History NetworkDecay / TotalAbandonment

22nd Mar '17 9:44:15 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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Its name may not have changed, but as evidenced by shows like ''Series/{{Greek}}'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', ''Series/KyleXY'', and ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', the station now known as Creator/ABCFamily isn't really that family-oriented anymore. Aside from its weekend movie blocks, it's now a basic cable version of [[TheWB the former WB network]].[[note]]When you actually air a movie called ''Satan's School for Girls'' and a show like ''WesternAnimation/SlackerCats'' on a channel with the word "family" in it, you are very much "a different kind of family"![[/note]] The ultimate {{irony}} is that Pat Robertson is one of the MoralGuardians who objects to the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, yet ABC Family owned the US broadcasting rights to the ''Film/HarryPotter'' films and aired ''Potter'' marathons constantly (at least until [=NBCUniversal=] acquired the broadcast rights in 2016). ''Series/The700Club'' (required in the original contract with Pat Robertson) and a Sunday morning/late night {{Infomercial}} block filled with megachurch pastors are the only things left hinting at ABC Family's roots as a religious channel, and even then they're buried at 11:00 PM with a {{content warning|s}} containing an unequivocal "does not reflect the views of ABC Family" due to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Robertson_controversies Robertson's laundry list of controversial statements and positions]].[[note]]To name just one example, he agreed with Jerry Falwell's statement that the USA's immorality invited the events of 9/11 '''[[TooSoon the week of]]'''.[[/note]] They aren't even mentioned at all on the channel's website; you'll either have to go to the CBN website for that.\\

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Its name may not have changed, but as evidenced by shows like ''Series/{{Greek}}'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', ''Series/KyleXY'', and ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', the station now known as Creator/ABCFamily isn't really that family-oriented anymore. Aside from its weekend movie blocks, it's now a basic cable version of [[TheWB the former WB network]].[[note]]When you actually air a movie called ''Satan's School for Girls'' and a show like ''WesternAnimation/SlackerCats'' on a channel with the word "family" in it, you are very much "a different kind of family"![[/note]] The ultimate {{irony}} is that Pat Robertson is one of the MoralGuardians who objects to the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, yet ABC Family owned owns the US broadcasting rights to the ''Film/HarryPotter'' films and aired airs ''Potter'' marathons constantly (at least until [=NBCUniversal=] acquired the broadcast rights in 2016).constantly. ''Series/The700Club'' (required in the original contract with Pat Robertson) and a Sunday morning/late night {{Infomercial}} block filled with megachurch pastors are the only things left hinting at ABC Family's roots as a religious channel, and even then they're buried at 11:00 PM with a {{content warning|s}} containing an unequivocal "does not reflect the views of ABC Family" due to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Robertson_controversies Robertson's laundry list of controversial statements and positions]].[[note]]To name just one example, he agreed with Jerry Falwell's statement that the USA's immorality invited the events of 9/11 '''[[TooSoon the week of]]'''.[[/note]] They aren't even mentioned at all on the channel's website; you'll either have to go to the CBN website for that.\\
21st Mar '17 4:11:22 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/DisneyChannel originally had a lineup of [[WaltDisney Walt-era]] Disney movies, cartoons, and TV shows, combined with original documentaries about the company's various projects, a lot of interesting imported shows (especially from Canada), and such programming for adults as ''Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion''. But as it lost ground to {{Nickelodeon}} in TheNineties, and as Disney itself began to expand from a studio into a multimedia company, it started to focus more and more on kids. It shoved most of the vintage programs aside, interspersing about three hours of cartoons at 1:00 AM with hours and hours of tween-centered programs and... BoyBand concerts... on Disney Channel? [[note]]The worst part was that, originally, the Disney Channel was a ''premium'' cable service like {{Creator/HBO}} or Cinemax, and was ''nothing'' like Nickelodeon, which was basic-cable from its conception. With Nickelodeon entering its golden age just as Disney was hitting a low point in programming quality, the only way to stop mass cancellation of subscriptions was to move it to basic-cable. '''Nickelodeon actually forced The Walt Disney Company to change Disney Channel's business model.'''[[/note]] It abandoned ''Vault Disney'', ''The Ink and Paint Club'', and most other broadcasts of classic Disney cartoons and shows in order to focus on the teenage demographic, with most of their shows featuring an actor/([[IdolSinger idol]]) singer/songwriter/dancer.\\

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* Creator/DisneyChannel originally had a lineup of [[WaltDisney Walt-era]] Disney movies, cartoons, and TV shows, combined with original documentaries about the company's various projects, a lot of interesting imported shows (especially from Canada), and such programming for adults as ''Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion''. But as it lost ground to {{Nickelodeon}} {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} in TheNineties, and as Disney itself began to expand from a studio into a multimedia company, it started to focus more and more on kids. It shoved most of the vintage programs aside, interspersing about three hours of cartoons at 1:00 AM with hours and hours of tween-centered programs and... BoyBand concerts... on Disney Channel? [[note]]The worst part was that, originally, the Disney Channel was a ''premium'' cable service like {{Creator/HBO}} or Cinemax, and was ''nothing'' like Nickelodeon, which was basic-cable from its conception. With Nickelodeon entering its golden age just as Disney was hitting a low point in programming quality, the only way to stop mass cancellation of subscriptions was to move it to basic-cable. '''Nickelodeon actually forced The Walt Disney Company to change Disney Channel's business model.'''[[/note]] It abandoned ''Vault Disney'', ''The Ink and Paint Club'', and most other broadcasts of classic Disney cartoons and shows in order to focus on the teenage demographic, with most of their shows featuring an actor/([[IdolSinger idol]]) singer/songwriter/dancer.\\



* Over the years, U.S. broadcast networks gradually dumped their traditional [[SaturdayMorningCartoon Saturday morning cartoon blocks]] for more dramas, reality shows, soaps, and news. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, all of the broadcast networks except Creator/{{UPN}} had the entire 6:00 AM to Noon block of Saturdays set aside just for animated programs and other all-ages fare, with Fox and the WB even going so far as to add in an extra two-to-three hours every weekday morning ''and'' afternoon. But in the late 1990s, increased cable competition ({{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/CartoonNetwork, etc.) and FCC mandates requiring a minimum three hours of educational kids' programming on broadcast networks each week proved crippling -- since most kids bar preschoolers don't/won't watch strictly educational shows, there was little incentive for producers to make them. Entertainment shows like ''TheWeirdAlShow'' wound up getting compromised by ExecutiveMeddling to fit the mandates.\\

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* Over the years, U.S. broadcast networks gradually dumped their traditional [[SaturdayMorningCartoon Saturday morning cartoon blocks]] for more dramas, reality shows, soaps, and news. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, all of the broadcast networks except Creator/{{UPN}} had the entire 6:00 AM to Noon block of Saturdays set aside just for animated programs and other all-ages fare, with Fox and the WB even going so far as to add in an extra two-to-three hours every weekday morning ''and'' afternoon. But in the late 1990s, increased cable competition ({{Nickelodeon}}, ({{Creator/Nickelodeon}}, Creator/CartoonNetwork, etc.) and FCC mandates requiring a minimum three hours of educational kids' programming on broadcast networks each week proved crippling -- since most kids bar preschoolers don't/won't watch strictly educational shows, there was little incentive for producers to make them. Entertainment shows like ''TheWeirdAlShow'' wound up getting compromised by ExecutiveMeddling to fit the mandates.\\
17th Mar '17 9:56:17 AM MarcoPolo250
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** After merging with [=NuvoTV=], outside of video blocks and shows like ''SKEE TV'' and ''Big Freeda'', Fuse has downplayed music programming to become a lifestyle network targeting a multicultural audience. It began when Fuse became the exclusive U.S broadcaster for the LFL, a deal which lasted all of one season before the network seemingly dumped them. Soon after the announcement, unrelated sitcom reruns came to dominate the daytime schedule, eventually displacing the music video blocks to the graveyard hours. Today, Fuse looks more like a Latino version of Creator/{{MTV}}2, while its new sister channel, FM, is pretty much what Fuse was before the merger.

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** After Since merging with [=NuvoTV=], [=NuvoTV=] in 2015, outside of video blocks and shows like ''SKEE TV'' and ''Big Freeda'', Fuse has downplayed music programming to become a in favor of lifestyle network shows targeting a multicultural audience. It began when Fuse became the exclusive U.S broadcaster for the LFL, a deal which lasted all of one season before the network seemingly dumped them. Soon after the announcement, unrelated sitcom reruns came to dominate the daytime schedule, eventually displacing the music video blocks to the graveyard hours. Today, Fuse looks more like a Latino version of Creator/{{MTV}}2, while its new sister channel, FM, is pretty much what Fuse was before the merger.
16th Mar '17 6:44:51 PM MarcoPolo250
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** After merging with [=NuvoTV=], outside of video blocks and shows like ''SKEE TV'' and ''Big Freeda'', Fuse has downplayed music programming to become a lifestyle network targeting a multicultural audience. It began when Fuse became the exclusive U.S broadcaster for the LFL, a deal which lasted all of one season before the network seemingly dumped them. Soon after the announcement, unrelated sitcom reruns came to dominate the daytime schedule, eventually displacing the music video blocks to the graveyard hours. Today, Fuse is more of a Latino version of Creator/{{MTV}}2, while its new sister channel, [[=FM=]], is basically what Fuse was before the merger.

to:

** After merging with [=NuvoTV=], outside of video blocks and shows like ''SKEE TV'' and ''Big Freeda'', Fuse has downplayed music programming to become a lifestyle network targeting a multicultural audience. It began when Fuse became the exclusive U.S broadcaster for the LFL, a deal which lasted all of one season before the network seemingly dumped them. Soon after the announcement, unrelated sitcom reruns came to dominate the daytime schedule, eventually displacing the music video blocks to the graveyard hours. Today, Fuse is looks more of like a Latino version of Creator/{{MTV}}2, while its new sister channel, [[=FM=]], FM, is basically pretty much what Fuse was before the merger.
16th Mar '17 6:42:40 PM MarcoPolo250
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** After merging with [=NuvoTV=], outside of video blocks and shows like ''SKEE TV'' and ''Big Freeda'', Fuse has downplayed music programming to become a lifestyle network targeting a multicultural audience. It began when Fuse became the exclusive U.S broadcaster for the LFL, a deal which lasted all of one season before the network seemingly dumped them. Soon after the announcement, unrelated sitcom reruns came to dominate the daytime schedule, eventually displacing the music video blocks to the graveyard hours. Today, Fuse is more of a Latino version of Creator/{{MTV}}2, while its new sister channel, [[=FM=]], is basically what Fuse was before the merger.



** Creator/{{CBS}} aired Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} and Nick Jr. programming from 2000 until 2006, after the CBS/Viacom breakup. It aired programming from various companies such as [[Creator/DiCEntertainment DiC]] eventually soaked up into the Cookie Jar Group, then in 2013 followed ABC's lead and gave up their time to Litton, which now brands the three hours under the oddly ExcitedShowTitle "'The CBS Dream Team...It's Epic!".

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** Creator/{{CBS}} aired Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} and Nick Jr. programming from 2000 until 2006, after the CBS/Viacom breakup. It aired programming from various companies such as [[Creator/DiCEntertainment DiC]] eventually soaked up into the Cookie Jar Group, then in 2013 followed ABC's lead and gave up their time to Litton, which now brands the three hours under the oddly ExcitedShowTitle "'The CBS Dream Team...It's Epic!".Litton.
16th Mar '17 5:33:47 PM MarcoPolo250
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* The cable channel Prime was licensed as a channel aimed at baby boomers, although it downplayed this on-air by acting like a superstation, airing a mixture of classic series (mostly from the 80's and older), home improvement shows, and repeats from Creator/{{Global}} and CH. Prime began slipping in 2006 when it re-branded as [=TVTropolis=]; at the time, Prime had focused more on classic 80's programming since in 2001, Canwest launched a "proper" classic TV channel known as [=DejaView=], which took on much of Prime's 60's and 70's output. [=TVTropolis=] was focused on "hit TV" and only aired 90's sitcoms and "pop culture" shows for [=CanCon=], but began slipping further to air reality shows which had almost nothing to do with ... wait, is it possible to slip if you don't even ''have'' a general theme? In August 2013, the channel's new full owner Shaw (Rogers previously owned a stake) abandoned [=TVTropolis=] entirely in favor of [=DTour=], which is a reality-oriented trav-''*ahem*'' ....... "new perspectives" channel, that is mainly just Travel Channel with the SerialNumbersFiledOff because actually calling it that would tip the CRTC off, because it's [[ExecutiveMeddling legally barred from directly competing with the aptly-named Travel + Escape]]. They've occasionally aired films too, although the relevance of ''Film/JamesBond'' films and ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' to this network's scope is somewhat questionable at first glance. After the re-launch, the aforementioned [=DejaView=] picked up some of the 90's series that had aired on [=TVTropolis=].

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* The cable channel Prime was licensed as a channel aimed at baby boomers, although it downplayed this on-air by acting like a superstation, airing a mixture of classic series (mostly from the 80's and older), home improvement shows, and repeats from Creator/{{Global}} and CH. Prime began slipping in 2006 when it re-branded as [=TVTropolis=]; at the time, Prime had focused more on classic 80's programming since in 2001, Canwest launched a "proper" classic TV channel known as [=DejaView=], which took on much of Prime's 60's and 70's output. [=TVTropolis=] was focused on "hit TV" and only aired 90's sitcoms and "pop culture" shows for [=CanCon=], but began slipping further to air reality shows which had almost nothing to do with ... wait, is it possible to slip if you don't even ''have'' a general theme? theme?
**
In August 2013, the channel's new full owner Shaw (Rogers previously owned a stake) abandoned [=TVTropolis=] entirely in favor of [=DTour=], which is a reality-oriented trav-''*ahem*'' ....... "new perspectives" channel, that is mainly just Travel Channel with the SerialNumbersFiledOff because actually calling it that would tip the CRTC off, because it's [[ExecutiveMeddling legally barred from directly competing with the aptly-named Travel + Escape]]. They've occasionally aired films too, although the relevance of ''Film/JamesBond'' films and ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' to this network's scope is somewhat questionable at first glance. After the re-launch, the aforementioned [=DejaView=] picked up some of the 90's series that had aired on [=TVTropolis=].



After CTV took over, the network slowly became a dumping ground for bad VH1 reality shows, old reruns of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'', and movies that have no connection to music whatsoever -- changing its name to [=MuchMore=]. In 2013, the channel re-launched as M3. Echoing the slippage [=MuchMusic=] was undergoing by slowly scaling back its remaining music programming in favor of comedy, the re-branded network stocked the remainder of its lineup with sitcoms and dramas instead. The only remotely music-related programs were encores of ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' and ''Series/TheVoice''. M3 became increasingly ignored by 2016, when its first-run acquired programming was moved to other Bell channels, and all their original shows were long gone. M3's lineup consisted of automated music videos in the morning, followed by shows from its sibling networks and same-week encores of CTV sitcoms and dramas. The only show they didn't steal was ''Series/TheMentalist'', which was [[AdoredByTheNetwork the number-one song on the M3 Countdown for weeks in a row.]] On September 2, 2016, M3 was replaced by Gusto, a food and cooking-oriented network that Bell sort of "acquired" [[note]] Bell bought rights to its brand and programming from its existing owner and shut down the previous version of the channel, which was under a Category B license and not as widely-carried. By virtue of its precursor's historic status as a must-carry channel, the new Gusto got wider carriage.[[/note]]

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After CTV took over, the network slowly became a dumping ground for bad VH1 reality shows, old reruns of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'', and movies that have no connection to music whatsoever -- changing its name to [=MuchMore=]. In 2013, the channel re-launched as M3. Echoing the slippage [=MuchMusic=] was undergoing by slowly scaling back its remaining music programming in favor of comedy, the re-branded network stocked the remainder of its lineup with sitcoms and dramas instead. The only remotely music-related programs were encores of ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' and ''Series/TheVoice''. M3 became increasingly ignored by 2016, when its first-run acquired programming was moved to other Bell channels, and all their original shows were long gone. M3's lineup consisted of automated music videos in the morning, followed by shows from its sibling networks and same-week encores of CTV sitcoms and dramas. The only show they didn't steal was ''Series/TheMentalist'', [[AdoredbyTheNetwork which was [[AdoredByTheNetwork got more airtime than the number-one song on rest of the M3 Countdown for weeks in a row.]] channel's programming]]. On September 2, 2016, M3 was replaced by Gusto, a food and cooking-oriented network that Bell sort of "acquired" [[note]] Bell bought rights to its brand and programming from its existing owner and shut down the previous version of the channel, which was under a Category B license and not as widely-carried. By virtue of its precursor's historic status as a must-carry channel, the new Gusto got wider carriage.[[/note]]
11th Mar '17 3:30:56 PM themisterfree
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abandoned the moment NBC took over.\\
\\
The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and obscure sports like hockey and the [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts mixed]] [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship martial arts]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the UFC being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]], and ''especially'' the UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which is aired by NBCSN among other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the better parts of Fox's coverage (including their commentators). NBCSN has also been used to broadcast a larger amount of live [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with too many commercial breaks[[note]]Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their own reduced package from 2007 to 2016, when NBC got it back on their own. It had all the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]]
** The network still devotes a good portion of its channel space for outdoor programing; much of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractual commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk if any of these programs run into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
* Oxygen was once the anti-Creator/{{Lifetime}}, airing shows revolving around making women better, ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' and ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' reruns, and programming about yoga and improving yourself, along with women's sports. By the time NBC bought the channel in 2007, the original partners had long left, and the new management decided programming which exploited women such as the ''Bad Girls Club'' (which itself has long abandoned any attempts at reforming their subjects), ''Snapped'' (profiles about women killers which edge uncomfortably close to idolization) and multiple shows revolving around Tori Spelling's love life would do better. Some argue that the decay began as early as 2004, which, for around a year, devoted late nights to the next rung below softcore porn (and actual {{Bowdlerise}}d Canadian softcore porn) and a QVC-like block devoted to ''sex toys''.
** Now it seems like the decay is coming full circle, since [[http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/oxygen-rebrand-true-crime-channel/410607 NBCUniversal announced that Oxygen was becoming a true crime channel]] in summer 2017, with a reboot of TNT's ''Cold Justice'' being among the first programs under the new format.
* Cloo (known prior to 2011 as Sleuth) supposedly should have been devoted fully to crime drama reruns from the deep reservoir of Universal's vaults, but by the end was more known as the "USA Network Annex" as all of its programming consisted of programs already rerunning or original series from USA Network, with the only Universal shows seen being the ubiquitous ''SVU'' and ''Criminal Intent''; those Universal crime drama reruns are seen on Cozi TV these days. In the summer of 2016, the head of NBC's cable division effectively gave the network its death sentence, as 'skinny bundles' came into vogue and rerun-only networks became verboten with the new age of Internet television providers who aren't willing to carry them. Dish Network and many other providers were dropping the network over the years, because its rerun-centric nature made it pointless when its programming can already be seen on other networks and online. Cloo ended their run quietly on February 1, 2017 on a decay-appropriate note, finishing their broadcast by airing the entirety of ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.
* Syfy UK shows some heavily-promoted proper science fiction series, but mostly they construct their schedule from a mix of documentaries on the supernatural/occult/alien abduction, kung fu movies, MMA, action series (such as ''HumanTarget''), frequent ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' reruns, {{disaster movie}}s, monster movies, [[SwordAndSandal sword-and-sandal]] flicks, medieval adventure movies (''Film/FirstKnight'' and ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves''?), all kinds of fantasy, and quirky dramas like ''EliStone''. It's rare to see genuine science fiction movies there. Syfy UK seems to following the American network's trend with the announcement that they will be showing the [[MixedMartialArts MMA]] promotion ''BAMMA''.
* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. No more. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which are sourced from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were kept from Nonstop to Cozi.)

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!The channel, with the exception of perhaps a few shows, has long abandoned its original concept.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:MTV Networks / Viacom Examples]]
->''"Wow, that was a real moment. That's weird for MTV."''
->'''Joel [=McHale=]:''' Hey, ya know what else is weird for MTV? '''[[TakeThat Showing a music video.]]'''
-->-- ''TheSoup''

One of
the moment NBC took over.\\
\\
The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected
most documented cases is that of Creator/{{MTV}}, which began in 1981 as an all-MusicVideo station. Now the majority of its time is devoted to original non-music programming; mostly {{teen drama}}s, {{talk show}}s, and obscure sports like hockey and the [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts mixed]] [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship martial arts]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the UFC being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]], and ''especially'' the UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which is aired by NBCSN among {{reality show}}s. That, or programs from other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the better parts of Fox's coverage (including their commentators). NBCSN has also been used to broadcast a larger amount of live [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may Creator/{{Viacom}}-owned networks, such as ''Series/AmericanGladiators'' and even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''.
* The decay began
in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts 1987 with too many commercial breaks[[note]]Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, ''Series/RemoteControl'' and then continued in throughout the [[TheNineties 1990s]] with their own reduced package from 2007 to 2016, when NBC got it back on their own. It had all ''Series/TheRealWorld'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' (the latter of which featured music videos, albeit with ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''-style commentary by the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]]
** The network still devotes a good portion of its channel space for outdoor programing; much
title characters), two of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractual commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit most popular programs in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk if any of these programs run history. The MTV executives saw this and started commissioning more non-music shows, until music had been pushed into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist late night/early morning and the after-school ''Total Request Live'' (''TRL'') block. At one point, they even ran commercials with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the tagline "MTV: [[SelfDeprecation We Don't Play Music]]." Since the cancellation of ''TRL'' in 2008, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
* Oxygen
lip service it still pays to its roots was once the anti-Creator/{{Lifetime}}, airing shows revolving around making women better, ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' and ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' reruns, and programming about yoga and improving yourself, along with women's sports. By the time NBC bought the channel in 2007, the original partners had long left, and the new management decided programming which exploited women such as the ''Bad Girls Club'' (which itself has long abandoned any attempts at reforming their subjects), ''Snapped'' (profiles about women killers which edge uncomfortably close to idolization) and multiple shows revolving around Tori Spelling's love life would do better. Some argue that the decay began as early as 2004, which, for around a year, devoted late nights to the next rung below softcore porn (and actual {{Bowdlerise}}d Canadian softcore porn) and a QVC-like block devoted to ''sex toys''.
** Now it seems like the decay is coming full circle, since
"AMTV" blocks of videos. In 2010, MTV's [[http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/oxygen-rebrand-true-crime-channel/410607 NBCUniversal announced that Oxygen creativereview.co.uk/images/uploads/2010/02/mtv_0.jpg logo was becoming a true crime channel]] in summer 2017, with a reboot of TNT's ''Cold Justice'' being among changed]] to omit the first programs under words "Music Television".
** ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' could be an indicator of how it decayed. It started off as about two minutes of animation and
the new format.
* Cloo (known prior to 2011 as Sleuth) supposedly should have been devoted fully to crime drama reruns from
rest was music videos. Then, the deep reservoir of Universal's vaults, but by the end was more known animations got longer as the "USA Network Annex" videos became much more expensive to license. Then for a while, during the bottom of the decay they had nothing in between animations. A short-lived relaunch in 2011 was closer to the original, albeit with MTV shows as all well as videos.
** Before ''Beavis'', others have noted MTV's mission statement began to slip when it debuted ''Yo! MTV Raps''. Before long, there were shows about other types
of its music (notably metal) that talked more about the music than actually ''showing'' it.
** In some European countries, MTV still primarily shows music videos. American reality TV isn't nearly as popular outside America. That also used to be true for Latin American MTV, but it eventually followed the steps of the U.S. channel.
** In the [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} United Kingdom]], MTV UK was re-branded as MTV One (now just plain MTV) and shows nothing but reality shows, animation, and live-action scripted shows such as ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' and ''Series/BlueMountainState''. [[note]]The new version of ''Series/TeenWolf'', which was ''actually produced by MTV'', is screened on another channel, Sky Living, instead of MTV UK, because MGM is the actual distributor of that show and doesn't have to sell it to international MTV networks if they don't want to.[[/note]] MTV UK's genre channels (MTV Base plays Urban, MTV Rocks plays indie rock and alternative, to give two examples) have their own
programming consisted related to the music they play, such as interviews. These have been cut back in favour of programs already rerunning playing more music videos, leading to perhaps the first known instance of MTV being criticized for playing ''too many'' music videos. In 2011, MTV UK more or less stopped pretending to be a music channel, moving alongside the entertainment channels on Sky's EPG and launching a new channel called [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment MTV Music]] to fill in the missing gap.
** The French and Walloon (southern Belgium) MTV used to be an English-language channel (weirdly enough). They added subtitles and later dubbing to some of their shows (mostly animated shows and live broadcasts) before adding
original series from USA Network, with the French-language shows. This only Universal made sense, considering the market, and they still aired plenty of music videos. However, like its foreign equivalents, it drifted toward reality shows seen being (both original French shows and imported ones). It still airs some music (predominantly hip hop), but late at night.
** At one time, there were three music channels in
the ubiquitous ''SVU'' Netherlands MTV, The Music Factory (TMF), and ''Criminal Intent''; those Universal crime drama reruns are seen on Cozi TV these days. In The Box. MTV followed the summer of 2016, the head of NBC's cable division effectively gave the network its death sentence, as 'skinny bundles' came into vogue and rerun-only networks became verboten all too familiar pattern with the new age of Internet television providers who aren't willing to carry them. Dish Network and many other providers were dropping the network over the years, because its rerun-centric nature made it pointless when its programming first shifting into the mainly R&B/Hip Hop/Rap genre, eventually phasing out to reality TV (although nothing Dutch; just stuff from the U.S.). TMF, the first true Dutch music channel, was soon bought out by MTV's parent company and changed from a channel with VJ's and life shows to a SMS-your-thoughts channel in addition to a radical music style change.
** The Italian MTV is also taking this route. Until the late 1990s/early 2000s, most of the schedule was composed of blocks of music videos and the occasional anime or ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode. Now it airs at least five or six episodes of American reality shows every day, and only two blocks of music one early in the morning and one late at night. There still is the occasional horror movie or anime, but those
can already be found only after midnight and change timeslots frequently.
** In Australia, pay TV company Foxtel, who has channel numbers ordered by categories, acknowledged this in November 2009, when they moved MTV from channel 808 (8''xx'' being Music Channels) to 124 (1''xx'' being General Entertainment Channels).
** New Zealand had C4, which was essentially MTV, up until the first quarter of 2011 when the channel as it was being renamed to 'Four' and another channel being set up to play music videos full-on (now called C4 in the old channel's stead). It remains to
be seen on other networks and online. Cloo ended their run quietly on February 1, 2017 on a decay-appropriate note, finishing their whether the cycle will repeat.
** This trope is {{enforced|Trope}} by law for [[UsefulNotes/CanadianMultichannelNetworks MTV Canada]], whose
broadcast by airing license heavily restricts the entirety amount of ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.music-oriented programming it can air, and has Canadian content obligations during certain daypart. However, this was because of its own Total Abandonment; before becoming MTV, it was [=talktv=], a network dedicated solely to talk shows (mostly re-ran from CTV). Since the license was not changed, MTV Canada slipped right out of the gate.
** In the 90s and early 2000s, MTV Brazil started moving towards variety shows (some had relation to music, such as a soccer tournament between musicians and a movie show that showed videos for songs popularized in soundtracks). Then in 2006 they decided to pull the plug on their TRL equivalent, marking the point where the decay became irreversible - even if music countdowns and such are still featured (though not as popular\prominent as the comedy and tween-focused shows). Then the "original" MTV, with broadcast signal and owned by a media conglomerate under the license of Viacom, was closed and the new cable channel under Viacom command is still barely about music.
* [=MTV2=] started out as an actual music channel and, for a while after buying out the competing Box music network, became a true haven for music fans with its innovative and bizarre themed video blocks. After introducing the "two-headed dog" logo, [=MTV2=] more of less became "MTV with hip-hop and rock videos". Even then, [[AdoredByTheNetwork hip-hop has become the dominate genre on the channel]]; the indie rock-centric ''Subterranean'', was pushed into the unsatisfactory timeslot of 1:00 AM on Friday mornings before being canned in 2011.
** [=MTV2=] Europe didn't stop playing music videos, but abandoned its mission to play obscure music (especially ''120 Minutes''). It was an unpredictable channel that could play any genre the other channels weren't playing, commercial-free all day, starting out as "M2" in 1998. Then [[RevenueEnhancingDevices commercial interests came calling]], and the alternative music ended: Zane Lowe stopped hosting ''Gonzo'' for good, [=MTV2=] became [[InvisibleSubtleDifference MTV Two]] and focused on playing well-known guitar pop bands. Its name was [[http://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1222867 changed to "MTV Rocks" in 2010]]. Its evening schedule now consists of two hours of "Kasabian vs. The Killers vs. Kings Of Leon", bands that were all promoted in 2002-04 by [=MTV2=] before they were famous -- but crucially they weren't the ''only'' thing it played.
* [[Letters2Numbers Tr3s]] is a Spanish MTV channel that's just MTV's regular schedule with GratuitousSpanish, subtitles, and some more music videos, though not a lot.

