History Series / Kaamelott

28th Mar '17 3:37:46 AM StFan
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** Arthur seems to have this trait. He gets all flustered and stumbling on his words when he tries to lie. It still works on the most naïve characters, like Perceval and Karadoc, or Guenievre -- though even she isn't always fooled.

to:

** Arthur seems to have this trait. He gets all flustered and stumbling on his words when he tries to lie. It still works on the most naïve characters, like Perceval and Karadoc, or Guenievre Guenièvre -- though even she isn't always fooled.



** Lancelot is shown asking Merlin for one, but backs down when asked who he wants to be.

to:

** Lancelot is shown asking Merlin for one, one such potion, but backs down when asked who he wants to be.



* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answered with Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Literature/{{Tristan|AndIseult}}''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]

to:

* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether whether they have some rights, only to be answered with Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Literature/{{Tristan|AndIseult}}''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte text ''at all'']]



* BurnTheWitch: The Witch Hunter (le Répurgateur)'s shtick. To the point that ''everybody'' he accuses of witchcraft would end up at the stake if Arthur didn't put a stop to it. In a pilot episode, he tries this ''on Arthur himself'', naturally resulting in the Witch Hunter ending at the stake himself. (Too bad Arthur didn't follow up with actually burning him.)

to:

* BurnTheWitch: The Witch Hunter (le Répurgateur)'s shtick. To the point that ''everybody'' he accuses of witchcraft would end up at the stake if Arthur didn't doesn't put a stop to it. In a pilot episode, he tries this ''on Arthur himself'', naturally resulting in the Witch Hunter ending at the stake himself. (Too bad Arthur didn't follow up with actually burning him.)



* ChronicBackstabbingDisorder: King Loth
-->'''Loth:''' I have just one question: When are we betraying?

to:

* ChronicBackstabbingDisorder: King Loth
-->'''Loth:''' I
Loth. "I have just one question: When are we betraying?betraying?" Let's see; Season 3: [[spoiler:he explains during the end of said season to Sir Dagonet how he associated with Lancelot when he seceded, and how he is the one financing him, while trying to recruit Dagonet for a coup against Arthur]]. Season 4: [[spoiler:After openly backing Lancelot's rebellion up during the whole season, he betrays him in a ''dastardly'' way in the end (taking back his men; removing every evidence of his involvement) after Arthur rescued Guenièvre, when it is obvious that Lancelot will fail]]. Season 5: [[spoiler:Starts the season by coming all the way to Kaamelott to plead his cause to Arthur. Follows up by trying to unsheath Excalibur from the stone. Finishes the season by trying to ''zap Arthur with his magic lightning ring'']]. Even [[{{Prequel}} Season 6]], in addition to the quote, shows he started plotting against Arthur during the latter's wedding, and even goes as far as ''trying to backstab his fellow Briton kings while they are fighting the Romans''. No wonder he is hated by ''[[ZeroPercentApprovalRating everyone]]''.



* TheCorrupter: Méléagant. Who or what he is stays unclear, but it is hinted he's incredibly ancient. With a mix of guile and carefully-used magic powers, he works at corrupting Lancelot even further than he already was, [[spoiler:and push a depressive King Arthur toward suicide]].

to:

* TheCorrupter: Méléagant. Who or what he is stays unclear, but it is hinted he's incredibly ancient. With a mix of guile and carefully-used carefully used magic powers, he works at corrupting Lancelot even further than he already was, [[spoiler:and push a depressive King Arthur toward suicide]].



** One episode has Arthur discussing various upcoming executions. Léodagan thinks burning them alive is still good, Lancelot suggests drawing and quartering (it's more suspenseful, you don't know whether the arms or legs will come off first), as Arthurs floats the idea of abolishing the death penalty. Everyone, including Lancelot, looks at him like he's crazy.

to:

** One episode has Arthur discussing various upcoming executions. Léodagan thinks burning them alive is still good, Lancelot suggests drawing and quartering (it's more suspenseful, you don't know whether the arms or legs will come off first), as Arthurs Arthur floats the idea of abolishing the death penalty. Everyone, including Lancelot, looks at him like he's crazy.



