History Series / LawAndOrder

2nd Jul '17 1:16:23 PM DrOO7
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** Nearly every episode has the defendant testifying. While technically not forbidden, it is something that even the worst defense attorney knows is a bad idea for the very reason frequently depicted--the person is subjected to cross-examination and ends up incriminating themselves either via their attitude or what they say, resulting in their conviction. In the early days of the show this was actually cited if a defendant wanted to testify, with the defense attorney, the judge, and even the DA warning them against this, but as time went on, defendants testified as if this was standard procedure.
1st Jul '17 5:10:11 PM nombretomado
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* LongRunnerCastTurnover: The series ended with a completely different cast than when it started. The series lost its last original cast member at the end of its tenth season, when Steven Hill's Adam Schiff retired. So half of its run was done with no one from the first season cast. TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_%26_Order#Casting_and_characters a section]] dedicated to the cast/character changes and overlaps.

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* LongRunnerCastTurnover: The series ended with a completely different cast than when it started. The series lost its last original cast member at the end of its tenth season, when Steven Hill's Adam Schiff retired. So half of its run was done with no one from the first season cast. TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_%26_Order#Casting_and_characters a section]] dedicated to the cast/character changes and overlaps.
13th Jun '17 8:43:31 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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Very little is known about the characters' personal lives, with all the emphasis put on the formula of the story, which was part of the reason for the constant character changes; actors often complained that it was extremely repetitive. Every single character on the show, for this reason, was replaced at least once, and the show finished with a completely different cast from its start. Despite this, the focus on the formula makes the show very rerun friendly on various cable outlets. In addition, the show's characters were well-written enough to justify sustaining relatively superficial information about them; Jerry Orbach's wise-cracking character, Detective Lennie Briscoe, was often considered to be a representation of the quintessential [[NewYorkCityCops New York cop]].

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Very little is known about the characters' personal lives, with all the emphasis put on the formula of the story, which was part of the reason for the constant character changes; actors often complained that it was extremely repetitive. Every single character on the show, for this reason, was replaced at least once, and the show finished with a completely different cast from its start. Despite this, the focus on the formula makes the show very rerun friendly on various cable outlets. In addition, the show's characters were well-written enough to justify sustaining relatively superficial information about them; Jerry Orbach's wise-cracking character, Detective Lennie Briscoe, was often considered to be a representation of the quintessential [[NewYorkCityCops [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCityCops New York cop]].
13th Jun '17 8:17:18 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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''Law & Order'' began as an optimistic and realistic portrayal of the criminal justice system. It became extremely popular because it was often RippedFromTheHeadlines, as NBC promotional ads put it, which meant that it was tentatively based on controversial cases and news stories that were extensively covered as the show progressed. This allowed viewers to remain invested in the show's plot before even viewing the episode. In addition, the inclusion of a more diverse cast of characters allowed the show to appeal to wider demographics and secure its prestigious LongRunner status.

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''Law & Order'' began as an optimistic and realistic portrayal of the criminal justice system. It became extremely popular because it was often RippedFromTheHeadlines, as NBC Creator/{{NBC}} promotional ads put it, which meant that it was tentatively based on controversial cases and news stories that were extensively covered as the show progressed. This allowed viewers to remain invested in the show's plot before even viewing the episode. In addition, the inclusion of a more diverse cast of characters allowed the show to appeal to wider demographics and secure its prestigious LongRunner status.
1st Jun '17 11:03:25 PM JediGoalie30
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* ExecutiveMeddling: A deadly InUniverse example during S11.E15, "Swept Away: A Very Special Episode." A network executive for a reality show prompts one cast member to get into an altercation with another to improve the show's ratings. The two get into a fight on the roof that ends with the second cast member getting pushed over the edge and falling to his death.
31st May '17 7:12:45 AM CosmicFerret
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* TheMcCoy: Definitely not Jack [=McCoy=]. Usually the female A.D.A. Except when Angie Harmon played the role as a conservative Republican, which led the writers to bring in a new D.A. who was female and a former college professor, and made ''her'' TheMcCoy.

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* TheMcCoy: Definitely not Jack [=McCoy=]. Usually the female A.D.A. Except when Angie Harmon Creator/AngieHarmon played the role as a conservative Republican, which led the writers to bring in a new D.A. who was female and a former college professor, and made ''her'' TheMcCoy.



** Angie Harmon is noted as a Republican activist; some of the reasons Dick Wolf immediately selected her for the job was due to her Texas accent, and to bring in an ADA who would outright challenge [=McCoy=]'s opinions.

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** Angie Harmon Creator/AngieHarmon is noted as a Republican activist; some of the reasons Dick Wolf immediately selected her for the job was due to her Texas accent, and to bring in an ADA who would outright challenge [=McCoy=]'s opinions.



** Angie Harmon (A.D.A. Carmichael) left the show, so her character got promoted to the Attorney General's office after Season 11.

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** Angie Harmon Creator/AngieHarmon (A.D.A. Carmichael) left the show, so her character got promoted to the Attorney General's office after Season 11.
12th May '17 12:21:00 AM dbz77
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** the most egregious example is "By Perjury". Bascially, the detectives and prosecutors suspect that an AmoralAttorney killed a judge in a case he was involved in two years before. the thing is, one of the attorney's clients was convicted and subsequently executed for the crime ''six months ago''. The murder case should have still been on appeal.
30th Apr '17 10:13:01 AM DrOO7
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** Nearly every show in this franchise has shown the cops barging into a doctor's office/exam room/ operating room to arrest the doctor in question or their patient. This is grossly inappropriate behavior that would never happen in RealLife (possibly even lampshaded by the fact that there's always someone present yelling, "You can't go in there!"). These actions would not only violate patient privacy (very often, they are present when the cops walk in), they would compromise the sterility of the OR and cause a huge swath of problems for the hospital/clinic staff.
8th Apr '17 1:49:35 PM nombretomado
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** Detective Ed Green was shot so that actor Jesse L Martin could take the time necessary to reprise his role as Tom Collins in the film version of {{Rent}}.

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** Detective Ed Green was shot so that actor Jesse L Martin could take the time necessary to reprise his role as Tom Collins in the film version of {{Rent}}.''Film/{{Rent}}''.



** Jesse L. Martin had to leave Season 15 near the end to work on filming the movie {{Rent}}, so he was replaced by Nick Falco (Michael Imperioli) for the last four episodes of Season 15. He returned in Season 16.

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** Jesse L. Martin had to leave Season 15 near the end to work on filming the movie {{Rent}}, ''Film/{{Rent}}'', so he was replaced by Nick Falco (Michael Imperioli) for the last four episodes of Season 15. He returned in Season 16.
24th Mar '17 1:56:27 AM WillBGood
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* ColourCodedForYourConvenience:

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* ColourCodedForYourConvenience:ColorCodedForYourConvenience:


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* CrapsackWorld: Considering that law enforcement is forced to deal with some of the worst of society, it often feels this way.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.LawAndOrder