History Main / YouHaveFailedMe

6th Feb '16 4:54:30 PM Vios
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* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate II'', [[GenreSavvy Jan Jansen]] makes fun of this trope. When you are tasked with killing the rebel sahuagin prince by the king, he finishes his sentence with "Succeed, and you shall be rewarded with great riches!" To which Jan continues:
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* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate II'', ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'', [[GenreSavvy Jan Jansen]] makes fun of this trope. When you are tasked with killing the rebel sahuagin prince by the king, he finishes his sentence with "Succeed, and you shall be rewarded with great riches!" To which Jan continues:
28th Jan '16 8:07:50 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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No potholes in page quotes
->'''Ozzel:''' Lord Vader. The fleet has moved out of lightspeed and we're preparing to-- ''[[[ForceChoke Force-choke]]]''\\
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->'''Ozzel:''' Lord Vader. The fleet has moved out of lightspeed and we're preparing to-- ''[[[ForceChoke Force-choke]]]''\\''[ Force-choke]''\\
28th Jan '16 7:31:13 PM Eddy1215
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** A particularly idiotic moment happened in one episode when a sniper failed to hit the Quests' boat, and the villain angrily shot him, [[HoistByHisOwnPetard only for the soldier's body to land on a detonator]].

* Surprisingly averted in ''GIJoe.'' Despite the constant distrust COBRA's henchmen have for their leader and their frequent attempts to criticize or even outright ''usurp'' him, or if their plans against G.I. Joe completely fail, Cobra Commander never enacts any punishment on his troops.
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* Surprisingly averted in ''GIJoe.''WesternAnimation/GIJoe.'' Despite the constant distrust COBRA's henchmen have for their leader and their frequent attempts to criticize or even outright ''usurp'' him, or if their plans against G.I. Joe completely fail, Cobra Commander never enacts any punishment on his troops.
28th Jan '16 7:21:54 PM Eddy1215
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See also: BadBoss, ShootTheMessenger, YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness, and VillainousDemotivator. Contrast EvenEvilHasLovedOnes, IWillPunishYourFriendForYourFailure, and CantKillYouStillNeedYou. See MakeAnExampleOfThem when the failure is punished especially harshly "to encourage the others". See also ThePurge when this is done ''en masse'' to anyone even suspected of incompetence or disloyalty. May be an example of KarmicDeath if the character has actually earned this fate.
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See also: BadBoss, ShootTheMessenger, YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness, and VillainousDemotivator. Contrast EvenEvilHasLovedOnes, IWillPunishYourFriendForYourFailure, and CantKillYouStillNeedYou. Can lead to MookDepletion if the villain overdoes this. See MakeAnExampleOfThem when the failure is punished especially harshly "to encourage the others". See also ThePurge when this is done ''en masse'' to anyone even suspected of incompetence or disloyalty. May be an example of KarmicDeath if the character has actually earned this fate.
27th Jan '16 2:03:44 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' the Prophets seemingly do this to the entire Elite race; after the destruction of one of the Halos and the death of the Prophet of Regret, they decided to scapegoat them for their loss, and have the Brutes take over their roles as the Covenant's vanguards. The expanded universe, however, hints that the Prophet of Truth was planning to do this for a long time, and were just waiting for the right excuse; indeed, he ''intentionally'' let Regret die as part of his plans. In this case, though, it completely backfires; the Prophets end up on the losing side of the resulting civil war against the Elites, and are driven to near-extinction.
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' the Prophets seemingly do this to the entire Elite race; after the destruction of one of the Halos and the death of the Prophet of Regret, they decided decide to scapegoat them the Elites for their loss, those losses, and have the Brutes take over their roles as the Covenant's vanguards. The expanded universe, however, strongly hints that the Prophet of Truth was planning to do this for a long time, ''long'' time for reasons of his own, and were was simply just waiting for the right excuse; indeed, in fact, he ''intentionally'' let Regret die as part of his plans.plans (by deliberately ignoring the good advice of his Elite subordinates, ironically enough). In this case, though, it completely backfires; the Prophets end up on the losing side of the resulting civil war against the Elites, and are driven to near-extinction.
18th Jan '16 2:30:21 PM MHarrington
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** [[VillainousBreakdown Near the end]], Hitler has this UpToEleven: he thought ''the entire nation of Germany'' had failed him. Due to this, his final orders were to destroy the country in a sort of scorched-earth tactic. Fortunately, his generals [[PragmaticVillainy finally decided he was batshit insane and surrendered instead.]] Albert Speer, who did most of the refusing, managed to avoid hanging after the war, and served a 20 year sentence for his prior war crimes.
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** [[VillainousBreakdown Near the end]], Hitler has this UpToEleven: he thought ''the entire nation of Germany'' had failed him. Due to this, his final orders were to destroy the country in a sort of scorched-earth tactic.tactic; a SocialDarwinist to the end, he thought that if Germany's enemies won, then they were obviously the superior ones and thus that, as usual, the existence of an inferior nation like Germany was worth nothing. Fortunately, his generals [[PragmaticVillainy finally decided he was batshit insane and surrendered instead.]] Albert Speer, who did most of the refusing, managed to avoid hanging after the war, and served a 20 year sentence for his prior war crimes.
18th Jan '16 12:46:20 PM HeraldAlberich
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oops
* Subverted in Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy, where tactical genius villain Grand Admiral Thrawn makes a point of [[PragmaticVillainy not indiscriminately killing subordinates]], and in fact quietly lampshades this when his CommanderContrarian expects him to act more like Vader. He instead has a TractorBeam operator (who was also a ContestWinnerCameo!) killed for not following procedure from his training--and for trying to pin the blame on his superior--and later actually [[CareerBuildingBlunder promotes]] a different tractor beam operator who quickly came up with a creative solution to a sudden problem that was "no less impressive for its failure" and for accepting the blame himself.
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* ** Subverted in Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy, where tactical genius villain Grand Admiral Thrawn makes a point of [[PragmaticVillainy not indiscriminately killing subordinates]], and in fact quietly lampshades this when his CommanderContrarian expects him to act more like Vader. He instead has a TractorBeam operator (who was also a ContestWinnerCameo!) killed for not following procedure from his training--and for trying to pin the blame on his superior--and later actually [[CareerBuildingBlunder promotes]] a different tractor beam operator who quickly came up with a creative solution to a sudden problem that was "no less impressive for its failure" and for accepting the blame himself.
18th Jan '16 12:45:37 PM HeraldAlberich
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The "Episode" part of the title is traditionally not italicized.
->'''Ozzel:''' Lord Vader. The fleet has moved out of lightspeed and we're preparing to-- (''[[ForceChoke Force-choke]]'')\\
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->'''Ozzel:''' Lord Vader. The fleet has moved out of lightspeed and we're preparing to-- (''[[ForceChoke Force-choke]]'')\\''[[[ForceChoke Force-choke]]]''\\

