History Series / RedDwarf

23rd Jun '16 6:55:10 PM PaulA
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* RewindGag: "Backwards", in which the crew visit a universe where time runs in reverse, is an entire episode of Rewind Gags.



* ShoutOut: The first two series' title music is very reminiscent of ''Music/AlsoSprachZarathustra'', and the sequence is in line with scenes from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' that utilise said music. The name ''Holly'' is a ShoutOut to ''2001'''s HAL, too, as is the fact that Holly, or "Hol" as Lister sometimes calls him, refers to David Lister as "Dave." (In the radio sketch series ''Dave Hollins, Space Cadet'' on which the series is based, the computer was known as 'Hab'.)

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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
The first two series' title music is very reminiscent of ''Music/AlsoSprachZarathustra'', and the sequence is in line with scenes from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' that utilise said music. The name ''Holly'' is a ShoutOut to ''2001'''s HAL, too, as is the fact that Holly, or "Hol" as Lister sometimes calls him, refers to David Lister as "Dave." (In the radio sketch series ''Dave Hollins, Space Cadet'' on which the series is based, the computer was known as 'Hab'.)


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** "Backwards", in which the space-future protagonists visit present-day Earth in a green spaceship modelled on an animal, contains several nods to ''Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome'', in which the space-future protagonists visit present-day Earth in a green spaceship modelled on an animal.
23rd Jun '16 6:44:49 PM PaulA
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* BangBangBANG: In Rob Grant's solo novel ''Backwards'', [[TheAce Ace Rimmer]]'s CO resigns his commission and takes a bath before pulling out his sidearm and fires it inside the confines of his bathroom. The gunshot is so loud that his ears start to bleed and he exclaims "Bugger me, that was loud!" Justified in that he's in a confined and tiled space that would amplify the sound of the gunshot.



** The novels had "Bliss", a brown powder that literally made you believe you were God, could supposedly get you hooked just by looking at it & would cause the user to become suicidally depressed for decades after coming down, which is probably what made it so addictive. Also, Better than Life, which was a sort of LotusEaterMachine in the books rather than the more innocuous artificial reality video game of the TV series.



** The novel ''Backwards'' goes further and explains that the reason Lister is a top engineer in Ace Rimmer's universe is because without Rimmer for a bunkmate, Lister ended up sharing with someone who encouraged him to study and realise his full potential. No explanation for why Kryten, Cat and Holly's equivalents are human, though.



* AGlitchInTheMatrix: In the novel "Better Than Life", this occurs. The characters are stuck in a virtual reality simulation of their greatest fantasies. At first they are alerted to their situation by Kryten signalling them from outside, then entering the game himself, which wouldn't qualify as this trope. However, when they decide to leave they wake up on Red Dwarf unharmed by the weeks they have spent effectively comatose, Lister notices that toast always lands face up when dropped, and finally two people are discovered alive and in stasis; Lister's crush Kochanski and Rimmer's living self. Lister realizes that things are ''still'' perfect, and that they are therefore still in the game. They wake up for real, and find they are in horrible shape from their experience.



** Averted in the novels, however, where the toaster actually ''does'' think to ask Holly about God. [[spoiler:It's Lister. Now, ask a ''hard'' one!]]



** "Better Than Life" features a Virtual Reality Game that can make all your deepest fantasies come true. In the end, though, Rimmer's deep self-loathing results in the destruction of everybody's perfect worlds. In the books, the game is almost impossible to leave, because in order to leave, somebody has to ''want'' to leave, and nobody ever does (also, it's hard for people to realize that they're in the game in the first place, as the game sets itself up in such a way as to prevent people from realizing that). As a result, the person's real-life body will eventually waste away and die. Somewhat of a spoof in the novel, as the Cat is so self-absorbed that nothing will fulfill his desires short of living in a mountain kingdom and being waited on by giant, topless, singing, dancing Valkyries, putting even Rimmer's incredibly indulgent fantasy to shame, while Kryten can come and go freely as he has no hopes, dreams, or desires besides getting a new squeezy-mop.
** The novel version of "Better Than Life" ends with Lister having to make the decision whether to stay in the simulation or return to the hardships of traveling back to an Earth ''six million'' years in the future where he may well be the last human as he understands it. Talk about a DownerEnding. The second novel reveals that the Lotus Eater Machine digs deep into their psyche, bringing to light their deepest desires. Which, unfortunately for Rimmer (or fortunately, since it is what breaks them out of the fake paradise), revolves around his self-loathing. Rimmer's self-hatred ends up destroying the dream world. When they finally leave, they find that reality is suspiciously better than it should be (Lister's 2nd cup of coffee tastes better than the first, he drops a slice of buttered toast 20 times and it always lands butter side up, [[SerialEscalation a TV dinner tastes better than its cardboard box]], etc.) and discover that they're still in the game, at which point the game designer appears and congratulates them for figuring it out, then lets them leave.

