]Humphrey's role as Lord Protector is an almost-approximate office to the Hand of the King in the series.[[/note]]
** John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, in contrast to most English nobles (especially York and Somerset) was trying his damned hardest to salvage the ground battles in France. Somerset's petulance and the lateness of York's response led to Talbot and his army being slaughtered wholesale at the Battle of Castillon.
* OffWithHisHead: Bolingbroke has Bushy and Green beheaded on-screen.
** The bitterest instigators of the Wars of the Roses, the Duke of Somerset and the Duke of York, also had their turns in losing their heads: the former at St. Albans, the latter in an ambush at his home.
** The heads of Richard III's enemies begin to roll in the middle part as he inches closer to the throne: [[spoiler: Rivers and Grey, Hastings, and finally Buckingham]].
* OneShotCharacter: The defection of Warwick to Margaret of Anjou's camp was presided by King Louis XI of France. While Louis XI only appears in this one scene, Creator/AndrewScott's turn as him is verily {{Camp}} and yet believable in his fury that [[OneSceneWonder it's one of the more memorable scenes in the series]].
* OneSteveLimit: Pretty much averted, in case you haven't noticed. Tons of Henrys, Edwards and Richards all over the place. In fact, the only attempt at differentiation is with Edward, Prince of Wales (Henry VI's son), who is called "Ned" in a few throwaway dialogues.
* OutOfFocus: Very little screentime is accorded to John Talbot, despite being supposedly one of the bigger tragic characters of ''HenryVIPart1''--which translates to more focus on this production's central character, Humphrey of Gloucester.
* PatrickStewartSpeech: Subverted by John of Gaunt's famous speech about the greatness of England, as the end of the speech suggests that it is doomed. Actually delivered in this version by Creator/PatrickStewart.
* PragmaticAdaptation: ''Henry VI Part I'' uses relatively little of the material from its corresponding play, since much of what happens-- fighting against Joan of Arc--has no relevance to what happens in the rest of the cycle.
* PunchClockVillain: The French ambassador, at least from the in-universe point of view of the English, comes off this way. He's constantly bringing Henry V bad news and rude messages, but both he and Henry acknowledge that it's just his job to convey messages, not to control for content.
* RememberTheNewGuy: You'd think you would have seen Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in ''Theatre/HenryV'', being Henry V's brother and subsequent regent for his son, yet he only debuts in ''HenryVIPart1.'' In fact, Shakespeare's original play has him, but he was cut out in the 2012 series.
* RousingSpeech:
** Henry V's "Once more, unto the breach" and "St. Crispin's Day" speeches appear, but are considerably more subdued (see DarkerAndEdgier above).
** At the morning before the Battle of Bosworth Field, the speeches of Henry, earl of Richmond and Richard III are inter-cut with each other. Richard's is streamlined as a more straightforward rallying cry, while Richmond's is quite more subdued akin to Henry V's above.
* RuleOfSymbolism:
** Related to LooksLikeJesus above, the image of {{Main/Jesus}} (sometimes his pure identity, sometimes his "Christ the King" iconography) is best invoked by kings to assert their authority (or at least their closeness to him in spirit). Richard II (in riding a donkey to his deposition) and Henry VI (as a mendicant) invokes this best, although only the latter could be categorically justified as such.
** The red and white roses are blatantly invoked early into ''Henry VI Part 1'', and Henry VI's innocent favoring of the red rose pretty much stokes the Duke of York's resentment further.
** Margaret of Anjou leading her husband's armies into battle might as well be a theatrical fantasy-fulfillment of what the historical Margaret of Anjou would have wanted to do, ham-strung as she was by her gender and limited authority as queen consort.
** At the Battle of Towton, Henry VI's armor is conspicuously designed to carry the coat of arms of England--and even invokes similarity to the armor worn by Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/KennethBranagh in their respective adaptations of ''Theatre/HenryV''. That Henry VI utterly fails to do anything valiant wearing it highlights just how much of an InadequateInheritor he is to his father's mantle.
** In Richard III's nightmare where he is haunted by his victims, a roasted pig's head is decked out on the table while the ghost of Buckingham waits for him. The boar is Richard's personal sigil.
* SadClown: Simon Russell Beale's Falstaff has definite shades of this, particularly evident in his "honor" monologue before the Battle of Shrewsbury. While he's definitely very much the LovableCoward (like ''all'' iterations of the Fat Man), the harsh realities of war seem to sadden him just as much as they frighten him.
* ShirtlessScene: Richard II ends up wearing nothing but a loincloth for the final act. In ''Henry IV,'' there's one for Hal and Poins and two towels. Finally, Henry VI becomes the medieval version of a hobo wearing nothing but a loincloth too.
* SissyVillain: Played with with Richard, who's more of an AntiVillain[=/=]TragicHero than a villain. Still, the contrast between his delicate effeminacy and obvious homosexuality and Henry's more conventional, heterosexual manliness is striking.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: In the full text of ''Henry V,'' the Boy is killed with his fellow pages while guarding the luggage. In this production, he survives to old age [[spoiler: and at the end is revealed to be the Chorus.]]
* TimeShiftedActor: Henry IV (Bolingbroke) is played by Rory Kinnear as a young man and JeremyIrons when he's older.
* TitleDrop: The title of the series was taken directly from Richard II's despairing monologue (''Theatre/RichardII'' III.2.165-167):
--> ''For within '''the hollow crown'''''
--> ''That rounds the mortal temples of a king''
--> ''Keeps Death his court...''
* TokenMinority: In Richard II, the Bishop of Carlisle is black; though nobody seems to notice. It's kind of difficult to ignore it once he says the line "O forfend it God/ That in a Christian climate, souls refined/ Should show so heinous, '''''black''''', obscene a deed!"
** Also, in ''Henry V'', the Duke of York is black, despite being the same individual as the Aumerle of ''RichardII'', who's played by a white actor. (Few productions make the connection between the two characters, however.)
** One of the most-discussed casting choices would be Creator/SophieOkonedo's portrayal of Margaret of Anjou--which even [[http://indy100.independent.co.uk/article/ukip-councillor-attempts-to-blast-bbc-for-historical-inaccuracy-gets-destroyed-by-actual-historian--ZyZAasU2fb invoked racist abuse online]]. [[DeliberateValuesDissonance It does, however, highlight her foreignness from the English court--as Margaret's French blood did during her time]].