** Galaad (a knight who found the Grail in Arthurian mythos and is Lancelot's son) sole mention comes when looking for knights whose names start with G.

to:

** Galaad Galahad (a knight who found the Grail in Arthurian mythos and is Lancelot's son) sole mention comes when looking for knights whose names start with G.



* DrivenToSuicide: [[spoiler:Arthur]], when convinced by Méléagant's manipulations that he'll never have children. [[spoiler:Lancelot]] is about to do so, prompting Méléagant to teleport offscreen and interrupt him.

to:

* DrivenToSuicide: DrivenToSuicide:
**
[[spoiler:Arthur]], when convinced by Méléagant's manipulations that he'll never have children. children.
**
[[spoiler:Lancelot]] is about to do so, prompting Méléagant to teleport offscreen and interrupt him.



** The ''Dies iræ'' pilot movie has several notable differences: (Yvain's actor is a servant, the cook is a more prominent character, the characters complain about having ''too much'' meat in their diet...).
** Angharad was as stupid as Perceval, if not moreso.

to:

** The ''Dies iræ'' pilot movie has several notable differences: (Yvain's Yvain's actor is a servant, the cook is a more prominent character, the characters complain about having ''too much'' meat in their diet...).
diet...
** In the following pilot episodes, Angharad was as stupid as Perceval, if not moreso.



* EyeCatch: The early seasons, having the shortest episodes, had two broadcasted side-by-side and separated by an eye catch (without commercial). Those were mostly short gags or scenes from the pilot episodes or ''Dies iræ''. One was original, though: Arthur pulling Excalibur from the stone and stumbling into a pond as a result. This scene ends up being {{retcon}}ned by the final season, and thus non-canon.

to:

* EyeCatch: The early seasons, having the shortest episodes, had two broadcasted broadcast side-by-side and separated by an eye catch (without commercial). Those were mostly short gags or scenes from the pilot episodes or ''Dies iræ''. One was original, though: Arthur pulling Excalibur from the stone and stumbling into a pond as a result. This scene ends up being {{retcon}}ned by the final season, and thus non-canon.



** Arthur once fainted when Perceval claimed he had successfully carried out a mission. This was the case, although he forgot what the medallion he'd recovered actually did. [[spoiler:when kept in a locked room overnight, it turns everything else in the room into gas. Locked rooms like Kaamelott's treasury...]]

to:

** Arthur once fainted faints when Perceval claimed claims he had has successfully carried out a mission. This was is the case, although he forgot what the medallion he'd recovered actually did. [[spoiler:when [[spoiler:When kept in a locked room overnight, it turns everything else in the room into gas. Locked rooms like Kaamelott's treasury...]]



* IneptMage: Merlin. He claims that he's a druid, not a mage, but he's not that great a druid either.

to:

* IneptMage: Merlin. He claims that once tries to cast a spell to make plants grow, and ends up giving Arthur and Léodagan brightly glowing eyes. He tries to explain it via NotThatKindOfMage, as he's a druid, not druid: supposedly all his nature-aligned powers take a mage, but he's not that great sharp dive when there's a roof over his head, i.e. in his laboratory. However, his talent as a druid either.is dubious as well: he can't even read the Druidic language.



** For all Arthur's in-laws' (and others) annoying questions on when they can expect an heir, there being one would quite a few problems.

to:

** For all Arthur's in-laws' (and others) annoying questions on when they can expect an heir, there being one would solve quite a few problems.



* LawfulStupid: Grüdü (yes, the Viking barbarian reared by polar bears) can follow orders to the exclusion of common sense. For example, when he and the swordsmaster are guarding the front gate, no-one is guarding the back gate. If he goes to guard it, that's dereliction of duty. If the swordsmaster goes, he's a deserter. While they argue semantics, the assassins slip in unimpeded.

to:

* LawfulStupid: Grüdü (yes, the Viking barbarian reared by polar bears) can follow orders to the exclusion of common sense. For example, when he and the swordsmaster are guarding the front gate, no-one is guarding the back gate. If he goes to guard it, that's dereliction of duty. If the swordsmaster goes, he's a deserter. While they argue semantics, the assassins slip in unimpeded.unimpeded (through the front gate).



