History Main / VendorTrash

23rd Apr '18 2:53:53 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' finally makes ''almost'' all of the the bottles and plates and sticks and toenail clippings scattered around the wasteland useful, for crafting things.\\
It also turns actual useful items into this; in its predecessors, items could be literally worthless when you finally trekked to a vendor to unload, thus forcing you to learn which items were worth collecting (cigarettes, for example, had a good value-to-weight ratio). In 4, possibly as a consequence of the designated junk vendors who sell items to use for crafting, the game assigns a value of at least one bottlecap (the in-game currency) to every single item. .38 ammo is only used for pipe guns, and since you find a superior 10mm pistol before you've even left the vault, chances are you'll stack up thousands of .38 bullets without even realising from fighting lower level raiders who continually use pipe guns throughout the world, even after you've long since moved onto laser guns and missile launchers. Every one of those bullets is worth at least a cap, and unless you're playing on survival mode, ammo has no weight. Basically, never take the perk that increases the amount of money you find in containers; take the one that increases the amount of ammo you find, because you can sell the ones you don't need and keep the ones you do.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' finally makes ''almost'' all of the the bottles and plates and sticks and toenail clippings scattered around the wasteland useful, for crafting things.\\
things.
***
It also turns actual useful items into this; in its predecessors, items could be literally worthless when you finally trekked to a vendor to unload, thus forcing you to learn which items were worth collecting (cigarettes, for example, had a good value-to-weight ratio). In 4, possibly as a consequence of the designated junk vendors who sell items to use for crafting, the game assigns a value of at least one bottlecap (the in-game currency) to every single item. .38 ammo is only used for pipe guns, and since you find a superior 10mm pistol before you've even left the vault, chances are you'll stack up thousands of .38 bullets without even realising from fighting lower level raiders who continually use pipe guns throughout the world, even after you've long since moved onto laser guns and missile launchers. Every one of those bullets is worth at least a cap, and unless you're playing on survival mode, ammo has no weight. Basically, never take the perk that increases "Fortune Finder" (increases the amount of money you find in containers; containers); take the one that "Scrounger" which increases the amount of ammo you find, because you can sell the ones rounds you don't need and keep the ones you do.
1st Apr '18 12:05:27 PM wingedcatgirl
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' contains several of these items, all helpfully identified with the phrase "Exchangeable for gil" in their FlavorText. The most obvious would be the Allagan <some-metal> Pieces, which are literally currency once used by the local {{Precursors}}. As an oblique measure against RealMoneyTrade, these items retain the original 99-per-slot {{Cap}} and were not affected when patch 4.2 increased the cap to 999 for everything else.
22nd Mar '18 8:22:54 PM Someoneman
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* The various Treasures in ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', most of which was pottery and figurines. Issun even recommends selling them, because what else would PhysicalGod Amaterasu need them for?
** As are most of the fish you fish up in the FishingMinigame. However, considering Ammy still eats and pees, one wonders why she can't just ''eat'' the fish.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}''
**
The various Treasures in ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', Treasures, most of which was pottery and figurines. Issun even recommends selling them, because what else would PhysicalGod Amaterasu need them for?
** As are Mre most of the fish you fish up in the FishingMinigame. However, considering Ammy still eats and pees, one wonders why she can't just ''eat'' the fish.



* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' introduced a character who accepted a monster-dropped Vendor Trash item for rewards above simple cash. However, this was never expressly stated in the dialogue with him.
** More than one. If monsters drop it, no matter how useless it seems, ''someone'' wants 20 of it for a Piece of Heart (or better.)
** And in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'', there's a whole line of treasure items (Goron Amber, Ruto Crown, etc.) that are nothing ''but'' vendor trash. The exact amount for each item varies from game to game and there is a way to trade these items between games to increase your profit.
*** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks'' they were changed to be useful to make new train parts, but still perfectly good as vendor trash if you didn't need more of that part.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda''
**
''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' introduced a character who accepted a monster-dropped Vendor Trash item items for rewards above simple cash. However, this was never expressly stated in the dialogue with him.
** More than one. If monsters drop it, no matter how useless it seems, ''someone'' wants 20 of it for a Piece of Heart (or better.)
** And in
** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'', there's a whole line of treasure items (Goron Amber, Ruto Crown, etc.) that are nothing ''but'' vendor trash. The exact amount for each item varies from game to game and there is a way to trade these items between games to increase your profit.
*** ** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks'' they ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks'', treasures were changed to be useful to make new train parts, but still perfectly good as vendor trash if you didn't need more of that part.



* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' had an array of different jewels which you could only sell to the Librarian for cash.
** In the Saturn version they could be equipped as rings to power up the Jewel Sword, but it's not worth it.
** Repeated in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'', though the things are so rare you have to wonder why they bothered. ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin'' and especially ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' have more varied vendor trash, though they also have (non-repeatable) quests.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania}}''
**
''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' had an array of different jewels which you could only sell to the Librarian for cash.
**
cash. In the Saturn version they could be equipped as rings to power up the Jewel Sword, but it's not worth it.
** Repeated in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'', though the things are so rare you have to wonder why they bothered. bothered.
**
''VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin'' and especially ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' have more varied vendor trash, though they also have (non-repeatable) quests.



** Another way of going about it is with foil versions of common but used cards (many players love their BlingOfWar). The YuGiOhTradingCardGame has special packs as participation prizes for local events, where the commons are reprints of hard-to-get cards... and the rares are foil versions of the commons people use.

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** Another way of going about it is with foil * Foil versions of common but used cards (many players love their BlingOfWar). The YuGiOhTradingCardGame ''TabletopGame/YuGiOhTradingCardGame'' has special packs as participation prizes for local events, where the commons are reprints of hard-to-get cards... and the rares are foil versions of the commons people use.



* In ''VideoGame/TheOregonTrail II'' and up, you can buy many useless items such as butter churns (useless even if you have milk cows), cast iron stoves, furniture, china, bags of beads, certain folk medicines and spices, sacks of sugar (you don't seem to use them), gun holsters (which don't protect you from accidental gunshots) etc, that serve no purpose other than to make your wagon heavier and increase the risk of tipping over. Then again, you can trade them for essentials later.
** They can also be seen as a SelfImposedChallenge by making the game more historically accurate, and bringing things that would only be useful when you get there.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheOregonTrail II'' and up, you can buy many useless items such as butter churns (useless even if you have milk cows), cast iron stoves, furniture, china, bags of beads, certain folk medicines and spices, sacks of sugar (you don't seem to use them), gun holsters (which don't protect you from accidental gunshots) etc, that serve no purpose other than to make your wagon heavier and increase the risk of tipping over. Then again, you can trade them for essentials later.
**
later. They can also be seen as a SelfImposedChallenge by making the game more historically accurate, and bringing things that would only be useful when you get there.



* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' has an "autosell" function that lets you sell just about any item in your inventory for money. Two items in particular are almost entirely useful only for their autosell value: "Valuable trinkets" and "fat stacks of cash" (the latter are userolless because the GlobalCurrency is "meat").
** Valuable trinkets do have a minor useful function and are not entirely vendor trash. Other Vendor Trash items like "fancy seashell necklaces" can be bought to enable one to convert non-exchangeable currencies into the GlobalCurrency.
*** And in the limited-time content of Christmas 2008 the "fat stacks of cash" ''also'' gained a valuable use. Seems that in Kingdom of Loathing ''nothing'' stays Vendor Trash forever!
*** Useless Powder, however, remains... well... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin useless]].
** Additionally, so-called "worthless" items of all types are useful to The Hermit, and indeed, you must use them to complete several important sidequests.
*** The joke being that ''Valuable'' Trinkets are near-worthless, while ''Worthless'' Trinkets are valuable.
*** When Hobopolis opened up, a vendor arrived who only accepted Valuable Trinkets. Good thing those aren't rare, or the player economy would have convulsed...
* In ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'', Vendor Trash also remains as the main source of income. Although some of those items can be used in certain quests, their main utility is being sold or exchanged for other items.
** Although it's not well known, the game mechanic is actually based on an early scene in [[Manhwa/{{Ragnarok}} the original manhwa]], when Chaos chops a horn off of a Face Worm so that he'd have proof that he'd killed it when he returned to Alberta to collect the 5,000 zeny bounty on its head. In ''RO'', a soldier in Izlude provides the {{justification}} as to why characters sell VendorTrash to merchants and not to a bounty hunter's office by explaining that the kingdom passed a law in which merchants can act as bounty hunting offices, and are compensated by the kingdom for paying out rewards.

