History Series / MisterRogersNeighborhood

21st Oct '17 7:17:26 AM Jeduthun
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The show would inspire an entire generation of children, and, alongside ''Series/SesameStreet'' and ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', anchored PBS' children's programming throughout the '80s and '90s. Reruns of the show are still broadcast occasionally, even after Rogers' death in 2003.

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The show would inspire an entire generation of children, and, alongside ''Series/SesameStreet'' and ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', anchored PBS' children's programming throughout the '80s and '90s. Reruns of the show are still broadcast occasionally, even after Rogers' death in 2003. It's also often been compared with ''Series/TheJoyOfPainting'', another beloved PBS show from the same era which featured a similarly good-natured host, Bob Ross, noted like Rogers for his kind interactions with the viewer in a peaceful speaking voice.
27th Sep '17 5:19:00 PM CJO123
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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: One episode showed a montage of baby animals drinking milk from their mothers, such as kittens, piglets, goats, etc. This is fine and all, but then it switches to footage of mothers breastfeeding their babies, and we get to see a ''lovely'' closeup of a bare nipple dripping milk as the baby stops suckling for a moment. Keep in mind that this is rated TV-Y. Also, after the montage, Mr. Rogers says that women get a lot of "pleasure" out of breastfeeding, which sounds dirty when taken out of context.

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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: One episode showed a montage of baby animals drinking milk from their mothers, such as kittens, piglets, goats, etc. This is fine and all, but then it switches to footage of mothers breastfeeding their babies, and we get to see a ''lovely'' closeup of a bare nipple dripping milk as the baby stops suckling for a moment. Keep in mind that this is rated TV-Y. Also, And after the montage, Mr. Rogers says that women get a lot of "pleasure" out of breastfeeding, which sounds dirty when taken out of context. Keep in mind that this show is rated TV-Y.
26th Sep '17 3:31:16 AM CJO123
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* PlayingGertrude: Betsy Nadas Seamans (Mrs. [=McFeely=]) was only 24 years old when she began working on the show. Slightly justified, since David Newell (aka Mr. [=McFeely=]) was only 28 or 29 when he debuted.

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* PlayingGertrude: Betsy Nadas Seamans (Mrs. [=McFeely=]) was only 24 years old when she began working on the show. Slightly justified, since David Newell (aka Mr. [=McFeely=]) was also only 28 or 29 years old when he debuted.started working on the show.
26th Sep '17 3:14:53 AM CJO123
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* AuteurLicense: Fred Rogers was basically granted this by {{PBS}} because of his pioneering status in children's programming. On the ''Neighborhood'' he starred not only as the on-screen host but as scriptwriter, director, producer, composer, and puppeteer.

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* AuteurLicense: Fred Rogers was basically granted this by {{PBS}} because of his pioneering status in children's programming. On the ''Neighborhood'' he starred not only as the on-screen host but also as scriptwriter, director, producer, chief puppeteer, composer, lyricist, script writer and puppeteer.executive producer.



** Early color episodes have the house with yellow interiors as opposed to the more familiar blue (up through 1326, where painting the house is actually part of the episode's premise). The model neighborhood also got a redesign at the same time, with more intricate buildings and a slight change in layout.

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** Early color episodes have the house with yellow interiors as opposed to the more familiar blue (up through 1326, Episode 1326 (1974), where painting the house is actually part of the episode's premise). The model neighborhood also got a redesign at the same time, with more intricate buildings and a slight change in layout.



*** Speaking of which, in the first few black and white episodes, Mister Rogers would pull out the sofa bed to go to Make-Believe. Likely because it was such a hassle to set it up and put it away every time, this was thrown away fairly quickly. He would also occasionally pull out a telescope to get a "view" into there, which admittedly lasted longer than the sofa gimmick (a few seasons), but was still tossed away after a while. On one of his final uses of the telescope, he [[LampshadeHanging hangs a lampshade on it]] by pointing out how long it had been since he'd used the telescope.

