History Series / Lingo

6th Dec '16 12:51:24 PM MarsJenkar
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* LuckBasedMission: Getting the top prize, from Season 2 on in the Woolery version. If you've got at least one word in the BonusRound correct, you get one chance at picking the ball that will win the top prize. The chance of winning the top prize is the ''same'' whether you got one word right or ten. The extra picks aren't ''completely'' meaningless, though; you get $5000 if you get a Lingo ''after'' the first pick, and if you fail that, you do get a consolation prize of $100 per correct word in the round.



* ObviousRulePatch: Bonus letters, Lingo requirements and speed in Bonus Lingo. Season 1 didn't have the bonus letters, played at the same speed as the main game, and a team needed at least two picks to make a Lingo, leading to the NonstandardGameOver twice (one with only one pick awarded, which apart from $100 was worthless, and the other team completely flunking out in the only Bonus Lingo wipeout on Woolery's version, which earned them no money and made their main game win meaningless since they were awarded the losing team's parting gifts). From season 2 onward, every team got one bonus letter for winning the game, plus one more for each Lingo scored in the main game (also, it was changed so that only one is needed to make a Lingo); it also sped up Bonus Lingo's spelling segment to make it much easier to get a lot of picks, up to 10, which is essentially an InstantWinCondition. Reverted with the Engvall version, where playing Bonus Lingo just earned money, but the bonus letter remained intact, albeit under different circumstances (see above).

to:

* ObviousRulePatch: Bonus letters, Lingo requirements and speed in Bonus Lingo. Season 1 didn't have the bonus letters, played at the same speed as the main game, and a team needed at least two picks to make a Lingo, leading to the NonstandardGameOver twice (one with only one pick awarded, which apart from $100 was worthless, and the other team completely flunking out in the only Bonus Lingo wipeout on Woolery's version, which earned them no money and made their main game win meaningless since they were awarded the losing team's parting gifts). From season 2 onward, every team got one bonus letter for winning the game, plus one more for each Lingo scored in the main game (also, it was changed so that only one is needed to make a Lingo); it also sped up Bonus Lingo's spelling segment to make it much easier to get a lot of picks, up to 10, which is essentially an InstantWinCondition.InstantWinCondition[[note]]Indeed, if you get at least 9 picks, you've won at least the $5000 prize, as there is no way to ''not'' score a Lingo at that point; the only question is whether the first pick will win the top prize[[/note]]. Reverted with the Engvall version, where playing Bonus Lingo just earned money, but the bonus letter remained intact, albeit under different circumstances (see above).
9th Nov '16 4:29:00 AM Fynlar
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* TrialAndErrorGameplay: The entire point of the spelling game, as you're supposed to guess what the word is by using the provided letter(s), correct guesses, and hints of a right letter in the wrong place. Sometimes a valid strategy was simply to say something that obviously wasn't the right word simply to get some more letters [[TimeBasedMission (and to avoid getting the buzzer)]]. Only the first letter is given to start off, so for example, suppose the answer is TRUCK. The contestant's first guess might be THOSE, which wouldn't reveal any letters. After this, if the contestant guessed THICK, even though that definitely couldn't be the answer (since H was already shown not to be in the correct response), they would now have T--CK on the board, making progress toward finding the correct response. In addition, following this point in gameplay, it is by no means required for the contestant to give another word that ends with -CK; other words can still be used in order to potentially fish for the letters that belong in the other spaces. The only hard rule was that the word spelled must still begin with the given letter (T, in this case).

to:

* TrialAndErrorGameplay: The entire point of the spelling game, as you're supposed to guess what the word is by using the provided letter(s), correct guesses, and hints of a right letter in the wrong place. Sometimes a valid strategy was simply to say something that obviously wasn't the right word simply to get some more letters [[TimeBasedMission [[TimedMission (and to avoid getting the buzzer)]]. Only the first letter is given to start off, so for example, suppose the answer is TRUCK. The contestant's first guess might be THOSE, which wouldn't reveal any letters. After this, if the contestant guessed THICK, even though that definitely couldn't be the answer (since H was already shown not to be in the correct response), they would now have T--CK on the board, making progress toward finding the correct response. In addition, following this point in gameplay, it is by no means required for the contestant to give another word that ends with -CK; other words can still be used in order to potentially fish for the letters that belong in the other spaces. The only hard rule was that the word spelled must still begin with the given letter (T, in this case).
9th Nov '16 4:28:31 AM Fynlar
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* TrialAndErrorGameplay: The entire point of the spelling game, as you're supposed to guess what the word is by using the provided letter(s), correct guesses, and hints of a right letter in the wrong place. Sometimes a valid strategy was simply to say something that obviously wasn't the right word simply to get some more letters. Only the first letter is given to start off, so for example, suppose the answer is TRUCK. The constant's first guess might be THOSE, which wouldn't reveal any letters. After this, if the contestant guessed TRICK, even though that definitely couldn't be the answer, they now have TR-CK on the board and pretty much a guaranteed shot of getting the answer before they run out of guesses.

