History NetworkDecay / TotalAbandonment

21st May '17 10:23:22 AM nombretomado
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* [=MuchMoreMusic=] launched in 1998 as a quirky offshoot of [[Creator/MuchMusic MuchMusic]]. It generally billed itself to be a LighterAndSofter sister channel, and focused mainly on adult contemporary, indie, and classic music (basically the VH1 to [=MuchMusic=]'s MTV). It also featured news segments, artist profile shows, and other VH1 shows of the era (i.e. ''Pop-Up Video'', ''Behind the Music'', ''Rock and Roll Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', etc.).\\\
After CTV took over, the network slowly became a dumping ground for bad VH1 reality shows, old reruns of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'', and movies that have no connection to music whatsoever -- changing its name to [=MuchMore=]. In 2013, the channel re-launched as M3. Echoing the slippage [=MuchMusic=] was undergoing by slowly scaling back its remaining music programming in favor of comedy, the re-branded network stocked the remainder of its lineup with sitcoms and dramas instead. The only remotely music-related programs were encores of ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' and ''Series/TheVoice''. M3 became increasingly ignored by 2016, when its first-run acquired programming was moved to other Bell channels, and all their original shows were long gone. M3's lineup consisted of automated music videos in the morning, followed by shows from its sibling networks and same-week encores of CTV sitcoms and dramas. The only show they didn't steal was ''Series/TheMentalist'', [[AdoredbyTheNetwork which got more airtime than the rest of the channel's programming]]. On September 2, 2016, M3 was replaced by Gusto, a food and cooking-oriented network that Bell sort of "acquired" [[note]] Bell bought rights to its brand and programming from its existing owner and shut down the previous version of the channel, which was under a Category B license and not as widely-carried. By virtue of its precursor's historic status as a must-carry channel, the new Gusto got wider carriage.[[/note]]

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* [=MuchMoreMusic=] launched in 1998 as a quirky offshoot of [[Creator/MuchMusic MuchMusic]]. It generally billed itself to be a LighterAndSofter sister channel, and focused mainly on adult contemporary, indie, and classic music (basically the VH1 Creator/VH1 to [=MuchMusic=]'s MTV). It also featured news segments, artist profile shows, and other VH1 [=VH1=] shows of the era (i.e. ''Pop-Up Video'', ''Behind the Music'', ''Rock and Roll Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', etc.).\\\
After CTV took over, the network slowly became a dumping ground for bad VH1 [=VH1=] reality shows, old reruns of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''Series/OneTreeHill'', and movies that have no connection to music whatsoever -- changing its name to [=MuchMore=]. In 2013, the channel re-launched as M3. Echoing the slippage [=MuchMusic=] was undergoing by slowly scaling back its remaining music programming in favor of comedy, the re-branded network stocked the remainder of its lineup with sitcoms and dramas instead. The only remotely music-related programs were encores of ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' and ''Series/TheVoice''. M3 became increasingly ignored by 2016, when its first-run acquired programming was moved to other Bell channels, and all their original shows were long gone. M3's lineup consisted of automated music videos in the morning, followed by shows from its sibling networks and same-week encores of CTV sitcoms and dramas. The only show they didn't steal was ''Series/TheMentalist'', [[AdoredbyTheNetwork which got more airtime than the rest of the channel's programming]]. On September 2, 2016, M3 was replaced by Gusto, a food and cooking-oriented network that Bell sort of "acquired" [[note]] Bell bought rights to its brand and programming from its existing owner and shut down the previous version of the channel, which was under a Category B license and not as widely-carried. By virtue of its precursor's historic status as a must-carry channel, the new Gusto got wider carriage.[[/note]]
14th May '17 10:26:04 AM Screwhorn77
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** MTV Russia's CEO Nikolay Kartoziya, after years of decay same as American MTV, eventually decided to call it quits and launched a brand new channel - [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyatnica!_(TV_channel,_Russia) Pyatnica!]], literally "Friday!". Viacom relaunched MTV Russia as a satellite channel shortly afterwards. (Interestingly, MTV Russia's main competitor, Muz-TV, did the same thing a couple of years earlier. Muz-TV's own case of decay is covered on NetworkDecay/TemporaryShifts subpage.)
9th May '17 12:19:07 PM Lirodon
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* "Independent" television stations in North America are an endangered species; many channels arose beginning in the 1960's and through to the 1980's with absolutely no network affiliation of any kind. These channels still managed to air just as wide a variety of programs as network affiliates, but they had the added benefit of being able to program their own primetime lineup, often with "first-run" syndicated programs and coverage of local sports. Some stations also operated scrambled premium television services for all or part of their broadcast day. The concept of independent stations began to fall out of favor with the growth of cable television, which began to offer the same variety, if not wider, that the independents previously offered. Not helping matters was the establishment of brand new television networks to compliment the "big three", such as Creator/{{Fox}} (which eventually ascended to being a ''de facto'' fourth major, and later Creator/{{UPN}} and Creator/{{TheWB}}.\\