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*** Speaking of which, in the first few black and white episodes, Mister Rogers would pull out the sofa bed to go to Make-Believe. Likely because it was such a hassle to set it up and put it away every time, this was thrown away fairly quickly. He would also occasionally often pull out a telescope and look through it to get a "view" into there, which admittedly lasted longer than the sofa gimmick (a few seasons), but was still tossed away after a while. On one of his final uses of the telescope, he [[LampshadeHanging hangs a lampshade on it]] by pointing out how long it had been since he'd used the telescope.



* NoFourthWall: Besides the constant interaction with the viewer, the fact that Fred's "TV house" was a mere set in a studio was made obvious. For example, one episode had Fred walk out of the living room and into the bare studio to introduce viewers to the live band accompanying the show: music director and pianist Johnny Costa, bassist Carl [=McVicker=], Jr., and drummer-percussionist Bobby Rawsthorne. He even revealed the normally hidden controls for Trolley very early on in the series' run, and later even showing Picture Picture's wired remote control on the show.

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* NoFourthWall: Besides the constant interaction with the viewer, the fact that Fred's "TV house" was a mere set in a studio was made obvious. For example, one episode Episode 1546 (1985) had Fred walk out of the living room and into the bare studio to introduce viewers to the live band accompanying the show: music director and pianist Johnny Costa, bassist Carl [=McVicker=], Jr., and drummer-percussionist Bobby Rawsthorne. He even revealed the normally hidden controls for Trolley very early on in the series' run, and later even showing Picture Picture's wired remote control on the show.



* {{Retool}}: The show's second run (which started in 1979) made a few changes to the way the show was filmed. Every week now had a specific theme to it, the model neighborhood was overhauled, the pace of the show slowed somewhat, there were much fewer episodes per season (anywhere from 5 to 15, where the early seasons were consistently 65 per season or a multiple of that), and a few other changes were made that made the second run feel quite distinct from the first.

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* {{Retool}}: The show's second run (which started in 1979) made a few changes to the way the show was filmed. Every week now had a specific theme to it, the model neighborhood was overhauled, modified, the pace of the show slowed somewhat, there were much fewer episodes per season (anywhere from 5 to 15, where the early seasons were consistently 65 per season or a multiple of that), and a few other changes were made that made the second run feel quite distinct from the first.



* TheTroubleWithTickets: Episode 1210 features Mr. Rogers having received a parking ticket before the episode opens and deciding to go to traffic court to try and get it waived. After several people go through the process, Mr. Rogers gets his turn to explain the circumstances and the judge lets him off with a warning.

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* TheTroubleWithTickets: Episode 1210 (1972) features Mr. Rogers having received a parking ticket before the episode opens and deciding to go to traffic court to try and get it waived. After several people go through the process, Mr. Rogers gets his turn to explain the circumstances and the judge lets him off with a warning.
22nd Sep '17 4:20:48 PM bjdwsm
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* AndYouWereThere: In the Neighborhood of Make-Believe, but other characters like Mr. McFeely and Chef Crockett are the same in both neighborhoods!

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* AndYouWereThere: In the Neighborhood of Make-Believe, but other characters like Mr. McFeely [=McFeely=] and Chef Crockett Brockett are the same in both neighborhoods!



** In episode 1129 (Cousin Mary Owl's debut in the Neighborhood of Make Believe), Lady Aberlin explains that Mary is much bigger than X because she's a person in an owl costume, while he's a puppet owl.

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** In episode 1129 (Cousin Mary Owl's debut in the Neighborhood of Make Believe), Lady Aberlin explains that Mary is much bigger than X because she's a person in an owl costume, dressed-up-person owl, while he's a puppet owl.



* InternalHomage: Francois Clemmons final appearance in the series opens by recreating a scene from season 3 where Mr. Rogers and then-Officer Clemmons soaked their feet in a swimming pool on a hot day.