-->-- ''Franchise/StarWars Episode V: Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' Commonly in a SicEm scene, the BigBad - usually a DiabolicalMastermind - kills one of their henchmen who has failed to capture and/or kill TheHero, as motivation to all of their other (surviving) underlings not to repeat their failure. Presumably, the other underlings immediately all fall into line instead of (say) quietly updating their resumes and [[HeelRealization trying to find a less psychopathic overlord to work for]]. Some bad guys will use the BlofeldPloy to pull off the underling murder. Others will drop the offending [[EvilMinions underling]] through a TrapDoor into a SharkPool or other {{deathtrap}}, or [[FedToTheBeast feed them]] to their RightHandAttackDog. A variation has the BigBad not killing the failed underling on the spot but sending him off on a SuicideMission, usually with a cold-hearted reminder that doing one's duty comes before self-preservation.
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-->-- ''Franchise/StarWars ''Franchise/StarWars'' Episode V: Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' Commonly in a SicEm scene, the BigBad - usually BigBad--usually a DiabolicalMastermind - kills DiabolicalMastermind--kills one of their henchmen who has failed to capture and/or kill TheHero, as motivation to all of their other (surviving) underlings not to repeat their failure. Presumably, the other underlings immediately all fall into line instead of (say) quietly updating their resumes and [[HeelRealization trying to find a less psychopathic overlord to work for]]. Some bad guys will use the BlofeldPloy to pull off the underling murder. Others will drop the offending [[EvilMinions underling]] through a TrapDoor into a SharkPool or other {{deathtrap}}, or [[FedToTheBeast feed them]] to their RightHandAttackDog. A variation has the BigBad not killing the failed underling on the spot but sending him off on a SuicideMission, usually with a cold-hearted reminder that doing one's duty comes before self-preservation.

