History Series / LawAndOrder

15th Apr '18 7:18:14 PM Temmere
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* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Well hardly "hero," but the real life inspirations for the "Mac Rangers" in the episode "Performance" were actually quite a bit ''worse'' than what made it onto the screen. The Mac Rangers pressure and bully teenage girls into sex, and in one case this crosses over into physical force. The real life "Spur Posse," though, is believed to have used physical force a number of times, sometimes with girls as young as ''ten''.
21st Mar '18 11:39:52 AM LittleDancerGirl
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*** A second one, six seasons later, with "Design" (SVU) and "Flaw" (L&O).
20th Mar '18 11:22:37 PM LittleDancerGirl
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* GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion: The victim of the Season 1 episode, "Life Choice", [[spoiler: was a perpetrator of the bombing of the abortion clinic; however, she stays in the clinic because she was considering having an abortion, too. Her vigorously pro-life family tries to cover that inconvenience up after the fact because they want her to remain, in their eyes, a martyr for the pro-life cause]].

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* GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion: The victim of the Season 1 episode, "Life Choice", [[spoiler: was believed to be a perpetrator of the bombing of the abortion clinic; however, she stays in the clinic because it turns out she was considering having actually there to have an abortion, too.and the bomb had been planted on her by the real bomber. Her vigorously pro-life family tries to cover that inconvenience up after the fact because they want her to remain, in their eyes, a martyr for the pro-life cause]].
7th Feb '18 6:19:46 PM karstovich2
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* AmoralAttorney: Attorneys, prosecutors, judges, hell, even clerks... no one is spared. [[spoiler: Every single assistant ADA on the series gets put through the ringer for corruption charges at least once. Jack especially so]].

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* AmoralAttorney: Attorneys, prosecutors, judges, hell, even clerks... no one is spared. [[spoiler: Every single assistant ADA on the series gets put through the ringer wringer for corruption charges at least once. Jack especially so]].


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** "Everybody Loves Raimondo's" hopelessly and more or less unnecessarily messes up New Jersey’s legal system. The cops have to go to Jersey City to find and arrest their perp. At the last minute, the Jersey City detective who’s been working with them take the arrest themselves. As it turns out the Hudson County District Attorney wants the Jersey police to get the credit and his office to get the perp walk as publicity for his reelection campaign. Except...New Jersey doesn’t have elected district attorneys. In New Jersey, the chief officer responsible for managing the prosecution of criminal cases is called County Prosecutor, and he or she is not elected, but rather appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the state Senate. New Jersey County Prosectors might want the publicity of a perp walk if they plan to run for an elected office (hardly unheard-of), but they would never need it to keep their jobs.
3rd Feb '18 9:13:33 PM nombretomado
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* NewYorkCityCops: The show is notable for thoroughly examining many aspects of New York cops. Lupo, for example, is noted for having worked with the CIA in places like Pakistan and Somalia.
** Chris Noth (Det. Mike Logan's actor) once talked about how a New York cop differed from every single other policeman in the world.
2nd Feb '18 12:36:11 AM Cryoclaste
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* HorribleHollywood: Taken to almost reflective levels in "Everybody Loves Raimando's", where Hollywood's romanticized portrayal of Italian mob families (TheGodfather is cited as being guilty of this) directly results in [[spoiler: a mob boss ordering a hit on the producer of such a film]].

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* HorribleHollywood: Taken to almost reflective levels in "Everybody Loves Raimando's", where Hollywood's romanticized portrayal of Italian mob families (TheGodfather (''Film/TheGodfather'' is cited as being guilty of this) directly results in [[spoiler: a mob boss ordering a hit on the producer of such a film]].
11th Jan '18 12:18:00 PM MikeW
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* AllForNothing:
** The daughter of a Holocaust survivor is determined to find the coins her father lost in the war. She tracks down a man who'd been boasting of the collection, the argument becoming heated and she ends up killing him. It's only near the end of the trial the truth comes out: The coins had been bought by a Swiss billionaire years before and the guy was lying about knowing where they were as a plan to make himself seem richer. The woman breaks down to realize the guy had no idea where the coins were and she killed for nothing.
** In the BlackComedy packed "Couples," a man dies of a heart attack while jogging with his husband. When it turns out the "heart attack" was poison, the cops talk to the husband. He immediately breaks down and confesses, assuming they'd figured out he'd killed the guy already. It turns out that after all the effort to get rid of him so he could inherit everything, it turns out the state of New York won't recognize their marriage and as everything was in his husband's name, the guy would be out of a home and money anyway.
6th Jan '18 10:36:18 PM nombretomado
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** Lennie slept with JohnMunch's wife. He isn't very pleased. In Munch's interactions with Lennie, however, they come off as very good friends.

