History Series / SpartacusBloodAndSand

20th May '18 8:51:07 PM Stevebob
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* ChainmailBikini: Most of the gladiators and rebels (both men and women) tend not to wear much in battle. This may ''possibly'' be a rare justified example, as the rebels are constantly on the move and don't have access to armourers or anything. The Roman soldiers, on the other hand, are usually fully armoured.
* CharactersDroppingLikeFlies: {{Historical Domain Character}}s aside, only a handful of characters are alive by the end of the series.
* ChekhovsSkill: The show takes time to highlight Spartacus' tactical mind, showing that he's capable of formulating plans and adapting them to new situations, skills that will later prove crucial during the revolt. It also shows Crixus as having a knack for inspiring loyalty and admiration in those around him, which will come into play [[spoiler: when Crixus breaks off with half the rebels when Spartacus decides to leave for Gaul.]]



* CharactersDroppingLikeFlies: {{Historical Domain Character}}s aside, only a handful of characters are alive by the end of the series.
* ChekhovsSkill: The show takes time to highlight Spartacus' tactical mind, showing that he's capable of formulating plans and adapting them to new situations, skills that will later prove crucial during the revolt. It also shows Crixus as having a knack for inspiring loyalty and admiration in those around him, which will come into play [[spoiler: when Crixus breaks off with half the rebels when Spartacus decides to leave for Gaul.]]
19th Apr '18 3:21:18 PM Malady
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**



* OneWordTitle: First name of ProtagonistTitle.



* PhraseCatcher: Spartacus and Gannicus are both on the receiving end of "you mad [[PrecisionFStrike fuck]]" several times.



* PoirotSpeak: Characters do not drop into Latin at random or with any frequency, but the English dialogue is often interrupted by a few specific Latin nouns related to the military, political office or gladiatory games and training (See also ShownTheirWork below)



* {{Pride}}: Ends up causing a lot of the drama in the story.



* PhraseCatcher: Spartacus and Gannicus are both on the receiving end of "you mad [[PrecisionFStrike fuck]]" several times.
* PoirotSpeak: Characters do not drop into Latin at random or with any frequency, but the English dialogue is often interrupted by a few specific Latin nouns related to the military, political office or gladiatory games and training (See also ShownTheirWork below)
* {{Pride}}: Ends up causing a lot of the drama in the story.

to:

* PhraseCatcher: Spartacus and Gannicus are both on the receiving end of "you mad [[PrecisionFStrike fuck]]" several times.
* PoirotSpeak: Characters do not drop into Latin at random or with any frequency, but the English dialogue is often interrupted by a few specific Latin nouns related to the military, political office or gladiatory games and training (See also ShownTheirWork below)
* {{Pride}}: Ends up causing a lot of the drama in the story.
ProtagonistTitle
7th Apr '18 6:57:28 PM PurpleEmperor
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* ManlyTears

to:

* ManlyTearsManlyTears: The hardened, profanity loving gladiators aren't immune this. Not Spartacus after [[spoiler: being forced to kill Varro]] and not even Crixus when [[spoiler: Naevia is forced to leave House Batiatus.]]
19th Mar '18 10:29:14 AM LondonKdS
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Added DiffLines:

* MasculineFeminineGayCouple:
** Played straight with two of the show's main gay male pairings: butch gladiator Barca and gentle slave Alexios in ''Blood and Sand'', and the hot-headedly macho Agron with the much calmer and kindlier, though by no means wimpy, Nasir in ''Vengeance'' and ''War of the Damned''.
** Averted with Barca and his previous lover Auctus in ''Gods of the Arena'' (both manly) and the show's main f/f pairing, Lucretia and Gaia in ''Gods of the Arena'', who are both very feminine.
15th Feb '18 6:07:00 PM PaulA
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* BillingDisplacement: Many actors/actresses play prominent characters and yet aren't included (or even [[PromotionToOpeningTitles promoted]]) in the main billing.
** Lesley-Ann Brandt Brandt (Naevia), Antonio Te Maioha (Barca) and Craig Walsh-Wrightson (Solonius) in both ''Blood and Sand'' and ''Gods of the Arena''. Ironically, [[TheOtherDarrin Brandt's replacement]] gets [[PromotionToOpeningTitles the promotion to the closing credits]]. [[note]] There are rumors that Brandt not being promoted is the real reason she left the show [[/note]]
** Heath Jones (Donar) and Barry Duffiel (Lugo) in both ''Vengeance'' and ''War of the Damned''.
** Jai Courtney (Varro) in ''Blood and Sand''.
** Jeffrey Thomas (Titus Batiatus) and Stephen Lovatt (Tullius) in ''Gods of the Arena''.
** Pane Hema Taylor (Nasir), Peter [=McCauley=] (Lucuius Caelius) and Hannah Mangan-Lawrence (Seppia) in ''Vengeance''. Taylor was [[PromotionToOpeningTitles promoted]] the following season.
** Gwendoline Taylor (Sybil) in ''War of the Damned''.



