History RealityIsUnrealistic / LiveActionTV

30th Mar '16 10:42:38 AM Morgenthaler
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* In an episode of ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'', Centauri women (a type of almost [[HumanAliens Human Alien]]) were depicted as being completely bald or bald except for a ponytail. They were played by actresses who wore latex caps, except for one extra who actually was bald. Supposedly, one of the production crew commented that her cap looked fake.

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* ''Series/BabylonFive'':
**
In an episode of ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'', episode, Centauri women (a type of almost [[HumanAliens Human Alien]]) were depicted as being completely bald or bald except for a ponytail. They were played by actresses who wore latex caps, except for one extra who actually was bald. Supposedly, one of the production crew commented that her cap looked fake.



* Relating to Furlan again: This was picked up on in ''Series/{{Lost}}'', when fans asked why the French woman trapped on the Island by herself for 16 years (played by Furlan, again with her native accent) is speaking with a Croatian accent. The producers regularly discuss this on their podcasts for Rousseau-heavy episodes, pondering if her traumatic experiences are responsible for the accent shift.

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* Relating to Furlan again: ''Series/{{Lost}}'':
**
This was picked up on in ''Series/{{Lost}}'', when fans asked why the French woman trapped on the Island by herself for 16 years (played by Furlan, again with her native accent) is speaking with a Croatian accent. The producers regularly discuss this on their podcasts for Rousseau-heavy episodes, pondering if her traumatic experiences are responsible for the accent shift.



*** She may have been "Anthony [=LaPaglia-ed=]" and had to reconstruct her accent. But then maybe the show's use of obviously non-Australian actors or Australians who had clearly been [=LaPaglia-ed=] planted the idea in people's heads that she might be American. The accent was either genuine or convincing enough that it's unlikely any Australian would call her on it if they heard it on an Australian show without knowing who she is.



* When the ''Series/MythBusters'' [[JustForFun/TropesExaminedByTheMythBusters bust a Hollywood myth]], like, say, BlownAcrossTheRoom, you can be almost certain that there will be a large portion of fans who clamor about having the myth re-tested because they're so used to seeing such myths on the media for so long that they have difficulty believing that real life won't live up to what they expect based on said myths.

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* ''Series/MythBusters'':
**
When the ''Series/MythBusters'' [[JustForFun/TropesExaminedByTheMythBusters they bust a Hollywood myth]], myth, like, say, BlownAcrossTheRoom, you can be almost certain that there will be a large portion of fans who clamor about having the myth re-tested because they're so used to seeing such myths on the media for so long that they have difficulty believing that real life won't live up to what they expect based on said myths.



*** In fact, [[http://www.mprnews.org/story/2010/12/14/american-community-survey-initial-findings 1 in 3 US Somalis live in Minnesota.]]



* Parodied in ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'''s self-referential episode "Hollywood Babylon". There's a real black-and-white ghost woman with rope burns on her neck and the producer just says "Not sure about those neck wounds, though. They need to be ''red''."

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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
**
Parodied in ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'''s the self-referential episode "Hollywood Babylon". There's a real black-and-white ghost woman with rope burns on her neck and the producer just says "Not sure about those neck wounds, though. They need to be ''red''."



** This is probably due to the idea that American English picked up some of the accent and flow (in addition to a lot of vocabulary) of Native American speech.



** For the [[Series/TheOfficeUK original British version]], a common point of complaint from early critics was that the PointyHairedBoss David Brent was too obviously incompetent and self-deluding to make it as the manager of the branch. The retort from the series creators was that if these critics were to go into any large organization ([[BItingTheHandHumor such as]] Creator/TheBBC) and spend just five minutes looking around, they'd run out of fingers to count the people who were just as bad if not worse than Brent but who had yet managed to make it to senior management level.

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** * For the [[Series/TheOfficeUK original British version]], ''Series/TheOfficeUK'', a common point of complaint from early critics was that the PointyHairedBoss David Brent was too obviously incompetent and self-deluding to make it as the manager of the branch. The retort from the series creators was that if these critics were to go into any large organization ([[BItingTheHandHumor such as]] Creator/TheBBC) and spend just five minutes looking around, they'd run out of fingers to count the people who were just as bad if not worse than Brent but who had yet managed to make it to senior management level.



* Deliberately avoided by the producers in the HBO adaptation of ''Series/GenerationKill''. No doubt the best example would be [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVV-qS7ZOA0 Captain America]], who is ''toned down'' from Evan Wright's account of things as seen in the book, for fear that the audience wouldn't believe it.

