History Quotes / NorseMythology

31st Mar '17 6:52:44 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday... History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[Myth/GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''

to:

-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings [[UsefulNotes/TheVikingAge by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday... History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[Myth/GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''
26th Mar '17 1:50:53 PM Gosicrystal
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-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[Myth/GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''

to:

-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday... History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]].know. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[Myth/GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''
27th Feb '17 4:42:04 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''

to:

-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[GreekMythology [[Myth/GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''
27th Feb '17 4:40:39 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''"The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/{{England}} -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''

to:

-> ''"The Norse myths [[GrimUpNorth are the myths of a chilly place, place]], with [[TheNightThatNeverEnds long, long winter nights nights]] and endless summer days, [[HadToBeSharp myths of a people people]] who did [[JerkassGods not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them. them]]. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/{{England}} UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''
27th Feb '17 4:36:50 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''"The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them. As best we can tell, the gods of Asgard came from UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, spread into Scandinavia, and then out into the parts of the world dominated [[HornyVikings by the Vikings]] -- into Orkney and UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} and the north of UsefulNotes/{{England}} -- where the invaders left places named for Thor or Odin. In English, [[HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt the gods have left their names in our days of the week]]. You can find Tyr the one-handed (Odin's son), Odin, Thor, and Frigg, the queen of the gods, in respectively, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday...History and religion and myth combine, and we wonder and we imagine and we guess, like detectives reconstructing the details of a long-forgotten crime. [[LostForever There are so many Norse stories we do not have, so much we do not know]]. All we have are some myths that have come to us in the form of fokltales, in retellings, in poems, in prose. [[NewerThanTheyThink They were written down when Christianity had already displaced the worship of the Norse gods]], and some of the stories we have came to us because people were concerned that [[ForgottenTrope if the stories were not preserved, some of the kennings -- the usages of poets that referred to events in specific myths -- would become meaningless]]; Freya's tears for instance was a poetic way of saying "gold"...It is, perhaps, as if the only tales of the gods and demigods of [[GreekMythology Greece and Rome that had survived]] were of the deeds of Theseus and Hercules."''
-->-- '''Creator/NeilGaiman''', ''Norse Mythology'', Pages 12-14.
11th Dec '16 4:22:34 PM Doug86
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What of Æsir? What of elves?\\

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What of Æsir? [=Æ=]sir? What of elves?\\
13th Nov '16 11:55:57 AM CurledUpWithDakka
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The heat plays high unto the heavens\\

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The heat plays high unto the heavens\\heavens
3rd Nov '14 8:46:39 AM Kaizerreich
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And I know an eighteenth charm, and that charm is the greatest of all, and that charm I can tell to no man, for a secret that no one know but you is the most powerful secret there can ever be.

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And I know an eighteenth charm, and that charm is the greatest of all, and that charm I can tell to no man, for a secret that no one know knows but you is the most powerful secret there can ever be.
3rd Nov '14 8:44:18 AM Kaizerreich
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[[TheHordeComFromTheEast Rym comes from the east]]\\

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[[TheHordeComFromTheEast Rym comes from the east]]\\east\\
12th Jun '14 11:04:01 AM AgentSniff
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-->-- '''Hávamál'''

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-->-- '''Hávamál''' The Song of the Masked One


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-->-- '''Hávamál'''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Quotes.NorseMythology