* LoveRuinsTheRealm: Does it ever. Despite ''multiple'' warnings (including a seer who goes into a trance to tell him not to do it) not to sleep with another knight's wife, Arthur still goes ahead with it.

to:

* LoveRuinsTheRealm: LoveRuinsTheRealm:
**
Does it ever. Despite ''multiple'' warnings (including a seer who goes into a trance to tell him not to do it) not to sleep with another knight's wife, Arthur still goes ahead with it.



* NotThatKindOfMage: Merlin often claims that the reason he's an IneptMage is that he's a ''druid'' -- stuff like having a roof over his head (for his laboratory) cuts his powers by half. However, it's also seen that he's not that great a druid either (he can't read druidic, for starters).

to:

* NotThatKindOfMage: Merlin often claims that the reason he's an IneptMage is that he's a ''druid'' -- stuff like having a roof over his head (for his laboratory) cuts his powers by half. However, it's also seen that he's not that great a druid either (he can't read druidic, Druidic, for starters).



'''Lady of the Lake:''' Are you kidding me?? You're praying to a Roman god! May I remind you, for your information, that you're ''quite'' commited to a quest in the name of the One God...\\

to:

'''Lady of the Lake:''' Are you kidding me?? You're praying to a Roman god! May I remind you, for your information, that you're ''quite'' commited committed to a quest in the name of the One God...\\



** Sadly, it goes right over Karadoc's head.



** Léodagan ordering siege engines even when they are unnecessary/useless, or trying to set up a watchtower network against sea invasions. The latter pays off in the forurth season, where Yvain and Gauvain manning the tower is a recurring subplot.

to:

** Léodagan ordering siege engines even when they are unnecessary/useless, or trying to set up a watchtower network against sea invasions. The latter pays off in the forurth fourth season, where Yvain and Gauvain manning the tower is a recurring subplot.



** Arthur being interrupted everytime he sings the pavane "Belle qui tiens ma vie".

to:

** Arthur being interrupted everytime every time he sings the pavane "Belle qui tiens ma vie".



** Also, Venec once screws up and is left with an unsaleable shipment of unaged goat cheese. Karadoc asks to look at it, since he might have a use for it... and goes ballistic. When Venec asks how much Karadoc will give for it, he just ''stares'', and Perceval has to tell Venec that he has to leave now.

to:

** Also, Venec once screws up and is left with an unsaleable shipment of unaged goat cheese. Karadoc asks to look at it, since he might have a use for it... and goes ballistic. When Venec asks how much Karadoc will give for it, he just ''stares'', and Perceval has to tell Perceval tells Venec that he has to leave he'd better leave, right now.



** Father Blaise occasionally speaks Latin (and "Gaelic" - actually ancient French - in one episode); neither the audience nor the other characters are meant to understand what he's saying.

to:

** Father Blaise occasionally speaks Latin (and "Gaelic" - -- actually ancient French - -- in one episode); neither the audience nor the other characters are meant to understand what he's saying.



--> ''Perceval:''' So what are they called?\\

to:

--> ''Perceval:''' -->'''Perceval:''' So what are they called?\\



* FailedASpotCheck: Karadoc and Perceval are rather oblivious as a general rule, but in ''Le Serpent Géant du lac de l'Ombre'' ("The Giant Snake from Shadow Lake"), they take it to a whole new level. While rowing on the title lake in search of the [[StockNessMonster eponymous giant snake]], a huge coil of said monster rises above the water behind them... and they don't notice. Then its tail strikes their boat, and they wonder if they hit a rock. Finally, a stronger tail lash capsizes their boat and sends both in the water. Their conclusion? There's no giant snake in this damn lake, they're just wasting their time.

to:

* FailedASpotCheck: Karadoc and Perceval are rather oblivious as a general rule, but in ''Le Serpent Géant géant du lac de l'Ombre'' ("The Giant Snake from Shadow Lake"), they take it to a whole new level. While rowing on the title lake in search of the [[StockNessMonster eponymous giant snake]], a huge coil of said monster rises above the water behind them... and they don't notice. Then its tail strikes their boat, and they wonder if they hit a rock. Finally, a stronger tail lash capsizes their boat and sends both in the water. Their conclusion? There's no giant snake in this damn lake, they're just wasting their time.