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* ''Series/GenerationKill'':
**
Deliberately avoided by the producers in the HBO adaptation of ''Series/GenerationKill''. adaptation. No doubt the best example would be [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVV-qS7ZOA0 [[LeeroyJenkins Captain America]], who is ''toned down'' from Evan Wright's account of things as seen in the book, for fear that the audience wouldn't believe it.



* The [[LaughTrack laughter track]] on the pilot episode of ''TheMightyBoosh'' is actually a quieter version of the laughter heard on the day. However, the audience who attended felt the laughter track was too much on the filmed episode, despite it being their laughter.
* British TV show ''CardiacArrest'' was written by a practicing doctor in a hospital about his experiences as a junior doctor. It was slammed as an unrealistic portrayal of life in a hospital by critics who had never been in one.
* A frequent knock on the TV show ''{{Survivorman}}'' is that the number of times he stumbles onto a useful piece of trash or a food source seems set up. Les Stroud often states, on air, that human refuse is simply a fact of life, no matter where you go. He {{lampshade}}s this trope during an episode in Alaska, where he runs across half a salmon discarded by an eagle.

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* The [[LaughTrack laughter track]] on the pilot episode of ''TheMightyBoosh'' ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' is actually a quieter version of the laughter heard on the day. However, the audience who attended felt the laughter track was too much on the filmed episode, despite it being their laughter.
* British TV show ''CardiacArrest'' ''Series/CardiacArrest'' was written by a practicing doctor in a hospital about his experiences as a junior doctor. It was slammed as an unrealistic portrayal of life in a hospital by critics who had never been in one.
* A frequent knock on the TV show ''{{Survivorman}}'' ''Series/{{Survivorman}}'' is that the number of times he stumbles onto a useful piece of trash or a food source seems set up. Les Stroud often states, on air, that human refuse is simply a fact of life, no matter where you go. He {{lampshade}}s this trope during an episode in Alaska, where he runs across half a salmon discarded by an eagle.



* Invoked in ''Series/BurnNotice'' when Fiona's brother shows up to help Fiona survive an old foe come back to kill her. Long story short, the brother thinks Michael is Irish from an old operation and Fiona encourages him to maintain the illusion. At a certain point they need to do some recon work and are left to wonder how an Irishman will blend into an American crew. At that point Michael drops his accent and says he's done undercover work in America before. Fiona's brother remarks that Michael's American accent could use some work.

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* ''Series/BurnNotice'':
**
Invoked in ''Series/BurnNotice'' when Fiona's brother shows up to help Fiona survive an old foe come back to kill her. Long story short, the brother thinks Michael is Irish from an old operation and Fiona encourages him to maintain the illusion. At a certain point they need to do some recon work and are left to wonder how an Irishman will blend into an American crew. At that point Michael drops his accent and says he's done undercover work in America before. Fiona's brother remarks that Michael's American accent could use some work.



* More from the Whedonverse -- Long after the end of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', James Marsters' real (American) accent is still rather jarring to fans of the show, as is Anthony Stewart Head's real English accent... which is closer to what Marsters adapted for the character of Spike than the one Head affected for Giles.

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* More from the Whedonverse -- ''Franchise/{{Buffyverse}}'':
**
Long after the end of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', James Marsters' real (American) accent is still rather jarring to fans of the show, as is Anthony Stewart Head's real English accent... which is closer to what Marsters adapted for the character of Spike than the one Head affected for Giles.



* The character of [[MagnificentBastard Tywin Lannister]] in ''Series/GameOfThrones'' was introduced skinning a stag. Viewers heartily criticised the silly fake stag and ridiculed the scene. It was a real freshly killed carcass and Creator/CharlesDance was actually skinning it on camera.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
**
The character of [[MagnificentBastard Tywin Lannister]] in ''Series/GameOfThrones'' was introduced skinning a stag. Viewers heartily criticised the silly fake stag and ridiculed the scene. It was a real freshly killed carcass and Creator/CharlesDance was actually skinning it on camera.
9th Mar '16 1:57:01 PM Hossmeister
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* In the early days of ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', Jason Alexander complained to Creator/LarryDavid of the way George was written, saying that ''no'' person could possibly sink so low as to do some particular thing, that it was completely unrealistic for one person to be that selfish and stupid. Larry informed him that he himself HAD done that very same thing in real life. This changed how Jason saw the character when he realized it is possible for a person to sink that low. Also lampshaded in an episode of ''CurbYourEnthusiasm''--playing himself, Jason complains to Larry that he always gets typecast as schmucks and assholes because of George. Larry asks what he meant, Jason says something like "Well come on, George was an asshole! He did [lists off various misdeeds of George]" to which Larry angrily replies "''I'' did those things!!!"

