History Main / WeWillNotUseStageMakeUpInTheFuture

24th Jul '17 5:06:17 PM Flynt_Coal
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* ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' averts this, as Alexander's make-up and prosthetics as Dr. Lazarus easily fools the Thermians... even as it starts [[ClothingDamage falling apart]] by the end of the movie. Of course, considering how naive the Thermians are, it's not saying much.
20th May '17 3:20:41 PM nombretomado
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* ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' has one present-day inversion if you play as a Nosferatu. One human NPC after initial shock just figures you're "into the whole body modification scene" and he doesn't pass judgment on what people do with their own bodies. Honest!

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\n* ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' has one present-day inversion if you play as a Nosferatu. One human NPC after initial shock just figures you're "into the whole body modification scene" and he doesn't pass judgment on what people do with their own bodies. Honest!
29th Apr '17 11:27:31 AM nombretomado
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** Subverted in ''[[HandOfThrawn Specter of the Past]]'' by TimothyZahn. Luke, inspired to cut back on his Force use by feelings of unease he gets every time he goes to do some "pretty flashy stuff", eschews a Force illusion in favor of simple skin coloring and fake facial hair.[[note]]This is also a TakeThat to the ''Literature/BlackFleetCrisis'' books, where Luke did exactly that.[[/note]] Earlier in the same book, the con artist Flim is established as being able to pull off an astonishing [[DeadPersonImpersonation impersonation of Grand Admiral Thrawn]], right on down to the powerful, almost regal air. It's mentioned a little later on that it wouldn't be too hard to make someone look like Thrawn, but [[MagicPlasticSurgery facial surgeries]] leave certain marks, and his sheer presence is something a droid wouldn't be able to fake.

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** Subverted in ''[[HandOfThrawn ''[[Literature/HandOfThrawn Specter of the Past]]'' by TimothyZahn.Creator/TimothyZahn. Luke, inspired to cut back on his Force use by feelings of unease he gets every time he goes to do some "pretty flashy stuff", eschews a Force illusion in favor of simple skin coloring and fake facial hair.[[note]]This is also a TakeThat to the ''Literature/BlackFleetCrisis'' books, where Luke did exactly that.[[/note]] Earlier in the same book, the con artist Flim is established as being able to pull off an astonishing [[DeadPersonImpersonation impersonation of Grand Admiral Thrawn]], right on down to the powerful, almost regal air. It's mentioned a little later on that it wouldn't be too hard to make someone look like Thrawn, but [[MagicPlasticSurgery facial surgeries]] leave certain marks, and his sheer presence is something a droid wouldn't be able to fake.
14th Mar '17 4:20:07 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** Subverted in "Trials and Tribble-ations", when the characters go back in time to the TOS era and ''assume'' a Klingon spy must have had massive surgery to pass as a human. This is because they don't know Klingons weren't always RubberForeheadAliens. To pose as a human, a 23rd century Klingon would only need to ''get a haircut.'' Though FridgeLogic would compel one to question the quality of history education in the Federation, if nobody knows one of the most prominent neighboring species used to look totally different.

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** Subverted in "Trials and Tribble-ations", when the characters go back in time to the TOS era and ''assume'' a Klingon spy must have had massive surgery to pass as a human. This is because they don't know Klingons weren't always RubberForeheadAliens. To pose as a human, a 23rd century Klingon would only need to ''get a haircut.'' Though FridgeLogic would compel one to question the quality of history education in the Federation, if nobody knows one of the most prominent neighboring species used to look totally different.different (an earlier incarnation of [[TheNthDoctor Dax]] was actually ''in Starfleet'' at this time).
14th Mar '17 4:11:03 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* Then there was the solution in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. How to make it so they don't expose past-Earth to the sight of aliens? Send the most human-looking ones. Worf stays home.