* Syfy UK shows some heavily-promoted proper science fiction series, but mostly they construct their schedule from MTV's subscription channels have followed a mix of documentaries on similar pattern, with the supernatural/occult/alien abduction, kung fu movies, MMA, action series (such as ''HumanTarget''), frequent ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' reruns, {{disaster movie}}s, monster movies, [[SwordAndSandal sword-and-sandal]] flicks, medieval adventure movies (''Film/FirstKnight'' metal-centric MTVX being replaced by the rap-centric MTV Jams. Same with VH-1 Soul, CMT Pure, and ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves''?), all kinds of fantasy, and quirky dramas like ''EliStone''. the aforementioned MTV Jams. MTV Hits was rebranded as [=NickMusic=] in October 2016. It's rare now a music channel for Nickelodeon (a Viacom-owned sister channel to see genuine science fiction MTV) that plays hit music geared towards young teens. It also features Nickelodeon characters in the breaks between videos and even plays videos from stars of Nickelodeon's children shows
* MTV's sister channel, Creator/VH1, was launched to stave off competition from Ted Turner's Cable Music Channel (it worked) and originally targeted the demographic that had grown out of [=MTV=] with videos by "adult contemporary" artists (Phil Collins, et al.). From there it added shows themed around music from the 1960s and '70s, plus some stand-up comedy programs to vary the lineup, and by the end of TheNineties it found a niche in music-related films (''Film/{{Footloose}}'', ''TheWall'', etc.) and documentary and trivia shows like ''Behind the Music'' and ''Pop-Up Video''. Starting at the TurnOfTheMillennium, however, it turned into a channel [[ILoveTheExties celebrating pop culture in general]] by getting D-list celebrities to comment on it. From there it moved to D-list celebrity shows, and only showed music videos for a few hours in the mornings. Its decay came full circle when, in November 2015, VH-1 shunted its video blocks in favor of sitcom reruns.
* VH-1 Classic may have anticipated this, launching as a station devoted purely to music and 1970s-'90s music videos and occasional music movies. It briefly decayed when it started airing VH-1 D-list shows in the off-hours, but reversed it with music festivals like Download and well-received talk shows like ''That Metal Show''. While some
movies there. Syfy UK seems to following had tenuous music connections (''Film/{{Gremlins}}''?), it dropped ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' reruns in favor of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' (which has musical guests who sometimes double as hosts) and the American network's trend channel's meat and potatoes remained as long video blocks and vintage concerts/concert films and documentaries. It found a niche in HardRock and HeavyMetal-related programs and was the '''only''' MTV channel to acknowledge the original's 30th anniversary in 2011, via a whole weekend of classic segments and promos! Exactly five years later, it was completely overhauled into '''MTV''' Classic, which features music videos from the 1980s, '90s and early 2000s as well as concert shows such as ''Unplugged'' on the one hand, and reruns of scripted and reality shows from TheNineties and the TurnOfTheMillennium on the other. However, since the scripted shows have given the channel abysmal ratings (as low as only 35,000 regular viewers according to ThatOtherWiki), MTV Classic has since switched to 100% music videos starting in January 2017.
* The Nashville Network, a country music and culture-oriented channel, was taken off-course after Viacom's acquisition of Westinghouse[=/=]CBS. The company decided, despite having been co-owned even before the merger, that TNN was redundant to its sister: the more music-oriented [[Creator/{{CMT}} Country Music Television]]. TNN began to morph into a genreless entertainment channel known as The ''National'' Network (otherwise later known as "The New TNN", even [[ArtifactTitle after it ceased to be "new"]]),
with a focus on off-network reruns in an attempt to compete with the Creator/USANetwork, and then re-branded as the male-centric Creator/{{SpikeTV}}. 2017 saw the announcement that they Spike will be showing re-branded as the [[MixedMartialArts MMA]] promotion ''BAMMA''.
''Creator/{{Paramount}} Network'', as Viacom refocuses on their core brands.
* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The Ironically, Creator/{{CMT}} also drifted towards programming consisted with little if any connection to country music. In something of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much a double decay, CMT in 2007 began drifting away from ''that'', showing reruns of it locally produced. No more. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features shows such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room ''Series/HoganKnowsBest'' and ''Series/{{Nanny 911}}'' along with movies like ''Film/TheNegotiator''. Even Time Warner Cable noticed, suing Viacom for Daddy'' not airing a network consisting of mainly country programming. Viacom responded with corporate buzzspeak about how country fans prefer "a greater variety of programming" with "the same types of values and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many stories embodied by country music". They've since slid back though -- in addition to still showing more videos than any other basic-cable music channel, they found something of which are sourced a niche with DeepSouth-flavored programming -- ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' reruns, a country-specific reboot of ''Series/TheSingingBee'', etc. Meanwhile, sister channel CMT Pure Country (originally VH-1 Country and renamed CMT Music in 2016) is almost entirely video-focused, even showing videos from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, '80's and '90's. This still doesn't explain the reruns of ''Series/HellsKitchen'', a cooking competition based around fine dining in Los Angeles starring a chef from Europe, though.
* TV Land started out as a off-shoot of the Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} programming block Creator/NickAtNite, which preserved classic sitcoms and westerns from TheFifties, TheSixties, TheSeventies, and even some from TheEighties and introduced them to younger generations. This worked very well, but by the mid-2000s, TV Land felt the need to add some of their own productions, so they added a few of their own reality shows - while some of them
were kept considered appropriate for the channel, since they featured celebrities from Nonstop their prime time period (for example, Farrah Fawcett of ''Series/CharliesAngels'' had a reality show), most them had nothing to Cozi.)do with classic TV in any way or form whatsoever. During this time, TV Land also produced some documentary series that showcased older shows and movies, such as ''Tickled Pink'' (a program that looked at HomoeroticSubtext in classic shows) and ''Myths & Legends'' (which explored urban legends that surrounded old shows and movies for years). By the late 2000s, TV Land began adding more and more reruns of modern sitcoms to their lineup, phasing out more and more classic sitcoms, and also producing their own original sitcoms, including, ''Series/HotInCleveland'', ''Series/TheExes'', ''Series/RetiredAt35'', ''Series/TheSoulMan'', ''Series/HappilyDivorced'', and ''Series/{{Kirstie}}''. TV Land has received outcry from its viewers over this shift in their priorities, but the network has flat-out dismissed said outcry, on the grounds that [[MoneyDearBoy their original sitcoms are helping their revenue]]. This was also taken as an admission that classic TV only appeals to older audiences, and the network would rather reel in that coveted 18-34 demographic. But it wasn't until they started airing encores of current season ''Series/{{CSI}}'' episodes and reruns of the Steve Harvey-hosted ''Family Feud'' that TV Land realized [[{{Understatement}} they might have gone too far]]. In the summer of 2015, the network was revamped; targeting viewers from Generation X and introducing more edgier original shows such as ''Series/{{Younger}}'' and ''Series/{{Impastor}}''. While TV Land still airs older TV shows during the day, they have deemphasized their original format for the most part.




[[folder:Animax Internatonal Distributors]]
* Creator/{{Animax}} (supposed to be a 24-hour {{anime}} channel), in its Latin American side, both Brazilian and Spanish-speaking versions, became this:
** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
** Before Animax LA was owned by Sony, it had other name, Locomotion. Originally a children oriented channel, but later became a youth oriented channel a year later to avoid competition with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, and shortly after an adult oriented animation channel (it showed things like ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'', ''ComicBook/TheMaxx'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHead'', the ''ComicStrip/PrinceValiant'' movies and ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts, among others), eventually it evolved into an anime channel (showing more than 10 anime series a day), so it started calling itself "The Anime Channel". The problem is that after a while it anime was aired with other programs like ''WesternAnimation/{{Duckman}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Eventually, it created an advertisement that said ''"The good anime, takes time. Anime-station"''. Watchers were really confused by this, but it turned out they sold their rights to an anime channel. Eventually this lead to the channel being rebranded to Animax.
** As Sony Spin, the channel still aired anime at early morning hours, even airing new series like ''Manga/NodameCantabile'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist Brotherhood'' and new episodes of ''Manga/{{Bleach}}''. This changed in March 2012, when the slot was replaced by live action shows, thus abandoning anime programming completely. The new channel got such lousy ratings that their exclusive live-action series were moved to sister channel Sony Entertainment. Sony Spin became a rerun loop of series such as ''Series/That70sShow'', ''Series/JoanOfArcadia'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', old movies and even a Latin American soap opera. This effectively meant Sony Spin itself entered into a drift status. In 2014, many cable systems began retiring the channel, in some places being replaced by History 2 and in others with the then-debuting Latin version of Creator/{{Lifetime}}. The channel's official shutdown took place in July 1 of the same year for South America and July 31 for the rest of the countries, ending nearly 18 years of broadcast (since it was launched as Locomotion).
* Animax South Africa followed the same disastrous way as Latin America's and Spain's. Japanese animation is now almost in the minority and are few and far between, as reality shows have taken over the schedule, and was soon closed down to make way for a new channel, Sony Max, which basically airs the same reality shows that aired on Animax South Africa.
* Animax Spain followed the same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
* Hungary's Animax has also gone down this route. It launched in 2004 under the name A+, and focused almost entirely on Japanese animation with some American cartoons thrown into the mix. Though the ratings weren't bad, and the RTL Group kept the channel alive by supplying their anime dubs, the network's real owners (Chello Central Europe) ignored it. Sony Pictures took ownership of the channel in 2007, and A+ attempted to keep itself up by airing subtitled anime releases, an act which had the effect of drastically lowering their ratings. After Sony rebranded it as Animax, dubbed productions came back and all seemed good. However in 2009, they decided to turn the channel into a general youth entertainment network, and started airing all sorts of American talent shows, scripted live-action series and movies (mostly taken from AXN's showcase), as well as some Japanese ones -- at least a few new anime shows still premiered regularly, although the channel lost its MultipleDemographicAppeal as it replaced the bulk of its programming with popular [[ShonenDemographic Shonen]] series. Around 2012, Animax began going bankrupt -- the rights to its anime series slowly expired, they broke up their advertising deal, and as Sony considered anime to be the cause of its problems (as opposed to their terrible coverage, mishandled marketing, careless decision-making and often sub-par dubbing work), they've only focused on adding more and more live-action shows and movies to Animax's showcase, and even canceled the long-awaited premieres of several anime series. Essentially, it became AXN's wastebasket, and the handful of Japanese shows that they still held broadcasting rights to were just tired reruns practically begging to be taken off the air. The fact that Animax only aired from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., and about half of that airtime was just reruns anyway, made the situation seem much worse. As expected, the ratings dropped like a rock, and from mid-'12 to early '14, Animax lingered on in rerun-limbo.\\\
The Animax staff vanished from the 'net in October 2012, and their website was taken down a year thereafter. Animax was replaced with a non-anime channel called C8 (also owned by Chello Central Europe) in April 2014, whose bare function is to fill out the late-night timeslot with content lazily taken from Chello's other networks. In some of the neighboring regions, Animax turned into Sony Spin, an all-round entertainment network whose only notable anime program is ''Anime/DragonBallKai''.

to:

\n[[folder:Animax Internatonal Distributors]]\n* Creator/{{Animax}} (supposed to be a 24-hour {{anime}} channel), [[folder: 21st Century Fox Examples]]
A major restructuring of Fox's cable division
in its Latin American side, both Brazilian and Spanish-speaking versions, became this:
** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
** Before Animax LA was owned by Sony, it had other name, Locomotion. Originally a children oriented channel, but later became a youth oriented channel a year later to avoid competition with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, and shortly after an adult oriented animation channel (it showed things like ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'', ''ComicBook/TheMaxx'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHead'', the ''ComicStrip/PrinceValiant'' movies and ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts, among others), eventually it evolved into an anime channel (showing more than 10 anime series a day), so it started calling itself "The Anime Channel". The problem is that after a while it anime was aired with other programs like ''WesternAnimation/{{Duckman}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Eventually, it created an advertisement that said ''"The good anime, takes time. Anime-station"''. Watchers were really confused by this, but it turned out they sold their rights to an anime channel. Eventually this
Fall 2013 lead to the channel being rebranded to Animax.
** As Sony Spin, the channel still
decay and re-branding of Speed, Fuel TV, and FOX Soccer into FOX Sports 1, FOX Sports 2, and FXX, respectively:

* Speed was formerly known as Speedvision, and
aired anime at early morning hours, even airing new series like ''Manga/NodameCantabile'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist Brotherhood'' and new episodes a much wider variety of ''Manga/{{Bleach}}''. This changed in March 2012, when the slot was replaced by live action shows, thus abandoning anime programming completely. The new channel got such lousy ratings that their exclusive live-action back in the day, including documentaries and series were moved to sister channel Sony Entertainment. Sony Spin became a rerun loop of series such as ''Series/That70sShow'', ''Series/JoanOfArcadia'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', old movies about classic cars, automakers and racing teams, occasional Barret-Jackson auctions, coverage of various professional racing leagues (including UsefulNotes/FormulaOne, along with the SCCA World Challenge, which it even sponsored for a Latin American soap opera. This period), and others. In 2001, Fox bought a majority stake in Speedvision. Under Fox ownership, it was re-launched as Speed, but in reality, it had slowly morphed into what was effectively meant Sony Spin itself entered into a drift status. In 2014, many cable systems began retiring the channel, in some places being replaced by History 2 and in others with NASCAR Network (Fox had later acquired the then-debuting Latin version of Creator/{{Lifetime}}. The channel's official shutdown took place in July 1 of the same year for South America and July 31 association's new unified television contract for the rest first half of the countries, ending nearly 18 years of broadcast (since it was launched as Locomotion).
* Animax South Africa followed the same disastrous way as Latin America's and Spain's. Japanese animation is now almost
season in the minority Winston Cup and are few Busch Series, and far between, as then bought out ESPN's rights to the Truck Series). By the late 2000's, it had wiped out all of its ''good'' automotive programming in favor of endless tuner reality competitions, reality shows have taken involving a towing business and repair shop, reruns of ''Series/PimpMyRide'', a show that is essentially ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace WITH VEHICLES]]]] and a GameShow which involved guessing quarter-mile times. By 2011, about 75% of Speed's lineup was devoted to NASCAR-related programming, including qualifying, practice sessions, and the full Truck Series season. They still aired other series (most notably the Rolex Sports Car Series and American Le Mans Series, which merged in 2014 to form the Tudor UsefulNotes/{{United SportsCar Championship}}), but they were often punted into obscure time slots, or as counter-programming for NASCAR broadcasts on other networks. They even aired luge and bobsled events as filler over the schedule, winter months, but there was some NASCAR CharacterOverlap thanks to Geoff Bodine (who also builds bobsleds), so it at least made sense (plus, it ''is'' still "speed"-y).

In late 2012, signs began pointing towards total abandonment: they lost Formula One to NBC Sports Network, and rumors began swirling that Fox was planning to re-launch Speed as a mainstream sports network, which was something that Fox, surprisingly, didn't have yet (they had FX, niche channels such as Fuel TV and [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fox Soccer]], and the regional networks (which they had tried multiple times to try and turn into a national/local hybrid network)); on the final day of the EPL season in 2012, they aired a soccer game in a nine-network event due to a rare end of the season where the championship clinching and relegation did occur at the end of the season (usually it's all well and done by the end of April). On March 5, 2013, Fox officially unveiled Fox Sports 1, set for a launch on August 17, 2013, but not before Speed signed off at 6 A.M. with a sobering farewell speech...[[MoodWhiplash which was followed immediately with a happy welcome to Fox Sports 1]]. The rebranded network continues to air NASCAR programming (which includes everything ''but'' the races, except for the Camping World Truck Series and tape-delayed regional series events, all of which was broadcast by Speed),
and was soon closed down expanded with the addition of live Sprint Cup and Xfinity Series races beginning in the 2015 season (prior to make way this, the Xfinity Series, formerly the Nationwide Series, was on ESPN/ABC, and all Sprint Cup races were on Fox; only the All-Star Race and Budweiser Duels were on Speed; FX had aired races under the 2001-06 TV deal)
** And
for a new channel, Sony Max, extra Total Abandonment points, Fox Sports 1 cancelled ''Speed Center'' and the long-running ''Wind Tunnel with Dave Despain'', both of which still contained some coverage of non-NASCAR racing series. And, just to throw in some irony, ''NASCAR Race Hub'' was initially moved from 6pm to either 4:30 or noon depending on the day of the week (and sometimes a third separate timeslot, which made [=DVRs=] a must for anyone who wanted to watch during this period) and shrunk to a half-hour, while ''NASCAR Raceday'', the pre-pre-race show that dates all the way back to 2001 and is now on its second ChannelHop (the first being to Speed from Fox Sports Net), was also cut in half, to one hour - but still kept in its traditional 10am Sunday start time (excluding night races), to the confusion of many. However, within one month ''Race Hub'' was back to one hour, and within nine months was firmly planted at 5pm,[[note]]excluding a handful of instances during special events like Daytona Speedweeks and the Charlotte Homestand, where it ran special primetime episodes[[/note]] while ''Raceday'' regained its second hour during Summer 2014 (although it shed said hour again at the beginning of 2015, excluding the Daytona 500). One major cause seems to be the lack of ratings life for anything except motorsports[[note]]besides the above- and below-mentioned NASCAR and USCC programming, there's also AMA Supercross, a dirt-bike racing series which runs in baseball and football stadiums during the off-seasons of those sports, and [=MotoGP=], a global paved-track motorcycle series which is basically FIM's equivalent to UsefulNotes/FormulaOne[[/note]], UFC and Major League Baseball, the only things consistently able to draw above 100,000 viewers, let alone a million, with the four highest rated programs in [=FS1=]'s first year being the three non-points NASCAR Sprint Cup races and an impromptu broadcast of the rain-delayed Bristol race (approximately tripling the usual MLB ratings) - all of which seems to suggest that people didn't necessarily want a new general-purpose national sports network.
** In Canada and several other "international" North American markets, FS1 did not replace Speed. As it would be impossible to get FS1 approved in Canada (they don't take kindly to networks trying to tread on the turf of established equivalents, plus rights to the remainder of its properties are held by said networks), Speed was silently replaced by an "international" version that
airs live and repeat airings of FS1 and FS2's motorsports events, but is otherwise an automated zombie loop of old Speed reality shows. The channel was re-branded as Fox Sports Racing on February 20, 2015, but it's really just the same channel with a different logo in the corner. A number of major Canadian providers began to drop the network in 2015 (though the rebranding also coincided with its return to Rogers Cable as a "new" network).
* Fuel TV was known as one of the lowest-viewed channels on cable television because of their heavy reliance on [[ExtremeSportExcusePlot Extreme Sports]] like surfing and skateboarding, which are usually best experienced outside. They stuck to their mission even with the low ratings and limited distribution, and even their few original comedy shows were based around extreme sports.
** In 2012 the network became the official cable home of the UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship, though in this case as MMA is still considered in that "extreme" area of sports, it still worked and the programs are designed to draw Fuel out of the Nielsen basement, so they can only help (though in mid-August 2013 many shows on the network still registered as being watched only by 1,000 homes). Eventually though the [=UFC=] and Speed
reality shows took over as contracts with Fuel TV's program providers ran out, and after months where TV analysts said that aired on Animax South Africa.
* Animax Spain followed
the strategy of leaving the extreme sports in late night would lead up to Fuel TV's inevitable re-branding as Fox Sports 2, it happened to little fanfare the same disastrous way as Latin American's day and South Africa's. Japanese animation time as Speed's transition, only announced a week before the rebranding. The [=UFC=] moved to Fox Sports 1, and Fox Sports 2 is expected to air the oddball sports that don't quite fit on FS1 like rugby, Australian rules football and, ironically enough, some of the remaining non-NASCAR racing series from Speed, such as Lucas Oil Off-Road and the Rolex Sports Car Series. Interestingly, Fox Sports decided to re-up for a five year deal with the United Sports Car Championship, a merger between the Rolex cars and the American Le Mans Series set to launch in 2014.
* But wait, there's more! Fox Soccer started as Fox Sports World, which aired a variety of sports from around the world, including motorsports (remember, this was before they bought Speed), rugby, cricket, etc. Then, it eroded into just soccer, prompting the rebranding. However, with the death of Setanta Sports due to the Irish debt crisis, FSC started up a SpinOff network called ''Fox Soccer Plus'', and added rugby, cricket, and
eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved (after a stint on ESPN) Aussie football to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
* Hungary's Animax has also gone down this route. It launched in 2004 under the name A+, and focused almost entirely on Japanese animation with some American cartoons thrown into the mix. Though the ratings weren't bad, and the RTL Group kept the channel alive by supplying their anime dubs, the
that network's real owners (Chello Central Europe) ignored it. Sony Pictures took ownership of schedule, which quelled this for a time.\\
\\
This would not last either, as shortly after they lost
the channel in 2007, and A+ attempted rights to keep itself up by the airing subtitled anime releases, an act which had the effect English Premier League to NBC (taking much of drastically lowering their ratings. After Sony rebranded it as Animax, dubbed productions came back and all seemed good. However in 2009, they decided to turn the channel into a general youth entertainment network, and started airing all sorts of American talent shows, scripted live-action series and movies (mostly taken from AXN's showcase), as well as some Japanese ones -- at least a few new anime shows still premiered regularly, although the channel lost its MultipleDemographicAppeal as it replaced the bulk of its it's soccer programming with popular [[ShonenDemographic Shonen]] series. Around 2012, Animax it), Fox announced that in March 2013, it would be forming a new spinoff of Creator/{{FX}} known as FXX. Without a doubt, it replaced Fox Soccer, while the remaining soccer programming moved to Fox Sports 1 & 2 depending on prominence. ''Fox Soccer Plus'' remains in the air though, airing soccer that isn't prominent to air on the new Fox Sports channels (rumors have swirled that it'll be rebranded as ''Fox Sports 3''). ''Fox Soccer News'', the [[CaptainObvious soccer news]] show that the Canadian channel Sportsnet produced for the network, got replaced with an in-house soccer show on [=FS1=] after its launch which few of FSC's viewers believed would last a few months (while Sportsnet re-launched the program as ''Soccer Central'' with its own branding); they were proven right as it went on a 'never to return' hiatus once the NFL playoffs began going bankrupt -- and when [=FS1=] and [=FS2=] got the rights to its anime series slowly expired, they broke up their advertising deal, and as Sony considered anime to be the cause video simulcast of its problems (as opposed to their terrible coverage, mishandled marketing, careless decision-making and often sub-par dubbing work), they've only focused Mike Francesa's afternoon radio show (formerly on adding more and more live-action shows and movies to Animax's showcase, and even canceled the long-awaited premieres nationally-limited YES Network, which Fox bought a majority-stake in back in 2012)).\\
\\
FXX's launch featured a final Fox Sports 1 promo, followed by footage
of several anime series. Essentially, it became AXN's wastebasket, and the handful of Japanese shows a soccer game being interrupted by that they still held broadcasting rights to were just tired reruns practically begging to be taken off the air. The fact that Animax only aired scene from 8 p.m. ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' where a couch gives birth to 2 a.m., and about half of that airtime was just reruns anyway, made the situation seem much worse. As expected, the ratings dropped like a rock, and from mid-'12 to early '14, Animax lingered on in rerun-limbo.\\\
The Animax staff vanished from the 'net in October 2012, and their website was taken down a year thereafter. Animax was replaced with a non-anime channel called C8 (also owned by Chello Central Europe) in April 2014, whose bare function is to fill out the late-night timeslot with content lazily taken from Chello's other networks. In some of the neighboring regions, Animax turned into Sony Spin, an all-round entertainment network whose only notable anime program is ''Anime/DragonBallKai''.
Frank Reynolds. ItMakesSenseInContext.


