History Main / WomenInRefrigerators

8th Jun '14 11:32:23 AM SeptimusHeap
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'''''Women in Refrigerators''''' is a site by Creator/GailSimone, created in March 1999, to list super-heroines who have been "either de-powered, raped, or cut up and stuck in the refrigerator" in an effort to illustrate that female superheroes are disproportionately likely to be brutalized in comic books, usually to further the character arc of male super heroes. It also spawned the infamous Women In Refrigerators meme, which has sparked a number of controversies regarding the subject. ---- !Provides examples of: * DoubleStandard: The site's thesis is that there is a DoubleStandard against superheroines: women with superpowers are disproportionately subjected to death or "life-derailing tragedies". * StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on a notorious incident early in Kyle Rayner's period as main ComicBook/GreenLantern, when his {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) was murdered, and her corpse literally left in their refrigerator by a villain to torment him. (According to WordOfGod, the comic was '''not''' intended to suggest that she'd been dismembered, although the art left some readers with that impression.) -------
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'''''Women in Refrigerators''''' is a site by Creator/GailSimone, created in March 1999, to list super-heroines who have been "either de-powered, raped, or cut up and stuck in the refrigerator" in an effort to illustrate that female superheroes are disproportionately likely to be brutalized in comic books, usually to further the character arc of male super heroes. It also spawned the infamous Women In Refrigerators meme, which has sparked a number of controversies regarding the subject. ---- !Provides examples of: * DoubleStandard: The site's thesis is that there is a DoubleStandard against superheroines: women with superpowers are disproportionately subjected to death or "life-derailing tragedies". * StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on a notorious incident early in Kyle Rayner's period as main ComicBook/GreenLantern, when his {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) was murdered, and her corpse literally left in their refrigerator by a villain to torment him. (According to WordOfGod, the comic was '''not''' intended to suggest that she'd been dismembered, although the art left some readers with that impression.) -------[[redirect:Website/WomenInRefrigerators]]
10th Mar '14 1:12:35 PM fq
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''Women in Refrigerators'' is a site by GailSimone, created in March 1999, to list super-heroines who have been "either de-powered, raped, or cut up and stuck in the refrigerator" in an effort to illustrate that female superheroes are disproportionately likely to be brutalized in comic books, usually to further the character arc of male super heroes. It also spawned the infamous Women In Refrigerators meme, which has sparked a number of controversies regarding the subject.
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''Women '''''Women in Refrigerators'' Refrigerators''''' is a site by GailSimone, Creator/GailSimone, created in March 1999, to list super-heroines who have been "either de-powered, raped, or cut up and stuck in the refrigerator" in an effort to illustrate that female superheroes are disproportionately likely to be brutalized in comic books, usually to further the character arc of male super heroes. It also spawned the infamous Women In Refrigerators meme, which has sparked a number of controversies regarding the subject.
28th Jan '14 2:24:33 AM LondonKdS
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* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on a notorious incident early in Kyle Rayner's period as ComicBook/GreenLantern, when his {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) was murdered, and her corpse literally left in their refrigerator by a villain to torment him.
to:
* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on a notorious incident early in Kyle Rayner's period as main ComicBook/GreenLantern, when his {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) was murdered, and her corpse literally left in their refrigerator by a villain to torment him.him. (According to WordOfGod, the comic was '''not''' intended to suggest that she'd been dismembered, although the art left some readers with that impression.)
28th Jan '14 2:23:23 AM LondonKdS
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* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on the time a hero's {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) who was actually cut up and stuck in the refrigerator by one of his villains.
to:
* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on the time a hero's notorious incident early in Kyle Rayner's period as ComicBook/GreenLantern, when his {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) who was actually cut up murdered, and stuck her corpse literally left in the their refrigerator by one of his villains.a villain to torment him.
7th Dec '13 8:25:11 AM Rothul
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* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list, creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on the time a hero's {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) who was actually cut up and stuck in the refrigerator by one of his villains.
to:
* StuffedIntoTheFridge: The original site focused on just the treatment of women in comics but over time, other sources have added men to the list, list (particularly gay men), creating the blanket term "StuffedInTheFridge" to cover more ground. The TropeNamer is based on the time a hero's {{Muggle}} girlfriend (''not'' a heroine) who was actually cut up and stuck in the refrigerator by one of his villains.
29th May '13 11:43:13 AM NicklePlatedStephen
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The Emphasis Added example was troll bait and had prompted thread mode to develope.
* DoubleStandard: The site's thesis is that there is a DoubleStandard against superheroines: women with superpowers are disproportionately subjected to death or "life-derailing tragedies". However, it's also often seen to fall into the trope due to: * EmphasizeEverything: When everything ever to happen to a female character is brought up in the context of "comics are misogynist," you wind up reading the list and saying "So if Storm is depowered but still {{Badass}}, it's sexist while when the very same thing happens to Wolverine, it just a comic plot?" Many of the things on the list happen to male and female characters in equal proportion. It doesn't totally torpedo the point they're trying to make, but it weakens it some. Especially when ''anything'' on the list happened in a story written by ChrisClaremont, patron saint of {{Xenafication}}. ** The idea of the trope though is that female characters (who are disproportionately underepresented as it is) are more likely to be killed to further the male character's journey. Aka, women are passive (as they are killed) and men are active (the men kill them/get revenge for them etc). There is also their secondary trope "Dead Men Defrosting" in which men being passive (in this case being severely injured or killed) is used to further their journey, and their injuries/death is often only temporary.
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* DoubleStandard: The site's thesis is that there is a DoubleStandard against superheroines: women with superpowers are disproportionately subjected to death or "life-derailing tragedies". However, it's also often seen to fall into the trope due to:\n* EmphasizeEverything: When everything ever to happen to a female character is brought up in the context of "comics are misogynist," you wind up reading the list and saying "So if Storm is depowered but still {{Badass}}, it's sexist while when the very same thing happens to Wolverine, it just a comic plot?" Many of the things on the list happen to male and female characters in equal proportion. It doesn't totally torpedo the point they're trying to make, but it weakens it some. Especially when ''anything'' on the list happened in a story written by ChrisClaremont, patron saint of {{Xenafication}}.\n** The idea of the trope though is that female characters (who are disproportionately underepresented as it is) are more likely to be killed to further the male character's journey. Aka, women are passive (as they are killed) and men are active (the men kill them/get revenge for them etc). There is also their secondary trope "Dead Men Defrosting" in which men being passive (in this case being severely injured or killed) is used to further their journey, and their injuries/death is often only temporary.
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