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* Then there was the solution in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. How to make it so they don't expose past-Earth to the sight of aliens? Send the most human-looking ones. Worf stays home. They did inexplicably choose to send the golden-skinned android in the first team, though.
18th Feb '17 3:12:40 AM AthenaBlue
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* Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse:
** Justified in the novel ''Literature/TheRomulanWay'' by Creator/DianeDuane and Peter Morwood, in which the protagonist stayed deep undercover for years in the fairly paranoid Romulan Empire. You ''really'' wouldn't want to nick yourself shaving and be caught bleeding red instead of green around these guys. Her controller {{lampshade}}d it a bit when reading through her file: "We're making you a disguise, not overhauling a starship!"
** ''Dwellers in the Crucible'', another Star Trek novel featuring Romulan infiltration, mentioned they couldn't give Sulu the green blood or the heartbeat, but they could give him sensory enhancers to mimic alien hearing and hypnotically condition him to dream in Rihan just in case he talked in his sleep.
** In the novel ''Prime Directive'', most of the ''Enterprise'''s bridge crew is forced out of Starfleet when a pre-contact civilization is destroyed by nuclear war under their watch. As they disperse and attempt to clear their names, [=McCoy=] and Uhura set up new identities as [[TheDreaded the pirate "Black Ire"]] and his companion. Uhura wears bright blue contact lenses, while [=McCoy=] wears a helmet, goggles, and a breathing mask to conceal his identity.

to:

* Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse:
** Justified
One time when [[Literature/{{Lensman}} Kimball Kinnison]] needs to go undercover, he not only grows a real beard but uses a laser to tan his wrist (where he normally would wear his Lens bracelet) to match the rest of his arm.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' series normally has magician characters use disguise spells to blend in when in other dimensions, but in ''Myth-ing Persons'' it's subverted: while in a dimension with limited magical power, the characters are forced to use more mundane disguises, which are actually ''more'' effective because the natives aren't expecting them. (They are, however, a pain
in the novel ''Literature/TheRomulanWay'' by Creator/DianeDuane and Peter Morwood, in which the protagonist stayed deep undercover for years in the fairly paranoid Romulan Empire. You ''really'' wouldn't want ass to nick yourself shaving and be caught bleeding red instead of green around these guys. Her controller {{lampshade}}d it a bit when reading through her file: "We're making you a disguise, not overhauling a starship!"
** ''Dwellers in the Crucible'', another Star Trek novel featuring Romulan infiltration, mentioned they couldn't give Sulu the green blood or the heartbeat, but they could give him sensory enhancers to mimic alien hearing and hypnotically condition him to dream in Rihan just in case he talked in his sleep.
** In the novel ''Prime Directive'', most
apply, since almost none of the ''Enterprise'''s bridge crew is forced out of Starfleet when a pre-contact civilization is destroyed by nuclear war under their watch. As they disperse characters have any experience with nonmagical disguises, and attempt due to clear their names, [=McCoy=] and Uhura set up new identities as [[TheDreaded [[{{Uberwald}} the pirate "Black Ire"]] and his companion. Uhura wears bright blue contact lenses, while [=McCoy=] wears a helmet, goggles, and a breathing mask to conceal his identity.nature of this dimension]], there are no mirrors available.)



* ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'':

to:

* ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'':''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' and ''[[Franchise/StarTrekNovelverse Novelverse]]'':
** There have been times when ''Franchise/StarTrek'' novels have averted it. In ''Literature/StarTrekTheGenesisWave'', Romulan agent Regimol applies rubber prosthetics and simple dyes to disguise himself. It helps that the race he's impersonating is genetically related, to the point where medical scanners are usually fooled anyway. Also, in ''Literature/StarTrekStargazer'', Guinan disguises herself and Picard as another race using skin dye.
** On the other hand, at the start of ''Literature/StarTrekFederation'' Kirk is recovering from an assassination attempt by an Orion surgically altered to look Andorian.
* Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse:
** Justified in the novel ''Literature/TheRomulanWay'' by Creator/DianeDuane and Peter Morwood, in which the protagonist stayed deep undercover for years in the fairly paranoid Romulan Empire. You ''really'' wouldn't want to nick yourself shaving and be caught bleeding red instead of green around these guys. Her controller {{lampshade}}d it a bit when reading through her file: "We're making you a disguise, not overhauling a starship!"
** ''Dwellers in the Crucible'', another Star Trek novel featuring Romulan infiltration, mentioned they couldn't give Sulu the green blood or the heartbeat, but they could give him sensory enhancers to mimic alien hearing and hypnotically condition him to dream in Rihan just in case he talked in his sleep.
** In the novel ''Prime Directive'', most of the ''Enterprise'''s bridge crew is forced out of Starfleet when a pre-contact civilization is destroyed by nuclear war under their watch. As they disperse and attempt to clear their names, [=McCoy=] and Uhura set up new identities as [[TheDreaded the pirate "Black Ire"]] and his companion. Uhura wears bright blue contact lenses, while [=McCoy=] wears a helmet, goggles, and a breathing mask to conceal his identity.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':