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** Lennie slept with JohnMunch's JustForFun/JohnMunch's wife. He isn't very pleased. In Munch's interactions with Lennie, however, they come off as very good friends.



* SignatureSoundEffect: The very famous ''CHUNG CHUNG''. Dann Florek called it the ''[[MostWonderfulSound Doink doink]]'', while [[JohnMunch Richard Belzer]] called it "the Creator/DickWolf cash register sound". It's actually an amalgamation of nearly a dozen sounds, including an actual gavel, a jail door slamming, and [[RuleOfCool five hundred Japanese monks walking across a hardwood floor]].

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* SignatureSoundEffect: The very famous ''CHUNG CHUNG''. Dann Florek called it the ''[[MostWonderfulSound Doink doink]]'', while [[JohnMunch [[JustForFun/JohnMunch Richard Belzer]] called it "the Creator/DickWolf cash register sound". It's actually an amalgamation of nearly a dozen sounds, including an actual gavel, a jail door slamming, and [[RuleOfCool five hundred Japanese monks walking across a hardwood floor]].
23rd Dec '17 3:06:11 PM nombretomado
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* ThemeNaming: It's probably a coincidence, but across the spinoffs there's been ADA Skinner, ADA [[TheBorgias Borgia]], [[Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent ADA Carver, Det. 'Gore'n]], ADA Cutter, [[Series/LawAndOrderUK CPS Steele, CPS Thorne]], and (probably a stretch) ADA [[Film/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet Barba]].

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* ThemeNaming: It's probably a coincidence, but across the spinoffs there's been ADA Skinner, ADA [[TheBorgias [[Series/TheBorgias Borgia]], [[Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent ADA Carver, Det. 'Gore'n]], ADA Cutter, [[Series/LawAndOrderUK CPS Steele, CPS Thorne]], and (probably a stretch) ADA [[Film/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet Barba]].
17th Dec '17 6:11:22 PM nombretomado
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* ThreeDegreesOfMurder: Technically four: Murder One, Murder Two, and Manslaughter One and Two. The distinction between both manslaughter charges in New York is somewhat justified.
** Murder One is either premeditated, with the willful intention to kill, or it involves the sustenance of some sort of felony. To prove it, the murderer must have had extreme indifference to the life of another human being, have rationalized and planned the killing, and carried it out in a cold-blooded manner. Because of this, it isn't pursued as often as the lesser charges, but it does carry the death penalty.
*** For example, in "Terminal", a man who opened fire in a crowd actually meant to target a single person, but ended up killing both his intended victim and another innocent woman. He did it in order to [[spoiler: cover-up his scheme to fake travel tickets. Because of these iffy circumstances, the state's office wants to pursue Murder One (and, thus, the death penalty) for the crime, but [=McCoy=] and Adam are against it in this instance. So, [=McCoy=] is taken off the case, but the state fails to prove Murder One, settling instead for Murder Two]].
** Murder Two is the most-commonly pursued crime. It involves either a depraved indifference to human life where the culprit didn't intend for the victim's death from the get-go, but still directly influenced his or her death. For Murder Two to qualify, the state must prove that the culprit willfully forfeited the life of another human being for their own safety.
** Man One closely resembles Murder Two in all but the seriousness of the perp's mental state. Man One applies when the perp had exigent mental circumstances which caused him to kill somebody out of passion, but not serious enough to qualify a "depraved indifference to human life". It's a Class B felony, which means it usually guarantees the possibility of parole.
** Man Two usually applies to people who cause or aid someone else in committing suicide. It's a Class C felony, which means very little jail time is involved.
*** Although, in "Tabloid", a man who gunned down a reporter is sentenced to Man Two, mainly because the [[AssholeVictim victim was a major asshole who chased down his wife]] and directly caused her to get run over by a taxi, but received a minor sentence. Even though [=McCoy=] is able to prove that [[spoiler: the man actually killed the reporter over a major news story cover-up and that he has exploited the tabloids his entire life,]] the man is still sentenced to no more than seven years. And is seen giving interviews to the press in the final moments of the episode.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.LawAndOrder