* TooDumbToLive: The young Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York (the younger of the Princes in the Tower) seems to have developed a habit of doing an exaggerated, limping impression of his uncle Richard III--despite being warned by his mother of its impropriety (and it being his BerserkButton). He had the temerity to do it in front of Richard himself. Needless to say, it cements Richard's intent that they do not leave the Tower alive.
* TrainingMontage: Featured over the opening credits of ''Richard II'' as Bolingbroke and Mowbray prepare for their duel.
* TheVoiceless: Elizabeth of York[[note]]Richard III's niece whom he plans to marry, and who later becomes Henry Tudor's queen[[/note]] appears across ''Richard III'', but is never given a speaking role. Still, considering she is normally TheGhost in most stagings of this play, it's technically a step up.
* TheWisePrince: Henry V starts out rather fresh-faced and dashing, but the toll of his decisions and the demands of leadership weigh him down more and more as his story unfolds. Then he dies.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom: Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March. Only referred to by word in the ''Henry IV'' episodes, he was seen as the only threat to the Lancasters' usurpation of Richard II. Come ''Henry VI Part 1'', the dying Mortimer calls Richard Plantagenet to his deathbed, spurring him to regain the duchy of York to his name and seek the English crown for himself.
* VomitIndiscretionShot: Henry VI, not a martial man by any fashion, throws up on-screen when the carnage of the Battle of Towton gets to him.
* WarIsHell: Consistently throughout both Major and Minor Tetralogies. Writers normally suggested that the Minor Tetralogy portrays war in all its vulgarities while the Major Tetralogy (especially ''Theatre/HenryV'') portrays WarIsGlorious. Yet throughout all productions, not once were the battles and triumphs (even in ''Henry V'', as mentioned in DarkerAndEdgier above) seen as worthy and of praise: people are stuck in the mud, cut down with brutal frequency, and human tragedy cuts across all--nobleman and foot soldier alike.
** The best illustration of this would be in the second ''Henry VI'' episode, where King Henry VI witnesses two men (one a son, the other an old father) killing their opponent for booty, only [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone to horrifically discover that they killed their own kin]] (the former his father, the latter his son).
** And then the last scene of the ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode tops this up with less gore and more scale, with Margaret of Anjou listlessly looking towards heaven while the camera zooms out of Bosworth Field, highlighting the hundreds of dead this last battle of the Wars of the Roses wrought.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Douglas has two scenes in Theatre/HenryIVPart1 and is never mentioned again. In the play, Hal is so impressed by his courage in battle that he releases him without a ransom, but this scene is omitted. It's a shame, too, because Hal's account of Douglas's capture paints him in a much better light than the DirtyCoward noblemen who get sentenced to death by King Henry in the same scene.
** Poins' role as one of Hal's friends is somewhat expanded on in this version, and yet he still drops off the face of the earth part of the way through ''Part 2''.
----
10th Jun '16 1:12:43 AM Sagetsu
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* {{Deconstruction}}: Interestingly, the second ''Henry VI'' episode and ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode manages to do this to UsefulNotes/RichardIII's plotting and MagnificentBastard reputation. For most of his adult life fighting for the House of York, he has been consumed by the idea of Yorkist supremacy that he is willing to go to so much ends to ensure it happens--even at the cost of alienating and discarding the people closest and related to him who should have backed him up. In short, he was obsessed with the ''idea'' of protecting the House of York that he doesn't even see the damage he has wrought on his family and relatives--not unlike the criticism levied against [[Series/Game of Thrones Tywin Lannister]].

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* {{Deconstruction}}: Interestingly, the second ''Henry VI'' episode and ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode manages to do this to UsefulNotes/RichardIII's plotting and MagnificentBastard reputation. For most of his adult life fighting for the House of York, he has been consumed by the idea of Yorkist supremacy that he is willing to go to so much ends to ensure it happens--even at the cost of alienating and discarding the people closest and related to him who should have backed him up. In short, he was obsessed with the ''idea'' of protecting the House of York that he doesn't even see the damage he has wrought on his family and relatives--not unlike the criticism levied against [[Series/Game of Thrones [[Series/GameOfThrones Tywin Lannister]].
10th Jun '16 1:12:17 AM Sagetsu
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* {{Deconstruction}}: Interestingly, the second ''Henry VI'' episode and ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode manages to do this to UsefulNotes/RichardIII's plotting and MagnificentBastard reputation. For most of his adult life fighting for the House of York, he has been consumed by the idea of Yorkist supremacy that he is willing to go to so much ends to ensure it happens--even at the cost of alienating and discarding the people closest and related to him who should have backed him up. In short, he was obsessed with the ''idea'' of protecting the House of York that he doesn't even see the damage he has wrought on his family and relatives--not unlike the criticism levied against [[Series/Game of Thrones Tywin Lannister]].



* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: Invoked by juxtaposing the assassination of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester with the adulterous bedding of Queen Margaret and the Duke of Somerset--a statement to how state power was centralized and perverted at the cost of innocent blood. Later on, Margaret seems to really enjoy her stabbing of Richard, Duke of York (before she orders him beheaded)--the man responsible for her lover Somerset's death.
* KarmaHoudini: Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester--the man responsible for the deaths of both Joan of Arc and Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester [[note]]the latter plotted together with Queen Margaret and Somerset[[/note]]--never gets his comeuppance[[note]]whereas Somerset was killed at St. Albans and Margaret dethroned[[/note]]. Albeit this may be more of a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse, as Winchester is portrayed dying in Shakespeare's original text (in a scene that's quite horrific, spiritually at least).
* KillEmAll: By the end of 2016 ''The Wars of the Roses'' cycle, almost every significant character in the series--good, ambiguous and evil--would have given up the ghost.
* KissingTheGround: Bolingbroke kisses the English sand after he returns from exile, as does Richard II after he returns from Ireland. Henry VI would himself do so after arriving in France to be crowned.