** It probably should go under Western Animation, but it ''is'' Star Wars EU, after all: in ''TheCloneWars'', Obi-Wan [[spoiler: is disguised as Rako Hardeen, an outlaw, with very sophisticated technology used to change his face and voice. Just make-up won't do, because he's going to jail, where no one will allow him to maintain it.]]
* One time when [[Literature/{{Lensman}} Kimball Kinnison]] needs to go undercover, he not only grows a real beard but uses a laser to tan his wrist (where he normally would wear his Lens bracelet) to match the rest of his arm.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' series normally has magician characters use disguise spells to blend in when in other dimensions, but in ''Myth-ing Persons'' it's subverted: while in a dimension with limited magical power, the characters are forced to use more mundane disguises, which are actually ''more'' effective because the natives aren't expecting them. (They are, however, a pain in the ass to apply, since almost none of the characters have any experience with nonmagical disguises, and due to [[{{Uberwald}} the nature of this dimension]], there are no mirrors available.)
* ''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' and ''[[Franchise/StarTrekNovelverse Novelverse]]'':
** There have been times when ''Franchise/StarTrek'' novels have averted it. In ''Literature/StarTrekTheGenesisWave'', Romulan agent Regimol applies rubber prosthetics and simple dyes to disguise himself. It helps that the race he's impersonating is genetically related, to the point where medical scanners are usually fooled anyway. Also, in ''Literature/StarTrekStargazer'', Guinan disguises herself and Picard as another race using skin dye.
** On the other hand, at the start of ''Literature/StarTrekFederation'' Kirk is recovering from an assassination attempt by an Orion surgically altered to look Andorian.

to:

** It probably should go under Western Animation, but it ''is'' Star Wars EU, after all: in ''TheCloneWars'', Obi-Wan [[spoiler: is disguised as Rako Hardeen, an outlaw, with very sophisticated technology used to change his face and voice. Just make-up won't do, because he's going to jail, where no one will allow him to maintain it.]]
* One time when [[Literature/{{Lensman}} Kimball Kinnison]] needs to go undercover, he not only grows a real beard but uses a laser to tan his wrist (where he normally would wear his Lens bracelet) to match the rest of his arm.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' series normally has magician characters use disguise spells to blend in when in other dimensions, but in ''Myth-ing Persons'' it's subverted: while in a dimension with limited magical power, the characters are forced to use more mundane disguises, which are actually ''more'' effective because the natives aren't expecting them. (They are, however, a pain in the ass to apply, since almost none of the characters have any experience with nonmagical disguises, and due to [[{{Uberwald}} the nature of this dimension]], there are no mirrors available.)
* ''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' and ''[[Franchise/StarTrekNovelverse Novelverse]]'':
** There have been times when ''Franchise/StarTrek'' novels have averted it. In ''Literature/StarTrekTheGenesisWave'', Romulan agent Regimol applies rubber prosthetics and simple dyes to disguise himself. It helps that the race he's impersonating is genetically related, to the point where medical scanners are usually fooled anyway. Also, in ''Literature/StarTrekStargazer'', Guinan disguises herself and Picard as another race using skin dye.
** On the other hand, at the start of ''Literature/StarTrekFederation'' Kirk is recovering from an assassination attempt by an Orion surgically altered to look Andorian.