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[[folder:[=NBCUniversal=] / Comcast Examples]]
* Bravo originally focused on independent cinema and the arts; for example, it was the U.S. outlet for Creator/CirqueDuSoleil specials/shows for years. They also featured what they termed "TV too good for TV": reruns of past artsy cult-favorite shows like ''Series/TwinPeaks'' and ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' shown unedited and free of commercial interruption. Original owners Rainbow Media (also the owner of Creator/{{AMC}} and IFC, which is a spin-off of Bravo) sold the channel to minority partner Creator/{{NBC}} in 2002, who originally intended to retool it into a no-genre entertainment channel not unlike Creator/{{TBS}}, TNT, and eventual corporate sibling Creator/USANetwork. Around 2004, it began a switch over to a pop-culture/occupational reality show format in the wake of hits like ''[[Series/QueerEye Queer Eye for the Straight Guy]]'', with occasional stragglers like ''Inside the Actors' Studio'' still inexplicably present. They've also shown ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'' and ''Series/{{House}}'' reruns, which are contrary to both their arts and reality programming, and built a whole franchise out of ''The Real Housewives'' in TheNewTens.
** The Canadian version of Bravo took a similar turn for the worse. As in the U.S., it was oriented towards arts and culture-related programming since its inception, and also aired independently produced short films from Canadian artists financed through the channel's Bravo!Fact fund. By the late 2000's, it began to shift away from the arts and culture programming (besides ''Inside the Actors' Studio''), but rather than going in a camp direction, it decided to turn into a drama-oriented entertainment channel not unlike TNT or USA, picking up ''Series/MadMen'', re-runs of Creator/{{CTV}} series such as ''Series/FlashPoint'' and ''Series/CriminalMinds'', and various feature films. This shift was even more pronounced under its current owners at Bell Media, who would later introduce an entirely new logo for the channel. Bravo Canada has essentially become Bell's answer to Creator/ShowcaseTelevision, a rival channel that had similarly punted its original format.
* [[Creator/{{E}} E! Entertainment Television]] originally showed movie previews, soap opera and talk show recap programs, and many making-of documentaries and specials that covered everything from theater to animation, serving as a sort of MTV for movie and TV buffs. It eventually became all about celebrity news (i.e. gossip) and True Hollywood Stories. Then it started airing all sorts of non-celebrity-related reality programs. With shows like ''The Girls Next Door'', ''Keeping Up With the Kardashians'' (and its many {{spinoff}}s) and two shows by bawdy comic Chelsea Handler[[note]]The TalkShow ''Chelsea Lately'', and the {{mockumentary}} series ''Series/AfterLately''.[[/note]], it comes as no surprise that in some commercials (and on ''TheSoup'') E! openly acknowledges itself as a [[GuiltyPleasures guilty pleasure]] channel.
* E!'s sister network, Style, launched as a network which stuck on two popular things in E!'s late-1990s scheduling their fashion and design coverage and when it launched it showed mostly runway shows and interior design programs designed to show off the current "styles" of a time period. This decayed into very generic reality programming (in order to not outshine sister network Oxygen), ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' reruns, and an inexplicable need for us to know about the private life of E!'s main female news anchor. In fall of 2013, it was abruptly replaced with the {{metrosexual}}-themed Esquire Network, a fate that was supposed to fall on Creator/G4TV.
* One of the most notorious examples of network decay this side of [=MTV=] can be seen with the troubled history of [[Creator/G4TV G4]], a television network that initially focused on videogames and geek culture. Despite featuring a slew of shows that are rather well-received today, the network struggled from the beginning, with the ratings that were brought in failing to please the network executives. This led to the network buying out Creator/TechTV, a popular computer enthusiast network with good ratings, and "[[ExecutiveMeddling merging]]" them into one channel, [=G4TechTV=]. This is where many would cite as when the roots of decay took hold, as the "merger" itself resulted in [[ScrewedByTheNetwork the near-complete jettison of the existing TechTV staff and programs in the process]], to much chagrin from the existing [=TechTV=] base. The merger itself only lasted a year before the channel reverted to the [=G4(TV)=] name.\\
\\
The decay only grew from there, as G4 then underwent a retool as "male-oriented" channel under then-new president Neal Tiles. [=G4TV=]'s lineup picked up reality shows like ''Totally Outrageous Behavior'' and ''Series/{{COPS}}'', Japanese game shows such as ''Series/NinjaWarrior'' and ''Series/UnbeatableBanzuke'', and reruns of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', ''Series/{{LOST}}'', and ''Series/{{Heroes}}''; all while whittling down any actual programs related to gaming and/or technology. Eventually, the only shows left on the network that were relevant to either channel's former demographics were ''Series/XPlay'' and ''Series/AttackOfTheShow'', with the channel at this point having mutated into a geekier version of Creator/SpikeTV. To put in perspective how little anyone thought of G4 since the decay, the premiere of ''Proving Ground'' [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-tv-column-g4-pulls-this-weeks-proving-ground-after-ryan-dunns-death/2011/06/20/AGZyWVdH_story.html got 31,000 viewers]], less than the population of Juneau, UsefulNotes/{{Alaska}}, while the [=UFC=] passed by the opportunity to own G4 for their own network for a deal with Fox.\\
\\
[=DirecTV=] even found so little to value in the network that they ''[[http://news-briefs.ew.com/2010/11/01/directv-drops-g4/ dropped it]]'', and [=DirecTV=] almost never drops networks in comparison with Dish Network. With the departure of network veterans and hosts of the few remaining Gaming/Technology shows, Adam Sessler (co-host of Series/XPlay) and Kevin Pierera (host of AttackOfTheShow), and [[http://kotaku.com/5955278/crisis-at-g4-studios-gaming-shows-will-be-cancelled-source-says G4 ending both ''X-Play'' and ''Attack Of The Show'' by the end of 2012]], the channel's death was set in stone.\\
\\
Plans were made to re-launch G4 as Esquire Network, but on September 9, 2013, NBC changed their minds and announced it would replace Style Network (which is carried on more cable systems than G4, most critically [=DirecTV=]) instead. G4, meanwhile, [[http://xfinity.comcast.net/learn/programming/ was pulled from the Comcast cable lineup in January 2014.]] Every other major provider has removed it on the same timeframe or earlier, and it became a shambling zombie feed of ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'', ''Campus PD'' and ''Series/WebSoup'' reruns until the network was fully shut down at 11:59 PM eastern time on December 31, 2014, when [=AT&T=] U-verse and the few cable providers that still had G4 [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIaPvsrUG8w dropped the network]], almost a full two years from when it was originally supposed to end. In December 2016, Esquire ended up losing the [=DirecTV=] carriage anyways (as well as virtually ''every other cable provider'' besides C-Band and Verizon [=FiOS=]) as they went with the new common reasoning for dropping channels that the repeats on that channel are also on Netflix, Hulu, and an assortment of other networks, making it pointless to keep.
** While G4's Canadian counterpart is still around today, they also went under a similar network decay as G4. It got to the point that the CRTC pressured that G4 Canada was competing against sister channel OLN and deviating too heavily from its purpose, which was to air technology-related programming. They also [[http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-447.htm stated]] that the channel's "programming is not in compliance with its nature of service definition" and that it detail measures "to ensure that the service is in compliance with its nature of service." Even worse is the network hasn't produced any tech-centric content since 2006; thanks to the loss of ''X-Play'' and ''Attack of the Show'', the only new original programs aired by G4 were ''EP Daily'' and ''Reviews on the Run'' (two long-running, Canadian-produced video game shows that [[ChannelHop channel hopped]] to Creator/{{Citytv}} and G4 from A-Channel and Space; they too have drifted to covering films and comic books once in a while too). Not to mention, it's still re-running episodes of ''Call for Help'' and ''The Lab with Leo Laporte'' that talk about Windows XP and the original iPod as "current technology", with most tips and calls being only pertinent to a grandmother that refuses to switch out the Dell Dimension she bought in 2003.\\
\\
Aside from those, the channel fulfilled its "technology" mandate by airing old History Channel shows about military technology (''Tactical to Practical'' and ''Man, Moment, Machine''), and the British programmes ''Bang Goes The Theory'' and ''Rude Tube'' (which is somewhat of a TransatlanticEquivalent of ''Web Soup''). But it only got worse after Rogers ended its partnership with The Electric Playground Network and G4 stopped airing ''EP Daily'' and ''Reviews on the Run''. Not only has the channel fallen back to OLN repeats, but has now added reruns of low-rated Citytv shows and, ironically, ''Campus PD'' to the mix.
* Creator/{{NBC}}SN, formerly ''Versus'' and originally the ''Outdoor Life Network'' (licensed from a magazine of the same name), originally focused on outdoorsy stuff like hunting and fishing. Then their annual coverage of the Tour de France became popular, due to Lance Armstrong's utter dominance at the ''Tour''. They then acquired the rights to the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]] which, unless they were playing a hockey game ''outside'', didn't fit the channel's format. Around the same time, they started to focus on extreme sports and college sports (although stuck with only covering lower-tier games from conferences in the western half of the country despite being based out of Philadelphia - because the [[{{ESPN}} Worldwide Leader]] got almost everything else - and out of New England prior to that), resulting in a name change to "Versus". In 2012, following a merger with NBC and Comcast, Versus was rebranded as the NBC Sports Network (later shortened to NBCSN) to become a 24 hour cable extension of NBC Sports, and perhaps to directly compete with Creator/{{ESPN}}. Low-brow programming such as GroinAttack clip shows and ''[[TheSoup Sports Soup]]'' was abandoned the moment NBC took over.\\
\\
The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and obscure sports like hockey and the [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts mixed]] [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship martial arts]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the UFC being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]], and ''especially'' the UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which is aired by NBCSN among other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the better parts of Fox's coverage (including their commentators). NBCSN has also been used to broadcast a larger amount of live [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with too many commercial breaks[[note]]Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their own reduced package from 2007 to 2016, when NBC got it back on their own. It had all the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]]
** The network still devotes a good portion of its channel space for outdoor programing; much of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractual commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk if any of these programs run into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
* Oxygen was once the anti-Creator/{{Lifetime}}, airing shows revolving around making women better, ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' and ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' reruns, and programming about yoga and improving yourself, along with women's sports. By the time NBC bought the channel in 2007, the original partners had long left, and the new management decided programming which exploited women such as the ''Bad Girls Club'' (which itself has long abandoned any attempts at reforming their subjects), ''Snapped'' (profiles about women killers which edge uncomfortably close to idolization) and multiple shows revolving around Tori Spelling's love life would do better. Some argue that the decay began as early as 2004, which, for around a year, devoted late nights to the next rung below softcore porn (and actual {{Bowdlerise}}d Canadian softcore porn) and a QVC-like block devoted to ''sex toys''.
** Now it seems like the decay is coming full circle, since [[http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/oxygen-rebrand-true-crime-channel/410607 NBCUniversal announced that Oxygen was becoming a true crime channel]] in summer 2017, with a reboot of TNT's ''Cold Justice'' being among the first programs under the new format.
* Cloo (known prior to 2011 as Sleuth) supposedly should have been devoted fully to crime drama reruns from the deep reservoir of Universal's vaults, but by the end was more known as the "USA Network Annex" as all of its programming consisted of programs already rerunning or original series from USA Network, with the only Universal shows seen being the ubiquitous ''SVU'' and ''Criminal Intent''; those Universal crime drama reruns are seen on Cozi TV these days. In the summer of 2016, the head of NBC's cable division effectively gave the network its death sentence, as 'skinny bundles' came into vogue and rerun-only networks became verboten with the new age of Internet television providers who aren't willing to carry them. Dish Network and many other providers were dropping the network over the years, because its rerun-centric nature made it pointless when its programming can already be seen on other networks and online. Cloo ended their run quietly on February 1, 2017 on a decay-appropriate note, finishing their broadcast by airing the entirety of ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.
* Syfy UK shows some heavily-promoted proper science fiction series, but mostly they construct their schedule from a mix of documentaries on the supernatural/occult/alien abduction, kung fu movies, MMA, action series (such as ''HumanTarget''), frequent ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' reruns, {{disaster movie}}s, monster movies, [[SwordAndSandal sword-and-sandal]] flicks, medieval adventure movies (''Film/FirstKnight'' and ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves''?), all kinds of fantasy, and quirky dramas like ''EliStone''. It's rare to see genuine science fiction movies there. Syfy UK seems to following the American network's trend with the announcement that they will be showing the [[MixedMartialArts MMA]] promotion ''BAMMA''.
* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. No more. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which are sourced from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were kept from Nonstop to Cozi.)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Disney Examples]]
* Pat Robertson launched the CBN Satellite Service, a cable arm of his ministry, the Christian Broadcasting Network, in 1977. It gradually began to add more and more {{sitcom}} reruns, general entertainment, [[GameShow game shows]], and other non-religious programming to its lineup throughout TheEighties in a bid to make it onto basic cable lineups outside of [[DeepSouth the Bible Belt]]. As the ratio of religious to non-religious programming shifted, it became the CBN Family Channel, then the Family Channel, before being bought out by {{Fox}}. Fox Family floundered and was sold to Creator/{{Disney}}, which wanted to rename the channel to "XYZ" to remarket it to a different audience by repurposing ABC shows. However, they did not do so.\\
Its name may not have changed, but as evidenced by shows like ''Series/{{Greek}}'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', ''Series/KyleXY'', and ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', the station now known as Creator/ABCFamily isn't really that family-oriented anymore. Aside from its weekend movie blocks, it's now a basic cable version of [[TheWB the former WB network]].[[note]]When you actually air a movie called ''Satan's School for Girls'' and a show like ''WesternAnimation/SlackerCats'' on a channel with the word "family" in it, you are very much "a different kind of family"![[/note]] The ultimate {{irony}} is that Pat Robertson is one of the MoralGuardians who objects to the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, yet ABC Family owned the US broadcasting rights to the ''Film/HarryPotter'' films and aired ''Potter'' marathons constantly (at least until [=NBCUniversal=] acquired the broadcast rights in 2016). ''Series/The700Club'' (required in the original contract with Pat Robertson) and a Sunday morning/late night {{Infomercial}} block filled with megachurch pastors are the only things left hinting at ABC Family's roots as a religious channel, and even then they're buried at 11:00 PM with a {{content warning|s}} containing an unequivocal "does not reflect the views of ABC Family" due to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Robertson_controversies Robertson's laundry list of controversial statements and positions]].[[note]]To name just one example, he agreed with Jerry Falwell's statement that the USA's immorality invited the events of 9/11 '''[[TooSoon the week of]]'''.[[/note]] They aren't even mentioned at all on the channel's website; you'll either have to go to the CBN website for that.\\
\\
In September 2015, ABC Family announced that it would re-brand as ''Freeform'' in January 2016, with a new focus on Millennials. Management also clarified that a commonly-heard rumor that the network was contractually forbidden from removing the word "Family" from its name without major repercussions was just an urban legend.
* Creator/DisneyChannel originally had a lineup of [[WaltDisney Walt-era]] Disney movies, cartoons, and TV shows, combined with original documentaries about the company's various projects, a lot of interesting imported shows (especially from Canada), and such programming for adults as ''Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion''. But as it lost ground to {{Nickelodeon}} in TheNineties, and as Disney itself began to expand from a studio into a multimedia company, it started to focus more and more on kids. It shoved most of the vintage programs aside, interspersing about three hours of cartoons at 1:00 AM with hours and hours of tween-centered programs and... BoyBand concerts... on Disney Channel? [[note]]The worst part was that, originally, the Disney Channel was a ''premium'' cable service like {{Creator/HBO}} or Cinemax, and was ''nothing'' like Nickelodeon, which was basic-cable from its conception. With Nickelodeon entering its golden age just as Disney was hitting a low point in programming quality, the only way to stop mass cancellation of subscriptions was to move it to basic-cable. '''Nickelodeon actually forced The Walt Disney Company to change Disney Channel's business model.'''[[/note]] It abandoned ''Vault Disney'', ''The Ink and Paint Club'', and most other broadcasts of classic Disney cartoons and shows in order to focus on the teenage demographic, with most of their shows featuring an actor/([[IdolSinger idol]]) singer/songwriter/dancer.\\
Disney Channel's tween pop focus, which began with the then-popular ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'' franchises, seemed to have overrun The Walt Disney Company as a whole throughout the mid-to-late 2000s, and the future of the company's reputation was in doubt, despite their acquisition of {{Pixar}} in 2006. Luckily, starting with the release of the traditionally-animated ''ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' in 2009, (almost) everything in the company is going back to its studio roots. Doesn't stop Disney's branded cable networks from catering exclusively to tweens and preschoolers, though.
** It's worth noting, as far as [[TheNineties The Nineties Kids]] are concerned, after Disney Channel's shift from premium to basic cable and their shift towards the teen demographic, their tween-targeted shows focused far less on being famous and moreso around family, friends, sports, and outdoor activities, like ''Series/TheFamousJettJackson'', ''The Jersey'', various sports-themed movies and more, under the programming block Zoog Disney. ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' may have paved the way for Music/HilaryDuff's IdolSinger status, but even then it wasn't focused on her career itself. Then, with the success of ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', [[Series/ShakeItUp more and]] [[Series/ANTFarm more shows]] [[Series/AustinAndAlly about fame]] [[Series/SonnyWithAChance were produced]] from 2006 onwards, and the ones that didn't focus on that became far more hokier--and, well, just look above. The change was jarring in that sudden and drastic shift in focus.
* The Southeast Asian feed of Disney Channel, aka Disney Channel Asia, is just as bad as it's US parent channel... The channel was fine up until the mid-2000's... but it got worse when the feed was overtaken by Malaysians and Singaporeans and at that point, the Southeast Asian feed [[ItsAllAboutMe doesn't care about the rest of the region]] as the channel, aside from the usual Disney fare and imports, aired ''Malaysian productions'' like [=Upin & Ipin=] and [=Boiboiboy=], as well as low-brow shows that most people are already tired of like OggyAndTheCockroaches, ''Series/JustForLaughsGags'' and MrBean. Even the show ''Waktu Rehat'' (Which by the way was made by Disney originally for the Malaysian feed) doesn't air dubbed but ''subbed'' in English (WTH?). And not to mention some Disney sitcoms have missing scenes that got censored for no reason (maybe this has something to do with the feed using the Disney Channel UK edits of the shows. Or maybe because of the different religions that lay in the Southern Asian feed.). At this point, the feed is beyond hopes of being like the old feed, to the point where you can actually call it Disney Channel Malaysia 2 (since there's an existing Disney Channel Malaysia feed, although Singapore also has it's own feeds, and at the moment the only differences between Malaysia, Singapore and Generic is slight variations in the programming schedule- all three are filled with Malaysian cruft), so if you're used to the uncut US versions of the original shows, your best option is to [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes just go underground]] (i.e. Wait until the newest episode finished aired on the US one so you can see it). Word has it that this happened because the Pay TV satellite monopoly in Malaysia, Astro, along with [=StarHub=] Singapore (''The'' Pay TV cable monopoly in Singapore), had managed to buy a sizable stake in Disney's South-East Asian operations. Yes, even Malaysians and Singaporeans don't like what the feeds had become. This even got worse, combined with ScrewedByTheNetwork: The Southeast Asian feed '''stopped''' airing ''Series/AustinAndAlly'' and ''Series/{{Jessie}}'' in favor of more ''Series/{{Violetta}}'' airings, angering both the two show's fans and the Auslly shippers in the region. There's even [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/87291874426 two confessions about the problem]] [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/103486725802 that state they're not amused]] about this. (And that's just the Pinoy viewers!)
* Creator/ToonDisney started out as the AlternateCompanyEquivalent to Cartoon Network, airing animated shows from the Disney archive (and some that they had acquired, mostly from Creator/DiCEntertainment) and classic Disney shorts. It would end up becoming an arch-rival to Cartoon Network's Creator/{{Boomerang}} upon its launch in 2000. A couple years later, Toon Disney underwent a major revamp, opting to air original, modern programming rather than endless repeats of older shows. All of the classic Disney shorts, as well as a majority of the [=DiC=] shows (including ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'', which was a notable staple on Toon Disney since its 1998 launch), were dropped from the channel, and shows that were originally on the OneSaturdayMorning block took their place. A year later, they started airing a growing number of non-Disney cartoons (including some from their arch-rival, Creator/WarnerBros), and the ''Jetix'' block, which featured shows like ''PowerRangers'', ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', ''TheTick'', and ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'', started eating up a growing chunk of the channel's airtime. Live-action shows and movies started appearing on the network, mirroring Cartoon Network's decay. Finally, in 2009, Toon Disney was renamed Creator/DisneyXD (which means "[[TotallyRadical eXtreme Disney]]") and turned into a network aimed at young boys -- the SpearCounterpart to the increasingly female-focused Disney Channel. In other words, it finally ''became'' Jetix in all but name in the process, dropping a significant portion of its remaining animated content to cram in episodes of ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', ''Series/EvenStevens'', and ''Series/ZekeAndLuther''. Ironically, in the following years, Disney XD would start a process of relapse. Ever since Disney's purchase of Marvel and Lucasfilm, Disney XD would begin producing and airing more animated series, with live-action shows being in the minority.\\
\\
Nonetheless, you could say that all of this could had been avoided in the first place if Fox hadn't sold their successful "Fox Kids" lineup (which aired ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Digimon'', and others) to Disney/ABC via [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]. But it had to be done seeing that Fox Kids saw its ratings decline over the years. Fox then retooled their Saturday-morning lineup into the "Fox Box", which consisted almost entirely of shows from the now-defunct Creator/FourKidsEntertainment. Naturally, they lampshaded this by changing the lineup's name to "4Kids TV".
** In some other countries, Jetix is (or was) its own channel. For whatever reason, Disney decided that it would be better to append it as a programming block onto a network it has nothing to do with, and then let it swallow the network whole.
** In Latin America, the local version of Fox Kids was rebranded Jetix as well in 2004. Although at the beginning most of Fox Kids' programming (which included popular anime series) was mantained, they were soon dropped and Jetix became a channel dependent on ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' reruns (the series was initially acquired for the region by Disney), various ''PowerRangers'' shows of the Disney-produced era (that were on Fox Kids to begin with), ''Animation/{{Pucca}}'', ''Dinosaur King'' and the "Super Hora" block of Marvel Comics cartoons (''The Incredible Hulk'', ''X-Men'', and ''Spider-Man Unlimited''). By 2009, before it was rebranded as Creator/DisneyXD, ''The Fairly [=OddParents=]'' aired up to '''15 times a day''', while ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' aired an additional '''8 times a day each'''. Fortunately, after the change to Creator/DisneyXD, it has presented more variety of programming instead of just endless reruns of a few series. As of 2016, ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' are long gone, while ''FOP'' reruns are only limited to overnights and early mornings (note that reruns only comprise the first five seasons, seasons six to present air on Nickelodeon; both channels have shared the series for ''ten years''').
** In Eastern Europe, Fox Kids became Jetix, gradually dumping most of the Fox Original cartoons, but retaining Disney originals and anime adaptations, like ''ShamanKing'', eventually airing a few original shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/GalactikFootball'' and ''WesternAnimation/ObanStarRacers''. By late 2009, it mutated again into a straight-up Disney Channel, dumping the old Jetix shows and replacing them with regular Disney Channel broadcast.
** Australia had the Jetix programming block on the Seven Network for a short time, vanishing just as quietly as it emerged. The same happened in Canada on FamilyChannel.
* [[Creator/{{ESPN}} ESPNEWS]] was created specifically so you could get scores and highlights in a half-hour (or much less if you just looked at the much more detailed ticker). After its ticker was replaced with the regular ESPN ticker, it became ''SportsCenter 24/7''. Eventually, the only true ESPNEWS programming left was the ''Highlight Express'' deep in late night, with the rest of the day filled with talking-head show repeats, ESPN Radio simulcasts, and overflow sports like softball and the UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} Nationwide Series [[note]]A practice that ended after the rights for the Nationwide Series, now Xfinity Series, went to Fox and NBC[[/note]]. In June 2013, [[http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Daily/Issues/2013/06/13/Media/ESPN.aspx ''Highlight Express'' was canceled]], leaving an overnight show about soccer (''ESPN FC Press Pass'') the only program produced solely for the network. ''And then'' ESPN decided to replace that soccer show with a new one on ESPN2.
* You have to give it to Disney they're at least honest about knowing when an entire '''genre''' is decaying, and have announced that because of both the fading influence of {{Soap Opera}}s and the fact you can now click over to a network website or flip on your cable on demand service to catch up on a soap anytime rather than waiting to record it Sunday morning at 4:00 AM, [=SOAPNet=] was replaced with Disney Junior, the new name for Disney's preschool shows (formerly Playhouse Disney) in March 2012. Better that they announce the decay now and get everyone prepared than just letting it wither on the vine. \\
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Unfortunately however, it led to the shocking cancellation of both ''Series/AllMyChildren'' and ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' under the Brian Frons excuse that without [=SOAPNet=] airings, the shows would be too expensive to produce without a cable channel component, a theory which quickly held no water with the soap community. In April 2013 both shows came back online, but under a [[NoBudget much-reduced]] effort that eventually fell apart due to infighting between the new owners and ABC over characters shuffled over to ''Series/GeneralHospital'' to prevent their re-use by the new owners. \\
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Admittedly, though, [=SOAPNet=] was always a tenuous project, as anything except ''Series/BeingErica'' that wasn't soap or a ''Series/GilmoreGirls'' marathon never did well at all for the channel. Outside of soap hours, it was a dumping ground for shows ABC and ABC Family rejected and only picked up to make existing producers happy or stop a format that might do well in another iteration from escaping to another network, or in the case of Greg Berendt, provided a firewall to burn off an ABC primetime show that was ordered before the massive failure of his 2006 daytime talk show; it didn't air until 2009. Also, it was proven over time that there's only a limited amount of interest in old soap episodes from canceled programs nobody's willing to catch up on ''Ryan's Hope'' episodes from April 1975, except for unexpected PeriodPiece curiosity.\\
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Despite the discontinuation announcement and Disney Junior launching in March 2012 however, [=SOAPNet=] continued to run on many cable systems which really didn't want to deal with subscriber complaints if they pulled it off (especially from ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'' fans who depended on it for their daily fix of those shows), with only a few national systems currently carrying Disney Junior because of some factors, including cost for the channel, forced HD carriage, and systems like Dish and DirecTV objecting to carrying a channel which won't have much of an audience past 10pm (Unlike Nick Jr., Disney Junior has few programs with PeripheryDemographic appeal, and there's ''no way'' Disney would try to re-create Creator/AdultSwim with one of their networks for late night). [=SOAPNet=] then was programming from that point through ABC Family as a sort-of extension channel and retained much of its programming, along with ABC Family content like ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'' and and the first ever run in syndication of ''Series/VeronicaMars'' (for awhile it was carrying [[IShallTauntYou viewership taunting]] weekend marathons of ''The Chew'' early in the winter until Brian Frons finally got his desk cleaned out), so it remained in vindication for two years after it was to have ended.\\
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Eventually though, [=SOAPNet=] melted away. During the Viacom/[=DirecTV=] dispute where the Viacom children's networks were pulled, by [[ThereAreNoCoincidences mere coincidence]], the satellite provider suddenly became interested in carrying Disney Junior and made a deal to launch it on a Saturday morning out of thin air, so [=SOAPNet=]'s days on [=DirecTV=] became numbered. Other providers eventually made deals as tots teased by ''WesternAnimation/SofiaTheFirst'' specials on Disney Channel made their parents plead for the network it aired on, and the rebranded TVGN under CBS ownership (now known as Pop) took the rights for same-day ''Young and the Restless'' and ''Bold and the Beautiful'' repeats over to their network, assuring a happy ending for those two shows at least; the original ''90210'' fans also got their show back on TVGN starting Labor Day 2014. Disney eventually announced that it would bury [=SOAPNet=]'s hatchet at the end of 2013, for real this time, and it ended quietly at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve 2013, showing nothing but black after the credits of its final ''Series/GeneralHospital'' rerun. The final Disney Junior holdout, Dish Network (which was involved in an epically long negotiation with Disney over a myriad of issues, which lead to Dish only airing their channels in Standard Definition) added the network in the spring of 2014.
* A&E ("Arts & Entertainment" and currently owned by Disney and Hearst Corporation) used to show artsy films, documentaries (most notably their flagship series ''Biography''), and British mystery and period dramas aimed at a highbrow (or at least high-middlebrow) adult audience, like a basic-cable version of Creator/{{PBS}}. However, a regime change in 2002 caused much of that programming to be moved over to the History Channel and the Biography Channel (see more on both below), while A&E itself switched its target audience to [[LowestCommonDenominator the opposite end of the spectrum]] virtually overnight. Today, it runs reality shows like ''Series/StorageWars'', ''Series/{{Hoarders}}'', and ''Series/DuckDynasty'', TrueCrime shows, and reruns and marathons of ''Series/CSIMiami''. An executive for the channel even joked at one point that it experienced the fastest drop in average demographic age ever, and ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' did [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-sad-ways-ae-became-walmart-television-networks/ an entire article]] comparing the post-decay network to UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}.
** Its Biography Channel spin-off -- later known as "Bio" -- didn't fare much better once the bio-show craze ''Biography'' spearheaded in the late 1990s fizzled out. At one point, they showed reruns of ''Series/NightCourt'' and ''Series/NewsRadio'' in an attempt to be to A&E what Boomerang was to Creator/CartoonNetwork - these shows having been rerun on A&E in the past. In TheNewTens, about two-thirds of the lineup consists of sensational TrueCrime documentaries and paranormal or crime-related reality shows picked up from the parent network, with some of the paranormal titles having titles such as ''The Family Who Slays Together'', ''Killer Kids'', and ''Celebrity Ghost Stories''. A&E called it quits when, in July 2014, Bio re-launched as the lifestyle network FYI.
** The Latin American feed of A&E, which suffered the exact same decay as their master network (and then some), now claims on their bumps that "A&E" stands for "'''A'''cción y '''E'''moción" ("Action and Emotion"). Retronym justification of the decay?
* Once called "The All-[[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] Channel", much of Creator/TheHistoryChannel's (now called "History") programming now consists of [[DocuSoap docu-soaps]] (''Series/IceRoadTruckers'', ''Series/AxMen'') and semi-documentaries with some (rather lowbrow) historical content (''Series/PawnStars'' and its spinoffs, as well ''Series/AmericanPickers'') focused on roughnecks or [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories conspiracy theory "documentaries"]] about [[Series/AncientAliens aliens]], the Bible Code, ghosts, {{Atlantis}}, Nostradamus, and {{the end of the world|AsWeKnowIt}}, earning the network the derisive nickname "The Hysterical Channel". Regarding ''actual'' history programming, they air, at best, specials on a few major holidays, and only when their big ratings grabbers like ''Series/PawnStars'' are on season hiatus. The only other time any actual historical programming shows up is to piggyback of any major upcoming films based on historical events. It makes many older fans long for the "Hitler Channel" days when all of their programming seemed to be about WorldWarII and [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]]. And then in 2015 they decided to combine the conspiracy theory stuff with Nazis by airing a show claiming that Hitler didn't actually die in Berlin and instead escaped to Argentina.\\
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One big reason for the network's decay is that the Smithsonian Institution, which was one of the go-to organizations for the History Channel in their early days, is now under an exclusive deal with Creator/{{Showtime}} where they produce programming around Smithsonian exhibits and properties for their exclusive Smithsonian Channel, which is not allowed to decay by design, while Showtime and Creator/{{CBS}} maintain rights to the institution's film library. Showtime, of course, isn't about to do anything to help its competitor, thus History has to look for other ideas to fill their broadcast day. Perhaps the only reason History didn't start calling themselves "THC" was because of that initialism's drug connotations.
** History International went from a channel focused on world history to a vault channel for old History Channel documentaries. It changed its name to H2, with the slogan "More 2 History", coinciding with a shift to placing many of History's remaining serious programming, like ''The Universe'', on the channel... along with blocks of History's conspiracy and paranormal fare. On February 29th, 2016, A&E replaced H2 with the American version of a new cable network called Viceland, in a joint venture with Vice Media.
** Realizing its sheer number of military programmes, including a documentary series on modern-day Canadian fighter pilots, the UK now has a Military History channel spun off from its History Channel. And now it's started some slippage as well, with a regular "Demilitarised Zone" slot where it can repeat the ''rest'' of the documentaries that used to be on History back when it wasn't showing ''Ice Road Truckers''. The little known US version of Military History is so far committed to showing all military-themed shows...whether they be WWII, Samurai-themed or biblical figures fighting across Canaan (modern-day Israel).[[note]]In defense of that last one, they do present rundowns of the weapons of the era, and even try to account for some of the "miraculous" happenings in the Bible accounts using actual military tactics of the time[[/note]]
** Due to the [[{{Understatement}} very emotionally charged]] political election, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a topic we will not argue about here]], History Channel had the idea of creating a topical "documentary" about how UsefulNotes/{{Nostradamus}} may have predicted the election between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump titled "Nostradamus: Election 2016". They uses a few of lines of his Quatrains that [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory vaguely relate to]] the two and their personalities and scandals.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Animax Internatonal Distributors]]
* Creator/{{Animax}} (supposed to be a 24-hour {{anime}} channel operated by Creator/SonyPictures), in its Latin American side, both Brazilian and Spanish-speaking versions, became this:
** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occurred in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
** Before Animax LA was owned by Sony, it had other name, Locomotion. Originally a children oriented channel, but later became a youth oriented channel a year later to avoid competition with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, and shortly after an adult oriented animation channel (it showed things like ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'', ''ComicBook/TheMaxx'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHead'', the ''ComicStrip/PrinceValiant'' movies and ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts, among others), eventually it evolved into an anime channel (showing more than 10 anime series a day), so it started calling itself "The Anime Channel". The problem is that after a while it anime was aired with other programs like ''WesternAnimation/{{Duckman}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Eventually, it created an advertisement that said ''"The good anime, takes time. Anime-station"''. Watchers were really confused by this, but it turned out they sold their rights to an anime channel. Eventually this lead to the channel being rebranded to Animax.
** As Sony Spin, the channel still aired anime at early morning hours, even airing new series like ''Manga/NodameCantabile'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist Brotherhood'' and new episodes of ''Manga/{{Bleach}}''. This changed in March 2012, when the slot was replaced by live action shows, thus abandoning anime programming completely. The new channel got such lousy ratings that their exclusive live-action series were moved to sister channel Sony Entertainment. Sony Spin became a rerun loop of series such as ''Series/That70sShow'', ''Series/JoanOfArcadia'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', old movies and even a Latin American soap opera. This effectively meant Sony Spin itself entered into a drift status. In 2014, many cable systems began retiring the channel, in some places being replaced by History 2 and in others with the then-debuting Latin version of Creator/{{Lifetime}}. The channel's official shutdown took place in July 1 of the same year for South America and July 31 for the rest of the countries, ending nearly 18 years of broadcast (since it was launched as Locomotion).
* Animax South Africa followed the same disastrous way as Latin America's and Spain's. Japanese animation is now almost in the minority and are few and far between, as reality shows have taken over the schedule, and was soon closed down to make way for a new channel, Sony Max, which basically airs the same reality shows that aired on Animax South Africa.
* Animax Spain followed the same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
* Hungary's Animax has also gone down this route. It launched in 2004 under the name A+, and focused almost entirely on Japanese animation with some American cartoons thrown into the mix. Though the ratings weren't bad, and the RTL Group kept the channel alive by supplying their anime dubs, the network's real owners (Chello Central Europe) ignored it. Sony Pictures took ownership of the channel in 2007, and A+ attempted to keep itself up by airing subtitled anime releases, an act which had the effect of drastically lowering their ratings. After Sony rebranded it as Animax, dubbed productions came back and all seemed good. However in 2009, they decided to turn the channel into a general youth entertainment network, and started airing all sorts of American talent shows, scripted live-action series and movies (mostly taken from AXN's showcase), as well as some Japanese ones -- at least a few new anime shows still premiered regularly, although the channel lost its MultipleDemographicAppeal as it replaced the bulk of its programming with popular [[ShonenDemographic Shonen]] series. Around 2012, Animax began going bankrupt -- the rights to its anime series slowly expired, they broke up their advertising deal, and as Sony considered anime to be the cause of its problems (as opposed to their terrible coverage, mishandled marketing, careless decision-making and often sub-par dubbing work), they've only focused on adding more and more live-action shows and movies to Animax's showcase, and even canceled the long-awaited premieres of several anime series. Essentially, it became AXN's wastebasket, and the handful of Japanese shows that they still held broadcasting rights to were just tired reruns practically begging to be taken off the air. The fact that Animax only aired from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., and about half of that airtime was just reruns anyway, made the situation seem much worse. As expected, the ratings dropped like a rock, and from mid-'12 to early '14, Animax lingered on in rerun-limbo.\\\
The Animax staff vanished from the 'net in October 2012, and their website was taken down a year thereafter. Animax was replaced with a non-anime channel called C8 (also owned by Chello Central Europe) in April 2014, whose bare function is to fill out the late-night timeslot with content lazily taken from Chello's other networks. In some of the neighboring regions, Animax turned into Sony Spin, an all-round entertainment network whose only notable anime program is ''Anime/DragonBallKai''.
[[/folder]]
9th Mar '17 6:19:05 PM IAmNotAFunguy
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* This is pretty much the case for independent channels in America. Many channels arose beginning in the 1960's and through to the 1980's with absolutely no network affiliation of any kind. These channels still managed to air just as wide a variety of programs as network channels but they had the added benefit of being able to program their own prime time. As the popularity of cable rose in the 1980's people would turn to cable for more variety of programming leaving independent channels behind. As channels lost ratings they were purchased left and right by non-traditional broadcasters like ''Creator/{{TBN}}'' or Home Shopping Network who would all but take over their programming. This was done so the networks would have to be carried by cable systems in the areas the system served. By the late 1980's new network channels emerged that tried to gain ground as major network channels, the first being ''Creator/{{Fox}}'' in 1987 followed by the emergence of ''Creator/TheWB'' and ''Creator/{{UPN}}'' in the mid 1990's. Paxson Communications would go the way of taking over channels with an all-infomercial network in 1996 before they too would introduce a major network in the form of Pax TV. By the 2000's the WB would become ''Creator/TheCW'' and ''Creaotr/MyNetworkTV'' would be introduced, and the latter would die out as a network in 2009 and become more of a broadcast service. Today channels carrying an affiliation with [=MyNetworkTV=] are very close to being independent but you're not likely to see more than just reruns of ''Series/TheJerrySpringerShow'' or other talk shows, the occasional game show, and the occasional children's show just to meet FCC Requirements for children's television. That is if your independent channel actually is more than just a 24/7 infomercial channel.