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* In the early days of ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', Jason Alexander complained to Creator/LarryDavid of the way George was written, saying that ''no'' person could possibly sink so low as to do some particular thing, that it was completely unrealistic for one person to be that selfish and stupid. Larry informed him that he himself HAD done that very same thing in real life. This changed how Jason saw the character when he realized it is possible for a person to sink that low. Also lampshaded in an episode of ''CurbYourEnthusiasm''--playing ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm''--playing himself, Jason complains to Larry that he always gets typecast as schmucks and assholes because of George. Larry asks what he meant, Jason says something like "Well come on, George was an asshole! He did [lists off various misdeeds of George]" to which Larry angrily replies "''I'' did those things!!!"
8th Mar '16 10:50:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* Deliberately avoided by the producers in the HBO adaptation of ''GenerationKill''. No doubt the best example would be [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVV-qS7ZOA0 Captain America]], who is ''toned down'' from Evan Wright's account of things as seen in the book, for fear that the audience wouldn't believe it.

to:

* Deliberately avoided by the producers in the HBO adaptation of ''GenerationKill''.''Series/GenerationKill''. No doubt the best example would be [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVV-qS7ZOA0 Captain America]], who is ''toned down'' from Evan Wright's account of things as seen in the book, for fear that the audience wouldn't believe it.
26th Feb '16 7:35:55 AM Discar
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** Skye's character got a lot of criticism for several reasons in the pilot, among them being the fact that it was absurd a law enforcement agency like SHIELD would need a civilian hacker who had no formal training and had attacked their databases, or that someone who was homeless and living in her van would be [[MrsFanservice so pretty]]. However, both are actually quite plausible; in real life, law enforcement agencies do tend to recruit criminal hackers, even if they've previously attacked said agency, due to the fact its more practical to put them to good use then lock them up and waste their skills. As for being pretty and homeless, Skye, being someone with a safe place to sleep (her van) and, as we learn later, a boyfriend who isn't homeless, Skye would be one of the 'invisible homeless', people who are technically homeless but live relatively comfortably thanks to owning a vehicle and having friends/family they're able to crash with when needed, giving them access to showers and personal hygiene.

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** Skye's character got a lot of criticism for several reasons in the pilot, among them being the fact that it was absurd a law enforcement agency like SHIELD would need a civilian hacker who had no formal training and had attacked their databases, or that someone who was homeless and living in her van would be [[MrsFanservice [[MsFanservice so pretty]]. However, both are actually quite plausible; in real life, law enforcement agencies do tend to recruit criminal hackers, even if they've previously attacked said agency, due to the fact its more practical to put them to good use then lock them up and waste their skills. As for being pretty and homeless, Skye, being someone with a safe place to sleep (her van) and, as we learn later, a boyfriend who isn't homeless, Skye would be one of the 'invisible homeless', people who are technically homeless but live relatively comfortably thanks to owning a vehicle and having friends/family they're able to crash with when needed, giving them access to showers and personal hygiene.
27th Dec '15 11:33:46 AM Wyldchyld
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** And another set. Alexis Denisof, who played Wesley, does an upper class English accent so well fans tend to find it more realistic than his natural American one. Similarly the accent Amy Acker initially gave Fred in season 3 of ''Angel'' was found to be unrealistic by fans. According to Joss Whedon, Acker originally spoke like that (she is a Texas native) and her accent has simply faded from years of doing Shakespeare.

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** And another set. Alexis Denisof, who played Wesley, does an upper a middle class English accent so well fans tend to find it more realistic than his natural American one. Similarly the accent Amy Acker initially gave Fred in season 3 of ''Angel'' was found to be unrealistic by fans. According to Joss Whedon, Acker originally spoke like that (she is a Texas native) and her accent has simply faded from years of doing Shakespeare.
5th Dec '15 12:00:19 PM erforce
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-->--'''Bill Gannon''', ''[[Series/{{Dragnet}} Mister]]''. [[RomanAClef The story is true]].