** The trope name comes from ''Franchise/StarWars Episode V: Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', and possibly the most famous instance: Darth Vader's "You have failed me for the last time" before choking Admiral Ozzel to death for botching the fleet's approach to Hoth, granting the Rebels enough advance warning to begin evacuating before the fleet is in position to attack. Captain Piett is then promoted to replace him before the body hits the floor. True to form, Piett survives a number of failures, once Vader realizes the heroes may actually count as a legitimate challenge. It helps that he didn't take any foolish chances like Ozzel was punished for. Ozzel's death deserves special mention, as Vader is doing it ''over the intercom/viewscreen.'' He's not even in the same room as Ozzel.
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** The trope name comes from ''Franchise/StarWars Episode V: Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', and possibly the most famous instance: Darth Vader's "You have failed me for the last time" before choking Admiral Ozzel to death for botching the fleet's approach to Hoth, granting the Rebels enough advance warning to begin evacuating before the fleet is in position to attack. Captain Piett is then promoted to replace him before the body hits the floor. True to form, Piett survives a number of failures, once Vader realizes the heroes may actually count as a legitimate challenge. It helps that he didn't take any foolish chances like Ozzel was punished for. Ozzel's death deserves special mention, as Vader is doing it ''over the intercom/viewscreen.'' He's not even in the same room as Ozzel.

** He does it ''again'' to the hapless Captain Needa before the film's even halfway done, even when Needa had the foresight to apologize to Vader for losing track of the ''Millenium Falcon'' (There's a reason Vader says "Apology accepted, Captain Needa"). The turnover rate for Imperial officers must be ''appalling''. Needa's expression when he tells his men that he's going to apologize personally to Vader tells the whole story. Needa ''knows'' Vader will kill him - [[TakeMeInstead but if he takes the blame]], [[HeroicSacrifice none of his underlings will]]. ** According to the expanded universe, Ozzel was a screw-up who kept his job mainly by virtue of family connections, and Vader was looking for any excuse to get rid of him. Which also explains why the TIE fighters didn't hesitate chasing the ''Falcon'' into the AsteroidThicket; the pilots knew damn well simply breaking off pursuit would have been an instant death sentence from Vader.
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** He does it ''again'' to the hapless Captain Needa before the film's even halfway done, even when Needa had the foresight to apologize to Vader for losing track of the ''Millenium Falcon'' (There's a reason Vader says "Apology accepted, Captain Needa"). The turnover rate for Imperial officers must be ''appalling''. Needa's expression when he tells his men that he's going to apologize personally to Vader tells the whole story. Needa ''knows'' Vader will kill him - [[TakeMeInstead him--[[TakeMeInstead but if he takes the blame]], [[HeroicSacrifice none of his underlings will]]. ** According to the expanded universe, Franchise/StarWarsLegends, Ozzel was a screw-up who kept his job mainly by virtue of family connections, and Vader was looking for any excuse to get rid of him. Which also explains why the TIE fighters didn't don't hesitate chasing the ''Falcon'' into the AsteroidThicket; the pilots knew know damn well simply breaking off pursuit would have been be an instant death sentence from Vader.

** It's noted in one of the novels that the fastest way to promotion in the Imperial Navy was to get yourself assigned to Vader's flagship, the ''Executor''. The flip side of that coin is, as [[TheThrawnTrilogy Pellaeon]] says, that this meant the crew of the ''Executor'' was entirely staffed by people who were either hypercompetent or very lucky (Vader was known for strangling people who delivered messages to his quarters while he was in a bad mood, so the crew drew lots whenever someone had to do that, with the honor going to the loser), since they were the only ones who survived. Which meant that when it was destroyed at Endor, the Empire lost more than a really big ship, they lost the best of the officer corps.
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** It's noted in one of the novels that the fastest way to promotion in the Imperial Navy was to get yourself assigned to Vader's flagship, the ''Executor''. The flip side of that coin is, as [[TheThrawnTrilogy [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Pellaeon]] says, that this meant the crew of the ''Executor'' was entirely staffed by people who were either hypercompetent or very lucky (Vader was known for strangling people who delivered messages to his quarters while he was in a bad mood, so the crew drew lots whenever someone had to do that, with the honor going to the loser), since they were the only ones who survived. Which meant that when it was destroyed at Endor, the Empire lost more than a really big ship, they lost the best of the officer corps.