''Bon, euh c'est bon, super, cassez-vous!''\\

to:

''Bon, ->''Bon, euh c'est bon, super, cassez-vous!''\\
27th Mar '17 12:04:36 PM Chabal2
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** The ''Dies iræ'' pilot movie has several notable differences, (Yvain's actor is a servant, the cook is a more prominent character, the characters complain about having ''too much'' meat in their diet...).

to:

** The ''Dies iræ'' pilot movie has several notable differences, differences: (Yvain's actor is a servant, the cook is a more prominent character, the characters complain about having ''too much'' meat in their diet...).).
** Angharad was as stupid as Perceval, if not moreso.



** Degrees, being used for both angles and temperatures, also confuses Perceval.

to:

** Degrees, being used for both angles and temperatures, also confuses Perceval. In addition to the Angles/angles thing.



** Hervé de Rinel, after a grand tour of Britannia, concludes that the island is round. Worse than that is when he adds, to be more convincing, "I went around it twice to be sure!"

to:

** Hervé de Rinel, after a grand tour of Britannia, concludes that the island is round.round (and produces a map as proof). Worse than that is when he adds, to be more convincing, "I went around it twice to be sure!"



'''Arthur:''' ''[sharply]'' "At first"? What, you're working half-time with the ones, half-time with the others? ''Religion is a mess''. Admit it and let me pray to whoever I want. Doesn't prevent me from searching for your damn Grail, anyway.

to:

'''Arthur:''' ''[sharply]'' "At first"? What, you're working half-time part-time with the ones, half-time part-time with the others? ''Religion is a mess''. Admit it and let me pray to whoever I want. Doesn't prevent me from searching for your damn Grail, anyway.



* {{Public Domain Character}}s: Most of the cast.

to:

* {{Public Domain Character}}s: Most of the cast.cast, though with considerable differences with the originals.



** [[TheBard A bard]] once announces the funerals of King Loth. As it happens, you [[UnreliableExpositor shouldn't listen to everything bards sing]].
** Léodagan and Séli are once believed to be dead by their kingdom of Carmélide, AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. When Léodagan learns that it was caused by Yvain's latest poor choice of a moniker (he was going for "the Elephant of Cameliard", but got it mixed up with "Orphan"), his father is ''not'' amused.

to:

** [[TheBard A bard]] once announces the funerals funeral of King Loth. As it happens, you [[UnreliableExpositor shouldn't listen to everything bards sing]].
** Léodagan and Séli are once believed to be dead by their kingdom of Carmélide, AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. When Léodagan learns that it was caused by Yvain's latest poor choice of a moniker (he was going for "the Elephant of Cameliard", but got it mixed up with "Orphan"), his father he is ''not'' amused.



** Léodagan ordering siege engines even when they are unnecessary/useless, or trying to set up a watchtower network against sea invasions.

to:

** Léodagan ordering siege engines even when they are unnecessary/useless, or trying to set up a watchtower network against sea invasions. The latter pays off in the forurth season, where Yvain and Gauvain manning the tower is a recurring subplot.



* SoundtrackDissonance: Not in the show itself, but one series of ad breaks uses, of all things, the theme for ''Series/GameOfThrones''.



** The [[MedievalMorons peasants]] also qualify, since they tend to revolt just for the sake of it.

to:

** The [[MedievalMorons peasants]] also qualify, since they tend to revolt just for the sake of it. Although they are aware of the idiocy of revolting without knowing why, and one episode even focuses on them trying to find a good reason.