to:

* This is pretty much the case for independent channels in America. Many channels arose beginning in the 1960's and through to the 1980's with absolutely no network affiliation of any kind. These channels still managed to air just as wide a variety of programs as network channels but they had the added benefit of being able to program their own prime time. As the popularity of cable rose in the 1980's people would turn to cable for more variety of programming leaving independent channels behind. As channels lost ratings they were purchased left and right by non-traditional broadcasters like ''Creator/{{TBN}}'' or Home Shopping Network who would all but take over their programming. This was done so the networks would have to be carried by cable systems in the areas the system served. By the late 1980's new network channels emerged that tried to gain ground as major network channels, the first being ''Creator/{{Fox}}'' in 1987 followed by the emergence of ''Creator/TheWB'' and ''Creator/{{UPN}}'' in the mid 1990's. Paxson Communications would go the way of taking over channels with an all-infomercial network in 1996 before they too would introduce a major network in the form of Pax TV. By the 2000's the WB would become ''Creator/TheCW'' and ''Creaotr/MyNetworkTV'' would be introduced, and the latter would die out as a network in 2009 and become more of a broadcast service. Today channels carrying an affiliation with [=MyNetworkTV=] are very close to being independent but you're not likely to see more than just reruns of ''Series/TheJerrySpringerShow'' or other talk shows, the occasional game show, and the occasional children's show just to meet FCC Requirements for children's television. That is if your You may still have an independent channel actually is with no affiliation of any kind including [=MyNetworkTV=] which carries the same format of programming, or it may be nothing more than just a 24/7 infomercial channel.channel carrying nothing but infomercials 24/7.
9th Mar '17 6:16:31 PM IAmNotAFunguy
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!The channel, with the exception of perhaps a few shows, has long abandoned its original concept.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:MTV Networks / Viacom Examples]]
->''"Wow, that was a real moment. That's weird for MTV."''
->'''Joel [=McHale=]:''' Hey, ya know what else is weird for MTV? '''[[TakeThat Showing a music video.]]'''
-->-- ''TheSoup''

One of the most documented cases is that of Creator/{{MTV}}, which began in 1981 as an all-MusicVideo station. Now the majority of its time is devoted to original non-music programming; mostly {{teen drama}}s, {{talk show}}s, and {{reality show}}s. That, or programs from other Creator/{{Viacom}}-owned networks, such as ''Series/AmericanGladiators'' and even ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''.
* The decay began in 1987 with ''Series/RemoteControl'' and continued in throughout the [[TheNineties 1990s]] with ''Series/TheRealWorld'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' (the latter of which featured music videos, albeit with ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''-style commentary by the title characters), two of the most popular programs in the network's history. The MTV executives saw this and started commissioning more non-music shows, until music had been pushed into late night/early morning and the after-school ''Total Request Live'' (''TRL'') block. At one point, they even ran commercials with the tagline "MTV: [[SelfDeprecation We Don't Play Music]]." Since the cancellation of ''TRL'' in 2008, the only lip service it still pays to its roots was with the "AMTV" blocks of videos. In 2010, MTV's [[http://www.creativereview.co.uk/images/uploads/2010/02/mtv_0.jpg logo was changed]] to omit the words "Music Television".
** ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' could be an indicator of how it decayed. It started off as about two minutes of animation and the rest was music videos. Then, the animations got longer as the videos became much more expensive to license. Then for a while, during the bottom of the decay they had nothing in between animations. A short-lived relaunch in 2011 was closer to the original, albeit with MTV shows as well as videos.
** Before ''Beavis'', others have noted MTV's mission statement began to slip when it debuted ''Yo! MTV Raps''. Before long, there were shows about other types of music (notably metal) that talked more about the music than actually ''showing'' it.
** In some European countries, MTV still primarily shows music videos. American reality TV isn't nearly as popular outside America. That also used to be true for Latin American MTV, but it eventually followed the steps of the U.S. channel.
** In the [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} United Kingdom]], MTV UK was re-branded as MTV One (now just plain MTV) and shows nothing but reality shows, animation, and live-action scripted shows such as ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' and ''Series/BlueMountainState''. [[note]]The new version of ''Series/TeenWolf'', which was ''actually produced by MTV'', is screened on another channel, Sky Living, instead of MTV UK, because MGM is the actual distributor of that show and doesn't have to sell it to international MTV networks if they don't want to.[[/note]] MTV UK's genre channels (MTV Base plays Urban, MTV Rocks plays indie rock and alternative, to give two examples) have their own programming related to the music they play, such as interviews. These have been cut back in favour of playing more music videos, leading to perhaps the first known instance of MTV being criticized for playing ''too many'' music videos. In 2011, MTV UK more or less stopped pretending to be a music channel, moving alongside the entertainment channels on Sky's EPG and launching a new channel called [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment MTV Music]] to fill in the missing gap.
** The French and Walloon (southern Belgium) MTV used to be an English-language channel (weirdly enough). They added subtitles and later dubbing to some of their shows (mostly animated shows and live broadcasts) before adding original French-language shows. This only made sense, considering the market, and they still aired plenty of music videos. However, like its foreign equivalents, it drifted toward reality shows (both original French shows and imported ones). It still airs some music (predominantly hip hop), but late at night.
** At one time, there were three music channels in the Netherlands MTV, The Music Factory (TMF), and The Box. MTV followed the all too familiar pattern with programming first shifting into the mainly R&B/Hip Hop/Rap genre, eventually phasing out to reality TV (although nothing Dutch; just stuff from the U.S.). TMF, the first true Dutch music channel, was soon bought out by MTV's parent company and changed from a channel with VJ's and life shows to a SMS-your-thoughts channel in addition to a radical music style change.
** The Italian MTV is also taking this route. Until the late 1990s/early 2000s, most of the schedule was composed of blocks of music videos and the occasional anime or ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode. Now it airs at least five or six episodes of American reality shows every day, and only two blocks of music one early in the morning and one late at night. There still is the occasional horror movie or anime, but those can be found only after midnight and change timeslots frequently.
** In Australia, pay TV company Foxtel, who has channel numbers ordered by categories, acknowledged this in November 2009, when they moved MTV from channel 808 (8''xx'' being Music Channels) to 124 (1''xx'' being General Entertainment Channels).
** New Zealand had C4, which was essentially MTV, up until the first quarter of 2011 when the channel as it was being renamed to 'Four' and another channel being set up to play music videos full-on (now called C4 in the old channel's stead). It remains to be seen whether the cycle will repeat.
** This trope is {{enforced|Trope}} by law for [[UsefulNotes/CanadianMultichannelNetworks MTV Canada]], whose broadcast license heavily restricts the amount of music-oriented programming it can air, and has Canadian content obligations during certain daypart. However, this was because of its own Total Abandonment; before becoming MTV, it was [=talktv=], a network dedicated solely to talk shows (mostly re-ran from CTV). Since the license was not changed, MTV Canada slipped right out of the gate.
** In the 90s and early 2000s, MTV Brazil started moving towards variety shows (some had relation to music, such as a soccer tournament between musicians and a movie show that showed videos for songs popularized in soundtracks). Then in 2006 they decided to pull the plug on their TRL equivalent, marking the point where the decay became irreversible - even if music countdowns and such are still featured (though not as popular\prominent as the comedy and tween-focused shows). Then the "original" MTV, with broadcast signal and owned by a media conglomerate under the license of Viacom, was closed and the new cable channel under Viacom command is still barely about music.
* [=MTV2=] started out as an actual music channel and, for a while after buying out the competing Box music network, became a true haven for music fans with its innovative and bizarre themed video blocks. After introducing the "two-headed dog" logo, [=MTV2=] more of less became "MTV with hip-hop and rock videos". Even then, [[AdoredByTheNetwork hip-hop has become the dominate genre on the channel]]; the indie rock-centric ''Subterranean'', was pushed into the unsatisfactory timeslot of 1:00 AM on Friday mornings before being canned in 2011.
** [=MTV2=] Europe didn't stop playing music videos, but abandoned its mission to play obscure music (especially ''120 Minutes''). It was an unpredictable channel that could play any genre the other channels weren't playing, commercial-free all day, starting out as "M2" in 1998. Then [[RevenueEnhancingDevices commercial interests came calling]], and the alternative music ended: Zane Lowe stopped hosting ''Gonzo'' for good, [=MTV2=] became [[InvisibleSubtleDifference MTV Two]] and focused on playing well-known guitar pop bands. Its name was [[http://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1222867 changed to "MTV Rocks" in 2010]]. Its evening schedule now consists of two hours of "Kasabian vs. The Killers vs. Kings Of Leon", bands that were all promoted in 2002-04 by [=MTV2=] before they were famous -- but crucially they weren't the ''only'' thing it played.
* [[Letters2Numbers Tr3s]] is a Spanish MTV channel that's just MTV's regular schedule with GratuitousSpanish, subtitles, and some more music videos, though not a lot.
* MTV's subscription channels have followed a similar pattern, with the metal-centric MTVX being replaced by the rap-centric MTV Jams. Same with VH-1 Soul, CMT Pure, and the aforementioned MTV Jams. MTV Hits was rebranded as [=NickMusic=] in October 2016. It's now a music channel for Nickelodeon (a Viacom-owned sister channel to MTV) that plays hit music geared towards young teens. It also features Nickelodeon characters in the breaks between videos and even plays videos from stars of Nickelodeon's children shows
* MTV's sister channel, Creator/VH1, was launched to stave off competition from Ted Turner's Cable Music Channel (it worked) and originally targeted the demographic that had grown out of [=MTV=] with videos by "adult contemporary" artists (Phil Collins, et al.). From there it added shows themed around music from the 1960s and '70s, plus some stand-up comedy programs to vary the lineup, and by the end of TheNineties it found a niche in music-related films (''Film/{{Footloose}}'', ''TheWall'', etc.) and documentary and trivia shows like ''Behind the Music'' and ''Pop-Up Video''. Starting at the TurnOfTheMillennium, however, it turned into a channel [[ILoveTheExties celebrating pop culture in general]] by getting D-list celebrities to comment on it. From there it moved to D-list celebrity shows, and only showed music videos for a few hours in the mornings. Its decay came full circle when, in November 2015, VH-1 shunted its video blocks in favor of sitcom reruns.
* VH-1 Classic may have anticipated this, launching as a station devoted purely to music and 1970s-'90s music videos and occasional music movies. It briefly decayed when it started airing VH-1 D-list shows in the off-hours, but reversed it with music festivals like Download and well-received talk shows like ''That Metal Show''. While some movies had tenuous music connections (''Film/{{Gremlins}}''?), it dropped ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' reruns in favor of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' (which has musical guests who sometimes double as hosts) and the channel's meat and potatoes remained as long video blocks and vintage concerts/concert films and documentaries. It found a niche in HardRock and HeavyMetal-related programs and was the '''only''' MTV channel to acknowledge the original's 30th anniversary in 2011, via a whole weekend of classic segments and promos! Exactly five years later, it was completely overhauled into '''MTV''' Classic, which features music videos from the 1980s, '90s and early 2000s as well as concert shows such as ''Unplugged'' on the one hand, and reruns of scripted and reality shows from TheNineties and the TurnOfTheMillennium on the other. However, since the scripted shows have given the channel abysmal ratings (as low as only 35,000 regular viewers according to ThatOtherWiki), MTV Classic has since switched to 100% music videos starting in January 2017.
* The Nashville Network, a country music and culture-oriented channel, was taken off-course after Viacom's acquisition of Westinghouse[=/=]CBS. The company decided, despite having been co-owned even before the merger, that TNN was redundant to its sister: the more music-oriented [[Creator/{{CMT}} Country Music Television]]. TNN began to morph into a genreless entertainment channel known as The ''National'' Network (otherwise later known as "The New TNN", even [[ArtifactTitle after it ceased to be "new"]]), with a focus on off-network reruns in an attempt to compete with the Creator/USANetwork, and then re-branded as the male-centric Creator/{{SpikeTV}}.
* Ironically, Creator/{{CMT}} also drifted towards programming with little if any connection to country music. In something of a double decay, CMT in 2007 began drifting away from ''that'', showing reruns of shows such as ''Series/HoganKnowsBest'' and ''Series/{{Nanny 911}}'' along with movies like ''Film/TheNegotiator''. Even Time Warner Cable noticed, suing Viacom for not airing a network consisting of mainly country programming. Viacom responded with corporate buzzspeak about how country fans prefer "a greater variety of programming" with "the same types of values and stories embodied by country music". They've since slid back though -- in addition to still showing more videos than any other basic-cable music channel, they found something of a niche with DeepSouth-flavored programming -- ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' reruns, a country-specific reboot of ''Series/TheSingingBee'', etc. Meanwhile, sister channel CMT Pure Country (originally VH-1 Country and renamed CMT Music in 2016) is almost entirely video-focused, even showing videos from the '80's and '90's. This still doesn't explain the reruns of ''Series/HellsKitchen'', a cooking competition based around fine dining in Los Angeles starring a chef from Europe, though.
* TV Land started out as a off-shoot of the Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} programming block Creator/NickAtNite, which preserved classic sitcoms and westerns from TheFifties, TheSixties, TheSeventies, and even some from TheEighties and introduced them to younger generations. This worked very well, but by the mid-2000s, TV Land felt the need to add some of their own productions, so they added a few of their own reality shows - while some of them were considered appropriate for the channel, since they featured celebrities from their prime time period (for example, Farrah Fawcett of ''Series/CharliesAngels'' had a reality show), most them had nothing to do with classic TV in any way or form whatsoever. During this time, TV Land also produced some documentary series that showcased older shows and movies, such as ''Tickled Pink'' (a program that looked at HomoeroticSubtext in classic shows) and ''Myths & Legends'' (which explored urban legends that surrounded old shows and movies for years). By the late 2000s, TV Land began adding more and more reruns of modern sitcoms to their lineup, phasing out more and more classic sitcoms, and also producing their own original sitcoms, including, ''Series/HotInCleveland'', ''Series/TheExes'', ''Series/RetiredAt35'', ''Series/TheSoulMan'', ''Series/HappilyDivorced'', and ''Series/{{Kirstie}}''. TV Land has received outcry from its viewers over this shift in their priorities, but the network has flat-out dismissed said outcry, on the grounds that [[MoneyDearBoy their original sitcoms are helping their revenue]]. This was also taken as an admission that classic TV only appeals to older audiences, and the network would rather reel in that coveted 18-34 demographic. But it wasn't until they started airing encores of current season ''Series/{{CSI}}'' episodes and reruns of the Steve Harvey-hosted ''Family Feud'' that TV Land realized [[{{Understatement}} they might have gone too far]]. In the summer of 2015, the network was revamped; targeting viewers from Generation X and introducing more edgier original shows such as ''Series/{{Younger}}'' and ''Series/{{Impastor}}''. While TV Land still airs older TV shows during the day, they have deemphasized their original format for the most part.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: 21st Century Fox Examples]]
A major restructuring of Fox's cable division in Fall 2013 lead to the decay and re-branding of Speed, Fuel TV, and FOX Soccer into FOX Sports 1, FOX Sports 2, and FXX, respectively:

* Speed was formerly known as Speedvision, and aired a much wider variety of programming back in the day, including documentaries and series about classic cars, automakers and racing teams, occasional Barret-Jackson auctions, coverage of various professional racing leagues (including UsefulNotes/FormulaOne, along with the SCCA World Challenge, which it even sponsored for a period), and others. In 2001, Fox bought a majority stake in Speedvision. Under Fox ownership, it was re-launched as Speed, but in reality, it had slowly morphed into what was effectively the NASCAR Network (Fox had later acquired the association's new unified television contract for the first half of the season in the Winston Cup and Busch Series, and then bought out ESPN's rights to the Truck Series). By the late 2000's, it had wiped out all of its ''good'' automotive programming in favor of endless tuner reality competitions, reality shows involving a towing business and repair shop, reruns of ''Series/PimpMyRide'', a show that is essentially ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace WITH VEHICLES]]]] and a GameShow which involved guessing quarter-mile times. By 2011, about 75% of Speed's lineup was devoted to NASCAR-related programming, including qualifying, practice sessions, and the full Truck Series season. They still aired other series (most notably the Rolex Sports Car Series and American Le Mans Series, which merged in 2014 to form the Tudor UsefulNotes/{{United SportsCar Championship}}), but they were often punted into obscure time slots, or as counter-programming for NASCAR broadcasts on other networks. They even aired luge and bobsled events as filler over the winter months, but there was some NASCAR CharacterOverlap thanks to Geoff Bodine (who also builds bobsleds), so it at least made sense (plus, it ''is'' still "speed"-y)\\

to:

!The channel, with the exception of perhaps a few shows, has long abandoned its original concept.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:MTV Networks / Viacom Examples]]
->''"Wow, that was a real moment. That's weird for MTV."''
->'''Joel [=McHale=]:''' Hey, ya know what else is weird for MTV? '''[[TakeThat Showing a music video.]]'''
-->-- ''TheSoup''

One of
the most documented cases is that of Creator/{{MTV}}, which began in 1981 as an all-MusicVideo station. Now the majority of its time is devoted to original non-music programming; mostly {{teen drama}}s, {{talk show}}s, and {{reality show}}s. That, or programs from other Creator/{{Viacom}}-owned networks, such as ''Series/AmericanGladiators'' and even ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''.
* The decay began in 1987 with ''Series/RemoteControl'' and continued in throughout the [[TheNineties 1990s]] with ''Series/TheRealWorld'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' (the latter of which featured music videos, albeit with ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''-style commentary by the title characters), two of the most popular programs in the network's history. The MTV executives saw this and started commissioning more non-music shows, until music had been pushed into late night/early morning and the after-school ''Total Request Live'' (''TRL'') block. At one point, they even ran commercials with the tagline "MTV: [[SelfDeprecation We Don't Play Music]]." Since the cancellation of ''TRL'' in 2008, the only lip service it still pays to its roots was with the "AMTV" blocks of videos. In 2010, MTV's [[http://www.creativereview.co.uk/images/uploads/2010/02/mtv_0.jpg logo was changed]] to omit the words "Music Television".
** ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' could be an indicator of how it decayed. It started off as about two minutes of animation and the rest was music videos. Then, the animations got longer as the videos became much more expensive to license. Then for a while, during the bottom of the decay they had nothing in between animations. A short-lived relaunch in 2011 was closer to the original, albeit with MTV shows as well as videos.
** Before ''Beavis'', others have noted MTV's mission statement began to slip when it debuted ''Yo! MTV Raps''. Before long, there were shows about other types of music (notably metal) that talked more about the music than actually ''showing'' it.
** In some European countries, MTV still primarily shows music videos. American reality TV isn't nearly as popular outside America. That also used to be true for Latin American MTV, but it eventually followed the steps of the U.S. channel.
** In the [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} United Kingdom]], MTV UK was re-branded as MTV One (now just plain MTV) and shows nothing but reality shows, animation, and live-action scripted shows such as ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' and ''Series/BlueMountainState''. [[note]]The new version of ''Series/TeenWolf'', which was ''actually produced by MTV'', is screened on another channel, Sky Living, instead of MTV UK, because MGM is the actual distributor of that show and doesn't have to sell it to international MTV networks if they don't want to.[[/note]] MTV UK's genre channels (MTV Base plays Urban, MTV Rocks plays indie rock and alternative, to give two examples) have their own programming related to the music they play, such as interviews. These have been cut back in favour of playing more music videos, leading to perhaps the first known instance of MTV being criticized for playing ''too many'' music videos. In 2011, MTV UK more or less stopped pretending to be a music channel, moving alongside the entertainment channels on Sky's EPG and launching a new channel called [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment MTV Music]] to fill in the missing gap.
** The French and Walloon (southern Belgium) MTV used to be an English-language channel (weirdly enough). They added subtitles and later dubbing to some of their shows (mostly animated shows and live broadcasts) before adding original French-language shows. This only made sense, considering the market, and they still aired plenty of music videos. However, like its foreign equivalents, it drifted toward reality shows (both original French shows and imported ones). It still airs some music (predominantly hip hop), but late at night.
** At one time, there were three music channels in the Netherlands MTV, The Music Factory (TMF), and The Box. MTV followed the all too familiar pattern with programming first shifting into the mainly R&B/Hip Hop/Rap genre, eventually phasing out to reality TV (although nothing Dutch; just stuff from the U.S.). TMF, the first true Dutch music channel, was soon bought out by MTV's parent company and changed from a channel with VJ's and life shows to a SMS-your-thoughts channel in addition to a radical music style change.
** The Italian MTV is also taking this route. Until the late 1990s/early 2000s, most of the schedule was composed of blocks of music videos and the occasional anime or ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode. Now it airs at least five or six episodes of American reality shows every day, and only two blocks of music one early in the morning and one late at night. There still is the occasional horror movie or anime, but those can be found only after midnight and change timeslots frequently.
** In Australia, pay TV company Foxtel, who has channel numbers ordered by categories, acknowledged this in November 2009, when they moved MTV from channel 808 (8''xx'' being Music Channels) to 124 (1''xx'' being General Entertainment Channels).
** New Zealand had C4, which was essentially MTV, up until the first quarter of 2011 when the channel as it was being renamed to 'Four' and another channel being set up to play music videos full-on (now called C4 in the old channel's stead). It remains to be seen whether the cycle will repeat.
** This trope is {{enforced|Trope}} by law for [[UsefulNotes/CanadianMultichannelNetworks MTV Canada]], whose broadcast license heavily restricts the amount of music-oriented programming it can air, and has Canadian content obligations during certain daypart. However, this was because of its own Total Abandonment; before becoming MTV, it was [=talktv=], a network dedicated solely to talk shows (mostly re-ran from CTV). Since the license was not changed, MTV Canada slipped right out of the gate.
** In the 90s and early 2000s, MTV Brazil started moving towards variety shows (some had relation to music, such as a soccer tournament between musicians and a movie show that showed videos for songs popularized in soundtracks). Then in 2006 they decided to pull the plug on their TRL equivalent, marking the point where the decay became irreversible - even if music countdowns and such are still featured (though not as popular\prominent as the comedy and tween-focused shows). Then the "original" MTV, with broadcast signal and owned by a media conglomerate under the license of Viacom, was closed and the new cable channel under Viacom command is still barely about music.
* [=MTV2=] started out as an actual music channel and, for a while after buying out the competing Box music network, became a true haven for music fans with its innovative and bizarre themed video blocks. After introducing the "two-headed dog" logo, [=MTV2=] more of less became "MTV with hip-hop and rock videos". Even then, [[AdoredByTheNetwork hip-hop has become the dominate genre on the channel]]; the indie rock-centric ''Subterranean'', was pushed into the unsatisfactory timeslot of 1:00 AM on Friday mornings before being canned in 2011.
** [=MTV2=] Europe didn't stop playing music videos, but abandoned its mission to play obscure music (especially ''120 Minutes''). It was an unpredictable channel that could play any genre the other channels weren't playing, commercial-free all day, starting out as "M2" in 1998. Then [[RevenueEnhancingDevices commercial interests came calling]], and the alternative music ended: Zane Lowe stopped hosting ''Gonzo'' for good, [=MTV2=] became [[InvisibleSubtleDifference MTV Two]] and focused on playing well-known guitar pop bands. Its name was [[http://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1222867 changed to "MTV Rocks" in 2010]]. Its evening schedule now consists of two hours of "Kasabian vs. The Killers vs. Kings Of Leon", bands that were all promoted in 2002-04 by [=MTV2=] before they were famous -- but crucially they weren't the ''only'' thing it played.
* [[Letters2Numbers Tr3s]] is a Spanish MTV channel that's just MTV's regular schedule with GratuitousSpanish, subtitles, and some more music videos, though not a lot.
* MTV's subscription channels have followed a similar pattern, with the metal-centric MTVX being replaced by the rap-centric MTV Jams. Same with VH-1 Soul, CMT Pure, and the aforementioned MTV Jams. MTV Hits was rebranded as [=NickMusic=] in October 2016. It's now a music channel for Nickelodeon (a Viacom-owned sister channel to MTV) that plays hit music geared towards young teens. It also features Nickelodeon characters in the breaks between videos and even plays videos from stars of Nickelodeon's children shows
* MTV's sister channel, Creator/VH1, was launched to stave off competition from Ted Turner's Cable Music Channel (it worked) and originally targeted the demographic that had grown out of [=MTV=] with videos by "adult contemporary" artists (Phil Collins, et al.). From there it added shows themed around music from the 1960s and '70s, plus some stand-up comedy programs to vary the lineup, and by the end of TheNineties it found a niche in music-related films (''Film/{{Footloose}}'', ''TheWall'', etc.) and documentary and trivia shows like ''Behind the Music'' and ''Pop-Up Video''. Starting at the TurnOfTheMillennium, however, it turned into a channel [[ILoveTheExties celebrating pop culture in general]] by getting D-list celebrities to comment on it. From there it moved to D-list celebrity shows, and only showed music videos for a few hours in the mornings. Its decay came full circle when, in November 2015, VH-1 shunted its video blocks in favor of sitcom reruns.
* VH-1 Classic may have anticipated this, launching as a station devoted purely to music and 1970s-'90s music videos and occasional music movies. It briefly decayed when it started airing VH-1 D-list shows in the off-hours, but reversed it with music festivals like Download and well-received talk shows like ''That Metal Show''. While some movies had tenuous music connections (''Film/{{Gremlins}}''?), it dropped ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' reruns in favor of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' (which has musical guests who sometimes double as hosts) and the channel's meat and potatoes remained as long video blocks and vintage concerts/concert films and documentaries. It found a niche in HardRock and HeavyMetal-related programs and was the '''only''' MTV channel to acknowledge the original's 30th anniversary in 2011, via a whole weekend of classic segments and promos! Exactly five years later, it was completely overhauled into '''MTV''' Classic, which features music videos from the 1980s, '90s and early 2000s as well as concert shows such as ''Unplugged'' on the one hand, and reruns of scripted and reality shows from TheNineties and the TurnOfTheMillennium on the other. However, since the scripted shows have given the channel abysmal ratings (as low as only 35,000 regular viewers according to ThatOtherWiki), MTV Classic has since switched to 100% music videos starting in January 2017.
* The Nashville Network, a country music and culture-oriented channel, was taken off-course after Viacom's acquisition of Westinghouse[=/=]CBS. The company decided, despite having been co-owned even before the merger, that TNN was redundant to its sister: the more music-oriented [[Creator/{{CMT}} Country Music Television]]. TNN began to morph into a genreless entertainment channel known as The ''National'' Network (otherwise later known as "The New TNN", even [[ArtifactTitle after it ceased to be "new"]]), with a focus on off-network reruns in an attempt to compete with the Creator/USANetwork, and then re-branded as the male-centric Creator/{{SpikeTV}}.
* Ironically, Creator/{{CMT}} also drifted towards programming with little if any connection to country music. In something of a double decay, CMT in 2007 began drifting away from ''that'', showing reruns of shows such as ''Series/HoganKnowsBest'' and ''Series/{{Nanny 911}}'' along with movies like ''Film/TheNegotiator''. Even Time Warner Cable noticed, suing Viacom for not airing a network consisting of mainly country programming. Viacom responded with corporate buzzspeak about how country fans prefer "a greater variety of programming" with "the same types of values and stories embodied by country music". They've since slid back though -- in addition to still showing more videos than any other basic-cable music channel, they found something of a niche with DeepSouth-flavored programming -- ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' reruns, a country-specific reboot of ''Series/TheSingingBee'', etc. Meanwhile, sister channel CMT Pure Country (originally VH-1 Country and renamed CMT Music in 2016) is almost entirely video-focused, even showing videos from the '80's and '90's. This still doesn't explain the reruns of ''Series/HellsKitchen'', a cooking competition based around fine dining in Los Angeles starring a chef from Europe, though.
* TV Land started out as a off-shoot of the Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} programming block Creator/NickAtNite, which preserved classic sitcoms and westerns from TheFifties, TheSixties, TheSeventies, and even some from TheEighties and introduced them to younger generations. This worked very well, but by the mid-2000s, TV Land felt the need to add some of their own productions, so they added a few of their own reality shows - while some of them were considered appropriate for the channel, since they featured celebrities from their prime time period (for example, Farrah Fawcett of ''Series/CharliesAngels'' had a reality show), most them had nothing to do with classic TV in any way or form whatsoever. During this time, TV Land also produced some documentary series that showcased older shows and movies, such as ''Tickled Pink'' (a program that looked at HomoeroticSubtext in classic shows) and ''Myths & Legends'' (which explored urban legends that surrounded old shows and movies for years). By the late 2000s, TV Land began adding more and more reruns of modern sitcoms to their lineup, phasing out more and more classic sitcoms, and also producing their own original sitcoms, including, ''Series/HotInCleveland'', ''Series/TheExes'', ''Series/RetiredAt35'', ''Series/TheSoulMan'', ''Series/HappilyDivorced'', and ''Series/{{Kirstie}}''. TV Land has received outcry from its viewers over this shift in their priorities, but the network has flat-out dismissed said outcry, on the grounds that [[MoneyDearBoy their original sitcoms are helping their revenue]]. This was also taken as an admission that classic TV only appeals to older audiences, and the network would rather reel in that coveted 18-34 demographic. But it wasn't until they started airing encores of current season ''Series/{{CSI}}'' episodes and reruns of the Steve Harvey-hosted ''Family Feud'' that TV Land realized [[{{Understatement}} they might have gone too far]]. In the summer of 2015, the network was revamped; targeting viewers from Generation X and introducing more edgier original shows such as ''Series/{{Younger}}'' and ''Series/{{Impastor}}''. While TV Land still airs older TV shows during the day, they have deemphasized their original format for the most part.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: 21st Century Fox Examples]]
A major restructuring of Fox's cable division in Fall 2013 lead to the decay and re-branding of Speed, Fuel TV, and FOX Soccer into FOX Sports 1, FOX Sports 2, and FXX, respectively:

* Speed was formerly known as Speedvision, and aired a much wider variety of programming back in the day, including documentaries and series about classic cars, automakers and racing teams, occasional Barret-Jackson auctions, coverage of various professional racing leagues (including UsefulNotes/FormulaOne, along with the SCCA World Challenge, which it even sponsored for a period), and others. In 2001, Fox bought a majority stake in Speedvision. Under Fox ownership, it was re-launched as Speed, but in reality, it had slowly morphed into what was effectively the NASCAR Network (Fox had later acquired the association's new unified television contract for the first half of the season in the Winston Cup and Busch Series, and then bought out ESPN's rights to the Truck Series). By the late 2000's, it had wiped out all of its ''good'' automotive programming in favor of endless tuner reality competitions, reality shows involving a towing business and repair shop, reruns of ''Series/PimpMyRide'', a show that is essentially ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace WITH VEHICLES]]]] and a GameShow which involved guessing quarter-mile times. By 2011, about 75% of Speed's lineup was devoted to NASCAR-related programming, including qualifying, practice sessions, and the full Truck Series season. They still aired other series (most notably the Rolex Sports Car Series and American Le Mans Series, which merged in 2014 to form the Tudor UsefulNotes/{{United SportsCar Championship}}), but they were often punted into obscure time slots, or as counter-programming for NASCAR broadcasts on other networks. They even aired luge and bobsled events as filler over the winter months, but there was some NASCAR CharacterOverlap thanks to Geoff Bodine (who also builds bobsleds), so it at least made sense (plus, it ''is'' still "speed"-y)\\
moment NBC took over.\\



In late 2012, signs began pointing towards total abandonment: they lost Formula One to NBC Sports Network, and rumors began swirling that Fox was planning to re-launch Speed as a mainstream sports network, which was something that Fox, surprisingly, didn't have yet (they had FX, niche channels such as Fuel TV and [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fox Soccer]], and the regional networks (which they had tried multiple times to try and turn into a national/local hybrid network)); on the final day of the EPL season in 2012, they aired a soccer game in a nine-network event due to a rare end of the season where the championship clinching and relegation did occur at the end of the season (usually it's all well and done by the end of April). On March 5, 2013, Fox officially unveiled Fox Sports 1, set for a launch on August 17, 2013, but not before Speed signed off at 6 A.M. with a sobering farewell speech...[[MoodWhiplash which was followed immediately with a happy welcome to Fox Sports 1]]. The rebranded network continues to air NASCAR programming (which includes everything ''but'' the races, except for the Camping World Truck Series and tape-delayed regional series events, all of which was broadcast by Speed), and was expanded with the addition of live Sprint Cup and Xfinity Series races beginning in the 2015 season (prior to this, the Xfinity Series, formerly the Nationwide Series, was on ESPN/ABC, and all Sprint Cup races were on Fox; only the All-Star Race and Budweiser Duels were on Speed; FX had aired races under the 2001-06 TV deal)
** And for extra Total Abandonment points, Fox Sports 1 cancelled ''Speed Center'' and the long-running ''Wind Tunnel with Dave Despain'', both of which still contained some coverage of non-NASCAR racing series. And, just to throw in some irony, ''NASCAR Race Hub'' was initially moved from 6pm to either 4:30 or noon depending on the day of the week (and sometimes a third separate timeslot, which made [=DVRs=] a must for anyone who wanted to watch during this period) and shrunk to a half-hour, while ''NASCAR Raceday'', the pre-pre-race show that dates all the way back to 2001 and is now on its second ChannelHop (the first being to Speed from Fox Sports Net), was also cut in half, to one hour - but still kept in its traditional 10am Sunday start time (excluding night races), to the confusion of many. However, within one month ''Race Hub'' was back to one hour, and within nine months was firmly planted at 5pm,[[note]]excluding a handful of instances during special events like Daytona Speedweeks and the Charlotte Homestand, where it ran special primetime episodes[[/note]] while ''Raceday'' regained its second hour during Summer 2014 (although it shed said hour again at the beginning of 2015, excluding the Daytona 500). One major cause seems to be the lack of ratings life for anything except motorsports[[note]]besides the above- and below-mentioned NASCAR and USCC programming, there's also AMA Supercross, a dirt-bike racing series which runs in baseball and football stadiums during the off-seasons of those sports, and [=MotoGP=], a global paved-track motorcycle series which is basically FIM's equivalent to UsefulNotes/FormulaOne[[/note]], UFC and Major League Baseball, the only things consistently able to draw above 100,000 viewers, let alone a million, with the four highest rated programs in [=FS1=]'s first year being the three non-points NASCAR Sprint Cup races and an impromptu broadcast of the rain-delayed Bristol race (approximately tripling the usual MLB ratings) - all of which seems to suggest that people didn't necessarily want a new general-purpose national sports network.
** In Canada and several other "international" North American markets, FS1 did not replace Speed. As it would be impossible to get FS1 approved in Canada (they don't take kindly to networks trying to tread on the turf of established equivalents, plus rights to the remainder of its properties are held by said networks), Speed was silently replaced by an "international" version that airs live and repeat airings of FS1 and FS2's motorsports events, but is otherwise an automated zombie loop of old Speed reality shows. The channel was re-branded as Fox Sports Racing on February 20, 2015, but it's really just the same channel with a different logo in the corner. A number of major Canadian providers began to drop the network in 2015 (though the rebranding also coincided with its return to Rogers Cable as a "new" network).
* Fuel TV was known as one of the lowest-viewed channels on cable television because of their heavy reliance on [[ExtremeSportExcusePlot Extreme Sports]] like surfing and skateboarding, which are usually best experienced outside. They stuck to their mission even with the low ratings and limited distribution, and even their few original comedy shows were based around extreme sports.
** In 2012 the network became the official cable home of the UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship, though in this case as MMA is still considered in that "extreme" area of sports, it still worked and the programs are designed to draw Fuel out of the Nielsen basement, so they can only help (though in mid-August 2013 many shows on the network still registered as being watched only by 1,000 homes). Eventually though the [=UFC=] and Speed reality shows took over as contracts with Fuel TV's program providers ran out, and after months where TV analysts said that the strategy of leaving the extreme sports in late night would lead up to Fuel TV's inevitable re-branding as Fox Sports 2, it happened to little fanfare the same day and time as Speed's transition, only announced a week before the rebranding. The [=UFC=] moved to Fox Sports 1, and Fox Sports 2 is expected to air the oddball sports that don't quite fit on FS1 like rugby, Australian rules football and, ironically enough, some of the remaining non-NASCAR racing series from Speed, such as Lucas Oil Off-Road and the Rolex Sports Car Series. Interestingly, Fox Sports decided to re-up for a five year deal with the United Sports Car Championship, a merger between the Rolex cars and the American Le Mans Series set to launch in 2014.
* But wait, there's more! Fox Soccer started as Fox Sports World, which aired a variety of sports from around the world, including motorsports (remember, this was before they bought Speed), rugby, cricket, etc. Then, it eroded into just soccer, prompting the rebranding. However, with the death of Setanta Sports due to the Irish debt crisis, FSC started up a SpinOff network called ''Fox Soccer Plus'', and added rugby, cricket, and eventually (after a stint on ESPN) Aussie football to that network's schedule, which quelled this for a time.\\
\\
This would not last either, as shortly after they lost the rights to the airing English Premier League to NBC (taking much of it's soccer programming with it), Fox announced that in March 2013, it would be forming a new spinoff of Creator/{{FX}} known as FXX. Without a doubt, it replaced Fox Soccer, while the remaining soccer programming moved to Fox Sports 1 & 2 depending on prominence. ''Fox Soccer Plus'' remains in the air though, airing soccer that isn't prominent to air on the new Fox Sports channels (rumors have swirled that it'll be rebranded as ''Fox Sports 3''). ''Fox Soccer News'', the [[CaptainObvious soccer news]] show that the Canadian channel Sportsnet produced for the network, got replaced with an in-house soccer show on [=FS1=] after its launch which few of FSC's viewers believed would last a few months (while Sportsnet re-launched the program as ''Soccer Central'' with its own branding); they were proven right as it went on a 'never to return' hiatus once the NFL playoffs began and when [=FS1=] and [=FS2=] got the rights to the video simulcast of Mike Francesa's afternoon radio show (formerly on the nationally-limited YES Network, which Fox bought a majority-stake in back in 2012)).\\
\\
FXX's launch featured a final Fox Sports 1 promo, followed by footage of a soccer game being interrupted by that scene from ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' where a couch gives birth to Frank Reynolds. ItMakesSenseInContext.