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* "Independent" television stations in North America are an endangered species; many channels arose beginning in the 1960's and through to the 1980's with absolutely no network affiliation of any kind. These channels still managed to air just as wide a variety of programs as network affiliates, but they had the added benefit of being able to program their own primetime lineup, often with "first-run" syndicated programs and coverage of local sports. Some stations also operated scrambled premium television services for all or part of their broadcast day. The concept of independent stations began to fall out of favor with the growth of cable television, which began to offer the same variety, if not wider, that the independents previously offered. Not helping matters was the establishment of brand new television networks to compliment the "big three", such as Creator/{{Fox}} (which eventually ascended to being a ''de facto'' fourth major, major), and later Creator/{{UPN}} and Creator/{{TheWB}}.\\



Most of the remaining U.S. independent stations are tied in some way to a major broadcasting company and may be a sister station to a major network affiliate (such as CBS's WLNY and KCAL, Fox's KICU, and WPCH Atlanta, the former [[Creator/{{TBS}} WTBS]] -- which is owned by Turner but is now managed by the local CBS station). Some independents, especially those that may have previously been an affiliate of one of the "six major networks" (including WGN Chicago, WJXT in Jacksonville, and most recently WHDH Boston), as well as KUSI San Diego, tend to rely heavily on their local news programming to pad out their lineup rather than syndicated programming, often focusing on scheduling newscasts in alternative time slots (such as primetime).\\

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Most of the remaining U.S. independent stations are tied in some way to a major broadcasting company and may be a sister station to a major network affiliate (such as CBS's WLNY and KCAL, Fox's KICU, and WPCH Atlanta, the former [[Creator/{{TBS}} WTBS]] -- which is now owned by Turner but is now managed by the local CBS station). Some independents, especially those that may have previously been an affiliate of one of the "six major networks" (including WGN Chicago, WJXT in Jacksonville, and most recently WHDH Boston), as well as KUSI San Diego, tend to rely heavily on their local news programming to pad out their lineup rather than syndicated programming, often focusing on scheduling newscasts in unconventional time slots as an alternative time slots (such as primetime).to network programming.\\



Nowadays, the stations closest to the format of a traditional independent without technically being independent, are stations which carry [=MyNetworkTV=] or The CW; barring the latter's one-hour daytime talk show, and a 5-hour [=E/I=] block, both networks only really program two hours of primetime and do not have national news or sports programming, meaning that affiliates have significantly less network programming to work around than big three. Plus, due to its current status as a relative bottom-feeder with no first-run programs, some MNTV stations (including, ironically, two Fox-owned stations, one which is also affiliated with The CW) pre-empt its programming into the late-night hours, and may downplay the affiliation to market themselves as a ''de facto'' independent because in its current form, [=MyNetworkTV=] is not really much of a network anymore.

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Nowadays, the stations closest to the format of a traditional independent without technically being independent, are stations which carry [=MyNetworkTV=] or The CW; barring the latter's one-hour daytime talk show, show and a 5-hour [=E/I=] block, both networks only really program two hours of primetime on weekdays, and do not have national news or sports programming, meaning that affiliates have significantly less network programming to work around than big three.three stations. Plus, due to its current status as a relative bottom-feeder with no first-run programs, some MNTV stations (including, ironically, two Fox-owned stations, one which is also affiliated with The CW) pre-empt its programming into the late-night hours, and may downplay the affiliation to market themselves as a ''de facto'' independent because in its current form, [=MyNetworkTV=] is not really much of a network anymore.
9th May '17 9:53:28 AM JamesAustin
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* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. Not anymore. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which are sourced from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were kept from Nonstop to Cozi.)

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* When U.S. television changed over to digital broadcasting, several NBC affiliates used a subchannel for NBC's "Nonstop" (e.g., "NBC Philadelphia Nonstop") brand. The programming consisted of news, public affairs, lifestyle and entertainment shows, much of it locally produced. Not anymore. As of December 20, 2012, it's been rebranded "Cozi TV" and features such moldy oldies as ''TheLoneRanger'', ''Radio/TheLoneRanger'', ''Make Room for Daddy'' and ''The Real [=McCoys=]'', many of which are sourced from the NBC Universal Television Distribution library. (Some stations do produce a "(Insert city/region name here) Nightly News" broadcast at 7pm, and were kept from Nonstop to Cozi.)
3rd May '17 2:44:23 PM faunas
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* Once upon a time, there was a premium cable channel called the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Theater_Network Home Theater Network]], launched 1978. It broadcast mainly movies (as almost every such channel then and now), a call-in trivia program and, most importantly, filler travel-based programming, which it called "The Travel Channel". As the time grew, the owners saw it wasn't growing and so, in 1987, they sold the satellite space and the "Travel Channel" name to an airline, and so the modern Travel Channel, which has changed hands various times, was born.[[note]]The Travel Channel is also mentioned on NetworkDecay/MajorShiftsThatFit.[[/note]]