Added DiffLines:

* TookALevelInJerkass: Séli was originally at least somewhat supportive of her son's non-combative leanings. Nowadays she's just as supportive of him as her husband.


Added DiffLines:

--> ''Perceval:''' So what are they called?\\
'''Arthur:''' Dunno.\\
'''Lancelot:''' Northpaw?\\
'''Perceval:''' Wait, northpaw doesn't mean anything, you want me to look like an idiot?
6th Mar '17 2:30:27 AM StFan
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* BadLiar: Arthur seems to have this trait.

to:

* BadLiar: BadLiar:
**
Arthur seems to have this trait.trait. He gets all flustered and stumbling on his words when he tries to lie. It still works on the most naïve characters, like Perceval and Karadoc, or Guenievre -- though even she isn't always fooled.
** Léodagan too. Being so used to BrutalHonesty, his rare attempts at lying are very unconvincing (notably, once when trying to prevent Bohort from freaking out). Most of the time, he just gives up and bluntly speaks his mind.
5th Mar '17 12:30:13 PM Ambrena
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Added DiffLines:

* BadLiar: Arthur seems to have this trait.
26th Jan '17 3:07:02 AM StFan
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*** On that topic, Arthur and Guenièvre to each other, many times, when they argue.

to:

*** ** On that topic, Arthur and Guenièvre to each other, many times, when they argue.
25th Jan '17 1:02:17 PM Ultor
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Added DiffLines:

*** On that topic, Arthur and Guenièvre to each other, many times, when they argue.
13th Jan '17 2:45:14 AM StFan
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* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answered with Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]

to:

* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answered with Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''.''Literature/{{Tristan|AndIseult}}''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]
12th Jan '17 9:39:24 PM Xtifr
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''Kaamelott'' is a French series. It was created and written by Alexandre Astier and broadcast on French channel '''M6''' since 2004. The show's four first seasons (called "livres", French for "books") were composed of short episodes (about 3 and a half minutes each.) Early seasons consisted of humorous depictions of daily life at King Arthur's court and of the knights' ineffective quest for the Holy Grail; but as the author grew more self-confident, it got spiced by more and more continuity (including RetCon at some point), half-serious story arcs. The fifth season then had longer episodes (7 minutes) and a DarkerAndEdgier tone.

to:

''Kaamelott'' is a French series. It was created and written by Alexandre Astier and broadcast on French channel '''M6''' M6 since 2004. The show's four first seasons (called "livres", French for "books") were composed of short episodes (about 3 and a half minutes each.) Early seasons consisted of humorous depictions of daily life at King Arthur's court and of the knights' ineffective quest for the Holy Grail; but as the author grew more self-confident, it got spiced by more and more continuity (including RetCon at some point), half-serious story arcs. The fifth season then had longer episodes (7 minutes) and a DarkerAndEdgier tone.
18th Dec '16 12:19:51 PM StFan
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* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answeredwith Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]

to:

* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answeredwith answered with Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''. So not only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]
18th Dec '16 10:37:39 AM Ultor
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* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answeredwith Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''. The bonus? The extract is [[TristanAndIseult Iseult]] answering an inquiry from her royal husband, saying that [[BlatantLies no she's not cheating on him with Tristan]], [[RefugeInAudacity how dare you!?]].

to:

* BilingualBonus: The episode "Le Code de Chevalerie" ("The Code of Chivalry") shows Arthur fighting dissension among his knights, because of a translation of the Code; the episode ends on Perceval asking wether they have some rights, only to be answeredwith Père Blaise reading the untranslated "Gaelic" text. What he's reading ("Qui sor mon cors mete flaele,/ S'onques fors cil qui m'ot pucele/ Out m'amistié encor nul jor!") is actually ancient French; an extract from Béroul's ''Tristan''. The bonus? The extract is [[TristanAndIseult Iseult]] answering an inquiry from her royal husband, saying that [[BlatantLies no she's So not cheating on him with Tristan]], only is Arthur keeping the Code obscure, [[RefugeInAudacity how dare you!?]].the text used as the new Code of Chivalry may actually not be a legislative texte ''at all'']]
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