to:

In late 2012, signs began pointing towards total abandonment: they lost Formula One to NBC Sports Network, The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and rumors began swirling that Fox was planning to re-launch Speed as a mainstream obscure sports like hockey and the [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts mixed]] [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship martial arts]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, which was something that Fox, surprisingly, didn't have yet (they had FX, niche channels such with the UFC being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as Fuel TV and [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fox a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]], and ''especially'' the regional networks UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which they had tried multiple times to try and turn into a national/local hybrid network)); on the final day of the EPL season in 2012, they is aired a soccer game in a nine-network event due to a rare end by NBCSN among other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the season where the championship clinching and relegation did occur at the end better parts of the season (usually it's all well and done by the end of April). On March 5, 2013, Fox officially unveiled Fox Sports 1, set for a launch on August 17, 2013, but not before Speed signed off at 6 A.M. with a sobering farewell speech...[[MoodWhiplash which was followed immediately with a happy welcome Fox's coverage (including their commentators). NBCSN has also been used to Fox Sports 1]]. The rebranded network continues to air NASCAR programming (which includes everything ''but'' the races, except for the Camping World Truck Series and tape-delayed regional series events, all of which was broadcast by Speed), and was expanded with the addition a larger amount of live Sprint Cup and Xfinity Series races beginning in the 2015 season (prior [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to this, the Xfinity Series, formerly the Nationwide Series, was on ESPN/ABC, and all Sprint Cup races were on Fox; only the All-Star Race and Budweiser Duels were on Speed; FX had aired races under the 2001-06 TV deal)
** And for extra Total Abandonment points, Fox Sports 1 cancelled ''Speed Center'' and the long-running ''Wind Tunnel with Dave Despain'', both of which still contained some coverage of non-NASCAR racing series. And, just to throw in some irony, ''NASCAR Race Hub'' was initially moved from 6pm to either 4:30 or noon depending on the day of the week (and sometimes a third separate timeslot, which made [=DVRs=] a must for anyone who wanted to watch during this period) and shrunk to a half-hour, while ''NASCAR Raceday'', the pre-pre-race show that dates all the way back to 2001 and is now on its second ChannelHop (the first being to Speed from Fox Sports Net), was also cut in half, to one hour - but still kept in its traditional 10am Sunday start time (excluding night races), to the confusion of many. However, within one month ''Race Hub'' was back to one hour, and within nine months was firmly planted at 5pm,[[note]]excluding a handful of instances during special events like Daytona Speedweeks and the Charlotte Homestand, where it ran special primetime episodes[[/note]] while ''Raceday'' regained its second hour during Summer 2014 (although it shed said hour again at the beginning of 2015, excluding the Daytona 500). One major cause seems to be the lack of ratings life for anything except motorsports[[note]]besides the above- and below-mentioned NASCAR and USCC programming, there's also AMA Supercross, a dirt-bike racing series which runs in baseball and football stadiums during the off-seasons of those sports, and [=MotoGP=], a global paved-track motorcycle series which is basically FIM's equivalent to UsefulNotes/FormulaOne[[/note]], UFC and Major League Baseball, the only things consistently able to draw above 100,000 viewers, let alone a million, with the four highest rated programs in [=FS1=]'s first year being the three non-points NASCAR Sprint Cup races and an impromptu
broadcast of events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the rain-delayed Bristol race (approximately tripling the usual MLB ratings) - all decision. It may even be a case of which seems to suggest that people didn't necessarily want a new general-purpose national NBC's sports network.
** In Canada and several other "international" North American markets, FS1 did not replace Speed. As it would be impossible to get FS1 approved in Canada (they don't take kindly to networks trying to tread on
coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the turf of established equivalents, plus rights to the remainder of its properties are held by said networks), Speed was silently replaced by an "international" version that airs live and repeat airings of FS1 and FS2's motorsports events, but is otherwise an automated zombie loop of old Speed reality shows. The channel was re-branded as Fox Sports Racing on February 20, 2015, but it's really just the same channel with a different logo in the corner. A number of major Canadian providers began to drop the main network in 2015 (though was the rebranding also coincided only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with its return too many commercial breaks[[note]]Don't talk to Rogers Cable as a "new" network).
* Fuel TV was known as one of the lowest-viewed channels on
UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable television because of partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their heavy reliance own reduced package from 2007 to 2016, when NBC got it back on [[ExtremeSportExcusePlot Extreme Sports]] like surfing and skateboarding, which are usually best experienced outside. They stuck to their mission even with own. It had all the low ratings old problems, and limited distribution, and even their few original comedy shows were based around extreme sports.
some new ones[[/note]]
** In 2012 the network became the official cable home of the UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship, though in this case as MMA is still considered in that "extreme" area of sports, it still worked and the programs are designed to draw Fuel out of the Nielsen basement, so they can only help (though in mid-August 2013 many shows on the The network still registered as being watched only by 1,000 homes). Eventually though the [=UFC=] and Speed reality shows took over as contracts with Fuel TV's program providers ran out, and after months where TV analysts said that the strategy devotes a good portion of leaving the extreme sports in late night would lead up to Fuel TV's inevitable re-branding as Fox Sports 2, it happened to little fanfare the same day and time as Speed's transition, only announced a week before the rebranding. The [=UFC=] moved to Fox Sports 1, and Fox Sports 2 is expected to air the oddball sports that don't quite fit on FS1 like rugby, Australian rules football and, ironically enough, some its channel space for outdoor programing; much of the remaining non-NASCAR racing series from Speed, such as Lucas Oil Off-Road and the Rolex Sports Car Series. Interestingly, Fox Sports decided to re-up for a five year deal with the United Sports Car Championship, a merger between the Rolex cars and the American Le Mans Series set to launch in 2014.
* But wait, there's more! Fox Soccer started as Fox Sports World,
outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractual commitments, which aired a variety of sports from around snarls the world, including motorsports (remember, this was before they bought Speed), rugby, cricket, etc. Then, it eroded into just soccer, prompting channel's attempts to get studio programming off the rebranding. However, with ground; it may have been a big culprit in the death demise of Setanta Sports due to the Irish debt crisis, FSC started up a SpinOff network called ''Fox Soccer Plus'', and added rugby, cricket, and eventually (after a stint on ESPN) Aussie football to that network's schedule, which quelled this for a time.\\
\\
This would not last either, as shortly after they lost
attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the rights to the airing English Premier League to NBC (taking much of it's soccer programming in bulk if any of these programs run into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist with it), Fox much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
* Oxygen was once the anti-Creator/{{Lifetime}}, airing shows revolving around making women better, ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' and ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' reruns, and programming about yoga and improving yourself, along with women's sports. By the time NBC bought the channel in 2007, the original partners had long left, and the new management decided programming which exploited women such as the ''Bad Girls Club'' (which itself has long abandoned any attempts at reforming their subjects), ''Snapped'' (profiles about women killers which edge uncomfortably close to idolization) and multiple shows revolving around Tori Spelling's love life would do better. Some argue that the decay began as early as 2004, which, for around a year, devoted late nights to the next rung below softcore porn (and actual {{Bowdlerise}}d Canadian softcore porn) and a QVC-like block devoted to ''sex toys''.
** Now it seems like the decay is coming full circle, since [[http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/oxygen-rebrand-true-crime-channel/410607 NBCUniversal
announced that Oxygen was becoming a true crime channel]] in March 2013, it would be forming summer 2017, with a reboot of TNT's ''Cold Justice'' being among the first programs under the new spinoff format.
* Cloo (known prior to 2011 as Sleuth) supposedly should have been devoted fully to crime drama reruns from the deep reservoir
of Creator/{{FX}} Universal's vaults, but by the end was more known as FXX. Without a doubt, it replaced Fox Soccer, while the remaining soccer "USA Network Annex" as all of its programming moved to Fox Sports 1 & 2 depending on prominence. ''Fox Soccer Plus'' remains in consisted of programs already rerunning or original series from USA Network, with the air though, airing soccer that isn't prominent to air only Universal shows seen being the ubiquitous ''SVU'' and ''Criminal Intent''; those Universal crime drama reruns are seen on Cozi TV these days. In the summer of 2016, the head of NBC's cable division effectively gave the network its death sentence, as 'skinny bundles' came into vogue and rerun-only networks became verboten with the new Fox Sports channels (rumors have swirled age of Internet television providers who aren't willing to carry them. Dish Network and many other providers were dropping the network over the years, because its rerun-centric nature made it pointless when its programming can already be seen on other networks and online. Cloo ended their run quietly on February 1, 2017 on a decay-appropriate note, finishing their broadcast by airing the entirety of ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.
* Syfy UK shows some heavily-promoted proper science fiction series, but mostly they construct their schedule from a mix of documentaries on the supernatural/occult/alien abduction, kung fu movies, MMA, action series (such as ''HumanTarget''), frequent ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' reruns, {{disaster movie}}s, monster movies, [[SwordAndSandal sword-and-sandal]] flicks, medieval adventure movies (''Film/FirstKnight'' and ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves''?), all kinds of fantasy, and quirky dramas like ''EliStone''. It's rare to see genuine science fiction movies there. Syfy UK seems to following the American network's trend with the announcement
that it'll they will be showing the [[MixedMartialArts MMA]] promotion ''BAMMA''.
* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. No more. As of December 20, 2012, it's been
rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''Fox Sports 3''). ''Fox Soccer News'', the [[CaptainObvious soccer news]] show that the Canadian channel Sportsnet produced ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for the network, got replaced with an in-house soccer show on [=FS1=] after its launch Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which few of FSC's viewers believed would last a few months (while Sportsnet re-launched are sourced from the program as ''Soccer Central'' with its own branding); they NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were proven right as it went on a 'never to return' hiatus once the NFL playoffs began and when [=FS1=] and [=FS2=] got the rights to the video simulcast of Mike Francesa's afternoon radio show (formerly on the nationally-limited YES Network, which Fox bought a majority-stake in back in 2012)).\\
\\
FXX's launch featured a final Fox Sports 1 promo, followed by footage of a soccer game being interrupted by that scene
kept from ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' where a couch gives birth Nonstop to Frank Reynolds. ItMakesSenseInContext.Cozi.)



[[folder:Disney Examples]]
* Pat Robertson launched the CBN Satellite Service, a cable arm of his ministry, the Christian Broadcasting Network, in 1977. It gradually began to add more and more {{sitcom}} reruns, general entertainment, [[GameShow game shows]], and other non-religious programming to its lineup throughout TheEighties in a bid to make it onto basic cable lineups outside of [[DeepSouth the Bible Belt]]. As the ratio of religious to non-religious programming shifted, it became the CBN Family Channel, then the Family Channel, before being bought out by {{Fox}}. Fox Family floundered and was sold to Creator/{{Disney}}, which wanted to rename the channel to "XYZ" to remarket it to a different audience by repurposing ABC shows. However, they did not do so.\\
Its name may not have changed, but as evidenced by shows like ''Series/{{Greek}}'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', ''Series/KyleXY'', and ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', the station now known as Creator/ABCFamily isn't really that family-oriented anymore. Aside from its weekend movie blocks, it's now a basic cable version of [[TheWB the former WB network]].[[note]]When you actually air a movie called ''Satan's School for Girls'' and a show like ''WesternAnimation/SlackerCats'' on a channel with the word "family" in it, you are very much "a different kind of family"![[/note]] The ultimate {{irony}} is that Pat Robertson is one of the MoralGuardians who objects to the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, yet ABC Family owned the US broadcasting rights to the ''Film/HarryPotter'' films and aired ''Potter'' marathons constantly (at least until [=NBCUniversal=] acquired the broadcast rights in 2016). ''Series/The700Club'' (required in the original contract with Pat Robertson) and a Sunday morning/late night {{Infomercial}} block filled with megachurch pastors are the only things left hinting at ABC Family's roots as a religious channel, and even then they're buried at 11:00 PM with a {{content warning|s}} containing an unequivocal "does not reflect the views of ABC Family" due to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Robertson_controversies Robertson's laundry list of controversial statements and positions]].[[note]]To name just one example, he agreed with Jerry Falwell's statement that the USA's immorality invited the events of 9/11 '''[[TooSoon the week of]]'''.[[/note]] They aren't even mentioned at all on the channel's website; you'll either have to go to the CBN website for that.\\
\\
In September 2015, ABC Family announced that it would re-brand as ''Freeform'' in January 2016, with a new focus on Millennials. Management also clarified that a commonly-heard rumor that the network was contractually forbidden from removing the word "Family" from its name without major repercussions was just an urban legend.
* Creator/DisneyChannel originally had a lineup of [[WaltDisney Walt-era]] Disney movies, cartoons, and TV shows, combined with original documentaries about the company's various projects, a lot of interesting imported shows (especially from Canada), and such programming for adults as ''Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion''. But as it lost ground to {{Nickelodeon}} in TheNineties, and as Disney itself began to expand from a studio into a multimedia company, it started to focus more and more on kids. It shoved most of the vintage programs aside, interspersing about three hours of cartoons at 1:00 AM with hours and hours of tween-centered programs and... BoyBand concerts... on Disney Channel? [[note]]The worst part was that, originally, the Disney Channel was a ''premium'' cable service like {{Creator/HBO}} or Cinemax, and was ''nothing'' like Nickelodeon, which was basic-cable from its conception. With Nickelodeon entering its golden age just as Disney was hitting a low point in programming quality, the only way to stop mass cancellation of subscriptions was to move it to basic-cable. '''Nickelodeon actually forced The Walt Disney Company to change Disney Channel's business model.'''[[/note]] It abandoned ''Vault Disney'', ''The Ink and Paint Club'', and most other broadcasts of classic Disney cartoons and shows in order to focus on the teenage demographic, with most of their shows featuring an actor/([[IdolSinger idol]]) singer/songwriter/dancer.\\
Disney Channel's tween pop focus, which began with the then-popular ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'' franchises, seemed to have overrun The Walt Disney Company as a whole throughout the mid-to-late 2000s, and the future of the company's reputation was in doubt, despite their acquisition of {{Pixar}} in 2006. Luckily, starting with the release of the traditionally-animated ''ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' in 2009, (almost) everything in the company is going back to its studio roots. Doesn't stop Disney's branded cable networks from catering exclusively to tweens and preschoolers, though.
** It's worth noting, as far as [[TheNineties The Nineties Kids]] are concerned, after Disney Channel's shift from premium to basic cable and their shift towards the teen demographic, their tween-targeted shows focused far less on being famous and moreso around family, friends, sports, and outdoor activities, like ''Series/TheFamousJettJackson'', ''The Jersey'', various sports-themed movies and more, under the programming block Zoog Disney. ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' may have paved the way for Music/HilaryDuff's IdolSinger status, but even then it wasn't focused on her career itself. Then, with the success of ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', [[Series/ShakeItUp more and]] [[Series/ANTFarm more shows]] [[Series/AustinAndAlly about fame]] [[Series/SonnyWithAChance were produced]] from 2006 onwards, and the ones that didn't focus on that became far more hokier--and, well, just look above. The change was jarring in that sudden and drastic shift in focus.
* The Southeast Asian feed of Disney Channel, aka Disney Channel Asia, is just as bad as it's US parent channel... The channel was fine up until the mid-2000's... but it got worse when the feed was overtaken by Malaysians and Singaporeans and at that point, the Southeast Asian feed [[ItsAllAboutMe doesn't care about the rest of the region]] as the channel, aside from the usual Disney fare and imports, aired ''Malaysian productions'' like [=Upin & Ipin=] and [=Boiboiboy=], as well as low-brow shows that most people are already tired of like OggyAndTheCockroaches, ''Series/JustForLaughsGags'' and MrBean. Even the show ''Waktu Rehat'' (Which by the way was made by Disney originally for the Malaysian feed) doesn't air dubbed but ''subbed'' in English (WTH?). And not to mention some Disney sitcoms have missing scenes that got censored for no reason (maybe this has something to do with the feed using the Disney Channel UK edits of the shows. Or maybe because of the different religions that lay in the Southern Asian feed.). At this point, the feed is beyond hopes of being like the old feed, to the point where you can actually call it Disney Channel Malaysia 2 (since there's an existing Disney Channel Malaysia feed, although Singapore also has it's own feeds, and at the moment the only differences between Malaysia, Singapore and Generic is slight variations in the programming schedule- all three are filled with Malaysian cruft), so if you're used to the uncut US versions of the original shows, your best option is to [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes just go underground]] (i.e. Wait until the newest episode finished aired on the US one so you can see it). Word has it that this happened because the Pay TV satellite monopoly in Malaysia, Astro, along with [=StarHub=] Singapore (''The'' Pay TV cable monopoly in Singapore), had managed to buy a sizable stake in Disney's South-East Asian operations. Yes, even Malaysians and Singaporeans don't like what the feeds had become. This even got worse, combined with ScrewedByTheNetwork: The Southeast Asian feed '''stopped''' airing ''Series/AustinAndAlly'' and ''Series/{{Jessie}}'' in favor of more ''Series/{{Violetta}}'' airings, angering both the two show's fans and the Auslly shippers in the region. There's even [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/87291874426 two confessions about the problem]] [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/103486725802 that state they're not amused]] about this. (And that's just the Pinoy viewers!)
* Creator/ToonDisney started out as the AlternateCompanyEquivalent to Cartoon Network, airing animated shows from the Disney archive (and some that they had acquired, mostly from Creator/DiCEntertainment) and classic Disney shorts. It would end up becoming an arch-rival to Cartoon Network's Creator/{{Boomerang}} upon its launch in 2000. A couple years later, Toon Disney underwent a major revamp, opting to air original, modern programming rather than endless repeats of older shows. All of the classic Disney shorts, as well as a majority of the [=DiC=] shows (including ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'', which was a notable staple on Toon Disney since its 1998 launch), were dropped from the channel, and shows that were originally on the OneSaturdayMorning block took their place. A year later, they started airing a growing number of non-Disney cartoons (including some from their arch-rival, Creator/WarnerBros), and the ''Jetix'' block, which featured shows like ''PowerRangers'', ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', ''TheTick'', and ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'', started eating up a growing chunk of the channel's airtime. Live-action shows and movies started appearing on the network, mirroring Cartoon Network's decay. Finally, in 2009, Toon Disney was renamed Creator/DisneyXD (which means "[[TotallyRadical eXtreme Disney]]") and turned into a network aimed at young boys -- the SpearCounterpart to the increasingly female-focused Disney Channel. In other words, it finally ''became'' Jetix in all but name in the process, dropping a significant portion of its remaining animated content to cram in episodes of ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', ''Series/EvenStevens'', and ''Series/ZekeAndLuther''. Ironically, in the following years, Disney XD would start a process of relapse. Ever since Disney's purchase of Marvel and Lucasfilm, Disney XD would begin producing and airing more animated series, with live-action shows being in the minority.\\
\\
Nonetheless, you could say that all of this could had been avoided in the first place if Fox hadn't sold their successful "Fox Kids" lineup (which aired ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Digimon'', and others) to Disney/ABC via [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]. But it had to be done seeing that Fox Kids saw its ratings decline over the years. Fox then retooled their Saturday-morning lineup into the "Fox Box", which consisted almost entirely of shows from the now-defunct Creator/FourKidsEntertainment. Naturally, they lampshaded this by changing the lineup's name to "4Kids TV".
** In some other countries, Jetix is (or was) its own channel. For whatever reason, Disney decided that it would be better to append it as a programming block onto a network it has nothing to do with, and then let it swallow the network whole.
** In Latin America, the local version of Fox Kids was rebranded Jetix as well in 2004. Although at the beginning most of Fox Kids' programming (which included popular anime series) was mantained, they were soon dropped and Jetix became a channel dependent on ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' reruns (the series was initially acquired for the region by Disney), various ''PowerRangers'' shows of the Disney-produced era (that were on Fox Kids to begin with), ''Animation/{{Pucca}}'', ''Dinosaur King'' and the "Super Hora" block of Marvel Comics cartoons (''The Incredible Hulk'', ''X-Men'', and ''Spider-Man Unlimited''). By 2009, before it was rebranded as Creator/DisneyXD, ''The Fairly [=OddParents=]'' aired up to '''15 times a day''', while ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' aired an additional '''8 times a day each'''. Fortunately, after the change to Creator/DisneyXD, it has presented more variety of programming instead of just endless reruns of a few series. As of 2016, ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' are long gone, while ''FOP'' reruns are only limited to overnights and early mornings (note that reruns only comprise the first five seasons, seasons six to present air on Nickelodeon; both channels have shared the series for ''ten years''').
** In Eastern Europe, Fox Kids became Jetix, gradually dumping most of the Fox Original cartoons, but retaining Disney originals and anime adaptations, like ''ShamanKing'', eventually airing a few original shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/GalactikFootball'' and ''WesternAnimation/ObanStarRacers''. By late 2009, it mutated again into a straight-up Disney Channel, dumping the old Jetix shows and replacing them with regular Disney Channel broadcast.
** Australia had the Jetix programming block on the Seven Network for a short time, vanishing just as quietly as it emerged. The same happened in Canada on FamilyChannel.
* [[Creator/{{ESPN}} ESPNEWS]] was created specifically so you could get scores and highlights in a half-hour (or much less if you just looked at the much more detailed ticker). After its ticker was replaced with the regular ESPN ticker, it became ''SportsCenter 24/7''. Eventually, the only true ESPNEWS programming left was the ''Highlight Express'' deep in late night, with the rest of the day filled with talking-head show repeats, ESPN Radio simulcasts, and overflow sports like softball and the UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} Nationwide Series [[note]]A practice that ended after the rights for the Nationwide Series, now Xfinity Series, went to Fox and NBC[[/note]]. In June 2013, [[http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Daily/Issues/2013/06/13/Media/ESPN.aspx ''Highlight Express'' was canceled]], leaving an overnight show about soccer (''ESPN FC Press Pass'') the only program produced solely for the network. ''And then'' ESPN decided to replace that soccer show with a new one on ESPN2.
* You have to give it to Disney they're at least honest about knowing when an entire '''genre''' is decaying, and have announced that because of both the fading influence of {{Soap Opera}}s and the fact you can now click over to a network website or flip on your cable on demand service to catch up on a soap anytime rather than waiting to record it Sunday morning at 4:00 AM, [=SOAPNet=] was replaced with Disney Junior, the new name for Disney's preschool shows (formerly Playhouse Disney) in March 2012. Better that they announce the decay now and get everyone prepared than just letting it wither on the vine. \\
\\
Unfortunately however, it led to the shocking cancellation of both ''Series/AllMyChildren'' and ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' under the Brian Frons excuse that without [=SOAPNet=] airings, the shows would be too expensive to produce without a cable channel component, a theory which quickly held no water with the soap community. In April 2013 both shows came back online, but under a [[NoBudget much-reduced]] effort that eventually fell apart due to infighting between the new owners and ABC over characters shuffled over to ''Series/GeneralHospital'' to prevent their re-use by the new owners. \\
\\
Admittedly, though, [=SOAPNet=] was always a tenuous project, as anything except ''Series/BeingErica'' that wasn't soap or a ''Series/GilmoreGirls'' marathon never did well at all for the channel. Outside of soap hours, it was a dumping ground for shows ABC and ABC Family rejected and only picked up to make existing producers happy or stop a format that might do well in another iteration from escaping to another network, or in the case of Greg Berendt, provided a firewall to burn off an ABC primetime show that was ordered before the massive failure of his 2006 daytime talk show; it didn't air until 2009. Also, it was proven over time that there's only a limited amount of interest in old soap episodes from canceled programs nobody's willing to catch up on ''Ryan's Hope'' episodes from April 1975, except for unexpected PeriodPiece curiosity.\\
\\
Despite the discontinuation announcement and Disney Junior launching in March 2012 however, [=SOAPNet=] continued to run on many cable systems which really didn't want to deal with subscriber complaints if they pulled it off (especially from ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'' fans who depended on it for their daily fix of those shows), with only a few national systems currently carrying Disney Junior because of some factors, including cost for the channel, forced HD carriage, and systems like Dish and DirecTV objecting to carrying a channel which won't have much of an audience past 10pm (Unlike Nick Jr., Disney Junior has few programs with PeripheryDemographic appeal, and there's ''no way'' Disney would try to re-create Creator/AdultSwim with one of their networks for late night). [=SOAPNet=] then was programming from that point through ABC Family as a sort-of extension channel and retained much of its programming, along with ABC Family content like ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'' and and the first ever run in syndication of ''Series/VeronicaMars'' (for awhile it was carrying [[IShallTauntYou viewership taunting]] weekend marathons of ''The Chew'' early in the winter until Brian Frons finally got his desk cleaned out), so it remained in vindication for two years after it was to have ended.\\
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Eventually though, [=SOAPNet=] melted away. During the Viacom/[=DirecTV=] dispute where the Viacom children's networks were pulled, by [[ThereAreNoCoincidences mere coincidence]], the satellite provider suddenly became interested in carrying Disney Junior and made a deal to launch it on a Saturday morning out of thin air, so [=SOAPNet=]'s days on [=DirecTV=] became numbered. Other providers eventually made deals as tots teased by ''WesternAnimation/SofiaTheFirst'' specials on Disney Channel made their parents plead for the network it aired on, and the rebranded TVGN under CBS ownership (now known as Pop) took the rights for same-day ''Young and the Restless'' and ''Bold and the Beautiful'' repeats over to their network, assuring a happy ending for those two shows at least; the original ''90210'' fans also got their show back on TVGN starting Labor Day 2014. Disney eventually announced that it would bury [=SOAPNet=]'s hatchet at the end of 2013, for real this time, and it ended quietly at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve 2013, showing nothing but black after the credits of its final ''Series/GeneralHospital'' rerun. The final Disney Junior holdout, Dish Network (which was involved in an epically long negotiation with Disney over a myriad of issues, which lead to Dish only airing their channels in Standard Definition) added the network in the spring of 2014.
* A&E ("Arts & Entertainment" and currently owned by Disney and Hearst Corporation) used to show artsy films, documentaries (most notably their flagship series ''Biography''), and British mystery and period dramas aimed at a highbrow (or at least high-middlebrow) adult audience, like a basic-cable version of Creator/{{PBS}}. However, a regime change in 2002 caused much of that programming to be moved over to the History Channel and the Biography Channel (see more on both below), while A&E itself switched its target audience to [[LowestCommonDenominator the opposite end of the spectrum]] virtually overnight. Today, it runs reality shows like ''Series/StorageWars'', ''Series/{{Hoarders}}'', and ''Series/DuckDynasty'', TrueCrime shows, and reruns and marathons of ''Series/CSIMiami''. An executive for the channel even joked at one point that it experienced the fastest drop in average demographic age ever, and ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' did [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-sad-ways-ae-became-walmart-television-networks/ an entire article]] comparing the post-decay network to UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}.
** Its Biography Channel spin-off -- later known as "Bio" -- didn't fare much better once the bio-show craze ''Biography'' spearheaded in the late 1990s fizzled out. At one point, they showed reruns of ''Series/NightCourt'' and ''Series/NewsRadio'' in an attempt to be to A&E what Boomerang was to Creator/CartoonNetwork - these shows having been rerun on A&E in the past. In TheNewTens, about two-thirds of the lineup consists of sensational TrueCrime documentaries and paranormal or crime-related reality shows picked up from the parent network, with some of the paranormal titles having titles such as ''The Family Who Slays Together'', ''Killer Kids'', and ''Celebrity Ghost Stories''. A&E called it quits when, in July 2014, Bio re-launched as the lifestyle network FYI.
** The Latin American feed of A&E, which suffered the exact same decay as their master network (and then some), now claims on their bumps that "A&E" stands for "'''A'''cción y '''E'''moción" ("Action and Emotion"). Retronym justification of the decay?
* Once called "The All-[[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] Channel", much of Creator/TheHistoryChannel's (now called "History") programming now consists of [[DocuSoap docu-soaps]] (''Series/IceRoadTruckers'', ''Series/AxMen'') and semi-documentaries with some (rather lowbrow) historical content (''Series/PawnStars'' and its spinoffs, as well ''Series/AmericanPickers'') focused on roughnecks or [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories conspiracy theory "documentaries"]] about [[Series/AncientAliens aliens]], the Bible Code, ghosts, {{Atlantis}}, Nostradamus, and {{the end of the world|AsWeKnowIt}}, earning the network the derisive nickname "The Hysterical Channel". Regarding ''actual'' history programming, they air, at best, specials on a few major holidays, and only when their big ratings grabbers like ''Series/PawnStars'' are on season hiatus. The only other time any actual historical programming shows up is to piggyback of any major upcoming films based on historical events. It makes many older fans long for the "Hitler Channel" days when all of their programming seemed to be about WorldWarII and [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]]. And then in 2015 they decided to combine the conspiracy theory stuff with Nazis by airing a show claiming that Hitler didn't actually die in Berlin and instead escaped to Argentina.\\
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One big reason for the network's decay is that the Smithsonian Institution, which was one of the go-to organizations for the History Channel in their early days, is now under an exclusive deal with Creator/{{Showtime}} where they produce programming around Smithsonian exhibits and properties for their exclusive Smithsonian Channel, which is not allowed to decay by design, while Showtime and Creator/{{CBS}} maintain rights to the institution's film library. Showtime, of course, isn't about to do anything to help its competitor, thus History has to look for other ideas to fill their broadcast day. Perhaps the only reason History didn't start calling themselves "THC" was because of that initialism's drug connotations.
** History International went from a channel focused on world history to a vault channel for old History Channel documentaries. It changed its name to H2, with the slogan "More 2 History", coinciding with a shift to placing many of History's remaining serious programming, like ''The Universe'', on the channel... along with blocks of History's conspiracy and paranormal fare. On February 29th, 2016, A&E replaced H2 with the American version of a new cable network called Viceland, in a joint venture with Vice Media.
** Realizing its sheer number of military programmes, including a documentary series on modern-day Canadian fighter pilots, the UK now has a Military History channel spun off from its History Channel. And now it's started some slippage as well, with a regular "Demilitarised Zone" slot where it can repeat the ''rest'' of the documentaries that used to be on History back when it wasn't showing ''Ice Road Truckers''. The little known US version of Military History is so far committed to showing all military-themed shows...whether they be WWII, Samurai-themed or biblical figures fighting across Canaan (modern-day Israel).[[note]]In defense of that last one, they do present rundowns of the weapons of the era, and even try to account for some of the "miraculous" happenings in the Bible accounts using actual military tactics of the time[[/note]]
** Due to the [[{{Understatement}} very emotionally charged]] political election, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a topic we will not argue about here]], History Channel had the idea of creating a topical "documentary" about how UsefulNotes/{{Nostradamus}} may have predicted the election between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump titled "Nostradamus: Election 2016". They uses a few of lines of his Quatrains that [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory vaguely relate to]] the two and their personalities and scandals.