* FollowTheLeader: The influence of ''Film/ThreeHundred'', ''Series/{{Rome}}'' and ''Film/{{Gladiator}}'' is pretty obvious here.



* MethodActing Cynthia Addai-Robinson was crying for real during Crixus' death scene, using the death of her father (who had recently passed away from cancer at the time). Manu Bennett, who didn't know how he was going to play the scene, said once she told him what she would be doing, he realized he didn't have to do anything but react to her. The look of support Crixus gives Naevia is actually from Manu to Cynthia.



* InMemoriam: The show honored Andy Whitfield in the credits of the season premiere.



* InMemoriam: The GrandFinale honored both Grant Konfeld (the show's VFX lead editor) and Andy Whitfield (the series' original lead actor).
30th Jan '18 5:56:03 PM nombretomado
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* WrestlerInAllOfUs: Unarmed combat frequently includes grappling moves commonly used in MixedMartialArts.

to:

* WrestlerInAllOfUs: Unarmed combat frequently includes grappling moves commonly used in MixedMartialArts.UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts.
20th Jan '18 11:36:54 AM LondonKdS
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Added DiffLines:

* RunningGag: [[BawdySong MY COCK RAGES ON! MY COCK RAGES ON!]]


Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: The constant references to Crixus as "the undefeated Gaul" will remind european viewers of a certain group of "[[ComicBook/{{Asterix}} indomitable gauls]]".
27th Dec '17 11:50:19 PM TheWoosterCode
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Added DiffLines:

* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: While Naevia reports the [[spoiler: death of Crixus,]] Nasir asks about Agron. [[spoiler: Naevia, who was present when Tiberius cut down Agron but not after the battle when he was taken prisoner, wordlessly informs Nasir that Agron died as well. And that's ''before'' his crucifixion!]]
2nd Oct '17 1:43:39 AM Aurelian
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** [[spoiler: Tiberius']] motivation for raping [[spoiler: Caesar]] and the latter's silence about it afterwards only make sense in a modern context. In Ancient Rome, the rape of any ''free-born citizen'' held the [[SeriousBusiness death penalty]] - and while the rape of an adult male wouldn't be directly punished through courts[[note]]Unlike the rape of a maiden, matron or any sexual contact between a man and a citizen boy who wasn't yet declared an adult, which usually happened at 15.[[/note]], the victim would be full within his rights to kill his attacker.[[note]] We have a historical case where a soldier got a ''medal'' for killing his superior officer while the latter tried to sexually assault him.[[/note]] And even if it came to a political scandal over this incident: [[spoiler: Caesar]] is the ''pater familias'' of an old, respected (though somewhat impoverished) noble house, with a young daughter to ally himself to another by engangement[[note]]He eventually marries her to Pompey, to cement the Triumvirate involving him, Pompey and Crassus.[[/note]], and has already served his country as a priest, minor official and by wiping out some pirates, whereas [[spoiler: Tiberius]] is the barely adult, completely undistinguished son of nouveau riche [[spoiler: Crassus]], whom the entire Senate hates for not "knowing his place". Who do you think they'd side with in a legal battle? Also, aside from signing his own death warrant and dooming his family, [[spoiler: Tiberius's]] threat of making the humilation public and thus harming [[spoiler: Caesar's]] reputation doesn't make sense with this particular victim, as the real [[spoiler:Caesar]] was rumored to have had an affair as a teenager with King Nicomedes of Bithynia while on a diplomatic mission, leading his enemies to quip that he was "a man to any woman, and a woman to any man".[[note]]Which, despite general expectations that Roman men should want to fuck AnythingThatMoves, ''was'' a genuine problem, as proof of voluntary bottoming - i.e. acting "like a woman" - would have saddled the man so accused with the legal status of "infamy", which among other losses in civil rights, would prevent him from ever holding public office. Since Caesar would have been the younger and lower-ranking partner in that affair, the Romans automatically assumed that he would have bottomed, because in their society, the person of lower social rank ''always'' was supposed to "serve the pleasure" of the higher-ranking one. Free-born male citizens couldn't have a sexual relationship with each other ''because'' they were of equal social rank.[[/note]] Regardless, whether true or not the rumors never seriously harmed his career. It also doesn't fit with what we know of the historical [[spoiler: Caesar's]] personality: personally brave and supremely self-confident. This is a man who after being kidnapped and ransomed by pirates (after first doubling his own ransom), hunted them all down and crucified them, and also received the very rare honor of the ''corona civica'' (civic crown), awarded for saving the life of a fellow citizen.

