History Main / VillainousIncest

2nd Sep '17 3:25:15 PM Eievie
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** Jaime and Cersei Lannister engage in {{twincest}}, which is revealed as an EstablishingCharacterMoment. Although with the series' GreyAndGrayMorality, they're villain-''ish'' rather than full-on villain''ous''. However, [[spoiler:Jaime becomes less villainous over time as he grows apart from his sister, while Cersei becomes more villainous. She also goes on to seduce her teenage cousin Lancel, with Jaime, who has always been faithful to her, feeling just as deeply betrayed as if an unrelated partner cheated on him.]]
*** Jaime and Cersei, however, are an unusual example of this trope, and might even be interpreted as a deconstruction; even when they're at their worst, their love for each other and for the children born of their incest is humanising for both of them, and is Cersei's single redeeming feature. Also, their justified fear of being caught and killed along with their children is one of the things that pushes them to some of their worst acts, and they (especially Jaime,) would likely be a lot less villainous if their lives weren't endangered by their feelings for each other. Finally, their villain credentials are firmly established through their willingness to murder children and other innocent people, while Cersei gets noticeably worse for reasons totally unrelated to her relationship with Jaime, making their incest almost a separate issue from their morality, and as it drives many of the events of the books it is certainly treated as more than a quick shorthand for showing how evil they are.

to:

** Jaime and Cersei Lannister engage in {{twincest}}, which is revealed as an EstablishingCharacterMoment. Although with the series' GreyAndGrayMorality, they're villain-''ish'' rather than full-on villain''ous''. However, [[spoiler:Jaime becomes less villainous over time as he grows apart from his sister, while Cersei becomes more villainous. She also goes on to seduce her teenage cousin Lancel, with Jaime, who has always been faithful to her, feeling just as deeply betrayed as if an unrelated partner cheated on him.]]
***
]] Jaime and Cersei, however, are an unusual example of this trope, and might even be interpreted as a deconstruction; {{deconstruction}}; even when they're at their worst, their love for each other and for the children born of their incest is humanising for both of them, and is Cersei's single redeeming feature. Also, their justified fear of being caught and killed along with their children is one of the things that pushes them to some of their worst acts, and acts--"The things we do for love,"--and they (especially Jaime,) Jaime) would likely be a lot less villainous if their lives weren't endangered by their feelings for each other. Finally, their villain credentials are firmly established through their willingness to murder children and other innocent people, while Cersei gets noticeably worse for reasons totally unrelated to her relationship with Jaime, making their incest almost a separate issue from their morality, and as it drives many of the events of the books it is certainly treated as more than a quick shorthand for showing how evil they are.



** Euron [[EyepatchOfPower "Crow's Eye"]] Greyjoy, [[spoiler:King of the Iron Islands]], is implied to have molested his younger brother Aeron Greyjoy, who despises and fears him, and still has nightmares of a creaking hinge when Euron visited him at night.

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** Euron [[EyepatchOfPower "Crow's Eye"]] Greyjoy, [[spoiler:King of the Iron Islands]], Greyjoy is implied to have molested his younger brother Aeron Greyjoy, Aeron, who despises and fears him, and still has nightmares of a creaking hinge when Euron visited him at night.



* [[BigBad Lord]] [[HornyDevils Raith]] of the [[OurVampiresAreDifferent White Court]] in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' has the habit of ''raping'' his daughters into [[MoreThanMindControl submission]], thus amplifying the evil of this trope by making it non-consensual. He kills his sons for being potential "threats," though, despite the fact that this cuts his potential workforce in half and the canonical fact that the [[LesbianVampire Raiths tend not to care about gender]] when it comes to food. [[spoiler:Maybe he decided making the extra sexual slaves would have been too much of a drain, since he'd been cursed to be unable to feed and thus die a slow death via starvation. In the end, it doesn't matter, since it's one of his 'not a threat' daughters that [[MindRape turns him into a vegetable]].]]