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-->--'''Bill -->-- '''Bill Gannon''', ''[[Series/{{Dragnet}} Mister]]''. [[RomanAClef The story is true]].



** When testing the method of slowing the detonation of a bomb by cooling it with liquid nitrogen like in ''LethalWeapon2'', it turned out that not only did it work, it actually worked a lot better than in the movie. In the movie, cooling the bomb gives Riggs and Murtaugh two or three seconds of time to dive into cover, but in the test they had to wait for the bomb's battery to completely thaw before it would explode 15 minutes later. To quote Adam: "The technique used by the bomb squad is far more effective in reality than it is in the movies. When does that ever happen?"

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** When testing the method of slowing the detonation of a bomb by cooling it with liquid nitrogen like in ''LethalWeapon2'', ''Film/LethalWeapon2'', it turned out that not only did it work, it actually worked a lot better than in the movie. In the movie, cooling the bomb gives Riggs and Murtaugh two or three seconds of time to dive into cover, but in the test they had to wait for the bomb's battery to completely thaw before it would explode 15 minutes later. To quote Adam: "The technique used by the bomb squad is far more effective in reality than it is in the movies. When does that ever happen?"
30th Nov '15 4:42:52 PM ablackraptor
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* The actors portraying Fitz and Simmons in ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' were criticized early on for their British accents sounding "fake". Both actors are indeed British: Iain De Caestecker is from Glasgow, Elizabeth Henstridge is from Sheffield. But, since regional British accents are rare on American shows, a lot of viewers apparently assumed they were American actors trying for more familiar [[IAmVeryBritish Edinburgh- or London-based RP accents]] and getting them slightly wrong.

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* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
**
The actors portraying Fitz and Simmons in ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' were criticized early on for their British accents sounding "fake". Both actors are indeed British: Iain De Caestecker is from Glasgow, Elizabeth Henstridge is from Sheffield. But, since regional British accents are rare on American shows, a lot of viewers apparently assumed they were American actors trying for more familiar [[IAmVeryBritish Edinburgh- or London-based RP accents]] and getting them slightly wrong.wrong.
** Skye's character got a lot of criticism for several reasons in the pilot, among them being the fact that it was absurd a law enforcement agency like SHIELD would need a civilian hacker who had no formal training and had attacked their databases, or that someone who was homeless and living in her van would be [[MrsFanservice so pretty]]. However, both are actually quite plausible; in real life, law enforcement agencies do tend to recruit criminal hackers, even if they've previously attacked said agency, due to the fact its more practical to put them to good use then lock them up and waste their skills. As for being pretty and homeless, Skye, being someone with a safe place to sleep (her van) and, as we learn later, a boyfriend who isn't homeless, Skye would be one of the 'invisible homeless', people who are technically homeless but live relatively comfortably thanks to owning a vehicle and having friends/family they're able to crash with when needed, giving them access to showers and personal hygiene.
9th Nov '15 6:25:00 PM nombretomado
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** The episodes "The Impossible Astronaut" and "Day of the Moon" were criticized by some fans because of the character of Carl Peterson, a black member of {{Richard Nixon}}'s security detail. While some people claimed this was an example of BlackVikings and PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad, it turns out that in real life Nixon ''did'' have at least one black agent.

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** The episodes "The Impossible Astronaut" and "Day of the Moon" were criticized by some fans because of the character of Carl Peterson, a black member of {{Richard UsefulNotes/{{Richard Nixon}}'s security detail. While some people claimed this was an example of BlackVikings and PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad, it turns out that in real life Nixon ''did'' have at least one black agent.
11th Oct '15 2:02:44 AM Morgenthaler
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** Several non-Brit fans of the show have complained about Peter Dinklage's "horrendously fake" British accent. While Dinklage is, in fact, an American, his accent has fooled some native Brits, and seems mostly to offend the ears of Americans, who believe all British accents are either Received Pronunciation or Cockney. Since ''GameOfThrones'' isn't even set in Great Britain, the point should be moot.

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** Several non-Brit fans of the show have complained about Peter Dinklage's "horrendously fake" British accent. While Dinklage is, in fact, an American, his accent has fooled some native Brits, and seems mostly to offend the ears of Americans, who believe all British accents are either Received Pronunciation or Cockney. Since ''GameOfThrones'' ''Series/GameOfThrones'' isn't even set in Great Britain, the point should be moot.