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* Once upon a time, there was a premium cable channel called the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Theater_Network Home Theater Network]], Network]] (HTN), launched 1978. It broadcast mainly movies (as almost every such channel then and now), a call-in trivia program and, most importantly, filler travel-based programming, which it called "The Travel Channel". As the time grew, the owners saw it wasn't growing and so, in 1987, they sold the satellite space and the "Travel Channel" name to an airline, and so the modern Travel Channel, which has changed hands various times, was born.[[note]]The Travel Channel is also mentioned on NetworkDecay/MajorShiftsThatFit.[[/note]][[note]]Also, it's an irony that HTN and TLC at one time [[https://youtu.be/gE3C1BWE3a4 shared their satellite space]].[[/note]]
3rd May '17 2:29:45 PM faunas
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to:

* Once upon a time, there was a premium cable channel called the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Theater_Network Home Theater Network]], launched 1978. It broadcast mainly movies (as almost every such channel then and now), a call-in trivia program and, most importantly, filler travel-based programming, which it called "The Travel Channel". As the time grew, the owners saw it wasn't growing and so, in 1987, they sold the satellite space and the "Travel Channel" name to an airline, and so the modern Travel Channel, which has changed hands various times, was born.[[note]]The Travel Channel is also mentioned on NetworkDecay/MajorShiftsThatFit.[[/note]]
30th Apr '17 9:11:03 AM mimitchi33
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** After the success of ''WesternAnimation/ElenaOfAvalor'', Disney has been trying to bring more animation back on their schedule, having weekend morning and weekday afternoon blocks entirely comprised of animated shows (mainly ones based on Disney movie-based properties like Elena and ''WesternAnimation/TangledTheSeries''), so the channel seems to be slowly returning to it's roots.
25th Apr '17 12:46:00 PM FromtheWordsofBR
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** It's worth noting, as far as [[TheNineties The Nineties Kids]] are concerned, after Disney Channel's shift from premium to basic cable and their shift towards the teen demographic, their tween-targeted shows focused far less on being famous and moreso around family, friends, sports, and outdoor activities, like ''Series/TheFamousJettJackson'', ''The Jersey'', various sports-themed movies and more, under the programming block Zoog Disney. ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' may have paved the way for Music/HilaryDuff's IdolSinger status, but even then it was a SliceOfLife show not focused on her career itself. Then, with the success of ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', [[Series/ShakeItUp more and]] [[Series/ANTFarm more shows]] [[Series/AustinAndAlly about fame]] [[Series/SonnyWithAChance were produced]] from 2006 onwards, and the ones that didn't focus on that became far more hokier--and, well, just look above. The change was jarring in that sudden and drastic shift in focus.

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** It's worth noting, as far as [[TheNineties The Nineties Kids]] are concerned, after Disney Channel's shift from premium to basic cable and their shift towards the teen demographic, their tween-targeted shows focused far less on being famous and moreso around family, friends, sports, and outdoor activities, like ''Series/TheFamousJettJackson'', ''The Jersey'', various sports-themed movies and more, under the programming block Zoog Disney. ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' [[FranchiseOriginalSin may have paved the way way]] for Music/HilaryDuff's IdolSinger status, but even then it was a SliceOfLife show not focused on her career itself. Then, with the success of ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', [[Series/ShakeItUp more and]] [[Series/ANTFarm more shows]] [[Series/AustinAndAlly about fame]] [[Series/SonnyWithAChance were produced]] from 2006 onwards, and the ones that didn't focus on that became far more hokier--and, well, just look above. The change was jarring in that sudden and drastic shift in focus.
20th Apr '17 1:23:15 PM lizaphile
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* ''Infinito'' was a cable channel that, in the early years, aired a huge variety of documentaries catering lots of themes. By the late 90, it shifted to show documentaries about conspiracy theories, [=UFOs=], Atlantis, GlobalWarming (before it became relatively mainstream), alternative medicine, and related stuff. Suddenly, in the mid-2000s, the channel started to mutate into a really bad Travel Channel wannabe, showcasing documentaries about New Age society, alternative lifestyles, Feng Shui, and spas which no one cares about. By 2009, it had completely ditched its original concept revolving around [[MagicPoweredPseudoscience alternative sciences]], and marketed itself as a serious documentary channel about crimes, the human mind, and historical tidbits. (the wellness theme is now explored by Ecuatorian cable network Inti Network.) Then it started to decay again in mid-2009, when it started to showcase movies based on RealLife stories and events. Starting January 2012, the rate of airing documentaries dropped, and most of its programming consisted on films based on RealLife events and shows from Creator/SpikeTV. A year later, there were no documentaries at all, and the channel was more about crime dramas and films, and Cheaters reruns, with the Latin American feed for History Channel ([[AndZoidberg and also the Latin American feeds for SyFy and Biography Channel]]) picking up on the paranormal documentaries gap left by them. Infinito eventually ceased operating in Latin America, in a right decision made by Turner. Argentina (the home country of former owner Imágen Satelital) was the first to close the channel down on March 10th, followed by most of Latin America on the 17th and finally Mexico on the 25th. The USA feed is still surviving because, despite adapting to the channel's changing identities, still airs old shows from an older phase of the channel and also acquired content from other Latino broadcasters. The replacement in Latin America was '''TNT Series'''.

