1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History NetworkDecay / TotalAbandonment

21st May '16 5:53:37 PM ooh
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PAX Television (now Creator/{{ION}}) was founded by Christian home-shopping mogul Lowell "Bud" Paxson as a family-friendly alternative to the major broadcast networks, with wholesome original programming, game shows and reruns of ''Series/TouchedByAnAngel''. The format wasn't working and Pax was rebranded "i" with the intention to lease airtime to independent producers. Those leased programs wound up being terrible and unwatched, consisting of mainly Canadian content dramas or the infamous ''Palmetto Pointe'', a low-budget ''Series/OneTreeHill'' ripoff set in Charleston, South Carolina which wasn't even SoBadItsGood, and the network soon resorted to filling 2/3 of their broadcast day with {{Infomercial}}s to keep the lights on, giving it the infamous industry joke that "i stands for infomercials' and nearly losing most of its coverage from Comcast and [=DirecTV=] because of it. Paxson left his company in 2007 and "i" became Ion Television. Since then, its schedule now largely consists of Crime Drama reruns, ''Film/JamesBond'' films and at one point even the Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s third-string weekly show (effectively making it a broadcast version of Creator/USANetwork), with the kind of violent content that Paxson most likely abhorred, but at least gets ratings and advertisers. As of late 2013, Ion's sixth subchannel now carries another Bud Paxson creation, the Home Shopping Network, under a channel lease agreement.

to:

* PAX Television (now Creator/{{ION}}) was founded by Christian home-shopping mogul Lowell "Bud" Paxson as a family-friendly alternative to the major broadcast networks, with wholesome original programming, game shows and reruns of ''Series/TouchedByAnAngel''. The format wasn't working and Pax was rebranded "i" with the intention to lease airtime to independent producers. Those leased programs wound up being terrible and unwatched, consisting of mainly Canadian content dramas or the infamous ''Palmetto Pointe'', a low-budget ''Series/OneTreeHill'' ripoff set in Charleston, South Carolina which wasn't even SoBadItsGood, and the network soon resorted to filling 2/3 of their broadcast day with {{Infomercial}}s to keep the lights on, giving it the infamous industry joke that "i "'i' stands for infomercials' infomercials" and nearly losing most of its coverage from Comcast and [=DirecTV=] because of it. Paxson left his company in 2007 and "i" became Ion Television. Since then, its schedule now largely consists of Crime Drama reruns, ''Film/JamesBond'' films and at one point even the Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s third-string weekly show (effectively making it a broadcast version of Creator/USANetwork), with the kind of violent content that Paxson most likely abhorred, but at least gets ratings and advertisers. As of late 2013, Ion's sixth subchannel now carries another Bud Paxson creation, the Home Shopping Network, under a channel lease agreement.
* The Odyssey Network, founded in 1988 as VISN (Vision Interfaith Satellite Network) was created to counter the popularity of televangelists at the time by airing programs from a heavy amount of religious denominations. In 1998, a joint venture of Hallmark and the Creator/JimHenson Company became principal investors in Odyssey, and through their influence, brought forth the most unusual marriage of Muppets and Spirituality. The religious programs were limited to 40 hours a week with the remaining time devoted to general-entertainment programming. In 2001, Hallmark bought controlling interest in Odyssey and renamed it the Hallmark Channel. Unlike what happened to Freeform, Hallmark gradually phased out religious programs that by 2010, the channel was 100% secular. The channel's founding parent company continues to produce religious programming for other cable channels under the Odyssey name.
19th May '16 11:45:26 PM BNSF1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[Creator/{{ESPN}} ESPNEWS]] was created specifically so you could get scores and highlights in a half-hour (or much less if you just looked at the much more detailed ticker) without any ''Series/SportsCenter'' gimmickry and annoying segments like "Play of the Day" or ''([[ProductPlacement Sliver-Canned National Light Beer Manufactured in the Rocky Mountain Region of Colorado]]) Cold Hard Facts''[[note]]Which usually contain ''opinions'' from its pontificators as opposed to any facts, hard, cold or otherwise.[[/note]] which pretty much existed to give short shrift to lower-tier teams who didn't have any highlights in their games, at least according to those in Bristol, Connecticut. Now that the ticker was replaced with the glacial regular flavor ESPN "bottom line" ticker and the regular ''Sports Center'' gimmicks have moved over to ESPNEWS, not to mention that ''Sports Center'' is now being used as the network's primetime branding, it's pretty much ''Sports Center 24/7'' but with the network's F-team anchors. Eventually, the only true ESPNEWS programming left was the ''Highlight Express'' deep in late night, with the rest of the day filled with ESPN/[=ESPN2=] talking head show repeats, ESPN Radio simulcasts, and overflow sports like softball and the UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} Nationwide Series. And then in June 2013, [[http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Daily/Issues/2013/06/13/Media/ESPN.aspx ''Highlight Express'' was canceled]], leaving an overnight show about soccer (''ESPN FC Press Pass'') the only program produced solely for the network. ''And then'' ESPN decided to replace the soccer show with a new one on ESPN2, leaving ESPNEWS to be the home for endless repeats of talking head shows, Sports Center when ESPN and ESPN2 aren't showing it, occasional ESPN Radio simulcasts, and as the designated overflow channel when events on other ESPN networks run long.