* While some elements of ''VivaLaBam'' were scripted in advance, some fans have claimed that Vince "Don Vito" Margera was acting, and that his over-the-top, incomprehensible manner was a put on. This is untrue, though April Margera has stated that the show made Vito out to be a bigger jerk than he actually is.
* Any mention of the character of Spearchucker Jones on ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' - including multiple pages on this very Wiki - inevitably includes the "fact" that he was written out when producers were told no black surgeons served in Korea. ''M*A*S*H'' is based on a real unit, the 8055th, which did indeed have an African-American surgeon on staff.
* Parodied in an episode of ''OneFootInTheGrave'', when a woman writes a play based on a typical day with the Meldrews... that is, a day when everything goes wrong and a few surreal things happen that [[RiddleForTheAges they never manage to figure out]]. Her backer protests that there isn't a proper story, and it's not convincing.

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* While some elements of ''VivaLaBam'' ''Series/VivaLaBam'' were scripted in advance, some fans have claimed that Vince "Don Vito" Margera was acting, and that his over-the-top, incomprehensible manner was a put on. This is untrue, though April Margera has stated that the show made Vito out to be a bigger jerk than he actually is.
* Any mention of the character of Spearchucker Jones on ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' ''Series/{{Mash}}'' - including multiple pages on this very Wiki - inevitably includes the "fact" that he was written out when producers were told no black surgeons served in Korea. ''M*A*S*H'' is based on a real unit, the 8055th, which did indeed have an African-American surgeon on staff.
* Parodied in an episode of ''OneFootInTheGrave'', ''Series/OneFootInTheGrave'', when a woman writes a play based on a typical day with the Meldrews... that is, a day when everything goes wrong and a few surreal things happen that [[RiddleForTheAges they never manage to figure out]]. Her backer protests that there isn't a proper story, and it's not convincing.



* In the early years of ''TheAdventuresOfSuperman'', when it was in black and white, Superman's costume was actually white and red, because blue would have looked wrong (you can see it in the movie Hollywoodland). A normal version was created for later seasons that were shot in color.
* Season 5 of ''MadMen'' opens with a rival agency throwing water bombs on protesters. The scene was criticized for being unrealistic and having bad dialogue, but it was actually lifted [[http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/on-mad-men-an-opening-scene-straight-from-page-1/ word for word]] from a contemporary New York Times article.
* Invoked in ''ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' when Mac and Charlie get a hold of a hand grenade and use it to blow up Dee's car. There's a small explosion which blows out the windows but doesn't do much other visible damage. They start complaining that they were expecting a fireball that would lift the car in the air.

* ''TheWire''

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* In the early years of ''TheAdventuresOfSuperman'', ''Series/TheAdventuresOfSuperman'', when it was in black and white, Superman's costume was actually white and red, because blue would have looked wrong (you can see it in the movie Hollywoodland). A normal version was created for later seasons that were shot in color.
* Season 5 of ''MadMen'' ''Series/MadMen'' opens with a rival agency throwing water bombs on protesters. The scene was criticized for being unrealistic and having bad dialogue, but it was actually lifted [[http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/on-mad-men-an-opening-scene-straight-from-page-1/ word for word]] from a contemporary New York Times article.
* Invoked in ''ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' when Mac and Charlie get a hold of a hand grenade and use it to blow up Dee's car. There's a small explosion which blows out the windows but doesn't do much other visible damage. They start complaining that they were expecting a fireball that would lift the car in the air.

* ''TheWire''''Series/TheWire''



* ''HorribleHistories'' loves pointing out how our perceptions of history are often misguided or influenced by anachronistic sources that came later, such as the works of Shakespeare influencing how Richard III is remembered. Their two greatest sources of sketches are commonly held misconceptions and things that sound so ridiculous that no one would believe they actually happened. For example, if someone named a Victorian era character "Never," or a 17th Century character "Silence," the vast majority of people probably would think it was something out of a bad fanfic as opposed to a completely real name used in England at the time. They've also pointed out plenty of weird things that would seem trite or like a contrived plot convenience in a story that have happened in real life, such as dying on stage or having Dick Turpin be caught by having a kind of mentor coincidentally deliver a letter from him and recognise his handwriting.