to:

* TrialAndErrorGameplay: The entire point of the spelling game, as you're supposed to guess what the word is by using the provided letter(s), correct guesses, and hints of a right letter in the wrong place. Sometimes a valid strategy was simply to say something that obviously wasn't the right word simply to get some more letters.letters [[TimeBasedMission (and to avoid getting the buzzer)]]. Only the first letter is given to start off, so for example, suppose the answer is TRUCK. The constant's contestant's first guess might be THOSE, which wouldn't reveal any letters. After this, if the contestant guessed TRICK, THICK, even though that definitely couldn't be the answer, answer (since H was already shown not to be in the correct response), they would now have TR-CK T--CK on the board and pretty much a guaranteed shot of getting board, making progress toward finding the answer before they run out of guesses.correct response. In addition, following this point in gameplay, it is by no means required for the contestant to give another word that ends with -CK; other words can still be used in order to potentially fish for the letters that belong in the other spaces. The only hard rule was that the word spelled must still begin with the given letter (T, in this case).
11th Sep '16 12:47:40 PM jameygamer
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* ObviousRulePatch: Bonus letters in Bonus Lingo. Season 1 didn't have them, leading to the NonstandardGameOver more than once. From season 2 onward, every team got one bonus letter for winning the game, plus one more for each Lingo scored in the main game (also, it was changed so that only one is needed to make a Lingo). Reverted with the Engvall version, where playing Bonus Lingo just earned money, but the bonus letter remained intact, albeit under different circumstances (see above).

to:

* ObviousRulePatch: Bonus letters letters, Lingo requirements and speed in Bonus Lingo. Season 1 didn't have them, the bonus letters, played at the same speed as the main game, and a team needed at least two picks to make a Lingo, leading to the NonstandardGameOver more than once. twice (one with only one pick awarded, which apart from $100 was worthless, and the other team completely flunking out in the only Bonus Lingo wipeout on Woolery's version, which earned them no money and made their main game win meaningless since they were awarded the losing team's parting gifts). From season 2 onward, every team got one bonus letter for winning the game, plus one more for each Lingo scored in the main game (also, it was changed so that only one is needed to make a Lingo).Lingo); it also sped up Bonus Lingo's spelling segment to make it much easier to get a lot of picks, up to 10, which is essentially an InstantWinCondition. Reverted with the Engvall version, where playing Bonus Lingo just earned money, but the bonus letter remained intact, albeit under different circumstances (see above).
11th Sep '16 12:41:32 PM jameygamer
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** The first season of the Woolery version taped on the Netherlands version's set. Bonus Lingo also had several differences: it was played for a small prize package including a Borders gift card and watch (described by Chuck in a pre-recorded copy), there were no bonus letters, and at least two balls were required to make a Lingo.

to:

** The first season of the Woolery version taped on the Netherlands version's set. Bonus Lingo also had several differences: it was played for a small prize package including a Borders gift card and watch (described by Chuck in a pre-recorded copy), there were no bonus letters, Bonus Lingo was spelled out at the same speed as the main game, and at least two balls were required to make a Lingo.



* InstantWinCondition: The best possible scenario in Woolery's Bonus Lingo is getting 10 words right, which awards 10 balls. If this is accomplished, the spelling part of the round ends immediately and the team is guaranteed $1,000, though that amount is meaningless because 10 balls '''will''' be enough to eventually make a Lingo even if the oddest sequence of ball-picking occurs, meaning the team will win $5,000 for getting 10 words (they still need to draw the one Lingo ball on the first pick to win the bigger bonus).