** Piett seems to go under 'Vader will forgive if it's a failure you can't plan for'. In Piett's case, his trap failed because R2, who arrived with Luke, repaired the sabotage to the Falcon-- something that Piett couldn't have expected, and was in fact partially Vader's fault because he drew Luke there in the first place, and locked R2 out and let him go on his way rather than destroy him. Hence Vader doesn't blame him.
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** Piett seems to go under 'Vader will forgive if it's a failure you can't plan for'. In Piett's case, his trap failed because R2, who arrived with Luke, repaired the sabotage to the Falcon-- something Falcon--something that Piett couldn't have expected, and was in fact partially Vader's fault because he drew Luke there in the first place, and locked R2 out and let him go on his way rather than destroy him. Hence Vader doesn't blame him.

* Subverted in ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', part of the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse, where tactical genius villain Grand Admiral Thrawn makes a point of [[PragmaticVillainy not indiscriminately killing subordinates]], and in fact quietly lampshades this when his CommanderContrarian expects him to act more like Vader. He instead has a TractorBeam operator (who was also a ContestWinnerCameo!) killed for not following procedure from his training - and for trying to pin the blame on his superior - and later actually [[CareerBuildingBlunder promotes]] a different TractorBeam operator who quickly came up with a creative solution to a sudden problem that was "no less impressive for its failure" and for accepting the blame himself.
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* Franchise/StarWarsLegends: * Subverted in ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', part of the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse, Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy, where tactical genius villain Grand Admiral Thrawn makes a point of [[PragmaticVillainy not indiscriminately killing subordinates]], and in fact quietly lampshades this when his CommanderContrarian expects him to act more like Vader. He instead has a TractorBeam operator (who was also a ContestWinnerCameo!) killed for not following procedure from his training - and training--and for trying to pin the blame on his superior - and superior--and later actually [[CareerBuildingBlunder promotes]] a different TractorBeam tractor beam operator who quickly came up with a creative solution to a sudden problem that was "no less impressive for its failure" and for accepting the blame himself.

--> Thrawn used a small measure of fear, certainly: the Grand Admiral realized that fear of failure was a powerful motivating force in a military the size of the Empire. But Thrawn's ability to invoke a sense of ''pride'' in his troops was his most powerful asset. Palpatine inspired arrogance and callousness in his officers; Thrawn made his men proud to be Imperial soldiers. Thrawn's officers would have willingly died for the Grand Admiral.
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--> ---> Thrawn used a small measure of fear, certainly: the Grand Admiral realized that fear of failure was a powerful motivating force in a military the size of the Empire. But Thrawn's ability to invoke a sense of ''pride'' in his troops was his most powerful asset. Palpatine inspired arrogance and callousness in his officers; Thrawn made his men proud to be Imperial soldiers. Thrawn's officers would have willingly died for the Grand Admiral.