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* InternalHomage: Francois Clemmons final appearance in the series opens by recreating a scene from season 3 2 where Mr. Rogers and then-Officer Clemmons soaked their feet in a swimming pool on a hot day.
22nd Sep '17 10:54:05 AM MackWylde
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* NiceGuy: Try to find a better example of this than Mr. Rogers. Just try.

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* NiceGuy: Try to find a better example of this nicer man than Mr. Fred Rogers. Just try.try!
15th Sep '17 3:57:52 PM LongLiveRock
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** The first three seasons have the title displayed as "[=MisteRogers'=] Neighborhood" (the name "Misterogers" (as seen on Picture Picture) was used during those seasons as well).

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** The first three seasons have the title displayed as "[=MisteRogers'=] Neighborhood" (the name "Misterogers" (as seen on Picture Picture) was used during those seasons as well). That was also the name of his earlier Canadian series.



** Earlier in the show, Robert Troll spoke mostly gibberish with English mixed in and was considered so hard to understand that characters had to work through his feelings to understand what he was saying. Eventually the gibberish in his speech disappeared after the first few seasons, presumably as he became more fluent in English, and he spoke with only English (but still in his own Troll accent). Later in the '90s during his final appearances, the gibberish returned but he was much easier to understand as it was more of a VerbalTic and he spoke clear sentences in the middle.

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** Earlier in the show, Robert Troll spoke mostly gibberish with English mixed in and was considered so hard to understand that characters had to work through his feelings to understand what he was saying. Eventually Eventually, the gibberish in his speech disappeared after the first few seasons, presumably as he became more fluent in English, and he spoke with only English (but still in his own Troll accent). Later in the '90s during his final appearances, the gibberish returned but he was much easier to understand as it was more of a VerbalTic and he spoke clear sentences in the middle.
15th Sep '17 3:49:49 PM LongLiveRock
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Added DiffLines:

* AndYouWereThere: In the Neighborhood of Make-Believe, but other characters like Mr. McFeely and Chef Crockett are the same in both neighborhoods!
10th Sep '17 10:46:08 AM CJO123
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Rogers' show had its earliest incarnation in 1954 as ''The Children's Corner'', a local program airing on station WQED in his native Pittsburgh. Rogers then took his talents to Canada in 1963 with a Creator/{{CBC}} TV program called ''Misterogers'', with Ernie Coombs as Rogers' understudy. After three years, Rogers decided to return to the U.S. while Coombs stayed to eventually became his boss' Canadian TV icon counterpart, ''Series/MrDressup''. ''Mister Rogers' Neighborhood'' debuted on National Educational Television (NET) in 1968; two years later, NET became Creator/{{PBS}} and Rogers' show continued through 2001.

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Rogers' show had its earliest incarnation in 1954 as ''The Children's Corner'', a local program airing on station WQED in his native Pittsburgh. Rogers then took his talents to Canada in 1963 with a Creator/{{CBC}} TV program called ''Misterogers'', with Ernie Coombs as Rogers' understudy. After three years, Rogers decided to return to the U.S. while Coombs stayed to eventually became his boss' Canadian TV icon counterpart, ''Series/MrDressup''. ''Mister Rogers' Neighborhood'' Neighborhood'', once again produced by WQED, debuted on National Educational Television (NET) in on February 19, 1968; two years later, NET became Creator/{{PBS}} and Rogers' show continued through until August 31, 2001.
9th Sep '17 2:28:38 PM nombretomado
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** He was also cited as a key witness in the [[AmericanCourts Supreme Court]]'s decision that home recording technology was fair use. Think about that: The man could persuade [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the U.S. government]] to change their minds on a controversial policy issue ''simply by talking to them''. Now that's badass.

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** He was also cited as a key witness in the [[AmericanCourts [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts Supreme Court]]'s decision that home recording technology was fair use. Think about that: The man could persuade [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the U.S. government]] to change their minds on a controversial policy issue ''simply by talking to them''. Now that's badass.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.MisterRogersNeighborhood