* NonStandardGameOver: In Season 1, the BonusRound did not offer bonus letters for every Lingo made in the main game, and two balls were required to make the winning Lingo. However, one team won only one ball, and another won ''zero'', likely leading to a rules tweak in Season 2.

to:

* NonStandardGameOver: In Season 1, the BonusRound did not offer bonus letters for every Lingo made in the main game, and two balls were required to make the winning Lingo. However, one team won only one ball, and another won ''zero'', ''zero'' [[note]] This team, who are the ones who attempted to spell "Approach" in the main game and then sucked hard in the bonus, only won the consolation prizes that were guaranteed for just appearing and which the losing team in the main game received; the Lingo board did not appear here [[/note]], likely leading to a rules tweak in Season 2.
5th Sep '16 5:02:25 PM WarioBarker
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* CurbStompBattle: The aforementioned April Fools' Day game. Mark and Marc won 500-0, still the second most lopsided defeat in the history of the show (The first was a 525-0 game, with the losers receiving donuts for their EpicFail.)

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* CurbStompBattle: The aforementioned April Fools' Day game. Mark and Marc won 500-0, still the second most lopsided defeat in the history of the show (The first (the biggest was a 525-0 game, with the losers receiving donuts for their EpicFail.)EpicFail).



** One moment towards the end of the original must be mentioned. The team got the rare Double Lingo for $2,000 and a shot at $64,000. They blitzed the endgame and reached the final ball, anything but a 44 gave them $64,000. Three guesses what happened.
** One team got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed '''the only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.

to:

** One moment towards On an episode very close to the end of the original must be mentioned. The run (after Ralph Andrews became host), a team got the rare Double Lingo for $2,000 and a shot at $64,000. They blitzed blazed through the endgame No Lingo round and reached the final draw for $64,000 with only one ball that would've caused a Lingo (and hence a loss)...and managed to draw that ball, anything but a 44 gave them $64,000. Three guesses what happened.
N44. Even Ralph, who almost certainly knew of the show's financial issues at this point, seemed legitly distraught at this.
** One team in the Woolery era got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed '''the only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.
29th Apr '16 4:27:00 PM goldenroad
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''Lingo'' (L-I-N-G-O) is a GameShow franchise begun (B-E-G-U-N) in 1987, combining Bingo (B-I-N-G-O) with a spelling game. It was first (F-I-R-S-T) hosted by Michael Reagan (son of UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan) and taped (T-A-P-E-D) in Canada in 1987-88, but became notorious for not paying its winning contestants. Despite this, the format became popular overseas (especially in the Netherlands beginning in 1989, originally hosted by Robert ten Brink (B-R-I-N-K) and later (L-A-T-E-R) by several other (O-T-H-E-R) emcees before Lucille Werner took over in 2005). Creator/{{GSN}} produced a revival hosted by Chuck (C-H-U-C-K) Woolery from 2002-07. A re-revival began (B-E-G-A-N) on June 6, 2011, with Creator/BillEngvall as host, but this attempt ended (E-N-D-E-D) after ([[OverlyLongGag A-F-T-E-R]]) only ([[SubvertedTrope O-N-L...]] [[RougeAnglesOfSatin E-E]]) one season.

to:

''Lingo'' (L-I-N-G-O) is a GameShow franchise begun (B-E-G-U-N) in 1987, combining Bingo (B-I-N-G-O) with a spelling game. It was first (F-I-R-S-T) hosted by Michael Reagan (son of UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan) and taped (T-A-P-E-D) in Canada in 1987-88, but became notorious for not paying its winning contestants. Despite this, the format became popular overseas (especially in the Netherlands beginning in 1989, originally hosted by Robert ten Brink (B-R-I-N-K) and later (L-A-T-E-R) by several other (O-T-H-E-R) emcees before Lucille Werner took over in 2005).2005 and lasting until 2013). Creator/{{GSN}} produced a revival hosted by Chuck (C-H-U-C-K) Woolery from 2002-07. A re-revival began (B-E-G-A-N) on June 6, 2011, with Creator/BillEngvall as host, but this attempt ended (E-N-D-E-D) after ([[OverlyLongGag A-F-T-E-R]]) only ([[SubvertedTrope O-N-L...]] [[RougeAnglesOfSatin E-E]]) one season.