* ''Series/BabylonFive'' averts this trope in one episode. It does fulfill it in two instances though. The aversion/subversion is when it shows a DRAZI wearing a rubber mask to look like a HUMAN (he's first played by a guy without prosthetics, then the camera pans to Ivanova, and when it pans back another actor in Drazi makeup removes a mask modeled after the first actor). And vice versa. Ivanova gets a little shocked. However, it is played straight in two instances where there is a genetic change (and is actually less convincing; one is obviously a hybrid to both races and the second has the same effect but gets away with it because the race he's infiltrating have never heard of his).
* Averted in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', when the Cylon D'Anna is made up to look sick as part of a trick being played on Bulldog.
* Played ludicrously straight in ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'': When the Imagin have to interact with {{Muggles}}, they dress up in ridiculous hats, veils, scarves, masks and even full-body-covering animal suits. So they pose as dudes in suits, despite the fact that an Imagin in his natural form looks unmistakably like a... [[PeopleInRubberSuits dude in a suit]].
** Deneb in particular [[RunningGag is a master]] of the PaperThinDisguise.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' uses this in the revival. Instead of the painstaking mask application used in the original series, we get one-piece masks that can be applied in seconds.
* One episode of ''Series/MythBusters'' focused on whether or not rubber masks of other people's faces could fool others. Not only did it not fool people who knew the original face, but it did not fool strangers either. Now imagine a human trying to pass for an alien.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' uses this to comedic effect in episode "Gunmen of the Apocalypse". They attempt to pass themselves off as "Vindaloovians" to a racist species that despises humans by placing the male {{Robot Maid}}'s eyes on their chins and filming only their chins and mouths. The Simulants board the ship and discover the ruse mid-transmission.
* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'':
** ''Series/StargateSG1'': Teal'c averts this by taking the solution used by Spock, covering the single odd feature (a gold-filled tattoo of Apophis's symbol) with a hat or bandanna whenever he leaves Stargate Command on Earth. There are several episodes where he forgets or loses his hat; his backup plan in such cases appears to be BrutalHonesty. Most people tend to drop the subject on being told [[{{Squick}} how the mark is made]], or that it symbolises "Slavery. To false gods." There is an episode where Teal'c is allowed to get an apartment in the city. He explains away his weirdness (including the tattoo) as being African (Mozambique, to be specific). Since most Americans know very little about African tribes, this tends to work.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
*** The series succumbed to this when Dr. Keller made Teyla look like a Wraith queen for an infiltration mission. The reason why Teyla was chosen is because her small amounts of Wraith DNA (the result of a Wraith MadScientist experimenting on her ancestors) allowed her to bypass Wraith psychic checks, so with her appearance not being the main subject of scrutiny there was presumably even less need to surgically alter her.
*** Then avoids the trope when a Wraith passes as a (bizarre) human...by means of makeup and facial appliances. This is in Vegas, though. How many people would notice, especially since aliens aren't exactly public knowledge, even after a massive Hive-ship is destroyed in orbit.