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* [[BigBad Lord]] [[HornyDevils Raith]] of the [[OurVampiresAreDifferent White Court]] in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' has the habit of ''raping'' his daughters into [[MoreThanMindControl submission]], thus amplifying the evil of this trope by making it non-consensual. He kills his sons for being potential "threats," though, despite the fact that this cuts his potential workforce in half and the canonical fact that the [[LesbianVampire Raiths tend not to care about gender]] when it comes to food. [[spoiler:Maybe he decided making the extra sexual slaves would have been too much of a drain, since he'd been cursed to be unable to feed and thus die a slow death via starvation. In the end, it doesn't matter, since it's one of his 'not "not a threat' threat" daughters that [[MindRape turns him into a vegetable]].]]



* In ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' Baron Vladimir Harkonnen openly ogles his nephew Feyd-Rautha (which both movie and miniseries played up for all its worth) and he also harbors an attraction to Paul Atreides [[spoiler: who, it turns out, is his grandson.]] ). The ''Literature/DuneEncyclopedia'' suggests that the Baron and Feyd had a sexual relationship, and strongly implies that he had sex with his mother before strangling her.

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* In ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' Baron Vladimir Harkonnen openly ogles his nephew Feyd-Rautha (which both movie and miniseries played up for all its worth) and he also harbors an attraction to Paul Atreides [[spoiler: who, [[spoiler:who, it turns out, is his grandson.]] ). The ''Literature/DuneEncyclopedia'' suggests that the Baron and Feyd had a sexual relationship, and strongly implies that he had sex with his mother before strangling her.



* Gerridon and Jamethiel, of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath''. They're the most infamous people in the entire history of their people, and they were {{twin|cest}}s and consorts. However, this is a {{subverted|Trope}} case, because as the story goes on, you learn that incest was traditional and culturally sanctioned in their culture, and doesn't have much to do with their being villainous. And the ''heroes'' of the story are shaping up to be twincestuous too!

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* ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath'' plays with this trope with Gerridon and Jamethiel, of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath''.Jamethiel. They're the most infamous people in the entire history of their people, and they were {{twin|cest}}s and consorts. However, this is a {{subverted|Trope}} case, slowly {{subverted|Trope}}, because as the story goes on, you learn that incest was traditional and culturally sanctioned in their culture, and doesn't have much to do with their being villainous. And the ''heroes'' of the story are shaping up to be twincestuous too!too! The Kencyrath have a... different culture than humans, and these two cases aren't the last incest you hear of. But this trope is pretty averted, and even in cases when incest '''is''' something horrific, it's portrayed as RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil, not VillainousIncest.
31st Aug '17 3:34:50 PM Storygirl000
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* [[http://archiveofourown.org/series/347432 This]] ''Film/{{Descendants}}'' fanfic series features Anastasia's daughter and Drizella's son as a couple, and they're among the numerous VKs that help our main characters take over Auradon.
31st Aug '17 9:58:38 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Film/CruelIntentions'', Creator/SarahMichelleGellar's character promises to sleep with her step-brother if he can deflower an avowed virgin before the summer is over. Somewhat averted in that they're not blood relatives, so it's not proper incest. Parodied in ''Film/NotAnotherTeenMovie'' where the interest is reversed with the sister agreeing to help him win the bet to get the nerdy-girl only if he'll agree to have sex with her after he wins. He objects that they are related and she responds "--only by blood!"

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* In ''Film/CruelIntentions'', Creator/SarahMichelleGellar's character promises to sleep with her step-brother if he can deflower an avowed virgin before the summer is over. Somewhat averted in that they're not blood relatives, so it's not proper incest. incest.
*
Parodied in ''Film/NotAnotherTeenMovie'' where the interest is reversed with the sister agreeing to help him win the bet to get the nerdy-girl only if he'll agree to have sex with her after he wins. He objects that they are related and she responds "--only by blood!"



* ''Film/CrimsonPeak'' reveals that [[spoiler:Thomas and Lucille Sharpe]] have had this going on since they were ''teenagers''.