to:

* [[Creator/{{ESPN}} ESPNEWS]] was created specifically so you could get scores and highlights in a half-hour (or much less if you just looked at the much more detailed ticker) without any ''Series/SportsCenter'' gimmickry and annoying segments like "Play of the Day" or ''([[ProductPlacement Sliver-Canned National Light Beer Manufactured in the Rocky Mountain Region of Colorado]]) Cold Hard Facts''[[note]]Which usually contain ''opinions'' from its pontificators as opposed to any facts, hard, cold or otherwise.[[/note]] which pretty much existed to give short shrift to lower-tier teams who didn't have any highlights in their games, at least according to those in Bristol, Connecticut. Now that the ticker was replaced with the glacial regular flavor ESPN "bottom line" ticker and the regular ''Sports Center'' gimmicks have moved over to ESPNEWS, not to mention that ''Sports Center'' is now being used as the network's primetime branding, it's pretty much ''Sports Center 24/7'' but with the network's F-team anchors. Eventually, the only true ESPNEWS programming left was the ''Highlight Express'' deep in late night, with the rest of the day filled with ESPN/[=ESPN2=] talking head show repeats, ESPN Radio simulcasts, and overflow sports like softball and the UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} Nationwide Series.Series [[note]]A practice that ended after the rights for the Nationwide Series, now Xfinity Series, went to Fox and NBC[[/note]]. And then in June 2013, [[http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Daily/Issues/2013/06/13/Media/ESPN.aspx ''Highlight Express'' was canceled]], leaving an overnight show about soccer (''ESPN FC Press Pass'') the only program produced solely for the network. ''And then'' ESPN decided to replace the soccer show with a new one on ESPN2, leaving ESPNEWS to be the home for endless repeats of talking head shows, Sports Center when ESPN and ESPN2 aren't showing it, occasional ESPN Radio simulcasts, and as the designated overflow channel when events on other ESPN networks run long.
19th May '16 10:21:33 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (suspiciously taken from the NBC feed, most likely because a TSN-operated network did not want to air footage owned by its main competitor) and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. \\\
The U.S. version of NHL Network, as part of a wider deal between the league and Major League Baseball's technology arm, was re-located to the faciities of MLB Network. Unlike the Canadian version, the American version does have purpose, as it has served as the U.S. outlet for national NHL broadcasts from Canada (such as ''Series/HockeyNightInCanada'') and coverage of Canadian and international tournaments that are too niche to be broadcast by a mainstream network as they do in Canada due to their signifigance.

to:

In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (suspiciously taken from (which used the U.S. NBC feed, most likely because a TSN-operated network did not want to air footage owned by its main competitor) coverage instead of Rogers, for [[TheRival seemingly obvious reasons]]) and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. \\\
The U.S. version of NHL Network, as part of a wider deal between the league and Major League Baseball's technology arm, was re-located to the faciities of MLB Network. Unlike the Canadian version, the American version does have purpose, as it has served as the U.S. outlet for national NHL broadcasts from Canada (such as ''Series/HockeyNightInCanada'') and coverage of Canadian and international tournaments that are too niche to be broadcast by a mainstream network as they do in Canada due to their signifigance.
19th May '16 10:20:05 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The same day, NHL Network also shut down. But why does Canada, where it is ''the'' national pastime, ''not'' need a 24-hour network devoted to hockey? As the major sports channels (including operating partner TSN) already treated hockey as [[AdoredByTheNetwork their #1 priority]], NHL Network was barely-promoted and mainly aired leftover all-U.S. games, studio shows, and obligatory classic games. The studio programming also faced competition from the better-known talent of TSN and Sportsnet. In its 14 years on-air, it also never launched an HD feed--a death sentence for a sports-oriented network, as it was relegated to a portion of program guides that only fans intentionally seeking out the channel would ever find it in. \\\
The U.S. version of NHL Network has purpose, since it mainly airs simulcasts of Canadian hockey events (including Canadian nationally-televised games) nominally aired by TSN or Sportsnet, and would not otherwise be relevant to an American channel. In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (suspiciously taken from the NBC feed, most likely because a TSN-operated network did not want to air footage owned by its main competitor) and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. Comcast, which controls the American version through the NBC deal, gave on-air control of the network to MLB's acclaimed Internet arm (which also took over the out-of-market Internet packaged for the league), and the network now shares operations with MLB Network.

to:

* The same day, NHL Network also shut down. But why does Canada, where it is ''the'' national pastime, ''not'' need a 24-hour network devoted to hockey? As the major sports channels (including operating partner TSN) already treated hockey as [[AdoredByTheNetwork their #1 priority]], it was basically redundant. NHL Network was barely-promoted and mainly aired leftover all-U.S. games, studio shows, and the obligatory classic games. The studio programming also faced competition from the better-known talent of TSN and Sportsnet. In its 14 years on-air, it also never launched an HD feed--a death sentence for a sports-oriented network, as it was relegated to a portion of program guides that only fans intentionally seeking out the channel would ever find it in. \\\
The U.S. version of NHL Network has purpose, since it mainly airs simulcasts of Canadian hockey events (including Canadian nationally-televised games) nominally aired by TSN or Sportsnet, and would not otherwise be relevant to an American channel. In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (suspiciously taken from the NBC feed, most likely because a TSN-operated network did not want to air footage owned by its main competitor) and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. Comcast, which controls \\\
The U.S. version of NHL Network, as part of a wider deal between the league and Major League Baseball's technology arm, was re-located to the faciities of MLB Network. Unlike the Canadian version,
the American version through does have purpose, as it has served as the NBC deal, gave on-air control U.S. outlet for national NHL broadcasts from Canada (such as ''Series/HockeyNightInCanada'') and coverage of the Canadian and international tournaments that are too niche to be broadcast by a mainstream network as they do in Canada due to MLB's acclaimed Internet arm (which also took over the out-of-market Internet packaged for the league), and the network now shares operations with MLB Network.
their signifigance.
19th May '16 10:06:29 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Creator/{{NBC}}SN'', formerly ''Versus'' and originally the ''Outdoor Life Network'' (licensed from a magazine of the same name), originally focused on outdoorsy stuff like hunting and fishing. Then their annual coverage of the Tour de France became popular, due to Lance Armstrong's utter dominance at the ''Tour''. They then acquired the rights to the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]], a sport which is ''not'' played outdoors. Around the same time, they started to focus on extreme sports and college sports (although stuck with only covering lower-tier games from conferences in the western half of the country despite being based out of Philadelphia - because the [[{{ESPN}} Worldwide Leader]] got almost everything else - and out of New England prior to that), resulting in a name change to Versus. In 2012, following a merger with NBC and Comcast, Versus was rebranded as the NBC Sports Network (later shortened to NBCSN) to become a 24 hour cable extension of NBC Sports, and perhaps to directly compete with Creator/{{ESPN}}. Low-brow programming such as GroinAttack clip shows and ''[[TheSoup Sports Soup]]'' was abandoned the moment NBC took over.\\

to:

* ''Creator/{{NBC}}SN'', Creator/{{NBC}}SN, formerly ''Versus'' and originally the ''Outdoor Life Network'' (licensed from a magazine of the same name), originally focused on outdoorsy stuff like hunting and fishing. Then their annual coverage of the Tour de France became popular, due to Lance Armstrong's utter dominance at the ''Tour''. They then acquired the rights to the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]], a sport which is ''not'' played outdoors. Around the same time, they started to focus on extreme sports and college sports (although stuck with only covering lower-tier games from conferences in the western half of the country despite being based out of Philadelphia - because the [[{{ESPN}} Worldwide Leader]] got almost everything else - and out of New England prior to that), resulting in a name change to Versus. In 2012, following a merger with NBC and Comcast, Versus was rebranded as the NBC Sports Network (later shortened to NBCSN) to become a 24 hour cable extension of NBC Sports, and perhaps to directly compete with Creator/{{ESPN}}. Low-brow programming such as GroinAttack clip shows and ''[[TheSoup Sports Soup]]'' was abandoned the moment NBC took over.\\



The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and obscure sports like the NHL and the [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship UFC]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the latter being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]] fans are hoping NBC can do the same thing with their sport with the network receiving the rights to [[UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer MLS]], and [[UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague EPL]] matches, and even the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianFootballLeague CFL]] and the UsefulNotes/FormulaOne have both even found a good broadcasting partner in NBC after being abandoned by the previous networks. In addition, NBC plans to use the network for their [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage to present more live events. Considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with too many commercial breaks (Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC carried races,[[note]]or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their own reduced package from 2007 through the present day. This includes all the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]] though thankfully their Formula One coverage has kept the best of Speed's coverage including the announcers, while reducing the worst parts. Hopefully, they'll pull that again when NASCAR returns to the NBC fold in 2015). As the increased exposure detailed above indicates, they appear to finally be learning how to get people hyped for lesser known events via this newly re-branded station. And furthermore, unlike sister networks G4 and Syfy, the network still devotes a good portion of it's channel space for outdoor programing, and even though itís for the most part been relegated to the morning hours, they still makes up much of the network's highest rated shows, though it comes at the risk of offending some; a couple of NBCSN's outdoors shows left when they ran into some kind of political buzzsaw or another, mainly involving gun rights or animal poaching that wasn't reported to the production company, but since other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is re-finding the show in the channel grid.
** Much of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractural commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights", though as said above, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk.

to:

The rebranding does have [[TropesAreTools positive aspects]]. Once neglected and obscure sports like the NHL and the [[UsefulNotes/UltimateFightingChampionship UFC]] have received much better exposure and viewership since they aired on the network, with the latter being able to get a lucrative deal with Creator/{{Fox}} as a result. NBC's handling of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Soccer]] fans are hoping NBC can do Soccer]], and ''especially'' the same thing with UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague (which is aired by NBCSN among other channels), has received universal praise, while its acquisition of Formula One kept the good parts of Fox's coverage (including their sport with commentators) while cutting down on the network receiving the rights not-so-great parts. NBCSN has also been used to [[UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer MLS]], and [[UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague EPL]] matches, and even the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianFootballLeague CFL]] and the UsefulNotes/FormulaOne have both even found broadcast a good broadcasting partner in NBC after being abandoned by the previous networks. In addition, NBC plans to use the network for their larger amount of live [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] coverage to present more live events. Considering coverage; considering NBC's previous tendencies to broadcast events LiveButDelayed, fans had approval for the decision. It may even be a case of NBC's sports coverage GrowingTheBeard as a whole. Back when the main network was the only place NBC put its sports broadcasts, they were infamous for giving little to no promotion for sports that weren't the Olympics or the NFL - in other words, they wouldn't promote the sports that really needed it - and overloading those broadcasts with too many commercial breaks (Don't breaks[[note]]Don't talk to a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} fan about when NBC previously carried races,[[note]]or races, or just watch a TNT race - they were NBC's cable partner from 2001-06, and then continued with their own reduced package from 2007 through the present day. This includes to 2016, when NBC got it back on their own. It had all the old problems, and some new ones[[/note]] though thankfully their Formula One coverage has kept the best of Speed's coverage including the announcers, while reducing the worst parts. Hopefully, they'll pull that again when NASCAR returns to the NBC fold in 2015). As the increased exposure detailed above indicates, they appear to finally be learning how to get people hyped for lesser known events via this newly re-branded station. And furthermore, unlike sister networks G4 and Syfy, the ones[[/note]]
** The
network still devotes a good portion of it's its channel space for outdoor programing, and even though itís for the most part been relegated to the morning hours, they still makes up programing; much of the network's highest rated shows, though it comes at the risk of offending some; a couple of NBCSN's outdoors shows left when they ran into some kind of political buzzsaw or another, mainly involving gun rights or animal poaching that wasn't reported to the production company, but since other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is re-finding the show in the channel grid.
** Much
of the outdoor programming on weekdays is only there because of lingering contractural commitments, which snarls the channel's attempts to get studio programming off the ground; it may have been a big culprit in the demise of the network's attempt at an early-morning highlight show, "The 'Lights", though as said above, 'Lights". Though, NBCSN is in no hurry to remove the programming in bulk.bulk if any of these programs run into some kind of political buzzsaw or another. Other outdoors networks now exist with much better quality controls than they had even five years ago, the only issue is finding where your favorite hunting show hopped to.
18th May '16 6:54:47 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example ó its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''TheMiddleMan'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".

to:

** The first slip and the most {{egregious}} example ó its cycle of movies appropriately named "Reciclo", since it recycled all the action flicks already worn by repetition in other channels of the Sony Group, like AXN. The only remotely anime-related movies shown there were ''Cowboy Bebop: The Movie'' and ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''...and they had repeated ''Film/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement'' each six weeks or so since its inception. Then they added series such as ''Series/{{Lost}}'', ''Series/BloodTies'', and ''TheMiddleMan'' ''Series/TheMiddleman'' (with the Brazilian side also having infomercials at odd hours), start to rarely promote their anime, such as ''Manga/DeathNote'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'', and inserted a concert block for Latin American performers. Then in May 2010, the channel announced that it would shift its focus to an overall youth programming, thus warranting its place in Total Abandonment. After that they were still broadcasting 12 hours of anime (13 during weekends). Five months later, anime was only 5 hours, starting at 2 AM. And just five months later (March 2011) they announced a name change that occured in May - the channel became known as "Sony Spin".
14th May '16 12:51:42 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{CMT}}, or Country Music Television, drifted towards programming with little if any connection to country music. In something of a double decay, CMT in 2007 began drifting away from ''that'', showing reruns of shows such as ''Series/HoganKnowsBest'' and ''Series/{{Nanny 911}}'' along with movies like ''Film/TheNegotiator''. Even Time Warner Cable noticed, suing Viacom for not airing a network consisting of mainly country programming. Viacom responded with corporate buzzspeak about how country fans prefer "a greater variety of programming" with "the same types of values and stories embodied by country music". They've since slid back though -- in addition to still showing more videos than any other basic-cable music channel (which basically means "more videos than any other Viacom channel"), they found something of a niche with DeepSouth-flavored programming -- ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' reruns, a country-specific reboot of ''Series/TheSingingBee'', etc. Meanwhile, sister channel CMT Pure Country (originally VH-1 Country) is almost entirely video-focused, even showing videos from the '80's and '90's. This doesn't explain the reruns of ''Series/HellsKitchen'', a cooking competition based around fine dining in Los Angeles starring a chef from Europe, though. In 2016, CMT Pure Country was renamed CMT Music.

to:

* {{CMT}}, Creator/{{CMT}}, or Country Music Television, drifted towards programming with little if any connection to country music. In something of a double decay, CMT in 2007 began drifting away from ''that'', showing reruns of shows such as ''Series/HoganKnowsBest'' and ''Series/{{Nanny 911}}'' along with movies like ''Film/TheNegotiator''. Even Time Warner Cable noticed, suing Viacom for not airing a network consisting of mainly country programming. Viacom responded with corporate buzzspeak about how country fans prefer "a greater variety of programming" with "the same types of values and stories embodied by country music". They've since slid back though -- in addition to still showing more videos than any other basic-cable music channel (which basically means "more videos than any other Viacom channel"), they found something of a niche with DeepSouth-flavored programming -- ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' reruns, a country-specific reboot of ''Series/TheSingingBee'', etc. Meanwhile, sister channel CMT Pure Country (originally VH-1 Country) is almost entirely video-focused, even showing videos from the '80's and '90's. This doesn't explain the reruns of ''Series/HellsKitchen'', a cooking competition based around fine dining in Los Angeles starring a chef from Europe, though. In 2016, CMT Pure Country was renamed CMT Music.
29th Apr '16 3:35:27 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[Creator/ITV]] has fallen into this, not in regards to programming (No specific niche to begin with) but in terms of identity. When the network started in 1955, it was only nominally a network, as it was really a collection of 15 regional networks [[note]] (By 1992, consisting of Thames Television and LWT for London, Central Television for Central England, Granada Television in the northwest, Yorkshire Television in, well, Yorkshire, TVS in the south, Tyne Tees Television in the North East, Anglia Television in the east, TSW in the west, Grampian Television in north Scotland, Scottish Television in central Scotland, Border Television in South Scotland, Channel Television in the Channel Islands, UTV in North Ireland, and HTV in Wales)[[/note]] all with their own identities and programming. Despite brief attempts at consolidation (Yorkshire and Tyne Tees combining to form Trident Television in the 1970s, and a unified identity in 1989, that was rejected by most) It held true to it's purpose for forty years. //

// That all changed in 1993. After a change in the franchises (Carlton replacing Thames, Meridian Broadcasting replacing TVS, Westcountry Television replacing TSW) the regions gradually consolidated. Yorkshire Television bought Tyne Tees in 1992, forming Yorkshire-Tyne Tees Television. In 1994, Carlton Television bought Central Independent Television, Granada Television bought LWT, and MAI, the parent of Meridian Broadcasting, took over Anglia Television. Westcountry Television was bought by Carlton in 1996, Granada bought Yorkshire-Tyne Tees in 1997, HTV was purchased by MAI (Renamed United News and Media) in the same year, and Scottish Media Group, the owner of Scottish Television, bought Grampian, also in the same year. Despite all this, all networks still operated independently. Then, in 1999, with only UTV, Channel Television, and Border Television independent, Carlton combined Carlton London, Central Television, and Westcountry Television into one region, Carlton Television. Soon after, in November, the Granada and UNM regions started using a generic presentation package for all of their regions, though they still kept their names and identities. By this point, only Channel Television, LWT, UTV, Grampian, and Scottish had their own identities, and Grampian and Scottish would be unified in 2000. Consolidation continued, with Meridian and Anglia sold to Granada in 2000, HTV sold to Carlton that same year, and Border Television sold to Granada in 2001. Finally, In October of 2002, all region names were dropped, with all regions names being changed to "ITV (Name of region") (EX: ITV London, ITV Wales), and in 2004, most regions were unified under the company name "ITV plc" and regional programming was all gone, excluding news. Only Channel Television, Grampian TV, Scottish TV, and UTV escaped this fate, but Grampian and Scottish would be combined under the unified "STV" branding in 2006, and Channel was bought under the ITV umbrella in 2011. UTV is also owned by ITV, but still keeps it's identity.

to:

* [[Creator/ITV]] {{Creator/ITV}} has fallen into this, not in regards to programming (No specific niche to begin with) but in terms of identity. When the network started in 1955, it was only nominally a network, as it was really a collection of 15 regional networks [[note]] (By 1992, consisting of Thames Television and LWT for London, Central Television for Central England, Granada Television in the northwest, Yorkshire Television in, well, Yorkshire, TVS in the south, Tyne Tees Television in the North East, Anglia Television in the east, TSW in the west, Grampian Television in north Scotland, Scottish Television in central Scotland, Border Television in South Scotland, Channel Television in the Channel Islands, UTV in North Ireland, and HTV in Wales)[[/note]] all with their own identities and programming. Despite brief attempts at consolidation (Yorkshire and Tyne Tees combining to form Trident Television in the 1970s, and a unified identity in 1989, that was rejected by most) It held true to it's purpose for forty years. //