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* ''Infinito'' was a cable channel that, in the early years, aired a huge variety of documentaries catering lots of themes. By the late 90, it shifted to show documentaries about conspiracy theories, [=UFOs=], Atlantis, GlobalWarming (before it became relatively mainstream), alternative medicine, and related stuff. Suddenly, in the mid-2000s, the channel started to mutate into a really bad Travel Channel wannabe, showcasing documentaries about New Age society, alternative lifestyles, Feng Shui, and spas which no one cares about. By 2009, it had completely ditched its original concept revolving around [[MagicPoweredPseudoscience alternative sciences]], and marketed itself as a serious documentary channel about crimes, the human mind, and historical tidbits. (the wellness theme is now explored by Ecuatorian cable network Inti Network.) Then it started to decay again in mid-2009, when it started to showcase movies based on RealLife stories and events. Starting January 2012, the rate of airing documentaries dropped, and most of its programming consisted on films based on RealLife events and shows from Creator/SpikeTV. A year later, there were no documentaries at all, and the channel was more about crime dramas and films, and Cheaters reruns, with the Latin American feed for History Channel ([[AndZoidberg and also the Latin American feeds for SyFy and Biography Channel]]) picking up on the paranormal documentaries gap left by them. Infinito eventually ceased operating in Latin America, in a right decision made by Turner. Argentina (the home country of former owner Imágen Satelital) was the first to close the channel down on March 10th, followed by most of Latin America on the 17th and finally Mexico on the 25th. The USA feed is still surviving survived until 2016 because, despite adapting to the channel's changing identities, it still airs old aired shows from an older phase of the channel and also acquired content from other Latino broadcasters.broadcasters, until succumbing when those broadcasters launched their own American networks. The replacement in Latin America was '''TNT Series'''.
20th Apr '17 12:46:20 PM lizaphile
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In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (which used the U.S. NBC coverage instead of Rogers, for [[TheRival seemingly obvious reasons]])[[note]](NBC has historically had an alignment with TSN for NHL coverage, having used its analysts as guest insiders, and following the transition of Canadian rights to Rogers, sometimes having TSN's talent call games)[[/note]] and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. The U.S. version of NHL Network was kept alive, and taken over by the staff of MLB Network; unlike the Canadian version, the American version does have purpose, as it has historically served as the U.S. outlet for national NHL broadcasts from Canada (such as ''Series/HockeyNightInCanada''), and coverage of Canadian and international tournaments that are relatively specialized in comparison by U.S. standards.

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In 2014, Rogers took over national rights to the NHL in Canada, but TSN kept operating the network ... until Bell finally gave up and laid off the channel's staff just a few weeks after the season wrapped up, resulting in a zombie feed of Stanley Cup encores (which used the U.S. NBC coverage instead of Rogers, for [[TheRival seemingly obvious reasons]])[[note]](NBC has historically had an alignment with TSN for NHL coverage, having used its analysts as guest insiders, and following the transition of Canadian rights to Rogers, sometimes having TSN's talent call games)[[/note]] and team documentaries before shutting down entirely. The U.S. version of NHL Network was kept alive, and taken over by the staff of MLB Network; unlike the Canadian version, the American version does have purpose, as it has historically served as the U.S. outlet for national NHL broadcasts from Canada (such as ''Series/HockeyNightInCanada''), overflow first-round games in years where there aren't that many series sweeps and even USA Network and CNBC aren't enough to carry all the gamees, and coverage of Canadian and international tournaments that are relatively specialized in comparison by U.S. standards.
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