The original version featured a BonusRound called "No Lingo", where the winning team got a chance to double a stake determined by how many games they had (won up to five times) by solving words given the first letter and one other letter in the word, but having to draw a ball for each try they use (as the goal was to ''avoid'' getting a line of five on a special card pattern), with a claimed maximum payout of $112,000.

Woolery's version replaced it with a new bonus game, called "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Bonus Lingo]]". Here, the winning team is given two minutes to complete as many five-letter words as possible, given the first letter and one other letter in the word. From season 2 onward, a team also received bonus letters (one for winning the game, plus one for every Lingo in the main game), which could be called for at any time. Each completed word awarded a ball draw for the Bonus Lingo board, a board with some of the 25 numbers filled in (13 in the first season, 12 in season 2 onward). Starting with Season 2, the board's pattern was made in such a way that a Lingo could be made on the first draw. Doing so initially won a trip, and later a progressive jackpot. Getting a Lingo on subsequent pulls won a smaller cash prize; failing to achieve Lingo in this round won $100 per ball.

GSN's revival with Engvall changed things up some, with Engvall giving clues for the words in the main game, in the style of Woolery's ''Series/{{Scrabble}}''. Also, Bonus Lingo became 5 words in 90 seconds for a chance at $100,000. Bonus letters were repurposed in this version's Bonus Lingo, with only one given out automatically on the first word courtesy of the show's sponsor, and the ball board was thrown out.



* BonusRound: The Reagan/Andrews version had "No Lingo", while both GSN versions have "Bonus Lingo".
* BonusSpace:

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* BonusRound: BonusRound:
** 1987-1988 (No Lingo):
***
The Reagan/Andrews version winning team started with a stake determined by either how many games they had "No Lingo", won ($500/$1000/$2000), or how much they won in the game ($500 for a horizontal/vertical Lingo, $1000 for a diagonal, $2000 for two lines with the same ball).
*** The team was given five chances to guess and were shown the first letter and one additional letter to start. If the team guessed the word on the first try, they drew one Lingo ball from the hopper in front of them. Each subsequent chance added a ball to the total,
while blowing it entirely was worth seven balls.
*** All even numbers that could possibly be on the Lingo card (2-74) were placed in the hopper, which could work to a team's advantage as they could draw a ball that had either already been covered or did not appear on the card at all. There was also a gold ball in the hopper and if it was drawn at any point in the team's turn, their money doubled on the spot and their turn ended. If any of the drawn balls formed a Lingo, the team lost the money.
*** After each turn, including at the beginning of the round, the team was given the choice to stop playing and take their money or keep going. If they managed to survive five turns without a Lingo, the team won the maximum prize.
** 2002-2007 (Bonus Lingo): 2:00 to guess as many words as possible, given the first letter and one other letter in the word. From season 2 onward, a team also received bonus letters (one for winning the game, plus one for every Lingo in the main game), which could be called for at any time. Each completed word awarded $100 and a ball draw for the Bonus Lingo board, a board with some of the 25 numbers filled in (13 in the first season, 12 in season 2 onward). A Lingo won a prize which changed each season.
*** Season 1: $4,000 prize package, Seasons 2-5: $5,000. Also, the spaces were marked so that a first-ball Lingo was possible. Doing so won an additional grand prize; Season 2: Trip to Jamaica, Season 3: Trip to Harrahs Lake Tahoe, Season 4: The $5,000 doubled to $10,000, Season 5: $10,000 + $1,000 per non-win.
** 2011 (Bonus Lingo): No card, just 90 seconds to guess five words; the first was worth the front game score, the next three doubled the money, all five won $100,000. Bonus letters were repurposed in this version's Bonus Lingo, with only one given out automatically on the first word courtesy of the show's sponsor, and the ball board was thrown out.
* BonusSpace:
** The original had prize balls; $250 in Traveler's Cheques, a trip, and a Jackpot which started at $1,000 and increased by $500 per game until won. Getting a Lingo awarded any drawn prizes. Later, the lowest prize was removed, and players had to draw
both GSN versions have "Bonus Lingo".
* BonusSpace:
remaining balls for the Lingo Jackpot. Later still, the trip was removed.