** This trope seems to be liked by villainous Imperials and former Imperials in general. In the ComicBook/XWingSeries, Zsinj, spying on the consoles of his bridge crew, sees that one of them is playing flight simulators instead of paying attention while on duty. He has been warned about this, but he wants to be a pilot so ''much''. Zsinj has his second-in-command whisk the crewman off in the dead of night telling him it's a secret pilot test, put him through the standard set of pilot qualification simulations, praise or chastise him as necessary, and then kill him. Later on he puts a pair of scientists in a ShootYourMate Or I Kill You Both. The trope, and the fact that they're cruel about it rather than simply just shooting them, serves as [[KickTheDog a good reminder]] that while Zsinj and his [[TheDragon Dragon]] are interesting, clever, and often funny characters, they are also the bad guys, and for good reason. On the other hand, Zsinj isn't punishing failure in terms of results, but failure in terms of ''duties''--the people in the previous examples were killed because they had not only shirked a duty of some kind, but tried to cover it up. If a failure is a result of circumstances beyond the control of a subordinate, Zsinj spares the subordinate. Further, he's willing to reward people who go beyond the call of duty even if the results fall short (as with Gatterweld). ** The Queen of this trope is Ysanne Isard, whose murderous punishments for failure were known to go as far as Familicide. Isard's love affair with this trope is skewered in one of Allston's ''X-Wing'' novels, where another Imperial explains that anyone working for a [[BadBoss capricious psycho]] like Isard had nothing to look forward to except either death by the Rebels, or death by ''her''. *** When someone he's interrogating dies before giving up the information he needs, Kirtan Loor is summoned back to Imperial Center by Isard. All along the way, even while [[TheWorldIsJustAwesome marveling at the view]], he's sweating and expecting her to kill him. She doesn't - not at that point in time - but she does make her displeasure at his poor thinking clear, and wants him to perform better.
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** This trope seems to be liked by villainous Imperials and former Imperials in general. In the ComicBook/XWingSeries, Zsinj, spying on the consoles of his bridge crew, sees that one of them is playing flight simulators instead of paying attention while on duty. He has been warned about this, but he wants to be a pilot so ''much''. Zsinj has his second-in-command whisk the crewman off in the dead of night telling him it's a secret pilot test, put him through the standard set of pilot qualification simulations, praise or chastise him as necessary, and then kill him. Later on he puts a pair of scientists in a ShootYourMate Or I Kill You Both. The trope, and the fact that they're cruel about it rather than simply just shooting them, serves as [[KickTheDog a good reminder]] that while Zsinj and his [[TheDragon Dragon]] are interesting, clever, and often funny characters, they are also the bad guys, and for good reason. On the other hand, Zsinj isn't punishing failure in terms of results, but failure in terms of ''duties''--the people in the previous examples were killed because they had not only shirked a duty of some kind, but tried to cover it up. If a failure is a result of circumstances beyond the control of a subordinate, Zsinj spares the subordinate. Further, he's willing to reward people who go beyond the call of duty even if the results fall short (as with Gatterweld). Gatterweld, a lowly stormtrooper who nearly steals an entire Super Star Destroyer for him--in the next book, he's an Ensign). ** The Queen of this trope is Ysanne Isard, also of the Literature/XWingSeries, whose murderous punishments for failure were known to go as far as Familicide. Isard's love affair with this trope is skewered in one of Allston's ''X-Wing'' novels, where another Imperial explains that anyone working for a [[BadBoss capricious psycho]] like Isard had nothing to look forward to except either death by the Rebels, or death by ''her''. *** When someone he's interrogating dies before giving up the information he needs, Kirtan Loor is summoned back to Imperial Center by Isard. All along the way, even while [[TheWorldIsJustAwesome marveling at the view]], he's sweating and expecting her to kill him. She doesn't - not doesn't--not at that point in time - but time--but she does make her displeasure at his poor thinking clear, and wants him to perform better.

--->'''Corran''': "Tavira, when she doesn't hear that you succeeded, will see you as having failed. And you know her -- failure isn't an accident, it's a conspiracy."
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--->'''Corran''': "Tavira, --->'''Corran:''' Tavira, when she doesn't hear that you succeeded, will see you as having failed. And you know her -- failure her--failure isn't an accident, it's a conspiracy."

Added DiffLines:
--->'''Corran''': "Tavira, ** In the novelization of ''Literature/RevengeOfTheSith'', General Grievous does this repeatedly aboard ''Invisible Hand'', killing officers who annoy him and promptly promoting the next guy in line. It leads to an amusing moment when she doesn't hear that you succeeded, will see you as having failed. And you know her -- failure isn't an accident, it's a conspiracy."Grievous kills one more guy who panics at the damage to their ship... and finds he's killed the last of his bridge crew.
17th Jan '16 8:08:46 PM nombretomado
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* Recurring villain Overseer Biron in the StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers stories is quick to kill off subordinates who fail him. As an Elite Officer-caste Androssi, he is within his rights to kill a Worker at any time. Failure, even relatively minor, often results in instant vaporization and replacement - Workers are considered fully expendable. Ironically, Biron's own boss is rather forgiving on those occasions that Biron himself fails.
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* Recurring villain Overseer Biron in the StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers stories is quick to kill off subordinates who fail him. As an Elite Officer-caste Androssi, he is within his rights to kill a Worker at any time. Failure, even relatively minor, often results in instant vaporization and replacement - Workers are considered fully expendable. Ironically, Biron's own boss is rather forgiving on those occasions that Biron himself fails.
17th Jan '16 6:53:04 PM nombretomado
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* ''StarDriver'' features a rather tame version of this one. Glittering Star pilots who lose to Takuto get their Cybody piloting privileges revoked. [[JustifiedTrope It's understandable]], as the series repeatedly mentions that Cybodies are really freaking expensive and they can't just have any incompetent buffoon step in and break their toys whenever they feel like it.
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* ''StarDriver'' ''Anime/StarDriver'' features a rather tame version of this one. Glittering Star pilots who lose to Takuto get their Cybody piloting privileges revoked. [[JustifiedTrope It's understandable]], as the series repeatedly mentions that Cybodies are really freaking expensive and they can't just have any incompetent buffoon step in and break their toys whenever they feel like it.
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