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* ''Film/CrimsonPeak'' reveals that [[spoiler:Thomas and Lucille Sharpe]] have had this going on since they were ''teenagers''. Even worse, she has actually given birth several times and killed all her offspring to hide their secret.
31st Aug '17 9:56:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* Eleanor Prentiss Shaw of ''Film/TheManchurianCandidate'' (known in the novel as Eleanor Iselin). Both film versions show Eleanor coming onto her son Raymond, whose consent is dubious, and the novel on which it was all based includes frank mentions of [[spoiler:consummated incest, both between Eleanor and her father Tyler and between Eleanor and Raymond]]. Eleanor figures as a villain in both the novel and the original film version. In the remake, she's a likable character who does horrible things with good intentions, and in all three works the incestuous element is definitely used to enhance her creepiness.

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* Eleanor Prentiss Shaw of ''Film/TheManchurianCandidate'' (known in the novel as Eleanor Iselin). Both film versions show Eleanor coming onto her son Raymond, whose consent is dubious, dubious given his brainwashing, and the novel on which it was all based includes frank mentions of [[spoiler:consummated incest, both between Eleanor and her father Tyler and between Eleanor and Raymond]]. Eleanor figures as a villain in both the novel and the original film version. In the remake, she's a likable character who does horrible things with good intentions, and in all three works the incestuous element is definitely used to enhance her creepiness.
31st Aug '17 9:51:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate'' implies a sexual relationship between Satan and his female offspring. She certainly has no moral boundaries regarding offering herself to her own brother to create TheAntichrist, with the Devil being the one proposing it to his son. Then there's that scene where Kevin sees her and another woman making out in an elevator before going up to Milton's apartment for a presumed threesome.
28th Aug '17 8:12:26 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** The whole Gaunt family also fits into this, frequently marrying cousins, which led to a strain of mental instability. One member, Merope, defied her pureblood family's traditions and married a local {{Muggle|s}} -- albeit through a LovePotion, making their son Tom Marvolo Riddle a ChildByRape. By doing this, Merope allowed Tom (better known as [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]) to become one of the most powerful wizards of all time instead of being pathetically inbred.

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** The whole Gaunt family also fits into this, frequently marrying cousins, which led to a strain of mental instability. One member, Merope, defied her pureblood family's traditions and married a local {{Muggle|s}} -- albeit through a LovePotion, making their son Tom Marvolo Riddle a ChildByRape. By doing this, Merope allowed Tom (better known as [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]) to become one of the most powerful wizards of all time instead of being pathetically inbred.
28th Aug '17 8:11:41 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** The whole Gaunt family also fits into this, frequently marrying cousins, which led to a strain of mental instability, except Merope, who defied her pureblood family's traditions and married a local {{Muggle|s}}, albeit through a LovePotion that makes him of a ChildByRape. By doing this, Merope allowed her son Tom Riddle (better known as [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]) to become one of the most powerful wizards of all time instead of being pathetically inbred.

to:

** The whole Gaunt family also fits into this, frequently marrying cousins, which led to a strain of mental instability, except instability. One member, Merope, who defied her pureblood family's traditions and married a local {{Muggle|s}}, {{Muggle|s}} -- albeit through a LovePotion that makes him of LovePotion, making their son Tom Marvolo Riddle a ChildByRape. By doing this, Merope allowed her son Tom Riddle (better known as [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]) to become one of the most powerful wizards of all time instead of being pathetically inbred.
27th Aug '17 8:19:19 PM Riley1sCool
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* Averted in ''Literature/Forbidden'', where the BrotherSisterIncest is told through the SympatheticPOV of the heroes, both of whom are equal participants over the age of consent and do nothing remotely abusive to each other. They struggle with their feelings a lot, but they are unable to find any solid reasons why their love should be considered so wrong, and their romantic relationship is much closer and healthier than most teenagers despite being birthed by the same mother.