* ''Series/BabylonFive'' averts this trope in one episode. It does fulfill it in two instances though. The aversion/subversion is when it shows a DRAZI wearing a rubber mask to look like a HUMAN (he's first played by a guy without prosthetics, then the camera pans to Ivanova, and when it pans back another actor in Drazi makeup removes a mask modeled after the first actor). And vice versa. Ivanova gets a little shocked. However, it is played straight in two instances where there is a genetic change (and is actually less convincing; one is obviously a hybrid to both races and the second has the same effect but gets away with it because the race he's infiltrating have never heard of his).
* Played ludicrously straight in ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'': When the Imagin have to interact with {{Muggles}}, they dress up in ridiculous hats, veils, scarves, masks and even full-body-covering animal suits. So they pose as dudes in suits, despite the fact that an Imagin in his natural form looks unmistakably like a... [[PeopleInRubberSuits dude in a suit]].
** Deneb in particular [[RunningGag is a master]] of the PaperThinDisguise.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The series succumbed to this when Dr. Keller made Teyla look like a Wraith queen for an infiltration mission. The reason why Teyla was chosen is because her small amounts of Wraith DNA (the result of a Wraith MadScientist experimenting on her ancestors) allowed her to bypass Wraith psychic checks, so with her appearance not being the main subject of scrutiny there was presumably even less need to surgically alter her.
** Then avoids the trope when a Wraith passes as a (bizarre) human...by means of makeup and facial appliances. This is in Vegas, though. How many people would notice, especially since aliens aren't exactly public knowledge, even after a massive Hive-ship is destroyed in orbit.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'': Teal'c averts this by taking the solution used by Spock, covering the single odd feature (a gold-filled tattoo of Apophis's symbol) with a hat or bandanna whenever he leaves Stargate Command on Earth. There are several episodes where he forgets or loses his hat; his backup plan in such cases appears to be BrutalHonesty. Most people tend to drop the subject on being told [[{{Squick}} how the mark is made]], or that it symbolises "Slavery. To false gods." There is an episode where Teal'c is allowed to get an apartment in the city. He explains away his weirdness (including the tattoo) as being African (Mozambique, to be specific). Since most Americans know very little about African tribes, this tends to work.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', when the Cylon D'Anna is made up to look sick as part of a trick being played on Bulldog.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' uses this in the revival. Instead of the painstaking mask application used in the original series, we get one-piece masks that can be applied in seconds.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' uses this to comedic effect in episode "Gunmen of the Apocalypse". They attempt to pass themselves off as "Vindaloovians" to a racist species that despises humans by placing the male {{Robot Maid}}'s eyes on their chins and filming only their chins and mouths. The Simulants board the ship and discover the ruse mid-transmission.
* One episode of ''Series/MythBusters'' focused on whether or not rubber masks of other people's faces could fool others. Not only did it not fool people who knew the original face, but it did not fool strangers either. Now imagine a human trying to pass for an alien.

to:

* ''Series/BabylonFive'' averts this trope in one episode. It does fulfill it in two instances though. The aversion/subversion is when it shows a DRAZI wearing a rubber mask to look like a HUMAN (he's first played by a guy without prosthetics, then the camera pans to Ivanova, and when it pans back another actor in Drazi makeup removes a mask modeled after the first actor). And vice versa. Ivanova gets a little shocked. However, it is played straight in two instances where there is a genetic change (and is actually less convincing; one is obviously a hybrid to both races and the second has the same effect but gets away with it because the race he's infiltrating have never heard of his).
* Played ludicrously straight in ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'': When the Imagin have to interact with {{Muggles}}, they dress up in ridiculous hats, veils, scarves, masks and even full-body-covering animal suits. So they pose as dudes in suits, despite the fact that an Imagin in his natural form looks unmistakably like a... [[PeopleInRubberSuits dude in a suit]].
** Deneb in particular [[RunningGag is a master]] of the PaperThinDisguise.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The series succumbed to this when Dr. Keller made Teyla look like a Wraith queen for an infiltration mission. The reason why Teyla was chosen is because her small amounts of Wraith DNA (the result of a Wraith MadScientist experimenting on her ancestors) allowed her to bypass Wraith psychic checks, so with her appearance not being the main subject of scrutiny there was presumably even less need to surgically alter her.
** Then avoids the trope when a Wraith passes as a (bizarre) human...by means of makeup and facial appliances. This is in Vegas, though. How many people would notice, especially since aliens aren't exactly public knowledge, even after a massive Hive-ship is destroyed in orbit.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'': Teal'c averts this by taking the solution used by Spock, covering the single odd feature (a gold-filled tattoo of Apophis's symbol) with a hat or bandanna whenever he leaves Stargate Command on Earth. There are several episodes where he forgets or loses his hat; his backup plan in such cases appears to be BrutalHonesty. Most people tend to drop the subject on being told [[{{Squick}} how the mark is made]], or that it symbolises "Slavery. To false gods." There is an episode where Teal'c is allowed to get an apartment in the city. He explains away his weirdness (including the tattoo) as being African (Mozambique, to be specific). Since most Americans know very little about African tribes, this tends to work.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', when the Cylon D'Anna is made up to look sick as part of a trick being played on Bulldog.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' uses this in the revival. Instead of the painstaking mask application used in the original series, we get one-piece masks that can be applied in seconds.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' uses this to comedic effect in episode "Gunmen of the Apocalypse". They attempt to pass themselves off as "Vindaloovians" to a racist species that despises humans by placing the male {{Robot Maid}}'s eyes on their chins and filming only their chins and mouths. The Simulants board the ship and discover the ruse mid-transmission.
* One episode of ''Series/MythBusters'' focused on whether or not rubber masks of other people's faces could fool others. Not only did it not fool people who knew the original face, but it did not fool strangers either. Now imagine a human trying to pass for an alien.