* LargeHam: Hotspur. Otherwise, mostly averted, which is surprising considering that it's Shakespeare. Speech is delivered as dialogue rather than verse. Even two great speeches of ''Theatre/HenryV'' are delivered in a more subdued way than usual.
** On the other hand, key characters from the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle would ham it up accordingly when given the spotlight (Joan of Arc, Richard of York, Queen Margaret, Somerset, Warwick and Edward, Prince of Wales).
** Humphrey of Gloucester, for someone who has served as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure and OnlySaneMan at court, was tipped over to SuddenlyShouting when the bickerings brought about by Henry VI's marriage to Margaret of Anjou become too much for him:
--> ''Lordings, farewell; and say, when I am gone,''
--> ''I prophesied France will be lost ere long!''
--> -- ''Henry VI Part 2'' I.1.152-153.
** Unsurprisingly, [[VillainProtagonist Richard III]] takes the cake out of everyone, with his soliloquies designed to unleash the hog as gloriously as possible. Choice examples would be:
*** As he walks towards Henry VI's prison to murder him (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' III.2.158-163):
--->To shrink mine arm up like a withered shrub;
--->To make an envious mountain on my back,
--->Where sits Deformity to mock my body;
--->To shape my legs of an unequal size;
--->To disproportion me in every part,
--->Like to a '''[[SuddenlyShouting CHAOOOSS]]!!!'''
*** As he holds his infant nephew while contemplating to destroy Edward IV's regime (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' V.7.34-35):
--->To say the truth, so Judas kissed his master
--->And cried “All hail!” whenas he meant '''[[EvilSoundsDeep ALL. HARM.]]'''
*** His "Winter of Discontent" monologue (''Theatre/RichardIII'' I.1.1-41) is probably dripping with far more contempt compared to previous productions (see, for example, Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/IanMckellen);
*** His condemnation of Lord Hastings (''Theatre/RichardIII'' III.4.75-78):
--->If? Thou... protector of this damnèd strumpet,
--->[[PunctuatedForEmphasis TALK'ST. THOU. TO ME. OF "IFFFSSSS?"!]] Thou art a traitor.--
--->OffWithHisHead! NOW BY ST. PAUL I SWEAR
--->I WILL NOT DINE UNTIL I SEE THE SAME!
*** His VillainousBreakdown at Henry, earl of Richmond's return to England (''Theatre/RichardIII'' IV.4.497-501):
--->[[ChewingTheScenery IS THE CHAIR EMPTY?I IS THE SWORD UNSWAAAAYEEEDDD?!]]
--->[[ThisCannotBe IS THE KING DEAD?! THE EMPIRE UNPOSSESSED?!]]
--->WHAT HEIR OF YORK IS THERE ALIVE BUT WE?!
--->AND WHO IS ENGLAND’S KING BUT GREAT YORK’S HEIR?
--->'''THEN TELL ME! [[PunctuatedForEmphasis WHAT. MAKES. HE. UPON. THE. SEAS?!]]'''
* LaserGuidedKarma: For the duration of the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle, most characters who have blood on their hands (either justified or not) would have been horrifically murdered or disgraced. It's almost positively similar to AkiraKurosawa's ''{{Film/Ran}}'' (itself an adaptation of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/KingLear'').
* LecherousLicking: Creator/BenedictCumberbatch does one over previous adaptations of ''Theatre/RichardIII'' by ''[[{{Main}} actively slurping Anne Neville's spit]].''
--> '''Richard:''' He that bereft thee, lady, of thy husband
--> Did it to help thee to a better husband.
-->'''Anne:''' His better doth not breathe upon the earth.
--> '''Richard:'''He lives that loves thee better than he could.
-->'''Anne:'''Where is he?
--> '''Richard:''' Here. (''Anne spits at his face.'') Why dost thou spit at me?
-->'''Anne:''' Would it were mortal poison for thy sake.
--> '''Richard:''' ''(wipes the spit and then licks his fingers)'' Never came poison from so sweet a place.
-->--''Theatre/RichardIII'', I.2.148-160.
* LooksLikeJesus: [[http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mijusui36y1rywehbo1_1361415343_cover.jpg Richard II.]] This is implied to be a calculated gesture to emphasize Richard's belief in the divinity of kingship.
** This was later unconsciously invoked by Henry VI himself. He starts off with the same long hair (albeit unkempt) and royal robes like Richard II. When he runs away from all the battles to become a mendicant, he eventually grows a beard and wears only a loincloth, much like Richard in his death. He ends in prison with gray robes and shaggy beard, consistent with the kind of robes the historical Jesus would wear. In contrast to Richard's megalomaniacal image-building, the evolution of Henry's image seems more consistent with first-century Christian imagery.
** Oddly enough, the one later to adopt the "Christ the King" image in Richard's vein would be Henry's rival, Edward IV.
* LoveRuinsTheRealm: In ''Henry VI Part 2,'' Edward IV chooses to marry Elizabeth Woodville, a relatively low-born widow.[[note]]For those who would want this plot point explored better (even if historically-inaccurately), PhilippaGregory's Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries and its TV adaptation ''The White Queen'' may be useful.[[/note]] This infuriates Warwick, who was arranging Edward's marriage to a French princess, and he promptly switches sides to join forces with Margaret of Anjou. Even worse, it alienates Edward's brothers, who are disillusioned with both him and his decisions. George flat out rebels and joins Warwick (if only for a little while before he comes crawling back) while Richard bides his time and waits...
* LoyalToThePosition: The Bishop of Ely is present in both the second ''Henry VI'' episode and in ''Richard III'' as the one presiding over the coronations of Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII--despite being loyal to Edward, fearful of Richard and Henry being the Lancastrian usurper to his previous Yorkist patrons. Interestingly, his continuing presence at court in all historical records probably makes this TruthInTelevision.
* MomentKiller:
** Deliberately invoked by Hal and Doll Tearsheet; they set up the sheriff to be a cockblocker as a way to 1. make the sheriff uncomfortable 2. [[FakeOutMakeOut give Hal a reasonable excuse]] for sending the sheriff and his men away without searching the house (and arresting Falstaff) and 3. make the sheriff ''extremely'' uncomfortable. It works.