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* ''HorribleHistories'' ''Series/HorribleHistories'' loves pointing out how our perceptions of history are often misguided or influenced by anachronistic sources that came later, such as the works of Shakespeare influencing how Richard III is remembered. Their two greatest sources of sketches are commonly held misconceptions and things that sound so ridiculous that no one would believe they actually happened. For example, if someone named a Victorian era character "Never," or a 17th Century character "Silence," the vast majority of people probably would think it was something out of a bad fanfic as opposed to a completely real name used in England at the time. They've also pointed out plenty of weird things that would seem trite or like a contrived plot convenience in a story that have happened in real life, such as dying on stage or having Dick Turpin be caught by having a kind of mentor coincidentally deliver a letter from him and recognise his handwriting.



* Students and younger alumni from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee often believe the red and white UWM pennants and paraphernalia used on ''HappyDays'' are a mistake, but during the period in which ''HappyDays'' takes place (late 50s and early 60s), UWM's official colors actually were white and cardinal red. The university didn't adopt its current colors (black & gold) until 1964.
* On ''PairOfKings'', the protagonists are a pair of twins born to a mixed race couple; one black and one white. Though it is rare, this has been known to happen.
* In DerrenBrown's [[Series/{{Apocalypse}} Apocalypse]] (which stages an insanely elaborate fake ZombieApocalypse, with common archetypal characters of such films being played by actors), the "hero" of the story (who is an unsuspecting member of the public who doesn't realize it's fake) uses extremely stilted or cliched dialogue that would be laughed at in a B-movie, despite it being completely natural. [[JustifiedTrope It's unsurprising really]]; given that he's a [[UnfazedEveryman very-definitely-fazed everyman]] totally out of his depth he's not going to be thinking up witty or creative things to say, and will be drawing on the only things that will give him any familiarity with that scenario (ie zombie apocalypse movies).

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* Students and younger alumni from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee often believe the red and white UWM pennants and paraphernalia used on ''HappyDays'' ''Series/HappyDays'' are a mistake, but during the period in which ''HappyDays'' ''Series/HappyDays'' takes place (late 50s and early 60s), UWM's official colors actually were white and cardinal red. The university didn't adopt its current colors (black & gold) until 1964.
* On ''PairOfKings'', ''Series/PairOfKings'', the protagonists are a pair of twins born to a mixed race couple; one black and one white. Though it is rare, this has been known to happen.
* In DerrenBrown's [[Series/{{Apocalypse}} Apocalypse]] Creator/DerrenBrown's ''Series/{{Apocalypse}}'' (which stages an insanely elaborate fake ZombieApocalypse, with common archetypal characters of such films being played by actors), the "hero" of the story (who is an unsuspecting member of the public who doesn't realize it's fake) uses extremely stilted or cliched dialogue that would be laughed at in a B-movie, despite it being completely natural. [[JustifiedTrope It's unsurprising really]]; given that he's a [[UnfazedEveryman very-definitely-fazed everyman]] totally out of his depth he's not going to be thinking up witty or creative things to say, and will be drawing on the only things that will give him any familiarity with that scenario (ie zombie apocalypse movies).



** StevenMoffat mentioned during a panel at the summer edition of the 2014 London Film and Comic Con that back in Victorian times, the "221B" wouldn't have actually been on the door as shown in several older movies and TV series (the 2009 and 2011 movies actually [[AluminumChristmasTrees garnered criticism]] for not showing it on the door, amazingly), so with the show being modernized, this time he actually had a reason to do it.

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** StevenMoffat Creator/StevenMoffat mentioned during a panel at the summer edition of the 2014 London Film and Comic Con that back in Victorian times, the "221B" wouldn't have actually been on the door as shown in several older movies and TV series (the 2009 and 2011 movies actually [[AluminumChristmasTrees garnered criticism]] for not showing it on the door, amazingly), so with the show being modernized, this time he actually had a reason to do it.
20th Sep '15 5:25:56 PM nombretomado
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* In the first episode of {{Series/Sharpe}}, a Spanish partisan chief sets fire to a document using a strange item which looks like a barrel-less pistol. Very few people know that flintlock lighters of that type were very fashionable among wealthy NapoleonicWars-era smokers, and call it a scriptwriter's cop-out.

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* In the first episode of {{Series/Sharpe}}, a Spanish partisan chief sets fire to a document using a strange item which looks like a barrel-less pistol. Very few people know that flintlock lighters of that type were very fashionable among wealthy NapoleonicWars-era [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars Napoleonic wars]]-era smokers, and call it a scriptwriter's cop-out.
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