to:

** [[spoiler: Tiberius']] motivation for raping [[spoiler: Caesar]] and the latter's silence about it afterwards only make sense in a modern context. In Ancient Rome, the rape of any ''free-born citizen'' held the [[SeriousBusiness death penalty]] - and while the rape of an adult male wouldn't be directly punished through courts[[note]]Unlike the rape of a maiden, matron or any sexual contact between a man and a citizen boy who wasn't yet declared an adult, which usually happened at 15.[[/note]], the victim would be full within his rights to kill his attacker.[[note]] We have a historical case where a soldier got a ''medal'' for killing his superior officer while the latter tried to sexually assault him.[[/note]] And even if it came to a political scandal over this incident: [[spoiler: Caesar]] is the ''pater familias'' of an old, respected (though somewhat impoverished) noble house, with a young daughter to ally himself to another by engangement[[note]]He eventually marries her to Pompey, to cement the Triumvirate involving him, Pompey and Crassus.[[/note]], and has already served his country as a priest, minor official and by wiping out some pirates, whereas [[spoiler: Tiberius]] is the barely adult, completely undistinguished son of nouveau riche [[spoiler: Crassus]], whom the entire Senate hates for not "knowing his place". Who do you think they'd side with in a legal battle? Also, aside from signing his own death warrant and dooming his family, [[spoiler: Tiberius's]] threat of making the humilation public and thus harming [[spoiler: Caesar's]] reputation doesn't make sense with this particular victim, as the real [[spoiler:Caesar]] was rumored to have had an affair as a teenager with King Nicomedes of Bithynia while on a diplomatic mission, leading his enemies to quip that he was "a man to any woman, and a woman to any man".[[note]]Which, despite general expectations that Roman men should want to fuck AnythingThatMoves, ''was'' a genuine problem, as proof of voluntary bottoming - i.e. acting "like a woman" - would have saddled the man so accused with the legal status of "infamy", which among other losses in civil rights, would prevent him from ever holding public office. Since Caesar would have been the younger and lower-ranking partner in that affair, the Romans automatically assumed that he would have bottomed, because in their society, the person of lower social rank ''always'' was supposed to "serve the pleasure" of the higher-ranking one. Free-born male citizens couldn't have a sexual relationship with each other ''because'' they were of equal social rank.[[/note]] Regardless, whether true or not Friends and enemies alike happily repeated the rumors throughout [[spoiler: Caesar's]] life, much to his annoyance, but they still never seriously harmed his career.career or stopped him winning the respect of his legions. It also doesn't fit with what we know of the historical [[spoiler: Caesar's]] personality: personally brave and supremely self-confident. This is a man who after being kidnapped and ransomed by pirates (after first doubling his own ransom), hunted them all down and crucified them, and also received the very rare honor of the ''corona civica'' (civic crown), awarded for saving the life of a fellow citizen.
15th Sep '17 5:02:36 PM Aurelian
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** [[spoiler: Tiberius']] motivation for raping [[spoiler: Caesar]] and the latter's silence about it afterwards only make sense in a modern context. In Ancient Rome, the rape of any ''free-born citizen'' held the [[SeriousBusiness death penalty]] - and while the rape of an adult male wouldn't be directly punished through courts[[note]]Unlike the rape of a maiden, matron or any sexual contact between a man and a citizen boy who wasn't yet declared an adult, which usually happened at 15.[[/note]], the victim would be full within his rights to kill his attacker.[[note]] We have a historical case where a soldier got a ''medal'' for killing his superior officer while the latter tried to sexually assault him.[[/note]] And even if it came to a political scandal over this incident: [[spoiler: Caesar]] is the ''pater familias'' of an old, respected (though somewhat impoverished) noble house, with a young daughter to ally himself to another by engangement[[note]]He eventually marries her to Pompey, to cement the Triumvirate involving him, Pompey and Crassus.[[/note]], and has already served his country as a priest, minor official and by wiping out some pirates, whereas [[spoiler: Tiberius]] is the barely adult, completely undistinguished son of nouveau riche [[spoiler: Crassus]], whom the entire Senate hates for not "knowing his place". Who do you think they'd side with in a legal battle? Also, aside from signing his own death warrant and dooming his family, [[spoiler: Tiberius's]] threat of making the humilation public and thus harming [[spoiler: Caesar's]] reputation doesn't make sense with this particular victim, as [[spoiler: Caesar]] already had rumors going on about him supposedly being "a man to any woman, and a woman to any man"[[note]]Which, despite general expectations that Roman men should want to fuck AnythingThatMoves, ''was'' a genuine problem, as proof of voluntary bottoming - i.e. acting "like a woman" - would have saddled the man so accused with the legal status of "infamy", which among other losses in civil rights, would prevent him from ever holding public office.[[/note]] ever since he was 19, due to a possible affair with a foreign king during a stint as a sort of ambassador for the Roman Republic.[[note]]Since he would have been the younger and lower-ranking partner in that affair, the Romans automatically assumed that he would have bottomed, because in their society, the person of lower social rank ''always'' was supposed to "serve the pleasure" of the higher-ranking one. Free-born male citizens couldn't have a sexual relationship with each other ''because'' they were of equal social rank.[[/note]] It also doesn't fit with what we know of the historical [[spoiler: Caesar's]] personality: personally brave and supremely self-confident. This is a man who after being kidnapped and ransomed by pirates (after first doubling his own ransom), hunted them all down and crucified them, and also received the very rare honor of the ''corona civica'' (civic crown), awarded for saving the life of a fellow citizen.