** The Engvall version got rid of the "?" balls (although a few sponsored episodes have special balls with a sponsor's logo which work the same way). In their place was the "Prize Ball", filled in the center with green. No number was marked off on the card, but the contestant did win a certain prize, one which was theirs to keep regardless of the game's outcome.
* ConsolationPrize: Averted. The Engvall version scored in dollars, but the losing team leaves with nothing (unless they were lucky enough to pick a prize ball during the game).

to:

** The Engvall version got rid of the "?" balls (although a few sponsored episodes have special balls with a sponsor's logo which work the same way). In their place was the "Prize Ball", a prize ball, filled in the center with green. No number was marked off on the card, but the contestant did win a certain prize, one which was theirs to keep regardless of the game's outcome.
* ConsolationPrize: Averted. The Averted with the Engvall version scored in dollars, but the losing team leaves with nothing (unless unless they were lucky enough to pick a prize ball during the game).game.



* DownerEnding: One team got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed '''the only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.

to:

* DownerEnding: DownerEnding:
** One moment towards the end of the original must be mentioned. The team got the rare Double Lingo for $2,000 and a shot at $64,000. They blitzed the endgame and reached the final ball, anything but a 44 gave them $64,000. Three guesses what happened.
**
One team got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed '''the only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.



** On the first Engvall episode, the same team submitted guesses of DICKS and SEMEN on separate words (The clues were "It always comes in the end" and "An arresting development", respectively.) Both guesses were accepted. Also, the first clue of the game was "Doggy style." [[spoiler:The correct word was "LOYAL", if anyone cares.]]

to:

** On the first Engvall episode, the same team submitted guesses of DICKS and SEMEN on separate words (The clues were "It always comes in the end" and "An arresting development", respectively.) Both guesses were accepted. Also, the first clue of the game was "Doggy style." [[spoiler:The The correct word was "LOYAL", if anyone cares.]]



*** Similarly, one of the clues started off with "It smells fishy" and the starting letter was a "P" and caused everyone to laugh knowing what was on everyone's minds. [[spoiler: The actual word was PEARL, if anyone cares.]]

to:

*** Similarly, one of the clues started off with "It smells fishy" and the starting letter was a "P" and caused everyone to laugh knowing what was on everyone's minds. [[spoiler: The actual word was PEARL, if anyone cares.]]



** Paula Cobb (only her first name was given on-air) was introduced halfway through GSN's third season. She'd introduce the players at the beginning of the show, and put the bonus prize ball into the well before the start of Bonus Lingo. Paula's main job, though, was to stand next to Stacey and gesture toward the game board. She was quietly dropped after just two episodes, and never mentioned again.

to:

** Paula Cobb (only her first name was given on-air) was introduced halfway through GSN's third season. She'd introduce the players at the beginning of the show, and put the bonus prize ball into the well hopper before the start of Bonus Lingo. Paula's main job, though, was to stand next to Stacey and gesture toward the game board. She was quietly dropped after just two episodes, and never mentioned again.
10th Feb '16 12:55:15 PM Gimere
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* BonusSpace: The "?" balls, which filled in a number of the team's choosing. If the number chosen by a "?" ball was drawn later, it was edited out and the team was allowed to redraw.

to:

* BonusSpace: BonusSpace:
**
The "?" balls, which filled in a number of the team's choosing. If the number chosen by a "?" ball was drawn later, it was edited out and the team was allowed to redraw.



* CatchPhrase: As he did on ''Series/LoveConnection'', Chuck regularly threw the show to commercial with, "We'll be back in two and two."

to:

* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase:
**
As he did on ''Series/LoveConnection'', Chuck regularly threw the show to commercial with, "We'll be back in two and two."



* DownerEnding: One team got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed the '''only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The first season of the Woolery version taped on the Netherlands version's set. Bonus Lingo also had several differences: it was played for a small prize package including a Borders gift card and watch (described by Chuck in a pre-recorded copy), there were no bonus letters, and at least two balls were required to make a Lingo.

to:

* DownerEnding: One team got seven balls in Bonus Lingo, giving them about a 98% chance of winning. Incredibly, they ''failed to make a Lingo'' on all seven balls. Chuck, incredulous over what just happened, reached into the hopper himself...and against 99.9% odds, grabbed the '''only '''the only ball''' that still left no Lingos on the board.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
The first season of the Woolery version taped on the Netherlands version's set. Bonus Lingo also had several differences: it was played for a small prize package including a Borders gift card and watch (described by Chuck in a pre-recorded copy), there were no bonus letters, and at least two balls were required to make a Lingo.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: When asked who would draw balls first in Bonus Lingo, one contestant said "I have red balls, Chuck; it's going to [my teammate]."