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** "Better Than Life" features a Virtual Reality Game that can make all your deepest fantasies come true. In the end, though, Rimmer's deep self-loathing results in the destruction of everybody's perfect worlds. In the books, the game is almost impossible to leave, because in order to leave, somebody has to ''want'' to leave, and nobody ever does (also, it's hard for people to realize that they're in the game in the first place, as the game sets itself up in such a way as to prevent people from realizing that). As a result, the person's real-life body will eventually waste away and die. Somewhat of a spoof in the novel, as the Cat is so self-absorbed that nothing will fulfill his desires short of living in a mountain kingdom and being waited on by giant, topless, singing, dancing Valkyries, putting even Rimmer's incredibly indulgent fantasy to shame, while Kryten can come and go freely as he has no hopes, dreams, or desires besides getting a new squeezy-mop.\n** The novel version of "Better Than Life" ends with Lister having to make the decision whether to stay in the simulation or return to the hardships of traveling back to an Earth ''six million'' years in the future where he may well be the last human as he understands it. Talk about a DownerEnding. The second novel reveals that the Lotus Eater Machine digs deep into their psyche, bringing to light their deepest desires. Which, unfortunately for Rimmer (or fortunately, since it is what breaks them out of the fake paradise), revolves around his self-loathing. Rimmer's self-hatred ends up destroying the dream world. When they finally leave, they find that reality is suspiciously better than it should be (Lister's 2nd cup of coffee tastes better than the first, he drops a slice of buttered toast 20 times and it always lands butter side up, [[SerialEscalation a TV dinner tastes better than its cardboard box]], etc.) and discover that they're still in the game, at which point the game designer appears and congratulates them for figuring it out, then lets them leave.



* {{Pseudolympics}}: The novel version had a version of the Olympics where drugs were legal and later a separate version for Genetically Engineered Life Forms ([=GELFs=]) who were specifically engineered to excel at a particular sport.



** "[[LotusEaterMachine Better Than Life]]" from Series 2, and at least one novel. By the end of the series, it's impossible to tell whether they've really escaped the game, or the game just lets them ''think'' they have. (It does explain a lot of the [[LampshadeHanging self-admitted]] [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness implausible science]].) The episode plays it almost entirely for laughs. The book version was much darker. The show version was basically the Holodeck driven by whatever your surface wish was; no mistaking it for reality. The book lets us go a good while thinking the cast has fully made it home. Over much of the rest of the book they manage to escape, and find that things were still a ''little'' too good to be true. When they escape for ''real,'' a message left by the creator of the game appears to congratulate them, and they finally return to the real world. Hopefully. Apparently, they ''wanted'' to do it this way all along in the show but budget or something didn't allow - in "Future Echoes," elderly Lister has "U=BTL" etched into his arm. No attention is called to it at the time (or ever, in the show. In the book, we see this happen in book 1 and Lister notices. Better than Life is book 2.)
22nd Jun '16 5:10:15 AM starofjusticev21
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** "Only the Good..." gets referenced in "The Beginning" only for the details of the solution to the virus being shushed.

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** We never find out what happened after "Only the Good..." to restore the status quo of previous seasons. It gets referenced in "The Beginning" only for the details of the solution to the virus being shushed.
5th Jun '16 4:11:44 PM nombretomado
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* DepravedHomosexual: In "Demons and Angels": Evil Rimmer, dressed like a punk version of [[RockyHorrorPictureShow Dr. Frank N Furter]], tells Lister in his most intimidating voice:

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* DepravedHomosexual: In "Demons and Angels": Evil Rimmer, dressed like a punk version of [[RockyHorrorPictureShow [[Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow Dr. Frank N Furter]], tells Lister in his most intimidating voice:
6th May '16 4:51:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* PossessiveParadise: The crew come across a luxurious space station manned by an entity calling itself "Legion". It was built by the greatest human intellectuals who ever lived, but they have all died three million years ago. He's delighted to cater to the crew's every whim and treat them like honored guests. However, he forbids them from leaving because [[spoiler:he's a formless entity that is created from the collective minds of the residents on the station. If they leave, he'll become nothing again.]]
29th Apr '16 5:20:42 PM pwiegle
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--> '''Rimmer:''' Stoke me a clipper, I'll be back for Christmas.
29th Apr '16 5:15:09 PM pwiegle
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** To "man-up" and accept the blame for a disaster that will kill everybody is a meaningless gesture anyway. Which makes it perfectly in keeping with Rimmer's symbolism-over-substance attitude.
19th Apr '16 12:43:18 PM caffeinatedkate
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** The leader of the simulants in Series Ten has the title of The Dominator.
18th Apr '16 4:44:52 AM tigerstar
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* TrickedOutGloves: The Inquisitor's time gauntlet.
29th Mar '16 4:54:58 PM LeedsKing
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--->'''Food Dispenser:''' Today's fish is trout a la creme. Enjoy your meal!

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--->'''Food Dispenser:''' Today's fish is trout a Trout à la creme.crème. Enjoy your meal!
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