//
\\
That all changed in 1993. After a change in the franchises (Carlton replacing Thames, Meridian Broadcasting replacing TVS, Westcountry Television replacing TSW) the regions gradually consolidated. Yorkshire Television bought Tyne Tees in 1992, forming Yorkshire-Tyne Tees Television. In 1994, Carlton Television bought Central Independent Television, Granada Television bought LWT, and MAI, the parent of Meridian Broadcasting, took over Anglia Television. Westcountry Television was bought by Carlton in 1996, Granada bought Yorkshire-Tyne Tees in 1997, HTV was purchased by MAI (Renamed United News and Media) in the same year, and Scottish Media Group, the owner of Scottish Television, bought Grampian, also in the same year. Despite all this, all networks still operated independently. Then, in 1999, with only UTV, Channel Television, and Border Television independent, Carlton combined Carlton London, Central Television, and Westcountry Television into one region, Carlton Television. Soon after, in November, the Granada and UNM regions started using a generic presentation package for all of their regions, though they still kept their names and identities. By this point, only Channel Television, LWT, UTV, Grampian, and Scottish had their own identities, and Grampian and Scottish would be unified in 2000. Consolidation continued, with Meridian and Anglia sold to Granada in 2000, HTV sold to Carlton that same year, and Border Television sold to Granada in 2001. Finally, In October of 2002, all region names were dropped, with all regions names being changed to "ITV (Name of region") (EX: ITV London, ITV Wales), and in 2004, most regions were unified under the company name "ITV plc" and regional programming was all gone, excluding news. Only Channel Television, Grampian TV, Scottish TV, and UTV escaped this fate, but Grampian and Scottish would be combined under the unified "STV" branding in 2006, and Channel was bought under the ITV umbrella in 2011. UTV is also owned by ITV, but still keeps it's identity. \n
24th Apr '16 3:39:05 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Nickelodeon, the first network for kids use to target all kids, including tweens. In it's glory days, the network was proud in targeting it's age 5-17 year old demographic (under 5 year olds for Nick Jr.) but in recent years, they've decided to change they're style in order to only target the 2-11 year olds. Shows that targeted tweens (such as ''{{Victorious}}'', ''Bucket & Skinner's Epic Adventures'', and ''Avatar: The Last Airbender'') were swiftly cancelled and replaced with shows more targeted towards younger kids (such as ''Henry Danger'' and ''The Thundermans''), along with even more airings of they're pet favorites ''Spongebob Squarepants'' & ''WesternAnimation/ALVINNNAndTheChipmunks''. The change has given Nick some disappointing results as they're ratings have declined as of late and the tweens have started watching more of rival Disney channel, making them the most watched network of 2015 and breaking Nick's 20 year record for that title.
* Teennick, the digital cable spinoff of Nick (also formerly named the-N), was made to target the teens (ages 13-19) and used to not only air teen oriented sitcoms and dramas (such as ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' and ''Moesha'') but also scripted shows such as ''Degrassi'' and ''South of Nowhere''. But in recent years, Nick has replaced all of said programming with repeats of they're current shows on Nick, which mostly target kids under the age of 12 (shows such as ''{{Henry Danger}}'' & ''{{NickyRickyDickyAndDawn}}'') and cancelled the scripted series like ''Degrassi''. Other than, the SPLAT (a block that airs the classic 90's Nick library), the channel seems to target the current elementary school set more than actual teens.
* TV Land started out as a off-shoot of the Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} programming block, Nick@Nite, which preserved classic sitcoms and westerns from TheFifties, TheSixties, TheSeventies, and even some from TheEighties and introduced them to younger generations. This worked very well, but by the mid-2000s, TV Land felt the need to add some of their own productions, so they added a few of their own reality shows - while some of them were considered appropriate for the channel, since they featured celebrities from their prime time period (for example, Farrah Fawcett of ''Series/CharliesAngels'' had a reality show), most them had nothing to do with classic TV in any way or form whatsoever. During this time, TV Land also produced some documentary series that showcased older shows and movies, such as ''Tickled Pink'' (a program that looked at HomoeroticSubtext in classic shows) and ''Myths & Legends'' (which explored urban legends that surrounded old shows and movies for years). By the late 2000s, TV Land began adding more and more reruns of modern sitcoms to their lineup, phasing out more and more classic sitcoms, and also producing their own original sitcoms starring has-been TV stars, including, ''Series/HotInCleveland'', ''Series/TheExes'', ''Series/RetiredAt35'', ''Series/TheSoulMan'', ''Series/HappilyDivorced'', and ''Series/{{Kirstie}}''. Since then, TV Land has received outcry from its viewers over this shift in their priorties, however, TV Land has flat-out dismissed said outcry, on the grounds that [[MoneyDearBoy their original sitcoms are helping their revenue]] as well blatantly admitting they no longer have interest in preserving classic TV, feeling it only appeals to older audiences, and they would rather reel in that coveted 18-34 demographic. They later reached a further low by airing reruns of ''Candid Camera'', that season's episodes of ''Series/{{CSI}}'' and, of all things, [[TheyJustDidntCare Steve Harvey-era episodes of ''Family Feud'']]. In the summer of 2015, TV Land blatantly evoked this trope when the network revamped its on-air look and introduced edgier new sitcoms such as ''Younger'' and ''Impastor''. The channel still airs classic TV reruns in the morning and afternoon, but the network for the most part have deemphasized their original format.