** The sheriff also kills another moment that has nothing to do with sex: for the first time, Hal has let on to Falstaff that their friendship cannot and will not survive his ascent to the throne. Before Falstaff can properly respond, the sheriff arrives.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Across the series, some characters soliloquize on their complicity in a crime, and how it has marked them for retribution. Only a few have actually crossed the MoralEventHorizon.
** Henry Bolingbroke / Henry IV seems to see his unwitting role in ordering Richard II's execution as this.
** Richard, Duke of York, despite raining insults on Joan of Arc, does seem eventually disturbed after seeing her consumed by flames. It doesn't, however, come up again when he himself is at the mercy of the Lancastrians.
** George of Clarence remembers his sins and contributions to the Wars (especially his killing of the Duke of Exeter) at Tewkesbury while he is imprisoned, and seems to begin regretting his actions. Shame that it was at that point that Richard of Gloucester's assassins turn up for him.
** Edward IV's last lines alive exhibit his shock and despair at failing to prevent George of Clarence's execution. His being sickly pale only adds to his pathos and fear.
** The most stark exhibition of it, of course, would be Richard III's nightmare where is haunted by the ghosts of all he killed (Henry VI, George of Clarence, the Duke of Buckingham, Queen Anne Neville, Rivers and Gray, and the Princes in the Tower). That the still-living Margaret of Anjou appears as his "tour guide from hell" doesn't help.
* NarratorAllAlong: The narrator (Creator/JohnHurt) of Henry V is really Henry's squire as an old man.
* NeverMyFault: By this point a broken, haggard woman, Margaret of Anjou in ''Theatre/RichardIII'' still seems oblivious towards her own complicity in her downfall and curses the entire House of York for her misfortune[[note]]forgetting she definitely crossed the MoralEventHorizon when she oversaw the execution of Richard of York, gleefully stuffing a handkerchief with his son Edmund's blood on his mouth before chopping off his head[[/note]]. It's probably only at the very last scene, where she stands at the aftermath of the carnage at Bosworth, [[WasItReallyWorthIt that she begins to see the futility of it]].
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Perhaps the most central tragic figure of the ''Henry VI, Part I'' episode would be Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Lord Protector and uncle to King Henry VI. Despite his best efforts, trying to live a frugal life (even spending his own coffers to finance the war in France) and being well-loved by the public, his power, competence and loyalty became the object of jealousy. Through the manipulations of Queen Margaret, Somerset and the Bishop of Winchester, he sees his wife disgraced, he is forced to resign his titles, imprisoned and then assassinated. He pretty much has it as bad as [[Series/GameOfThrones Lord Eddard 'Ned' Stark]].[[note]]Humphrey's role as Lord Protector is an almost-approximate office to the Hand of the King in the series.[[/note]]
** John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, in contrast to most English nobles (especially York and Somerset) was trying his damned hardest to salvage the ground battles in France. Somerset's petulance and the lateness of York's response led to Talbot and his army being slaughtered wholesale at the Battle of Castillon.
* OffWithHisHead: Bolingbroke has Bushy and Green beheaded on-screen.
** The bitterest instigators of the Wars of the Roses, the Duke of Somerset and the Duke of York, also had their turns in losing their heads: the former at St. Albans, the latter in an ambush at his home.
** The heads of Richard III's enemies begin to roll in the middle part as he inches closer to the throne: [[spoiler: Rivers and Grey, Hastings, and finally Buckingham]].
* OneShotCharacter: The defection of Warwick to Margaret of Anjou's camp was presided by King Louis XI of France. While Louis XI only appears in this one scene, Creator/AndrewScott's turn as him is verily {{Camp}} and yet believable in his fury that [[OneSceneWonder it's one of the more memorable scenes in the series]].
* OneSteveLimit: Pretty much averted, in case you haven't noticed. Tons of Henrys, Edwards and Richards all over the place. In fact, the only attempt at differentiation is with Edward, Prince of Wales (Henry VI's son), who is called "Ned" in a few throwaway dialogues.
* OutOfFocus: Very little screentime is accorded to John Talbot, despite being supposedly one of the bigger tragic characters of ''HenryVIPart1''--which translates to more focus on this production's central character, Humphrey of Gloucester.
* PatrickStewartSpeech: Subverted by John of Gaunt's famous speech about the greatness of England, as the end of the speech suggests that it is doomed. Actually delivered in this version by Creator/PatrickStewart.
* PragmaticAdaptation: ''Henry VI Part I'' uses relatively little of the material from its corresponding play, since much of what happens-- fighting against Joan of Arc--has no relevance to what happens in the rest of the cycle.
* PunchClockVillain: The French ambassador, at least from the in-universe point of view of the English, comes off this way. He's constantly bringing Henry V bad news and rude messages, but both he and Henry acknowledge that it's just his job to convey messages, not to control for content.
* RememberTheNewGuy: You'd think you would have seen Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in ''Theatre/HenryV'', being Henry V's brother and subsequent regent for his son, yet he only debuts in ''HenryVIPart1.'' In fact, Shakespeare's original play has him, but he was cut out in the 2012 series.
* RousingSpeech:
** Henry V's "Once more, unto the breach" and "St. Crispin's Day" speeches appear, but are considerably more subdued (see DarkerAndEdgier above).
** At the morning before the Battle of Bosworth Field, the speeches of Henry, earl of Richmond and Richard III are inter-cut with each other. Richard's is streamlined as a more straightforward rallying cry, while Richmond's is quite more subdued akin to Henry V's above.
* RuleOfSymbolism:
** Related to LooksLikeJesus above, the image of {{Main/Jesus}} (sometimes his pure identity, sometimes his "Christ the King" iconography) is best invoked by kings to assert their authority (or at least their closeness to him in spirit). Richard II (in riding a donkey to his deposition) and Henry VI (as a mendicant) invokes this best, although only the latter could be categorically justified as such.
** The red and white roses are blatantly invoked early into ''Henry VI Part 1'', and Henry VI's innocent favoring of the red rose pretty much stokes the Duke of York's resentment further.
** Margaret of Anjou leading her husband's armies into battle might as well be a theatrical fantasy-fulfillment of what the historical Margaret of Anjou would have wanted to do, ham-strung as she was by her gender and limited authority as queen consort.
