History Music / GustavMahler

9th Apr '18 9:15:34 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AuthorExistenceFailure Mahler died before he could complete his Tenth Symphony]]. Interestingly, he had feared exactly this: he believed in the "Curse of the Ninth", which states that a composer has to die either while working on or after completing his/her ninth symphony, as had happened to Music/LudwigVanBeethoven, Music/FranzSchubert[[note]] sort of; in Mahler's lifetime, Schubert was only seen as having written eight symphonies, as the symphony now known as No.7 only exists in sketch form[[/note]], Anton Bruckner[[note]] if one ignores two early symphonies, now known as No.00 and No.0[[/note]], and Music/AntoninDvorak[[note]] except that the symphonies now known as Nos.1-4 were not published until after Mahler (and, more importantly, Dvorak himself) had died[[/note]], and as later happened to Alexander Glazunov and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Mahler tried to subvert the Curse by not numbering ''Das Lied von der Erde'' (''The Song of the Earth''). [[SelfFulfillingProphecy This would have been his ninth symphony]][[note]] although the use of the term "symphony" to refer to the work is somewhat contentious[[/note]], making the Ninth his actual 10th. It seems the Curse of the Ninth only goes after numbered symphonies...

to:

[[AuthorExistenceFailure Mahler died before he could complete his Tenth Symphony]]. Interestingly, he had feared exactly this: he believed in the "Curse of the Ninth", which states that a composer has to die either while working on or after completing his/her ninth symphony, as had happened to Music/LudwigVanBeethoven, Music/FranzSchubert[[note]] sort of; in Mahler's lifetime, Schubert was only seen as having written eight symphonies, as the symphony now known as No.7 only exists in sketch form[[/note]], Anton Bruckner[[note]] if one ignores two early symphonies, now known as No.00 and No.0[[/note]], and Music/AntoninDvorak[[note]] except that the symphonies now known as Nos.1-4 were not published until after Mahler (and, more importantly, Dvorak Dvořák himself) had died[[/note]], died, and were not counted toward the numbering of his symphonies until the 1950s[[/note]], and as later happened to Alexander Glazunov and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Mahler tried to subvert the Curse by not numbering ''Das Lied von der Erde'' (''The Song of the Earth''). [[SelfFulfillingProphecy This would have been his ninth symphony]][[note]] although the use of the term "symphony" to refer to the work is somewhat contentious[[/note]], making the Ninth his actual 10th. It seems the Curse of the Ninth only goes after numbered symphonies...
9th Apr '18 9:11:23 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AuthorExistenceFailure Mahler died before he could complete his Tenth Symphony]]. Interestingly, he had feared exactly this: he believed in the "Curse of the Ninth", which states that a composer has to die after completing his/her ninth symphony, as had happened to Music/LudwigVanBeethoven, Music/FranzSchubert[[note]] sort of; in Mahler's lifetime, Schubert was only seen as having written eight symphonies, as the symphony now known as No.7 only exists in sketch form[[/note]], Anton Bruckner[[note]] if one ignores two early symphonies, now known as No.00 and No.0[[/note]], and Music/AntoninDvorak[[note]] except that the symphonies now known as Nos.1-4 were not published until after Mahler (and, more importantly, Dvorak himself) had died[[/note]], and as later happened to Ralph Vaughan Williams. Mahler tried to subvert the Curse by not numbering ''Das Lied von der Erde'' (''The Song of the Earth''). [[SelfFulfillingProphecy This would have been his ninth symphony]][[note]] although the use of the term "symphony" to refer to the work is somewhat contentious[[/note]], making the Ninth his actual 10th. It seems the Curse of the Ninth only goes after numbered symphonies...

to:

[[AuthorExistenceFailure Mahler died before he could complete his Tenth Symphony]]. Interestingly, he had feared exactly this: he believed in the "Curse of the Ninth", which states that a composer has to die either while working on or after completing his/her ninth symphony, as had happened to Music/LudwigVanBeethoven, Music/FranzSchubert[[note]] sort of; in Mahler's lifetime, Schubert was only seen as having written eight symphonies, as the symphony now known as No.7 only exists in sketch form[[/note]], Anton Bruckner[[note]] if one ignores two early symphonies, now known as No.00 and No.0[[/note]], and Music/AntoninDvorak[[note]] except that the symphonies now known as Nos.1-4 were not published until after Mahler (and, more importantly, Dvorak himself) had died[[/note]], and as later happened to Alexander Glazunov and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Mahler tried to subvert the Curse by not numbering ''Das Lied von der Erde'' (''The Song of the Earth''). [[SelfFulfillingProphecy This would have been his ninth symphony]][[note]] although the use of the term "symphony" to refer to the work is somewhat contentious[[/note]], making the Ninth his actual 10th. It seems the Curse of the Ninth only goes after numbered symphonies...
9th Apr '18 9:08:22 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DownerEnding: The 6th symphony, [[FanNickname so-called]] ''Tragic'', ends with a massive dissonant tutti burst just to be silenced by a lonely pianissimo, representing the loss of hope.

to:

* DownerEnding: DownerEnding:
**
The 6th symphony, [[FanNickname so-called]] ''Tragic'', ends with a massive dissonant tutti burst just to be silenced by a lonely pianissimo, representing the loss of hope.