to:

* Nickelodeon, the first network for kids use to target all kids, including tweens. In it's glory days, the network was proud in targeting it's age 5-17 year old demographic (under 5 year olds for Nick Jr.) but in recent years, they've decided to change they're style in order to only target the 2-11 year olds. Shows that targeted tweens (such as ''{{Victorious}}'', ''Bucket & Skinner's Epic Adventures'', and ''Avatar: The Last Airbender'') were swiftly cancelled and replaced with shows more targeted towards younger kids (such as ''Henry Danger'' and ''The Thundermans''), along with even more airings of they're pet favorites ''Spongebob Squarepants'' & ''WesternAnimation/ALVINNNAndTheChipmunks''. The change has given Nick some disappointing results as they're ratings have declined as of late and the tweens have started watching more of rival Disney channel, making them the most watched network of 2015 and breaking Nick's 20 year record for that title.
* Teennick, the digital cable spinoff of Nick (also formerly named the-N), was made to target the teens (ages 13-19) and used to not only air teen oriented sitcoms and dramas (such as ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' and ''Moesha'') but also scripted shows such as ''Degrassi'' and ''South of Nowhere''. But in recent years, Nick has replaced all of said programming with repeats of they're current shows on Nick, which mostly target kids under the age of 12 (shows such as ''{{Henry Danger}}'' & ''{{NickyRickyDickyAndDawn}}'') and cancelled the scripted series like ''Degrassi''. Other than, the SPLAT (a block that airs the classic 90's Nick library), the channel seems to target the current elementary school set more than actual teens.
* TV Land started out as a off-shoot of the Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} programming block, block Nick@Nite, which preserved classic sitcoms and westerns from TheFifties, TheSixties, TheSeventies, and even some from TheEighties and introduced them to younger generations. This worked very well, but by the mid-2000s, TV Land felt the need to add some of their own productions, so they added a few of their own reality shows - while some of them were considered appropriate for the channel, since they featured celebrities from their prime time period (for example, Farrah Fawcett of ''Series/CharliesAngels'' had a reality show), most them had nothing to do with classic TV in any way or form whatsoever. During this time, TV Land also produced some documentary series that showcased older shows and movies, such as ''Tickled Pink'' (a program that looked at HomoeroticSubtext in classic shows) and ''Myths & Legends'' (which explored urban legends that surrounded old shows and movies for years). By the late 2000s, TV Land began adding more and more reruns of modern sitcoms to their lineup, phasing out more and more classic sitcoms, and also producing their own original sitcoms starring has-been TV stars, including, ''Series/HotInCleveland'', ''Series/TheExes'', ''Series/RetiredAt35'', ''Series/TheSoulMan'', ''Series/HappilyDivorced'', and ''Series/{{Kirstie}}''. Since then, TV Land has received outcry from its viewers over this shift in their priorties, however, TV Land has flat-out dismissed said outcry, on the grounds that [[MoneyDearBoy their original sitcoms are helping their revenue]] as well blatantly admitting they no longer have interest in preserving classic TV, feeling it only appeals to older audiences, and they would rather reel in that coveted 18-34 demographic. They later reached a further low by airing reruns of ''Candid Camera'', that season's episodes of ''Series/{{CSI}}'' and, of all things, [[TheyJustDidntCare Steve Harvey-era episodes of ''Family Feud'']]. In the summer of 2015, TV Land blatantly evoked this trope when the network revamped its on-air look and introduced edgier new sitcoms such as ''Younger'' and ''Impastor''. The channel still airs classic TV reruns in the morning and afternoon, but the network for the most part have deemphasized their original format.



* The TVGuide Channel, formerly the Preview Guide or Prevue Channel. Originally, it was a nice little channel that gave the local TV listings and the weather, along with unobtrusive text ads, using [[http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teletext Teletext]]-style graphics set to music from a local radio station. About a year later, it added Muzak and dedicated half of the screen to trailers with the rare show (or whatever the cable company wanted to advertise). It was later bought by TV Guide, which mutated it into the channel it is today. When TV Guide took over, the listings were further pushed down the screen so as to make more room to show talking heads blab about reality shows, awards ceremonies, and whatever [[Music/BritneySpears Britney]] did. When Creator/{{Lionsgate}} acquired the network in 2009, the listings were removed altogether when contractually possible, prompting a few cable companies to drop the channel; although this has since been reversed. Eventually the tabloid shows went away due to budget cuts, and it became a Lionsgate TV rerun farm. In 2013, CBS bought the channel and the network rebranded as "TVGN", which is a temporary branding until 2015, when it will change to the more-appropriate "Pop" ("TVG", a horse racing network, was formerly TV Guide Network's sister network, so there was good reason for it to get a better ID to avert confusion). The network moved ''Series/BigBrother After Dark'' to the network from Showtime 2 at the start of the 2013 season to give TVGN a boost, and it also grabbed same-day ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' episodes from the dying [=SoapNet=], and later also added ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful'' too. It could be argued that this change was made to compete with Internet channel listings and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_program_guide electronic program guide]] features available with satellite and digital cable packages (which allow viewers to scroll through the listings at will and select channels from the menu); the HD version of the network has no listings whatsoever.