** At the Battle of Towton, Henry VI's armor is conspicuously designed to carry the coat of arms of England--and even invokes similarity to the armor worn by Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/KennethBranagh in their respective adaptations of ''Theatre/HenryV''. That Henry VI utterly fails to do anything valiant wearing it highlights just how much of an InadequateInheritor he is to his father's mantle.
** In Richard III's nightmare where he is haunted by his victims, a roasted pig's head is decked out on the table while the ghost of Buckingham waits for him. The boar is Richard's personal sigil.
* SadClown: Simon Russell Beale's Falstaff has definite shades of this, particularly evident in his "honor" monologue before the Battle of Shrewsbury. While he's definitely very much the LovableCoward (like ''all'' iterations of the Fat Man), the harsh realities of war seem to sadden him just as much as they frighten him.
* ShirtlessScene: Richard II ends up wearing nothing but a loincloth for the final act. In ''Henry IV,'' there's one for Hal and Poins and two towels. Finally, Henry VI becomes the medieval version of a hobo wearing nothing but a loincloth too.
* SissyVillain: Played with with Richard, who's more of an AntiVillain[=/=]TragicHero than a villain. Still, the contrast between his delicate effeminacy and obvious homosexuality and Henry's more conventional, heterosexual manliness is striking.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: In the full text of ''Henry V,'' the Boy is killed with his fellow pages while guarding the luggage. In this production, he survives to old age [[spoiler: and at the end is revealed to be the Chorus.]]
* TimeShiftedActor: Henry IV (Bolingbroke) is played by Rory Kinnear as a young man and JeremyIrons when he's older.
* TitleDrop: The title of the series was taken directly from Richard II's despairing monologue (''Theatre/RichardII'' III.2.165-167):
--> ''For within '''the hollow crown'''''
--> ''That rounds the mortal temples of a king''
--> ''Keeps Death his court...''
* TokenMinority: In Richard II, the Bishop of Carlisle is black; though nobody seems to notice. It's kind of difficult to ignore it once he says the line "O forfend it God/ That in a Christian climate, souls refined/ Should show so heinous, '''''black''''', obscene a deed!"
** Also, in ''Henry V'', the Duke of York is black, despite being the same individual as the Aumerle of ''RichardII'', who's played by a white actor. (Few productions make the connection between the two characters, however.)
** One of the most-discussed casting choices would be Creator/SophieOkonedo's portrayal of Margaret of Anjou--which even [[http://indy100.independent.co.uk/article/ukip-councillor-attempts-to-blast-bbc-for-historical-inaccuracy-gets-destroyed-by-actual-historian--ZyZAasU2fb invoked racist abuse online]]. [[DeliberateValuesDissonance It does, however, highlight her foreignness from the English court--as Margaret's French blood did during her time]].
* TooDumbToLive: The young Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York (the younger of the Princes in the Tower) seems to have developed a habit of doing an exaggerated, limping impression of his uncle Richard III--despite being warned by his mother of its impropriety (and it being his BerserkButton). He had the temerity to do it in front of Richard himself. Needless to say, it cements Richard's intent that they do not leave the Tower alive.
* TrainingMontage: Featured over the opening credits of ''Richard II'' as Bolingbroke and Mowbray prepare for their duel.
* TheVoiceless: Elizabeth of York[[note]]Richard III's niece whom he plans to marry, and who later becomes Henry Tudor's queen[[/note]] appears across ''Richard III'', but is never given a speaking role. Still, considering she is normally TheGhost in most stagings of this play, it's technically a step up.
* TheWisePrince: Henry V starts out rather fresh-faced and dashing, but the toll of his decisions and the demands of leadership weigh him down more and more as his story unfolds. Then he dies.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom: Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March. Only referred to by word in the ''Henry IV'' episodes, he was seen as the only threat to the Lancasters' usurpation of Richard II. Come ''Henry VI Part 1'', the dying Mortimer calls Richard Plantagenet to his deathbed, spurring him to regain the duchy of York to his name and seek the English crown for himself.
* VomitIndiscretionShot: Henry VI, not a martial man by any fashion, throws up on-screen when the carnage of the Battle of Towton gets to him.
* WarIsHell: Consistently throughout both Major and Minor Tetralogies. Writers normally suggested that the Minor Tetralogy portrays war in all its vulgarities while the Major Tetralogy (especially ''Theatre/HenryV'') portrays WarIsGlorious. Yet throughout all productions, not once were the battles and triumphs (even in ''Henry V'', as mentioned in DarkerAndEdgier above) seen as worthy and of praise: people are stuck in the mud, cut down with brutal frequency, and human tragedy cuts across all--nobleman and foot soldier alike.
** The best illustration of this would be in the second ''Henry VI'' episode, where King Henry VI witnesses two men (one a son, the other an old father) killing their opponent for booty, only [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone to horrifically discover that they killed their own kin]] (the former his father, the latter his son).
** And then the last scene of the ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode tops this up with less gore and more scale, with Margaret of Anjou listlessly looking towards heaven while the camera zooms out of Bosworth Field, highlighting the hundreds of dead this last battle of the Wars of the Roses wrought.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Douglas has two scenes in Theatre/HenryIVPart1 and is never mentioned again. In the play, Hal is so impressed by his courage in battle that he releases him without a ransom, but this scene is omitted. It's a shame, too, because Hal's account of Douglas's capture paints him in a much better light than the DirtyCoward noblemen who get sentenced to death by King Henry in the same scene.
** Poins' role as one of Hal's friends is somewhat expanded on in this version, and yet he still drops off the face of the earth part of the way through ''Part 2''.
----

to:

* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: Invoked by juxtaposing the assassination of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester with the adulterous bedding of Queen Margaret and the Duke of Somerset--a statement to how state power was centralized and perverted at the cost of innocent blood. Later on, Margaret seems to really enjoy her stabbing of Richard, Duke of York (before she orders him beheaded)--the man responsible for her lover Somerset's death.
* KarmaHoudini: Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester--the man responsible for the deaths of both Joan of Arc and Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester [[note]]the latter plotted together with Queen Margaret and Somerset[[/note]]--never gets his comeuppance[[note]]whereas Somerset was killed at St. Albans and Margaret dethroned[[/note]]. Albeit this may be more of a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse, as Winchester is portrayed dying in Shakespeare's original text (in a scene that's quite horrific, spiritually at least).