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* Averted in ''Literature/Forbidden'', ''Literature/{{Forbidden}}'', where the BrotherSisterIncest is told through the SympatheticPOV of the heroes, both of whom are equal participants over the age of consent and do nothing remotely abusive to each other. They struggle with their feelings a lot, but they are unable to find any solid reasons why their love should be considered so wrong, and their romantic relationship is much closer and healthier than most teenagers despite being birthed by the same mother.
3rd Aug '17 7:01:00 AM mzytryck01
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Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''Literature/Forbidden'', where the BrotherSisterIncest is told through the SympatheticPOV of the heroes, both of whom are equal participants over the age of consent and do nothing remotely abusive to each other. They struggle with their feelings a lot, but they are unable to find any solid reasons why their love should be considered so wrong, and their romantic relationship is much closer and healthier than most teenagers despite being birthed by the same mother.
3rd Aug '17 6:15:36 AM mzytryck01
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** [[spoiler:Jaime and Cersei Lannister]] engage in {{twincest}}, which is revealed as an EstablishingCharacterMoment. Although with the series' GreyAndGrayMorality, they're villain-''ish'' rather than full-on villain''ous''. However, [[spoiler:Jaime becomes less villainous over time as he grows apart from his sister, while Cersei becomes more villainous. She also goes on to seducing her teenage cousin Lancel.]]

to:

** [[spoiler:Jaime Jaime and Cersei Lannister]] Lannister engage in {{twincest}}, which is revealed as an EstablishingCharacterMoment. Although with the series' GreyAndGrayMorality, they're villain-''ish'' rather than full-on villain''ous''. However, [[spoiler:Jaime becomes less villainous over time as he grows apart from his sister, while Cersei becomes more villainous. She also goes on to seducing seduce her teenage cousin Lancel.]]Lancel, with Jaime, who has always been faithful to her, feeling just as deeply betrayed as if an unrelated partner cheated on him.]]
*** Jaime and Cersei, however, are an unusual example of this trope, and might even be interpreted as a deconstruction; even when they're at their worst, their love for each other and for the children born of their incest is humanising for both of them, and is Cersei's single redeeming feature. Also, their justified fear of being caught and killed along with their children is one of the things that pushes them to some of their worst acts, and they (especially Jaime,) would likely be a lot less villainous if their lives weren't endangered by their feelings for each other. Finally, their villain credentials are firmly established through their willingness to murder children and other innocent people, while Cersei gets noticeably worse for reasons totally unrelated to her relationship with Jaime, making their incest almost a separate issue from their morality, and as it drives many of the events of the books it is certainly treated as more than a quick shorthand for showing how evil they are.



** Nicodemus and his daughter Deirdre have been lovers for thousands of years.

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** Nicodemus and his daughter Deirdre have been lovers for thousands of years. She talks about it in more detail in ''Skin Game'', where she claims that their relationship started off completely platonic, and it was only when both of them had been working together as partners for several centuries that they started to see each other as equal lovers instead of father and daughter. Harry, while still disgusted, finds it difficult to refute her assertion that their relationship is much deeper and stronger than any of the conventional romances he's had, and it serves as a strangely humanising moment for two unrepentant villains. Of course, this makes [[spoiler: their mutual willingness for Nicodemus to kill her to accomplish his goals all the more shocking, and even after this final leap over the MoralEventHorizon, Harry provoking him with his memories of her is enough of a BerserkButton to break his usual self-control]].


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*** Jaime and Cersei, however, are an unusual example of this trope, and might even be interpreted as a deconstruction; even when they're at their worst, their love for each other and for the children born of their incest is humanising for both of them, and is Cersei's single redeeming feature. Also, their justified fear of being caught and killed along with their children is one of the things that pushes them to some of their worst acts, and they (especially Jaime,) would likely be a lot less villainous if their lives weren't endangered by their feelings for each other. Finally, their villain credentials are firmly established through their willingness to murder children and other innocent people, while Cersei gets noticeably worse for reasons totally unrelated to her relationship with Jaime, making their incest almost a separate issue from their morality, and as it drives many of the events of the books it is certainly treated as more than a quick shorthand for showing how evil they are. Notably, Jaime repeatedly says "we don't get to choose who we love," and nobody can actually refute it as an argument.
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