to:

** [[spoiler: Tiberius']] motivation for raping [[spoiler: Caesar]] and the latter's silence about it afterwards only make sense in a modern context. In Ancient Rome, the rape of any ''free-born citizen'' held the [[SeriousBusiness death penalty]] - and while the rape of an adult male wouldn't be directly punished through courts[[note]]Unlike the rape of a maiden, matron or any sexual contact between a man and a citizen boy who wasn't yet declared an adult, which usually happened at 15.[[/note]], the victim would be full within his rights to kill his attacker.[[note]] We have a historical case where a soldier got a ''medal'' for killing his superior officer while the latter tried to sexually assault him.[[/note]] And even if it came to a political scandal over this incident: [[spoiler: Caesar]] is the ''pater familias'' of an old, respected (though somewhat impoverished) noble house, with a young daughter to ally himself to another by engangement[[note]]He eventually marries her to Pompey, to cement the Triumvirate involving him, Pompey and Crassus.[[/note]], and has already served his country as a priest, minor official and by wiping out some pirates, whereas [[spoiler: Tiberius]] is the barely adult, completely undistinguished son of nouveau riche [[spoiler: Crassus]], whom the entire Senate hates for not "knowing his place". Who do you think they'd side with in a legal battle? Also, aside from signing his own death warrant and dooming his family, [[spoiler: Tiberius's]] threat of making the humilation public and thus harming [[spoiler: Caesar's]] reputation doesn't make sense with this particular victim, as [[spoiler: Caesar]] already the real [[spoiler:Caesar]] was rumored to have had rumors going an affair as a teenager with King Nicomedes of Bithynia while on about him supposedly being a diplomatic mission, leading his enemies to quip that he was "a man to any woman, and a woman to any man"[[note]]Which, man".[[note]]Which, despite general expectations that Roman men should want to fuck AnythingThatMoves, ''was'' a genuine problem, as proof of voluntary bottoming - i.e. acting "like a woman" - would have saddled the man so accused with the legal status of "infamy", which among other losses in civil rights, would prevent him from ever holding public office.[[/note]] ever since he was 19, due to a possible affair with a foreign king during a stint as a sort of ambassador for the Roman Republic.[[note]]Since he Since Caesar would have been the younger and lower-ranking partner in that affair, the Romans automatically assumed that he would have bottomed, because in their society, the person of lower social rank ''always'' was supposed to "serve the pleasure" of the higher-ranking one. Free-born male citizens couldn't have a sexual relationship with each other ''because'' they were of equal social rank.[[/note]] Regardless, whether true or not the rumors never seriously harmed his career. It also doesn't fit with what we know of the historical [[spoiler: Caesar's]] personality: personally brave and supremely self-confident. This is a man who after being kidnapped and ransomed by pirates (after first doubling his own ransom), hunted them all down and crucified them, and also received the very rare honor of the ''corona civica'' (civic crown), awarded for saving the life of a fellow citizen.
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