* KillEmAll: By the end of 2016 ''The Wars of the Roses'' cycle, almost every significant character in the series--good, ambiguous and evil--would have given up the ghost.
* KissingTheGround: Bolingbroke kisses the English sand after he returns from exile, as does Richard II after he returns from Ireland. Henry VI would himself do so after arriving in France to be crowned.
* LargeHam: Hotspur. Otherwise, mostly averted, which is surprising considering that it's Shakespeare. Speech is delivered as dialogue rather than verse. Even two great speeches of ''Theatre/HenryV'' are delivered in a more subdued way than usual.
** On the other hand, key characters from the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle would ham it up accordingly when given the spotlight (Joan of Arc, Richard of York, Queen Margaret, Somerset, Warwick and Edward, Prince of Wales).
** Humphrey of Gloucester, for someone who has served as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure and OnlySaneMan at court, was tipped over to SuddenlyShouting when the bickerings brought about by Henry VI's marriage to Margaret of Anjou become too much for him:
--> ''Lordings, farewell; and say, when I am gone,''
--> ''I prophesied France will be lost ere long!''
--> -- ''Henry VI Part 2'' I.1.152-153.
** Unsurprisingly, [[VillainProtagonist Richard III]] takes the cake out of everyone, with his soliloquies designed to unleash the hog as gloriously as possible. Choice examples would be:
*** As he walks towards Henry VI's prison to murder him (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' III.2.158-163):
--->To shrink mine arm up like a withered shrub;
--->To make an envious mountain on my back,
--->Where sits Deformity to mock my body;
--->To shape my legs of an unequal size;
--->To disproportion me in every part,
--->Like to a '''[[SuddenlyShouting CHAOOOSS]]!!!'''
*** As he holds his infant nephew while contemplating to destroy Edward IV's regime (''Theatre/HenryVIPart3'' V.7.34-35):
--->To say the truth, so Judas kissed his master
--->And cried “All hail!” whenas he meant '''[[EvilSoundsDeep ALL. HARM.]]'''
*** His "Winter of Discontent" monologue (''Theatre/RichardIII'' I.1.1-41) is probably dripping with far more contempt compared to previous productions (see, for example, Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/IanMckellen);
*** His condemnation of Lord Hastings (''Theatre/RichardIII'' III.4.75-78):
--->If? Thou... protector of this damnèd strumpet,
--->[[PunctuatedForEmphasis TALK'ST. THOU. TO ME. OF "IFFFSSSS?"!]] Thou art a traitor.--
--->OffWithHisHead! NOW BY ST. PAUL I SWEAR
--->I WILL NOT DINE UNTIL I SEE THE SAME!
*** His VillainousBreakdown at Henry, earl of Richmond's return to England (''Theatre/RichardIII'' IV.4.497-501):
--->[[ChewingTheScenery IS THE CHAIR EMPTY?I IS THE SWORD UNSWAAAAYEEEDDD?!]]
--->[[ThisCannotBe IS THE KING DEAD?! THE EMPIRE UNPOSSESSED?!]]
--->WHAT HEIR OF YORK IS THERE ALIVE BUT WE?!
--->AND WHO IS ENGLAND’S KING BUT GREAT YORK’S HEIR?
--->'''THEN TELL ME! [[PunctuatedForEmphasis WHAT. MAKES. HE. UPON. THE. SEAS?!]]'''
* LaserGuidedKarma: For the duration of the ''Wars of the Roses'' cycle, most characters who have blood on their hands (either justified or not) would have been horrifically murdered or disgraced. It's almost positively similar to AkiraKurosawa's ''{{Film/Ran}}'' (itself an adaptation of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/KingLear'').
* LecherousLicking: Creator/BenedictCumberbatch does one over previous adaptations of ''Theatre/RichardIII'' by ''[[{{Main}} actively slurping Anne Neville's spit]].''
--> '''Richard:''' He that bereft thee, lady, of thy husband
--> Did it to help thee to a better husband.
-->'''Anne:''' His better doth not breathe upon the earth.
--> '''Richard:'''He lives that loves thee better than he could.
-->'''Anne:'''Where is he?
--> '''Richard:''' Here. (''Anne spits at his face.'') Why dost thou spit at me?
-->'''Anne:''' Would it were mortal poison for thy sake.
--> '''Richard:''' ''(wipes the spit and then licks his fingers)'' Never came poison from so sweet a place.
-->--''Theatre/RichardIII'', I.2.148-160.
* LooksLikeJesus: [[http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mijusui36y1rywehbo1_1361415343_cover.jpg Richard II.]] This is implied to be a calculated gesture to emphasize Richard's belief in the divinity of kingship.
** This was later unconsciously invoked by Henry VI himself. He starts off with the same long hair (albeit unkempt) and royal robes like Richard II. When he runs away from all the battles to become a mendicant, he eventually grows a beard and wears only a loincloth, much like Richard in his death. He ends in prison with gray robes and shaggy beard, consistent with the kind of robes the historical Jesus would wear. In contrast to Richard's megalomaniacal image-building, the evolution of Henry's image seems more consistent with first-century Christian imagery.
** Oddly enough, the one later to adopt the "Christ the King" image in Richard's vein would be Henry's rival, Edward IV.
* LoveRuinsTheRealm: In ''Henry VI Part 2,'' Edward IV chooses to marry Elizabeth Woodville, a relatively low-born widow.[[note]]For those who would want this plot point explored better (even if historically-inaccurately), PhilippaGregory's Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries and its TV adaptation ''The White Queen'' may be useful.[[/note]] This infuriates Warwick, who was arranging Edward's marriage to a French princess, and he promptly switches sides to join forces with Margaret of Anjou. Even worse, it alienates Edward's brothers, who are disillusioned with both him and his decisions. George flat out rebels and joins Warwick (if only for a little while before he comes crawling back) while Richard bides his time and waits...
* LoyalToThePosition: The Bishop of Ely is present in both the second ''Henry VI'' episode and in ''Richard III'' as the one presiding over the coronations of Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII--despite being loyal to Edward, fearful of Richard and Henry being the Lancastrian usurper to his previous Yorkist patrons. Interestingly, his continuing presence at court in all historical records probably makes this TruthInTelevision.