to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': In [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS4E15Deception "Deception"]], Obi-Wan's death is faked and he's disguised as his "killer", a bounty hunter named Rako Hardeen, with very sophisticated technology so he can go undercover to investigate a plot against the Chancellor. Since his first stop on this mission is prison, he wouldn't be able to maintain the disguise with makeup.
6th Jan '17 8:45:52 PM nombretomado
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* ''JemAndTheHolograms'' - Showtime, Synergy!

to:

* ''JemAndTheHolograms'' ''WesternAnimation/JemAndTheHolograms'' - Showtime, Synergy!
29th Nov '16 11:28:51 PM PaulA
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** Justified in the novel ''[[Literature/{{Rihannsu}} The Romulan Way]]'' by Creator/DianeDuane and Peter Morwood, in which the protagonist stayed deep undercover for years in the fairly paranoid Romulan Empire. You ''really'' wouldn't want to nick yourself shaving and be caught bleeding red instead of green around these guys. Her controller {{lampshade}}d it a bit when reading through her file: "We're making you a disguise, not overhauling a starship!"

to:

** Justified in the novel ''[[Literature/{{Rihannsu}} The Romulan Way]]'' ''Literature/TheRomulanWay'' by Creator/DianeDuane and Peter Morwood, in which the protagonist stayed deep undercover for years in the fairly paranoid Romulan Empire. You ''really'' wouldn't want to nick yourself shaving and be caught bleeding red instead of green around these guys. Her controller {{lampshade}}d it a bit when reading through her file: "We're making you a disguise, not overhauling a starship!"
8th Oct '16 5:11:41 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* The Thin Man aliens from ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' appear to avert this on the surface, but autopsying them reveals that they received extensive genetic modifications to appear human.

to:

* The Thin Man aliens from ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' appear to avert this on the surface, but autopsying them reveals that they received extensive genetic modifications to appear human.
human. Their unmodified form is actually the Vipers from the next game, non-anthropomophic snake people much larger than a man.
17th Sep '16 5:36:40 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''Series/BabylonFive'' averts this trope in one episode. It does fulfill it in two instances though. The aversion/subversion is when it shows a DRAZI wearing a rubber mask to look like a HUMAN (he's first played by a guy without prosthetics, then the camera pans to Ivanova, and when it pans back another actor in Drazi makeup removes a mask modeled after the first actor). And vice versa. Ivanova gets a little shocked. However, it is played straight in two instances where there is a genetic change.

to:

* ''Series/BabylonFive'' averts this trope in one episode. It does fulfill it in two instances though. The aversion/subversion is when it shows a DRAZI wearing a rubber mask to look like a HUMAN (he's first played by a guy without prosthetics, then the camera pans to Ivanova, and when it pans back another actor in Drazi makeup removes a mask modeled after the first actor). And vice versa. Ivanova gets a little shocked. However, it is played straight in two instances where there is a genetic change.change (and is actually less convincing; one is obviously a hybrid to both races and the second has the same effect but gets away with it because the race he's infiltrating have never heard of his).
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