to:

[[folder:Disney Examples]]

[[folder:Animax Internatonal Distributors]]
* Pat Robertson launched the CBN Satellite Service, Creator/{{Animax}} (supposed to be a cable arm of his ministry, the Christian Broadcasting Network, 24-hour {{anime}} channel), in 1977. It gradually began to add more its Latin American side, both Brazilian and more {{sitcom}} reruns, general entertainment, [[GameShow game shows]], and other non-religious programming to its lineup throughout TheEighties in a bid to make it onto basic cable lineups outside of [[DeepSouth the Bible Belt]]. As the ratio of religious to non-religious programming shifted, it Spanish-speaking versions, became this:
** The first slip and
the CBN Family Channel, then most {{egregious}} example its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the Family Channel, before being bought out action flicks already worn by {{Fox}}. Fox Family floundered repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and was sold ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to Creator/{{Disney}}, which wanted to rename rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel to "XYZ" to remarket it to a different audience by repurposing ABC shows. However, they did not do so.\\
Its name may not have changed, but as evidenced by shows like ''Series/{{Greek}}'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', ''Series/KyleXY'', and ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', the station now known as Creator/ABCFamily isn't really that family-oriented anymore. Aside from its weekend movie blocks, it's now a basic cable version of [[TheWB the former WB network]].[[note]]When you actually air a movie called ''Satan's School for Girls'' and a show like ''WesternAnimation/SlackerCats'' on a channel with the word "family" in it, you are very much "a different kind of family"![[/note]] The ultimate {{irony}} is that Pat Robertson is one of the MoralGuardians who objects to the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, yet ABC Family owned the US broadcasting rights to the ''Film/HarryPotter'' films and aired ''Potter'' marathons constantly (at least until [=NBCUniversal=] acquired the broadcast rights in 2016). ''Series/The700Club'' (required in the original contract with Pat Robertson) and a Sunday morning/late night {{Infomercial}} block filled with megachurch pastors are the only things left hinting at ABC Family's roots as a religious channel, and even then they're buried at 11:00 PM with a {{content warning|s}} containing an unequivocal "does not reflect the views of ABC Family" due to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Robertson_controversies Robertson's laundry list of controversial statements and positions]].[[note]]To name just one example, he agreed with Jerry Falwell's statement that the USA's immorality invited the events of 9/11 '''[[TooSoon the week of]]'''.[[/note]] They aren't even mentioned at all on the channel's website; you'll either have to go to the CBN website for that.\\
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In September 2015, ABC Family
announced that it would re-brand as ''Freeform'' in January 2016, with a new shift its focus on Millennials. Management also clarified to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that a commonly-heard rumor that the network was contractually forbidden from removing the word "Family" from its name without major repercussions was just an urban legend.
* Creator/DisneyChannel originally had a lineup of [[WaltDisney Walt-era]] Disney movies, cartoons, and TV shows, combined with original documentaries about the company's various projects, a lot of interesting imported shows (especially from Canada), and such programming for adults as ''Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion''. But as it lost ground to {{Nickelodeon}} in TheNineties, and as Disney itself began to expand from a studio into a multimedia company, it started to focus more and more on kids. It shoved most of the vintage programs aside, interspersing about three
they were still broadcasting 12 hours of cartoons anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 1:00 AM 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
** Before Animax LA was owned by Sony, it had other name, Locomotion. Originally a children oriented channel, but later became a youth oriented channel a year later to avoid competition
with hours Cartoon Network and hours of tween-centered programs and... BoyBand concerts... on Disney Channel? [[note]]The worst part was that, originally, the Disney Channel was a ''premium'' cable service like {{Creator/HBO}} or Cinemax, and was ''nothing'' like Nickelodeon, which was basic-cable from its conception. With Nickelodeon entering its golden age just as Disney was hitting a low point in programming quality, the only way to stop mass cancellation of subscriptions was to move it to basic-cable. '''Nickelodeon actually forced The Walt Disney Company to change Disney Channel's business model.'''[[/note]] It abandoned ''Vault Disney'', ''The Ink and Paint Club'', and most other broadcasts of classic Disney cartoons and shows in order to focus on the teenage demographic, with most of their shows featuring an actor/([[IdolSinger idol]]) singer/songwriter/dancer.\\
Disney Channel's tween pop focus, which began with the then-popular ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'' franchises, seemed to have overrun The Walt Disney Company as a whole throughout the mid-to-late 2000s, and the future of the company's reputation was in doubt, despite their acquisition of {{Pixar}} in 2006. Luckily, starting with the release of the traditionally-animated ''ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' in 2009, (almost) everything in the company is going back to its studio roots. Doesn't stop Disney's branded cable networks from catering exclusively to tweens and preschoolers, though.
** It's worth noting, as far as [[TheNineties The Nineties Kids]] are concerned,
shortly after Disney Channel's shift from premium to basic cable and their shift towards the teen demographic, their tween-targeted shows focused far less on being famous and moreso around family, friends, sports, and outdoor activities, an adult oriented animation channel (it showed things like ''Series/TheFamousJettJackson'', ''The Jersey'', various sports-themed ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'', ''ComicBook/TheMaxx'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHead'', the ''ComicStrip/PrinceValiant'' movies and more, under the programming block Zoog Disney. ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' may have paved the way for Music/HilaryDuff's IdolSinger status, but even then ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts, among others), eventually it wasn't focused on her career itself. Then, with the success of ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', [[Series/ShakeItUp more and]] [[Series/ANTFarm more shows]] [[Series/AustinAndAlly about fame]] [[Series/SonnyWithAChance were produced]] from 2006 onwards, and the ones that didn't focus on that became far more hokier--and, well, just look above. The change was jarring in that sudden and drastic shift in focus.
* The Southeast Asian feed of Disney Channel, aka Disney Channel Asia, is just as bad as it's US parent channel... The
evolved into an anime channel was fine up until the mid-2000's... but it got worse when the feed was overtaken by Malaysians and Singaporeans and at that point, the Southeast Asian feed [[ItsAllAboutMe doesn't care about the rest of the region]] as the channel, aside from the usual Disney fare and imports, aired ''Malaysian productions'' like [=Upin & Ipin=] and [=Boiboiboy=], as well as low-brow shows that most people are already tired of like OggyAndTheCockroaches, ''Series/JustForLaughsGags'' and MrBean. Even the show ''Waktu Rehat'' (Which by the way was made by Disney originally for the Malaysian feed) doesn't air dubbed but ''subbed'' in English (WTH?). And not to mention some Disney sitcoms have missing scenes that got censored for no reason (maybe this has something to do with the feed using the Disney Channel UK edits of the shows. Or maybe because of the different religions that lay in the Southern Asian feed.). At this point, the feed is beyond hopes of being like the old feed, to the point where you can actually call it Disney Channel Malaysia 2 (since there's an existing Disney Channel Malaysia feed, although Singapore also has it's own feeds, and at the moment the only differences between Malaysia, Singapore and Generic is slight variations in the programming schedule- all three are filled with Malaysian cruft), so if you're used to the uncut US versions of the original shows, your best option is to [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes just go underground]] (i.e. Wait until the newest episode finished aired on the US one so you can see it). Word has it that this happened because the Pay TV satellite monopoly in Malaysia, Astro, along with [=StarHub=] Singapore (''The'' Pay TV cable monopoly in Singapore), had managed to buy a sizable stake in Disney's South-East Asian operations. Yes, even Malaysians and Singaporeans don't like what the feeds had become. This even got worse, combined with ScrewedByTheNetwork: The Southeast Asian feed '''stopped''' airing ''Series/AustinAndAlly'' and ''Series/{{Jessie}}'' in favor of (showing more ''Series/{{Violetta}}'' airings, angering both the two show's fans and the Auslly shippers in the region. There's even [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/87291874426 two confessions about the problem]] [[http://ausllyconfessions.tumblr.com/post/103486725802 that state they're not amused]] about this. (And that's just the Pinoy viewers!)
* Creator/ToonDisney
than 10 anime series a day), so it started calling itself "The Anime Channel". The problem is that after a while it anime was aired with other programs like ''WesternAnimation/{{Duckman}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Eventually, it created an advertisement that said ''"The good anime, takes time. Anime-station"''. Watchers were really confused by this, but it turned out as they sold their rights to an anime channel. Eventually this lead to the AlternateCompanyEquivalent channel being rebranded to Cartoon Network, Animax.
** As Sony Spin, the channel still aired anime at early morning hours, even
airing animated shows from the Disney archive (and some that they had acquired, mostly from Creator/DiCEntertainment) and classic Disney shorts. It would end up becoming an arch-rival to Cartoon Network's Creator/{{Boomerang}} upon its launch in 2000. A couple years later, Toon Disney underwent a major revamp, opting to air original, modern programming rather than endless repeats of older shows. All of the classic Disney shorts, as well as a majority of the [=DiC=] shows (including ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'', which was a notable staple on Toon Disney since its 1998 launch), were dropped from the channel, and shows that were originally on the OneSaturdayMorning block took their place. A year later, they started airing a growing number of non-Disney cartoons (including some from their arch-rival, Creator/WarnerBros), and the ''Jetix'' block, which featured shows new series like ''PowerRangers'', ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', ''TheTick'', ''Manga/NodameCantabile'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist Brotherhood'' and ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'', started eating up a growing chunk of the channel's airtime. Live-action shows and movies started appearing on the network, mirroring Cartoon Network's decay. Finally, in 2009, Toon Disney was renamed Creator/DisneyXD (which means "[[TotallyRadical eXtreme Disney]]") and turned into a network aimed at young boys -- the SpearCounterpart to the increasingly female-focused Disney Channel. In other words, it finally ''became'' Jetix in all but name in the process, dropping a significant portion of its remaining animated content to cram in new episodes of ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', ''Series/EvenStevens'', and ''Series/ZekeAndLuther''. Ironically, ''Manga/{{Bleach}}''. This changed in March 2012, when the following years, Disney XD would start a process of relapse. Ever since Disney's purchase of Marvel and Lucasfilm, Disney XD would begin producing and airing more animated series, with live-action shows being in the minority.\\
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Nonetheless, you could say that all of this could had been avoided in the first place if Fox hadn't sold their successful "Fox Kids" lineup (which aired ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Digimon'', and others) to Disney/ABC via [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]. But it had to be done seeing that Fox Kids saw its ratings decline over the years. Fox then retooled their Saturday-morning lineup into the "Fox Box", which consisted almost entirely of shows from the now-defunct Creator/FourKidsEntertainment. Naturally, they lampshaded this by changing the lineup's name to "4Kids TV".
** In some other countries, Jetix is (or was) its own channel. For whatever reason, Disney decided that it would be better to append it as a programming block onto a network it has nothing to do with, and then let it swallow the network whole.
** In Latin America, the local version of Fox Kids was rebranded Jetix as well in 2004. Although at the beginning most of Fox Kids' programming (which included popular anime series) was mantained, they were soon dropped and Jetix became a channel dependent on ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' reruns (the series was initially acquired for the region by Disney), various ''PowerRangers'' shows of the Disney-produced era (that were on Fox Kids to begin with), ''Animation/{{Pucca}}'', ''Dinosaur King'' and the "Super Hora" block of Marvel Comics cartoons (''The Incredible Hulk'', ''X-Men'', and ''Spider-Man Unlimited''). By 2009, before it was rebranded as Creator/DisneyXD, ''The Fairly [=OddParents=]'' aired up to '''15 times a day''', while ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' aired an additional '''8 times a day each'''. Fortunately, after the change to Creator/DisneyXD, it has presented more variety of programming instead of just endless reruns of a few series. As of 2016, ''Pucca'' and ''Dinosaur King'' are long gone, while ''FOP'' reruns are only limited to overnights and early mornings (note that reruns only comprise the first five seasons, seasons six to present air on Nickelodeon; both channels have shared the series for ''ten years''').
** In Eastern Europe, Fox Kids became Jetix, gradually dumping most of the Fox Original cartoons, but retaining Disney originals and anime adaptations, like ''ShamanKing'', eventually airing a few original shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/GalactikFootball'' and ''WesternAnimation/ObanStarRacers''. By late 2009, it mutated again into a straight-up Disney Channel, dumping the old Jetix shows and replacing them with regular Disney Channel broadcast.
** Australia had the Jetix programming block on the Seven Network for a short time, vanishing just as quietly as it emerged. The same happened in Canada on FamilyChannel.
* [[Creator/{{ESPN}} ESPNEWS]] was created specifically so you could get scores and highlights in a half-hour (or much less if you just looked at the much more detailed ticker). After its ticker
slot was replaced with the regular ESPN ticker, it became ''SportsCenter 24/7''. Eventually, the only true ESPNEWS by live action shows, thus abandoning anime programming left was the ''Highlight Express'' deep in late night, with the rest of the day filled with talking-head show repeats, ESPN Radio simulcasts, and overflow sports like softball and the UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} Nationwide Series [[note]]A practice that ended after the rights for the Nationwide Series, now Xfinity Series, went to Fox and NBC[[/note]]. In June 2013, [[http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Daily/Issues/2013/06/13/Media/ESPN.aspx ''Highlight Express'' was canceled]], leaving an overnight show about soccer (''ESPN FC Press Pass'') the only program produced solely for the network. ''And then'' ESPN decided to replace that soccer show with a completely. The new one on ESPN2.
* You have to give it to Disney they're at least honest about knowing when an entire '''genre''' is decaying, and have announced that because of both the fading influence of {{Soap Opera}}s and the fact you can now click over to a network website or flip on your cable on demand service to catch up on a soap anytime rather than waiting to record it Sunday morning at 4:00 AM, [=SOAPNet=] was replaced with Disney Junior, the new name for Disney's preschool shows (formerly Playhouse Disney) in March 2012. Better that they announce the decay now and get everyone prepared than just letting it wither on the vine. \\
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Unfortunately however, it led to the shocking cancellation of both ''Series/AllMyChildren'' and ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' under the Brian Frons excuse that without [=SOAPNet=] airings, the shows would be too expensive to produce without a cable
channel component, a theory which quickly held no water with the soap community. In April 2013 both shows came back online, but under a [[NoBudget much-reduced]] effort got such lousy ratings that eventually fell apart due to infighting between the new owners and ABC over characters shuffled over to ''Series/GeneralHospital'' to prevent their re-use by the new owners. \\
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Admittedly, though, [=SOAPNet=] was always
exclusive live-action series were moved to sister channel Sony Entertainment. Sony Spin became a tenuous project, rerun loop of series such as anything except ''Series/BeingErica'' that wasn't ''Series/That70sShow'', ''Series/JoanOfArcadia'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', old movies and even a Latin American soap or opera. This effectively meant Sony Spin itself entered into a ''Series/GilmoreGirls'' marathon never did well at all for the channel. Outside of soap hours, it was a dumping ground for shows ABC and ABC Family rejected and only picked up to make existing producers happy or stop a format that might do well in another iteration from escaping to another network, or in the case of Greg Berendt, provided a firewall to burn off an ABC primetime show that was ordered before the massive failure of his 2006 daytime talk show; it didn't air until 2009. Also, it was proven over time that there's only a limited amount of interest in old soap episodes from canceled programs nobody's willing to catch up on ''Ryan's Hope'' episodes from April 1975, except for unexpected PeriodPiece curiosity.\\
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Despite the discontinuation announcement and Disney Junior launching in March 2012 however, [=SOAPNet=] continued to run on
drift status. In 2014, many cable systems which really didn't want to deal with subscriber complaints if they pulled it off (especially from ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'' fans who depended on it for their daily fix of those shows), with only a few national systems currently carrying Disney Junior because of some factors, including cost for began retiring the channel, forced HD carriage, in some places being replaced by History 2 and systems like Dish and DirecTV objecting to carrying a channel which won't have much of an audience past 10pm (Unlike Nick Jr., Disney Junior has few programs in others with PeripheryDemographic appeal, and there's ''no way'' Disney would try to re-create Creator/AdultSwim with one of their networks for late night). [=SOAPNet=] then was programming from that point through ABC Family as a sort-of extension channel and retained much of its programming, along with ABC Family content like ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'' and and the first ever run in syndication of ''Series/VeronicaMars'' (for awhile it was carrying [[IShallTauntYou viewership taunting]] weekend marathons of ''The Chew'' early in the winter until Brian Frons finally got his desk cleaned out), so it remained in vindication for two years after it was to have ended.\\
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Eventually though, [=SOAPNet=] melted away. During the Viacom/[=DirecTV=] dispute where the Viacom children's networks were pulled, by [[ThereAreNoCoincidences mere coincidence]], the satellite provider suddenly became interested in carrying Disney Junior and made a deal to launch it on a Saturday morning out of thin air, so [=SOAPNet=]'s days on [=DirecTV=] became numbered. Other providers eventually made deals as tots teased by ''WesternAnimation/SofiaTheFirst'' specials on Disney Channel made their parents plead for the network it aired on, and the rebranded TVGN under CBS ownership (now known as Pop) took the rights for same-day ''Young and the Restless'' and ''Bold and the Beautiful'' repeats over to their network, assuring a happy ending for those two shows at least; the original ''90210'' fans also got their show back on TVGN starting Labor Day 2014. Disney eventually announced that it would bury [=SOAPNet=]'s hatchet at the end of 2013, for real this time, and it ended quietly at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve 2013, showing nothing but black after the credits of its final ''Series/GeneralHospital'' rerun. The final Disney Junior holdout, Dish Network (which was involved in an epically long negotiation with Disney over a myriad of issues, which lead to Dish only airing their channels in Standard Definition) added the network in the spring of 2014.
* A&E ("Arts & Entertainment" and currently owned by Disney and Hearst Corporation) used to show artsy films, documentaries (most notably their flagship series ''Biography''), and British mystery and period dramas aimed at a highbrow (or at least high-middlebrow) adult audience, like a basic-cable
then-debuting Latin version of Creator/{{PBS}}. However, a regime change Creator/{{Lifetime}}. The channel's official shutdown took place in 2002 caused much of that programming to be moved over to the History Channel and the Biography Channel (see more on both below), while A&E itself switched its target audience to [[LowestCommonDenominator the opposite end July 1 of the spectrum]] virtually overnight. Today, same year for South America and July 31 for the rest of the countries, ending nearly 18 years of broadcast (since it runs was launched as Locomotion).
* Animax South Africa followed the same disastrous way as Latin America's and Spain's. Japanese animation is now almost in the minority and are few and far between, as
reality shows like ''Series/StorageWars'', ''Series/{{Hoarders}}'', have taken over the schedule, and ''Series/DuckDynasty'', TrueCrime shows, and reruns and marathons of ''Series/CSIMiami''. An executive was soon closed down to make way for a new channel, Sony Max, which basically airs the channel even joked at one point that it experienced the fastest drop in average demographic age ever, and ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' did [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-sad-ways-ae-became-walmart-television-networks/ an entire article]] comparing the post-decay network to UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}.
** Its Biography Channel spin-off -- later known as "Bio" -- didn't fare much better once the bio-show craze ''Biography'' spearheaded in the late 1990s fizzled out. At one point, they showed reruns of ''Series/NightCourt'' and ''Series/NewsRadio'' in an attempt to be to A&E what Boomerang was to Creator/CartoonNetwork - these shows having been rerun on A&E in the past. In TheNewTens, about two-thirds of the lineup consists of sensational TrueCrime documentaries and paranormal or crime-related
same reality shows picked up from that aired on Animax South Africa.
* Animax Spain followed
the parent network, with some of same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the paranormal titles having titles such as ''The Family Who Slays Together'', ''Killer Kids'', minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Celebrity Ghost Stories''. A&E ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called it quits when, in July 2014, Bio re-launched as the lifestyle network FYI.
** The Latin
"Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American feed of A&E, which suffered folk). Eventually, all the exact same decay as their master network (and then some), now claims on their bumps that "A&E" stands for "'''A'''cción y '''E'''moción" ("Action and Emotion"). Retronym justification of the decay?
* Once called "The All-[[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] Channel", much of Creator/TheHistoryChannel's (now called "History")
non-anime programming now consists of [[DocuSoap docu-soaps]] (''Series/IceRoadTruckers'', ''Series/AxMen'') was moved to other channels, and semi-documentaries the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
* Hungary's Animax has also gone down this route. It launched in 2004 under the name A+, and focused almost entirely on Japanese animation
with some (rather lowbrow) historical content (''Series/PawnStars'' and its spinoffs, as well ''Series/AmericanPickers'') focused on roughnecks or [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories conspiracy theory "documentaries"]] about [[Series/AncientAliens aliens]], American cartoons thrown into the Bible Code, ghosts, {{Atlantis}}, Nostradamus, and {{the end of mix. Though the world|AsWeKnowIt}}, earning the network the derisive nickname "The Hysterical Channel". Regarding ''actual'' history programming, they air, at best, specials on a few major holidays, and only when their big ratings grabbers like ''Series/PawnStars'' are on season hiatus. The only other time any actual historical programming shows up is to piggyback of any major upcoming films based on historical events. It makes many older fans long for weren't bad, and the "Hitler Channel" days when all of RTL Group kept the channel alive by supplying their programming seemed to be about WorldWarII and [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]]. And then in 2015 they decided to combine the conspiracy theory stuff with Nazis by airing a show claiming that Hitler didn't actually die in Berlin and instead escaped to Argentina.\\
\\
One big reason for
anime dubs, the network's decay is that the Smithsonian Institution, which was one real owners (Chello Central Europe) ignored it. Sony Pictures took ownership of the go-to organizations for channel in 2007, and A+ attempted to keep itself up by airing subtitled anime releases, an act which had the History Channel in effect of drastically lowering their early days, is now under an exclusive deal with Creator/{{Showtime}} where ratings. After Sony rebranded it as Animax, dubbed productions came back and all seemed good. However in 2009, they produce decided to turn the channel into a general youth entertainment network, and started airing all sorts of American talent shows, scripted live-action series and movies (mostly taken from AXN's showcase), as well as some Japanese ones -- at least a few new anime shows still premiered regularly, although the channel lost its MultipleDemographicAppeal as it replaced the bulk of its programming around Smithsonian exhibits and properties for their exclusive Smithsonian Channel, which is not allowed to decay by design, while Showtime and Creator/{{CBS}} maintain with popular [[ShonenDemographic Shonen]] series. Around 2012, Animax began going bankrupt -- the rights to the institution's film library. Showtime, of course, isn't about to do anything to help its competitor, thus History has to look for other ideas to fill anime series slowly expired, they broke up their broadcast day. Perhaps advertising deal, and as Sony considered anime to be the cause of its problems (as opposed to their terrible coverage, mishandled marketing, careless decision-making and often sub-par dubbing work), they've only reason History didn't start calling themselves "THC" was because of that initialism's drug connotations.
** History International went from a channel
focused on world history adding more and more live-action shows and movies to a vault channel for old History Channel documentaries. It changed its name to H2, with Animax's showcase, and even canceled the slogan "More 2 History", coinciding with a shift long-awaited premieres of several anime series. Essentially, it became AXN's wastebasket, and the handful of Japanese shows that they still held broadcasting rights to placing many were just tired reruns practically begging to be taken off the air. The fact that Animax only aired from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., and about half of History's remaining serious programming, that airtime was just reruns anyway, made the situation seem much worse. As expected, the ratings dropped like ''The Universe'', a rock, and from mid-'12 to early '14, Animax lingered on in rerun-limbo.\\\
The Animax staff vanished from
the channel... along with blocks of History's conspiracy 'net in October 2012, and paranormal fare. On February 29th, 2016, A&E their website was taken down a year thereafter. Animax was replaced H2 with the American version of a new cable network called Viceland, in a joint venture with Vice Media.
** Realizing its sheer number of military programmes, including a documentary series on modern-day Canadian fighter pilots, the UK now has a Military History
non-anime channel spun off called C8 (also owned by Chello Central Europe) in April 2014, whose bare function is to fill out the late-night timeslot with content lazily taken from its History Channel. And now it's started some slippage as well, with a regular "Demilitarised Zone" slot where it can repeat the ''rest'' of the documentaries that used to be on History back when it wasn't showing ''Ice Road Truckers''. The little known US version of Military History is so far committed to showing all military-themed shows...whether they be WWII, Samurai-themed or biblical figures fighting across Canaan (modern-day Israel).[[note]]In defense of that last one, they do present rundowns of the weapons of the era, and even try to account for Chello's other networks. In some of the "miraculous" happenings in the Bible accounts using actual military tactics of the time[[/note]]
** Due to the [[{{Understatement}} very emotionally charged]] political election, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a topic we will not argue about here]], History Channel had the idea of creating a topical "documentary" about how UsefulNotes/{{Nostradamus}} may have predicted the election between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump titled "Nostradamus: Election 2016". They uses a few of lines of his Quatrains that [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory vaguely relate to]] the two and their personalities and scandals.
neighboring regions, Animax turned into Sony Spin, an all-round entertainment network whose only notable anime program is ''Anime/DragonBallKai''.