* MomentKiller:
** Deliberately invoked by Hal and Doll Tearsheet; they set up the sheriff to be a cockblocker as a way to 1. make the sheriff uncomfortable 2. [[FakeOutMakeOut give Hal a reasonable excuse]] for sending the sheriff and his men away without searching the house (and arresting Falstaff) and 3. make the sheriff ''extremely'' uncomfortable. It works.
** The sheriff also kills another moment that has nothing to do with sex: for the first time, Hal has let on to Falstaff that their friendship cannot and will not survive his ascent to the throne. Before Falstaff can properly respond, the sheriff arrives.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Across the series, some characters soliloquize on their complicity in a crime, and how it has marked them for retribution. Only a few have actually crossed the MoralEventHorizon.
** Henry Bolingbroke / Henry IV seems to see his unwitting role in ordering Richard II's execution as this.
** Richard, Duke of York, despite raining insults on Joan of Arc, does seem eventually disturbed after seeing her consumed by flames. It doesn't, however, come up again when he himself is at the mercy of the Lancastrians.
** George of Clarence remembers his sins and contributions to the Wars (especially his killing of the Duke of Exeter) at Tewkesbury while he is imprisoned, and seems to begin regretting his actions. Shame that it was at that point that Richard of Gloucester's assassins turn up for him.
** Edward IV's last lines alive exhibit his shock and despair at failing to prevent George of Clarence's execution. His being sickly pale only adds to his pathos and fear.
** The most stark exhibition of it, of course, would be Richard III's nightmare where is haunted by the ghosts of all he killed (Henry VI, George of Clarence, the Duke of Buckingham, Queen Anne Neville, Rivers and Gray, and the Princes in the Tower). That the still-living Margaret of Anjou appears as his "tour guide from hell" doesn't help.
* NarratorAllAlong: The narrator (Creator/JohnHurt) of Henry V is really Henry's squire as an old man.
* NeverMyFault: By this point a broken, haggard woman, Margaret of Anjou in ''Theatre/RichardIII'' still seems oblivious towards her own complicity in her downfall and curses the entire House of York for her misfortune[[note]]forgetting she definitely crossed the MoralEventHorizon when she oversaw the execution of Richard of York, gleefully stuffing a handkerchief with his son Edmund's blood on his mouth before chopping off his head[[/note]]. It's probably only at the very last scene, where she stands at the aftermath of the carnage at Bosworth, [[WasItReallyWorthIt that she begins to see the futility of it]].
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Perhaps the most central tragic figure of the ''Henry VI, Part I'' episode would be Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Lord Protector and uncle to King Henry VI. Despite his best efforts, trying to live a frugal life (even spending his own coffers to finance the war in France) and being well-loved by the public, his power, competence and loyalty became the object of jealousy. Through the manipulations of Queen Margaret, Somerset and the Bishop of Winchester, he sees his wife disgraced, he is forced to resign his titles, imprisoned and then assassinated. He pretty much has it as bad as [[Series/GameOfThrones Lord Eddard 'Ned' Stark]].[[note]]Humphrey's role as Lord Protector is an almost-approximate office to the Hand of the King in the series.[[/note]]
** John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, in contrast to most English nobles (especially York and Somerset) was trying his damned hardest to salvage the ground battles in France. Somerset's petulance and the lateness of York's response led to Talbot and his army being slaughtered wholesale at the Battle of Castillon.
* OffWithHisHead: Bolingbroke has Bushy and Green beheaded on-screen.
** The bitterest instigators of the Wars of the Roses, the Duke of Somerset and the Duke of York, also had their turns in losing their heads: the former at St. Albans, the latter in an ambush at his home.
** The heads of Richard III's enemies begin to roll in the middle part as he inches closer to the throne: [[spoiler: Rivers and Grey, Hastings, and finally Buckingham]].
* OneShotCharacter: The defection of Warwick to Margaret of Anjou's camp was presided by King Louis XI of France. While Louis XI only appears in this one scene, Creator/AndrewScott's turn as him is verily {{Camp}} and yet believable in his fury that [[OneSceneWonder it's one of the more memorable scenes in the series]].
* OneSteveLimit: Pretty much averted, in case you haven't noticed. Tons of Henrys, Edwards and Richards all over the place. In fact, the only attempt at differentiation is with Edward, Prince of Wales (Henry VI's son), who is called "Ned" in a few throwaway dialogues.
* OutOfFocus: Very little screentime is accorded to John Talbot, despite being supposedly one of the bigger tragic characters of ''HenryVIPart1''--which translates to more focus on this production's central character, Humphrey of Gloucester.
* PatrickStewartSpeech: Subverted by John of Gaunt's famous speech about the greatness of England, as the end of the speech suggests that it is doomed. Actually delivered in this version by Creator/PatrickStewart.
* PragmaticAdaptation: ''Henry VI Part I'' uses relatively little of the material from its corresponding play, since much of what happens-- fighting against Joan of Arc--has no relevance to what happens in the rest of the cycle.
* PunchClockVillain: The French ambassador, at least from the in-universe point of view of the English, comes off this way. He's constantly bringing Henry V bad news and rude messages, but both he and Henry acknowledge that it's just his job to convey messages, not to control for content.
* RememberTheNewGuy: You'd think you would have seen Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in ''Theatre/HenryV'', being Henry V's brother and subsequent regent for his son, yet he only debuts in ''HenryVIPart1.'' In fact, Shakespeare's original play has him, but he was cut out in the 2012 series.
* RousingSpeech:
** Henry V's "Once more, unto the breach" and "St. Crispin's Day" speeches appear, but are considerably more subdued (see DarkerAndEdgier above).
** At the morning before the Battle of Bosworth Field, the speeches of Henry, earl of Richmond and Richard III are inter-cut with each other. Richard's is streamlined as a more straightforward rallying cry, while Richmond's is quite more subdued akin to Henry V's above.
* RuleOfSymbolism:
** Related to LooksLikeJesus above, the image of {{Main/Jesus}} (sometimes his pure identity, sometimes his "Christ the King" iconography) is best invoked by kings to assert their authority (or at least their closeness to him in spirit). Richard II (in riding a donkey to his deposition) and Henry VI (as a mendicant) invokes this best, although only the latter could be categorically justified as such.