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: GettingCrapPastTheRadar:
**
When asked who would draw balls first in Bonus Lingo, one contestant said "I have red balls, Chuck; it's going to [my teammate]."



* RougeAnglesOfSatin: Contestants averaged at least one {{egregious}} misspelling per game, if not more. There have also been many occasions in which someone says a six-letter word and starts spelling it out, only to make an OhCrap reaction when they realize their error.

to:

* RougeAnglesOfSatin: RougeAnglesOfSatin:
**
Contestants averaged at least one {{egregious}} misspelling per game, if not more. There have also been many occasions in which someone says a six-letter word and starts spelling it out, only to make an OhCrap reaction when they realize their error.



* RunningGag: The second season of the Woolery version used foghorns to indicate the end of each round. Whenever the game ended in a CurbStompBattle, Chuck would jokingly tell the losing team that their ship has just arrived after the foghorn was played.

to:

* RunningGag: RunningGag:
**
The second season of the Woolery version used foghorns to indicate the end of each round. Whenever the game ended in a CurbStompBattle, Chuck would jokingly tell the losing team that their ship has just arrived after the foghorn was played.



* ShoutOut: Woolery called the red balls "stoppers" in reference to his own ''Series/{{Scrabble}}''. Both shows had, essentially, the same rules regarding Stoppers. The Engvall version officially crowned the red balls "Stoppers," making this an AscendedMeme.

to:

* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
Woolery called the red balls "stoppers" in reference to his own ''Series/{{Scrabble}}''. Both shows had, essentially, the same rules regarding Stoppers. The Engvall version officially crowned the red balls "Stoppers," making this an AscendedMeme.



* WeHardlyKnewYe: Paula Cobb (only her first name was given on-air) was introduced halfway through GSN's third season. She'd introduce the players at the beginning of the show, and put the bonus prize ball into the well before the start of Bonus Lingo. Paula's main job, though, was to stand next to Stacey and gesture toward the game board. She was quietly dropped after just two episodes, and never mentioned again.

to:

* WeHardlyKnewYe: WeHardlyKnewYe:
**
Paula Cobb (only her first name was given on-air) was introduced halfway through GSN's third season. She'd introduce the players at the beginning of the show, and put the bonus prize ball into the well before the start of Bonus Lingo. Paula's main job, though, was to stand next to Stacey and gesture toward the game board. She was quietly dropped after just two episodes, and never mentioned again.
30th Dec '15 10:20:30 PM Gimere
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** Anytime a team forfeited an extremely obvious word, Chuck would often instruct the team who got the word correct turn to their opponents and say "thank you" to them.

to:

** Anytime a team forfeited an extremely obvious word, Chuck would often instruct the team who got the word correct it to turn to their opponents and say "thank you" to them.
30th Dec '15 10:19:05 PM Gimere
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!!GameShow Tropes (T-R-O-P-E) in use:

to:

!!GameShow Tropes !!GameShowTropes (T-R-O-P-E) in use:



*** Similarly, one of the clues started off with "It smells fishy" and the starting letter was a "P" and caused everyone to laugh knowing what was on everyone's minds. [[spoiler: The actual word was PEARLS, if anyone cares.]]

to:

*** Similarly, one of the clues started off with "It smells fishy" and the starting letter was a "P" and caused everyone to laugh knowing what was on everyone's minds. [[spoiler: The actual word was PEARLS, PEARL, if anyone cares.]]



** Anytime a team forfeited an extremely obvious word, Chuck would often instruct the team who got the word correct to look at their opponents and say thank you to them.

to:

** Anytime a team forfeited an extremely obvious word, Chuck would often instruct the team who got the word correct turn to look at their opponents and say thank you "thank you" to them.



** TakeThatMe: In the Engvall run, one puzzle's clue was "People have said this about my act." The contestant first said SHAME ("Obviously you've never seen my act or you'd know I ''have'' no shame."), followed by SORRY. Eventually she got the right answer: SUCKS.

to:

** TakeThatMe: [[SelfDeprecation Take That, Me]]: In the Engvall run, one puzzle's clue was "People have said this about my act." The contestant first said SHAME ("Obviously you've never seen my act or you'd know I ''have'' no shame."), followed by SORRY. Eventually she got the right answer: SUCKS.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.Lingo