to:

* The TVGuide Channel, formerly the Preview Guide or Prevue Channel. Originally, it was a nice little channel that gave the local TV listings and the weather, along with unobtrusive text ads, using [[http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teletext Teletext]]-style graphics set to music from a local radio station. About a year later, it added Muzak and dedicated half of the screen to trailers with the rare show (or whatever the cable company wanted to advertise). It was later bought by TV Guide, which mutated it into the channel it is today. When TV Guide took over, the listings were further pushed down the screen so as to make more room to show talking heads blab blabbing about reality shows, awards ceremonies, and whatever [[Music/BritneySpears Britney]] did. When Creator/{{Lionsgate}} acquired the network in 2009, the listings were removed altogether when contractually possible, prompting a few cable companies to drop the channel; although this has since been reversed. Eventually the tabloid shows went away due to budget cuts, and it became a Lionsgate TV rerun farm. In 2013, CBS bought the channel and the network rebranded as "TVGN", which is a temporary branding until 2015, when it will change to the more-appropriate "Pop" ("TVG", a horse racing network, was formerly TV Guide Network's sister network, so there was good reason for it to get a better ID to avert confusion). The network moved ''Series/BigBrother After Dark'' to the network from Showtime 2 at the start of the 2013 season to give TVGN a boost, and it also grabbed same-day ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' episodes from the dying [=SoapNet=], and later also added ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful'' too. It could be argued that this change was made to compete with Internet channel listings and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_program_guide electronic program guide]] features available with satellite and digital cable packages (which allow viewers to scroll through the listings at will and select channels from the menu); the HD version of the network has no listings whatsoever.whatsoever.
** In 2013, CBS bought a stake in the channel, which rebranded as "TVGN" on an interim basis (TVG, a horse racing network, was formerly TV Guide Network's sister network, so there was good reason for it to get a better name to avert confusion). CBS moved ''Series/BigBrother After Dark'' to the network from Showtime 2 at the start of the 2013 season to give TVGN a boost, and it also grabbed same-day ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' episodes from the dying [=SoapNet=], as well as ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful''. In January 2015, TVGN re-launched as Pop, which is focused on pop culture-related programs.



Among the programming in Destination America's first few days: marathons of David Blaine specials, ''Destroyed In Seconds'', and ''Series/AHaunting'', and ''Series/LAInk''. Does it count as decay if you're doing it in the ''very first block'' of programming? Then they added Wrestling/{{TNA}} wrestling at the start of 2015, which only invites comparisons to SyFy.

to:

Among the programming in Destination America's first few days: marathons of David Blaine specials, ''Destroyed In Seconds'', and ''Series/AHaunting'', and ''Series/LAInk''. Does it count as decay if you're doing it in the ''very first block'' of programming? Then they added Wrestling/{{TNA}} wrestling at the start of In 2015, they briefly dabbled in wrestling--adding ''[[Wrestling/{{TNA}} Impact Wrestling]]'' and later ''Wrestling/RingOfHonor'' (although both have since been dropped), which only invites comparisons to SyFy.
14th Apr '16 6:05:51 PM talov
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Nickelodeon, the first network for kids use to target all kids, including tweens. In it's glory days, the network was proud in targeting it's age 5-17 year old demographic (under 5 year olds for Nick Jr.) but in recent years, they've decided to change they're style in order to only target the 2-11 year olds. Shows that targeted tweens (such as ''{{Victorious}}'', ''Bucket & Skinner's Epic Adventures'', and ''Avatar: The Last Airbender'') were swiftly cancelled and replaced with shows more targeted towards younger kids (such as ''Henry Danger''), along with even more airings of they're pet favorite ''Spongebob Squarepants''. The change has given Nick some disappointing results as they're ratings have declined as of late and the tweens have started watching more of rival Disney channel, making them the most watched network of 2015 and breaking Nick's 20 year record for that title.

to:

* Nickelodeon, the first network for kids use to target all kids, including tweens. In it's glory days, the network was proud in targeting it's age 5-17 year old demographic (under 5 year olds for Nick Jr.) but in recent years, they've decided to change they're style in order to only target the 2-11 year olds. Shows that targeted tweens (such as ''{{Victorious}}'', ''Bucket & Skinner's Epic Adventures'', and ''Avatar: The Last Airbender'') were swiftly cancelled and replaced with shows more targeted towards younger kids (such as ''Henry Danger''), Danger'' and ''The Thundermans''), along with even more airings of they're pet favorite favorites ''Spongebob Squarepants''.Squarepants'' & ''WesternAnimation/ALVINNNAndTheChipmunks''. The change has given Nick some disappointing results as they're ratings have declined as of late and the tweens have started watching more of rival Disney channel, making them the most watched network of 2015 and breaking Nick's 20 year record for that title.
This list shows the last 10 events of 670. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=NetworkDecay.TotalAbandonment