** The red and white roses are blatantly invoked early into ''Henry VI Part 1'', and Henry VI's innocent favoring of the red rose pretty much stokes the Duke of York's resentment further.
** Margaret of Anjou leading her husband's armies into battle might as well be a theatrical fantasy-fulfillment of what the historical Margaret of Anjou would have wanted to do, ham-strung as she was by her gender and limited authority as queen consort.
** At the Battle of Towton, Henry VI's armor is conspicuously designed to carry the coat of arms of England--and even invokes similarity to the armor worn by Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Creator/KennethBranagh in their respective adaptations of ''Theatre/HenryV''. That Henry VI utterly fails to do anything valiant wearing it highlights just how much of an InadequateInheritor he is to his father's mantle.
** In Richard III's nightmare where he is haunted by his victims, a roasted pig's head is decked out on the table while the ghost of Buckingham waits for him. The boar is Richard's personal sigil.
* SadClown: Simon Russell Beale's Falstaff has definite shades of this, particularly evident in his "honor" monologue before the Battle of Shrewsbury. While he's definitely very much the LovableCoward (like ''all'' iterations of the Fat Man), the harsh realities of war seem to sadden him just as much as they frighten him.
* ShirtlessScene: Richard II ends up wearing nothing but a loincloth for the final act. In ''Henry IV,'' there's one for Hal and Poins and two towels. Finally, Henry VI becomes the medieval version of a hobo wearing nothing but a loincloth too.
* SissyVillain: Played with with Richard, who's more of an AntiVillain[=/=]TragicHero than a villain. Still, the contrast between his delicate effeminacy and obvious homosexuality and Henry's more conventional, heterosexual manliness is striking.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: In the full text of ''Henry V,'' the Boy is killed with his fellow pages while guarding the luggage. In this production, he survives to old age [[spoiler: and at the end is revealed to be the Chorus.]]
* TimeShiftedActor: Henry IV (Bolingbroke) is played by Rory Kinnear as a young man and JeremyIrons when he's older.
* TitleDrop: The title of the series was taken directly from Richard II's despairing monologue (''Theatre/RichardII'' III.2.165-167):
--> ''For within '''the hollow crown'''''
--> ''That rounds the mortal temples of a king''
--> ''Keeps Death his court...''
* TokenMinority: In Richard II, the Bishop of Carlisle is black; though nobody seems to notice. It's kind of difficult to ignore it once he says the line "O forfend it God/ That in a Christian climate, souls refined/ Should show so heinous, '''''black''''', obscene a deed!"
** Also, in ''Henry V'', the Duke of York is black, despite being the same individual as the Aumerle of ''RichardII'', who's played by a white actor. (Few productions make the connection between the two characters, however.)
** One of the most-discussed casting choices would be Creator/SophieOkonedo's portrayal of Margaret of Anjou--which even [[http://indy100.independent.co.uk/article/ukip-councillor-attempts-to-blast-bbc-for-historical-inaccuracy-gets-destroyed-by-actual-historian--ZyZAasU2fb invoked racist abuse online]]. [[DeliberateValuesDissonance It does, however, highlight her foreignness from the English court--as Margaret's French blood did during her time]].
* TooDumbToLive: The young Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York (the younger of the Princes in the Tower) seems to have developed a habit of doing an exaggerated, limping impression of his uncle Richard III--despite being warned by his mother of its impropriety (and it being his BerserkButton). He had the temerity to do it in front of Richard himself. Needless to say, it cements Richard's intent that they do not leave the Tower alive.
* TrainingMontage: Featured over the opening credits of ''Richard II'' as Bolingbroke and Mowbray prepare for their duel.
* TheVoiceless: Elizabeth of York[[note]]Richard III's niece whom he plans to marry, and who later becomes Henry Tudor's queen[[/note]] appears across ''Richard III'', but is never given a speaking role. Still, considering she is normally TheGhost in most stagings of this play, it's technically a step up.
* TheWisePrince: Henry V starts out rather fresh-faced and dashing, but the toll of his decisions and the demands of leadership weigh him down more and more as his story unfolds. Then he dies.
* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom: Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March. Only referred to by word in the ''Henry IV'' episodes, he was seen as the only threat to the Lancasters' usurpation of Richard II. Come ''Henry VI Part 1'', the dying Mortimer calls Richard Plantagenet to his deathbed, spurring him to regain the duchy of York to his name and seek the English crown for himself.
* VomitIndiscretionShot: Henry VI, not a martial man by any fashion, throws up on-screen when the carnage of the Battle of Towton gets to him.
* WarIsHell: Consistently throughout both Major and Minor Tetralogies. Writers normally suggested that the Minor Tetralogy portrays war in all its vulgarities while the Major Tetralogy (especially ''Theatre/HenryV'') portrays WarIsGlorious. Yet throughout all productions, not once were the battles and triumphs (even in ''Henry V'', as mentioned in DarkerAndEdgier above) seen as worthy and of praise: people are stuck in the mud, cut down with brutal frequency, and human tragedy cuts across all--nobleman and foot soldier alike.
** The best illustration of this would be in the second ''Henry VI'' episode, where King Henry VI witnesses two men (one a son, the other an old father) killing their opponent for booty, only [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone to horrifically discover that they killed their own kin]] (the former his father, the latter his son).
** And then the last scene of the ''Theatre/RichardIII'' episode tops this up with less gore and more scale, with Margaret of Anjou listlessly looking towards heaven while the camera zooms out of Bosworth Field, highlighting the hundreds of dead this last battle of the Wars of the Roses wrought.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Douglas has two scenes in Theatre/HenryIVPart1 and is never mentioned again. In the play, Hal is so impressed by his courage in battle that he releases him without a ransom, but this scene is omitted. It's a shame, too, because Hal's account of Douglas's capture paints him in a much better light than the DirtyCoward noblemen who get sentenced to death by King Henry in the same scene.
** Poins' role as one of Hal's friends is somewhat expanded on in this version, and yet he still drops off the face of the earth part of the way through ''Part 2''.
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