* DramaticTimpani: Used very quietly in the third movement of his 1st Symphony (emphasizing the motif of the descending fourth interval that ties the four movements together) and to accompany the fanfares in the fourth movement, and [[SubvertedTrope played very slowly]] at the end of the 3rd Symphony.
** Also in the 6th, in the first movement just before A major-minor chord. The same rhythm comes back over the final chord

to:

* DramaticTimpani: DramaticTimpani:
**
Used very quietly in the third movement of his 1st Symphony (emphasizing the motif of the descending fourth interval that ties the four movements together) and to accompany the fanfares in the fourth movement.
** In the 2nd, after the soft pizzicato chords at the end of the second
movement, and the audience is jolted back to attention by a sudden BA-DUM! from the timpani to introduce the third movement.
**
[[SubvertedTrope played Played very slowly]] at the end of the 3rd Symphony.
** Also in the 6th, in the first movement just before A major-minor chord. The same rhythm comes back over the final chordchord.



* EscapedFromHell: Mahler's First Symphony details the life of a hero, including his funeral in the third movement. The final movement is him fighting his way out of Hell to ascend to Heaven.

to:

* EscapedFromHell: EscapedFromHell:
**
Mahler's First Symphony details the life of a hero, including his funeral in the third movement. The final movement is him fighting his way out of Hell to ascend to Heaven.Heaven.
** The 2nd symphony opens once again with the funeral rites of the hero from the previous symphony, while the finale is a depiction of the Last Judgement. The first ten minutes depict the angelic summons (Mahler subtitled the initial offstage horn call "a voice calling in the wilderness"), then a thundering drum roll represents the ground tearing wide open as the dead rise from their graves and march off to be judged. The triumphant final minutes suggest that even the condemned souls have been redeemed and restored by ThePowerOfLove.


Added DiffLines:

* ThePerfectionist: Mahler was meticulous in marking the scores of his symphonies with precise performance instructions for both the musicians and the conductor; he was adamant that the performance should reflect the vision in his mind to the letter.
6th Mar '18 2:29:46 PM Jeduthun
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* DeathOfAChild: The theme of "Kindertotenlieder" (meaning "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Songs on the Death of Children]].") Each song explores a different aspect of [[TearJerker the grief that follows losing a child]].
20th Oct '17 11:12:47 AM klop422
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CallBack: Some material from earlier symphonies can be heard in later ones, for example a horn call in the fifth returning in the sixth.


Added DiffLines:

** Also in the 6th, in the first movement just before A major-minor chord. The same rhythm comes back over the final chord
20th Feb '17 2:09:52 AM bt8257
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DownerEnding:
** The 6th symphony, [[FanNickname so-called]] ''Tragic'', ends with a massive dissonant tutti burst just to be silenced by a lonely pianissimo, representing the loss of hope.

to:

* DownerEnding:
**
DownerEnding: The 6th symphony, [[FanNickname so-called]] ''Tragic'', ends with a massive dissonant tutti burst just to be silenced by a lonely pianissimo, representing the loss of hope.



* FoolishSiblingResponsibleSibling: Mahler had a sister, Justine. Mahler's wife Alma hated her and [[AnnoyingYoungerSibling accused her of being exploitative of her brother's naivity]].

to:

* FoolishSiblingResponsibleSibling: Mahler had a sister, Justine. Mahler's wife Alma hated her and [[AnnoyingYoungerSibling accused her of being exploitative of her brother's naivity]].naivete]].
28th Dec '16 5:25:36 AM ParanoiaAgent
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FoolishSiblingResponsibleSibling: Mahler had a sister, Justine. Mahler's wife Alma hated her and [[AnnoyingYoungerSibling accused her of being exploitative of her brother's naivity]].
* FriendlyRivalry: With [[Music/AlsoSprachZarathustra Richard Strauss]]. Mahler said [[NotSoDifferent they were digging towards the same summit from different sides of a mountain]].



* KavorkaMan: Described as this by his widow Alma. Also had the (unjust) reputation of being TheCasanova.

to:

* KavorkaMan: Described as this by his widow Alma.Alma Mahler-Werfel. Also had the (unjust) reputation of being TheCasanova.


Added DiffLines:

* TheMentor: To Music/ArnoldSchoenberg and like-minded. He actually was friends with Schoenberg. But since Mahler had shades of DrillSergeantNasty, [[RageAgainstTheMentor they had hot-headed arguments]]. According to Alma, Mahler was GenreSavvy enough to know that Schoenberg [[TakeUpMySword will eventually built on Mahler's innovations and herald a new age of classical music]]. During Schoenberg's "Skandalkonzerte" he always defended his friend. Keep in mind, [[BadassTeacher these arguments sometimes ended in fistfights of pro and contra-Schoenberg]].
26th Dec '16 3:50:37 AM ParanoiaAgent
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* IllBoy: Like his siblings, he inherited a weak heart from his mother.
26th Dec '16 3:37:35 AM ParanoiaAgent
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* KavorkaMan: Described as this by his widow Alma. Also had the (unjust) reputation of being TheCasanova.
20th Nov '16 4:42:33 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Austrian composer and conductor (7 July 1860 - 18 May 1911), one of the last of the Romantic era.

to:

Austrian composer and conductor (7 July 1860 - 18 May 1911), one of the last of the Romantic era.
This list shows the last 10 events of 42. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.GustavMahler