[[folder:[=NBCUniversal=] / Comcast Examples]]
* Bravo originally focused on independent cinema and the arts; for example, it was the U.S. outlet for Creator/CirqueDuSoleil specials/shows for years. They also featured what they termed "TV too good for TV": reruns of past artsy cult-favorite shows like ''Series/TwinPeaks'' and ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' shown unedited and free of commercial interruption. Original owners Rainbow Media (also the owner of Creator/{{AMC}} and IFC, which is a spin-off of Bravo) sold the channel to minority partner Creator/{{NBC}} in 2002, who originally intended to retool it into a no-genre entertainment channel not unlike Creator/{{TBS}}, TNT, and eventual corporate sibling Creator/USANetwork. Around 2004, it began a switch over to a pop-culture/occupational reality show format in the wake of hits like ''[[Series/QueerEye Queer Eye for the Straight Guy]]'', with occasional stragglers like ''Inside the Actors' Studio'' still inexplicably present. They've also shown ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'' and ''Series/{{House}}'' reruns, which are contrary to both their arts and reality programming, and built a whole franchise out of ''The Real Housewives'' in TheNewTens.
** The Canadian version of Bravo took a similar turn for the worse. As in the U.S., it was oriented towards arts and culture-related programming since its inception, and also aired independently produced short films from Canadian artists financed through the channel's Bravo!Fact fund. By the late 2000's, it began to shift away from the arts and culture programming (besides ''Inside the Actors' Studio''), but rather than going in a camp direction, it decided to turn into a drama-oriented entertainment channel not unlike TNT or USA, picking up ''Series/MadMen'', re-runs of Creator/{{CTV}} series such as ''Series/FlashPoint'' and ''Series/CriminalMinds'', and various feature films. This shift was even more pronounced under its current owners at Bell Media, who would later introduce an entirely new logo for the channel. Bravo Canada has essentially become Bell's answer to Creator/ShowcaseTelevision, a rival channel that had similarly punted its original format.
* [[Creator/{{E}} E! Entertainment Television]] originally showed movie previews, soap opera and talk show recap programs, and many making-of documentaries and specials that covered everything from theater to animation, serving as a sort of MTV for movie and TV buffs. It eventually became all about celebrity news (i.e. gossip) and True Hollywood Stories. Then it started airing all sorts of non-celebrity-related reality programs. With shows like ''The Girls Next Door'', ''Keeping Up With the Kardashians'' (and its many {{spinoff}}s) and two shows by bawdy comic Chelsea Handler[[note]]The TalkShow ''Chelsea Lately'', and the {{mockumentary}} series ''Series/AfterLately''.[[/note]], it comes as no surprise that in some commercials (and on ''TheSoup'') E! openly acknowledges itself as a [[GuiltyPleasures guilty pleasure]] channel.
* E!'s sister network, Style, launched as a network which stuck on two popular things in E!'s late-1990s scheduling their fashion and design coverage and when it launched it showed mostly runway shows and interior design programs designed to show off the current "styles" of a time period. This decayed into very generic reality programming (in order to not outshine sister network Oxygen), ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' reruns, and an inexplicable need for us to know about the private life of E!'s main female news anchor. In fall of 2013, it was abruptly replaced with the {{metrosexual}}-themed Esquire Network, a fate that was supposed to fall on Creator/G4TV.
* One of the most notorious examples of network decay this side of [=MTV=] can be seen with the troubled history of [[Creator/G4TV G4]], a television network that initially focused on videogames and geek culture. Despite featuring a slew of shows that are rather well-received today, the network struggled from the beginning, with the ratings that were brought in failing to please the network executives. This led to the network buying out Creator/TechTV, a popular computer enthusiast network with good ratings, and "[[ExecutiveMeddling merging]]" them into one channel, [=G4TechTV=]. This is where many would cite as when the roots of decay took hold, as the "merger" itself resulted in [[ScrewedByTheNetwork the near-complete jettison of the existing TechTV staff and programs in the process]], to much chagrin from the existing [=TechTV=] base. The merger itself only lasted a year before the channel reverted to the [=G4(TV)=] name.\\
\\
The decay only grew from there, as G4 then underwent a retool as "male-oriented" channel under then-new president Neal Tiles. [=G4TV=]'s lineup picked up reality shows like ''Totally Outrageous Behavior'' and ''Series/{{COPS}}'', Japanese game shows such as ''Series/NinjaWarrior'' and ''Series/UnbeatableBanzuke'', and reruns of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', ''Series/{{LOST}}'', and ''Series/{{Heroes}}''; all while whittling down any actual programs related to gaming and/or technology. Eventually, the only shows left on the network that were relevant to either channel's former demographics were ''Series/XPlay'' and ''Series/AttackOfTheShow'', with the channel at this point having mutated into a geekier version of Creator/SpikeTV. To put in perspective how little anyone thought of G4 since the decay, the premiere of ''Proving Ground'' [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-tv-column-g4-pulls-this-weeks-proving-ground-after-ryan-dunns-death/2011/06/20/AGZyWVdH_story.html got 31,000 viewers]], less than the population of Juneau, UsefulNotes/{{Alaska}}, while the [=UFC=] passed by the opportunity to own G4 for their own network for a deal with Fox.\\
\\
[=DirecTV=] even found so little to value in the network that they ''[[http://news-briefs.ew.com/2010/11/01/directv-drops-g4/ dropped it]]'', and [=DirecTV=] almost never drops networks in comparison with Dish Network. With the departure of network veterans and hosts of the few remaining Gaming/Technology shows, Adam Sessler (co-host of Series/XPlay) and Kevin Pierera (host of AttackOfTheShow), and [[http://kotaku.com/5955278/crisis-at-g4-studios-gaming-shows-will-be-cancelled-source-says G4 ending both ''X-Play'' and ''Attack Of The Show'' by the end of 2012]], the channel's death was set in stone.\\
\\
Plans were made to re-launch G4 as Esquire Network, but on September 9, 2013, NBC changed their minds and announced it would replace Style Network (which is carried on more cable systems than G4, most critically [=DirecTV=]) instead. G4, meanwhile, [[http://xfinity.comcast.net/learn/programming/ was pulled from the Comcast cable lineup in January 2014.]] Every other major provider has removed it on the same timeframe or earlier, and it became a shambling zombie feed of ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'', ''Campus PD'' and ''Series/WebSoup'' reruns until the network was fully shut down at 11:59 PM eastern time on December 31, 2014, when [=AT&T=] U-verse and the few cable providers that still had G4 [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIaPvsrUG8w dropped the network]], almost a full two years from when it was originally supposed to end. In December 2016, Esquire ended up losing the [=DirecTV=] carriage anyways (as well as virtually ''every other cable provider'' besides C-Band and Verizon [=FiOS=]) as they went with the new common reasoning for dropping channels that the repeats on that channel are also on Netflix, Hulu, and an assortment of other networks, making it pointless to keep.
** While G4's Canadian counterpart is still around today, they also went under a similar network decay as G4. It got to the point that the CRTC pressured that G4 Canada was competing against sister channel OLN and deviating too heavily from its purpose, which was to air technology-related programming. They also [[http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-447.htm stated]] that the channel's "programming is not in compliance with its nature of service definition" and that it detail measures "to ensure that the service is in compliance with its nature of service." Even worse is the network hasn't produced any tech-centric content since 2006; thanks to the loss of ''X-Play'' and ''Attack of the Show'', the only new original programs aired by G4 were ''EP Daily'' and ''Reviews on the Run'' (two long-running, Canadian-produced video game shows that [[ChannelHop channel hopped]] to Creator/{{Citytv}} and G4 from A-Channel and Space; they too have drifted to covering films and comic books once in a while too). Not to mention, it's still re-running episodes of ''Call for Help'' and ''The Lab with Leo Laporte'' that talk about Windows XP and the original iPod as "current technology", with most tips and calls being only pertinent to a grandmother that refuses to switch out the Dell Dimension she bought in 2003.\\
\\
Aside from those, the channel fulfilled its "technology" mandate by airing old History Channel shows about military technology (''Tactical to Practical'' and ''Man, Moment, Machine''), and the British programmes ''Bang Goes The Theory'' and ''Rude Tube'' (which is somewhat of a TransatlanticEquivalent of ''Web Soup''). But it only got worse after Rogers ended its partnership with The Electric Playground Network and G4 stopped airing ''EP Daily'' and ''Reviews on the Run''. Not only has the channel fallen back to OLN repeats, but has now added reruns of low-rated Citytv shows and, ironically, ''Campus PD'' to the mix.
* Creator/{{NBC}}SN, formerly ''Versus'' and originally the ''Outdoor Life Network'' (licensed from a magazine of the same name), originally focused on outdoorsy stuff like hunting and fishing. Then their annual coverage of the Tour de France became popular, due to Lance Armstrong's utter dominance at the ''Tour''. They then acquired the rights to the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]] which, unless they were playing a hockey game ''outside'', didn't fit the channel's format. Around the same time, they started to focus on extreme sports and college sports (although stuck with only covering lower-tier games from conferences in the western half of the country despite being based out of Philadelphia - because the [[{{ESPN}} Worldwide Leader]] got almost everything else - and out of New England prior to that), resulting in a name change to "Versus". In 2012, following a merger with NBC and Comcast, Versus was rebranded as the NBC Sports Network (later shortened to NBCSN) to become a 24 hour cable extension of NBC Sports, and perhaps to directly compete with Creator/{{ESPN}}. Low-brow programming such as GroinAttack clip shows and ''[[TheSoup Sports Soup]]'' was abandoned the moment NBC took over.\\
\\
The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and obscure sports like hockey and the [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts mixed]] [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship martial arts]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the UFC being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]], and ''especially'' the UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which is aired by NBCSN among other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the better parts of Fox's coverage (including their commentators). NBCSN has also been used to broadcast a larger amount of live [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with too many commercial breaks[[note]]Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their own reduced package from 2007 to 2016, when NBC got it back on their own. It had all the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]]
** The network still devotes a good portion of its channel space for outdoor programing; much of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractual commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk if any of these programs run into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
* Oxygen was once the anti-Creator/{{Lifetime}}, airing shows revolving around making women better, ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' and ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' reruns, and programming about yoga and improving yourself, along with women's sports. By the time NBC bought the channel in 2007, the original partners had long left, and the new management decided programming which exploited women such as the ''Bad Girls Club'' (which itself has long abandoned any attempts at reforming their subjects), ''Snapped'' (profiles about women killers which edge uncomfortably close to idolization) and multiple shows revolving around Tori Spelling's love life would do better. Some argue that the decay began as early as 2004, which, for around a year, devoted late nights to the next rung below softcore porn (and actual {{Bowdlerise}}d Canadian softcore porn) and a QVC-like block devoted to ''sex toys''.
** Now it seems like the decay is coming full circle, since [[http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/oxygen-rebrand-true-crime-channel/410607 NBCUniversal announced that Oxygen was becoming a true crime channel]] in summer 2017, with a reboot of TNT's ''Cold Justice'' being among the first programs under the new format.
* Cloo (known prior to 2011 as Sleuth) supposedly should have been devoted fully to crime drama reruns from the deep reservoir of Universal's vaults, but by the end was more known as the "USA Network Annex" as all of its programming consisted of programs already rerunning or original series from USA Network, with the only Universal shows seen being the ubiquitous ''SVU'' and ''Criminal Intent''; those Universal crime drama reruns are seen on Cozi TV these days. In the summer of 2016, the head of NBC's cable division effectively gave the network its death sentence, as 'skinny bundles' came into vogue and rerun-only networks became verboten with the new age of Internet television providers who aren't willing to carry them. Dish Network and many other providers were dropping the network over the years, because its rerun-centric nature made it pointless when its programming can already be seen on other networks and online. Cloo ended their run quietly on February 1, 2017 on a decay-appropriate note, finishing their broadcast by airing the entirety of ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.
* Syfy UK shows some heavily-promoted proper science fiction series, but mostly they construct their schedule from a mix of documentaries on the supernatural/occult/alien abduction, kung fu movies, MMA, action series (such as ''HumanTarget''), frequent ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' reruns, {{disaster movie}}s, monster movies, [[SwordAndSandal sword-and-sandal]] flicks, medieval adventure movies (''Film/FirstKnight'' and ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves''?), all kinds of fantasy, and quirky dramas like ''EliStone''. It's rare to see genuine science fiction movies there. Syfy UK seems to following the American network's trend with the announcement that they will be showing the [[MixedMartialArts MMA]] promotion ''BAMMA''.
* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. No more. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which are sourced from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were kept from Nonstop to Cozi.)
[[/folder]]


[[folder:Animax Internatonal Distributors]]
* Creator/{{Animax}} (supposed to be a 24-hour {{anime}} channel), in its Latin American side, both Brazilian and Spanish-speaking versions, became this:
** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
** Before Animax LA was owned by Sony, it had other name, Locomotion. Originally a children oriented channel, but later became a youth oriented channel a year later to avoid competition with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, and shortly after an adult oriented animation channel (it showed things like ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'', ''ComicBook/TheMaxx'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHead'', the ''ComicStrip/PrinceValiant'' movies and ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts, among others), eventually it evolved into an anime channel (showing more than 10 anime series a day), so it started calling itself "The Anime Channel". The problem is that after a while it anime was aired with other programs like ''WesternAnimation/{{Duckman}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Eventually, it created an advertisement that said ''"The good anime, takes time. Anime-station"''. Watchers were really confused by this, but it turned out they sold their rights to an anime channel. Eventually this lead to the channel being rebranded to Animax.
** As Sony Spin, the channel still aired anime at early morning hours, even airing new series like ''Manga/NodameCantabile'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist Brotherhood'' and new episodes of ''Manga/{{Bleach}}''. This changed in March 2012, when the slot was replaced by live action shows, thus abandoning anime programming completely. The new channel got such lousy ratings that their exclusive live-action series were moved to sister channel Sony Entertainment. Sony Spin became a rerun loop of series such as ''Series/That70sShow'', ''Series/JoanOfArcadia'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', old movies and even a Latin American soap opera. This effectively meant Sony Spin itself entered into a drift status. In 2014, many cable systems began retiring the channel, in some places being replaced by History 2 and in others with the then-debuting Latin version of Creator/{{Lifetime}}. The channel's official shutdown took place in July 1 of the same year for South America and July 31 for the rest of the countries, ending nearly 18 years of broadcast (since it was launched as Locomotion).
* Animax South Africa followed the same disastrous way as Latin America's and Spain's. Japanese animation is now almost in the minority and are few and far between, as reality shows have taken over the schedule, and was soon closed down to make way for a new channel, Sony Max, which basically airs the same reality shows that aired on Animax South Africa.
* Animax Spain followed the same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
* Hungary's Animax has also gone down this route. It launched in 2004 under the name A+, and focused almost entirely on Japanese animation with some American cartoons thrown into the mix. Though the ratings weren't bad, and the RTL Group kept the channel alive by supplying their anime dubs, the network's real owners (Chello Central Europe) ignored it. Sony Pictures took ownership of the channel in 2007, and A+ attempted to keep itself up by airing subtitled anime releases, an act which had the effect of drastically lowering their ratings. After Sony rebranded it as Animax, dubbed productions came back and all seemed good. However in 2009, they decided to turn the channel into a general youth entertainment network, and started airing all sorts of American talent shows, scripted live-action series and movies (mostly taken from AXN's showcase), as well as some Japanese ones -- at least a few new anime shows still premiered regularly, although the channel lost its MultipleDemographicAppeal as it replaced the bulk of its programming with popular [[ShonenDemographic Shonen]] series. Around 2012, Animax began going bankrupt -- the rights to its anime series slowly expired, they broke up their advertising deal, and as Sony considered anime to be the cause of its problems (as opposed to their terrible coverage, mishandled marketing, careless decision-making and often sub-par dubbing work), they've only focused on adding more and more live-action shows and movies to Animax's showcase, and even canceled the long-awaited premieres of several anime series. Essentially, it became AXN's wastebasket, and the handful of Japanese shows that they still held broadcasting rights to were just tired reruns practically begging to be taken off the air. The fact that Animax only aired from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., and about half of that airtime was just reruns anyway, made the situation seem much worse. As expected, the ratings dropped like a rock, and from mid-'12 to early '14, Animax lingered on in rerun-limbo.\\\
The Animax staff vanished from the 'net in October 2012, and their website was taken down a year thereafter. Animax was replaced with a non-anime channel called C8 (also owned by Chello Central Europe) in April 2014, whose bare function is to fill out the late-night timeslot with content lazily taken from Chello's other networks. In some of the neighboring regions, Animax turned into Sony Spin, an all-round entertainment network whose only notable anime program is ''Anime/DragonBallKai''.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

* This is pretty much the case for independent channels in America. Many channels arose beginning in the 1960's and through to the 1980's with absolutely no network affiliation of any kind. These channels still managed to air just as wide a variety of programs as network channels but they had the added benefit of being able to program their own prime time. As the popularity of cable rose in the 1980's people would turn to cable for more variety of programming leaving independent channels behind. As channels lost ratings they were purchased left and right by non-traditional broadcasters like ''Creator/{{TBN}}'' or Home Shopping Network who would all but take over their programming. This was done so the networks would have to be carried by cable systems in the areas the system served. By the late 1980's new network channels emerged that tried to gain ground as major network channels, the first being ''Creator/{{Fox}}'' in 1987 followed by the emergence of ''Creator/TheWB'' and ''Creator/{{UPN}}'' in the mid 1990's. Paxson Communications would go the way of taking over channels with an all-infomercial network in 1996 before they too would introduce a major network in the form of Pax TV. By the 2000's the WB would become ''Creator/TheCW'' and ''Creaotr/MyNetworkTV'' would be introduced, and the latter would die out as a network in 2009 and become more of a broadcast service. Today channels carrying an affiliation with [=MyNetworkTV=] are very close to being independent but you're not likely to see more than just reruns of ''Series/TheJerrySpringerShow'' or other talk shows, the occasional game show, and the occasional children's show just to meet FCC Requirements for children's television. That is if your independent channel actually is more than just a 24/7 infomercial channel.
28th Feb '17 9:02:53 AM MisaoFan
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* Animax Spain followed the same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakittateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.

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* Animax Spain followed the same disastrous way as Latin American's and South Africa's. Japanese animation eventually found in the minority (they only broadcast either very old series like ''Anime/{{Kochikame}}'' or ''Anime/LupinIII'', or commercial successes like ''Anime/{{Inuyasha}}'' or ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}''). By 2011, 90% of Animax Spain consisted of low-budget live-action series like ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Series/SamuraiGirl'', ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/{{Reaper}}'', or bland, soulless "young adult" TV shows like ''In The Qbe'' and ''Insert Coin''. They even have earned the moniker of "Yankeemax" amongst Spanish otakus (similarly, the LA version has been called "Gringomax" by Mexicans and other South American folk). Eventually, all the non-anime programming was moved to other channels, and the channel became a rerun loop of ''Kochikame'' and ''Anime/YakittateJapan'' ''Anime/YakitateJapan'' until its shutdown in 2013.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=NetworkDecay.TotalAbandonment