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* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'':
** The game
has an "autosell" function that lets you sell just about any item in your inventory for money. Two items in particular are were almost entirely useful only for their autosell value: "Valuable trinkets" trinkets"[[note]]Which became useful when Hobopolis was released and a merchant exchanged them for items. The joke before that was that they were almost useless, while another type of item, "Worthless trinkets", is actually useful for trading with The Hermit.[[/note]] and "fat stacks of cash" cash"[[note]]Which became useful during the Christmas 2008 event.[[/note]] (the latter are userolless useless because the GlobalCurrency is "meat").
"meat").
** Valuable trinkets do have a minor useful function and are not entirely vendor trash. Other Vendor Trash items Items like "fancy seashell necklaces" can be bought to enable one to convert non-exchangeable currencies into the GlobalCurrency.
*** And in the limited-time content of Christmas 2008 the "fat stacks of cash" ''also'' gained a valuable use. Seems that in Kingdom of Loathing ''nothing'' stays * ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline''
**
Vendor Trash forever!
*** Useless Powder, however, remains... well... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin useless]].
** Additionally, so-called "worthless" items of all types are useful to The Hermit, and indeed, you must use them to complete several important sidequests.
*** The joke being that ''Valuable'' Trinkets are near-worthless, while ''Worthless'' Trinkets are valuable.
*** When Hobopolis opened up, a vendor arrived who only accepted Valuable Trinkets. Good thing those aren't rare, or the player economy would have convulsed...
* In ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'', Vendor Trash also remains as
is the main source of income. Although some of those items can be used in certain quests, their main utility is being sold or exchanged for other items.
** Although it's not well known, the
items. The game mechanic is actually based on an early scene in [[Manhwa/{{Ragnarok}} the original manhwa]], when Chaos chops a horn off of a Face Worm so that he'd have proof that he'd killed it when he returned to Alberta to collect the 5,000 zeny bounty on its head. In ''RO'', a soldier in Izlude provides the {{justification}} as to why characters sell VendorTrash to merchants and not to a bounty hunter's office by explaining that the kingdom passed a law in which merchants can act as bounty hunting offices, and are compensated by the kingdom for paying out rewards.



* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' goes as far as color-coding its Vendor Trash. If you see an item with its name in gray, you can rest assured its only purpose in the game is to be sold to vendors. This was eventually [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] with the item "[[http://www.wowhead.com/item=27442 Goldenscale Vendorfish]]," a rarely caught fish which sells for an impressive amount of money for its item level.
** And some so-called vendor trash can be sold to vendors for more than even legendary weapons, though these are fairly rare items contained within the daily fishing quest grab-bag. The [[http://www.wowhead.com/item=34823 Beautiful Glass Eye]] goes for 18 gold pieces, while the [[http://www.wowhead.com/item=34822 Ancient Coins]] go for 25!

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' goes as far as color-coding its Vendor Trash. If you see an item with its name in gray, you can rest assured its only purpose in the game is to be sold to vendors. vendors.
**
This was eventually [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] with the item "[[http://www.wowhead.com/item=27442 Goldenscale Vendorfish]]," a rarely caught fish which sells for an impressive amount of money for its item level.
** And some Some so-called vendor trash can be sold to vendors for more than even legendary weapons, though these are fairly rare items contained within the daily fishing quest grab-bag. The [[http://www.wowhead.com/item=34823 Beautiful Glass Eye]] goes for 18 gold pieces, while the [[http://www.wowhead.com/item=34822 Ancient Coins]] go for 25!



* In ''VideoGame/GuildWars'', there's an entire class of [=NPCs=] who trade weapons, armor, or other useful items for otherwise useless items. Some collectors offer explanations, but not all of them. And then there are merchants who buy virtually anything. Even then this trope is technically an aversion as the "useless" items can all be salvaged for crafting materials, sometimes being one of the few reliable sources for rarer materials.
** This idea was taken a bit further with the introduction of Nicholas the Traveler, an NPC who wants different items weekly (or daily in [[DoomedHometown Pre-Searing]]) in exchange for consumables. He nearly always asks for Vendor Trash. He, at least, gives a detailed explanation as to what use he has for such a bizarre item.

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* In ''VideoGame/GuildWars'', there's ''VideoGame/GuildWars'':
** There's
an entire class of [=NPCs=] who trade weapons, armor, or other useful items for otherwise useless items. Some collectors offer explanations, but not all of them. And then there are merchants who buy virtually anything. Even then this trope is technically an aversion as the "useless" items can all be salvaged for crafting materials, sometimes being one of the few reliable sources for rarer materials.
**
materials. This idea was taken a bit further with the introduction of Nicholas the Traveler, an NPC who wants different items weekly (or daily in [[DoomedHometown Pre-Searing]]) in exchange for consumables. He nearly always asks for Vendor Trash. He, at least, gives a detailed explanation as to what use he has for such a bizarre item.



* The net-based game ''VideoGame/ForumWarz'' has an entire item category of vendor trash called "Useless Junk". The value of the items ranges from the marble, which sells for only 1 unit of currency, to the nude Mary Magdalene, which sells for over 5000. To avoid quest items being mistaken for useless junk, they cannot be sold.
** Why is it necessary to make quest items unsellable? Because otherwise you couldn't tell the difference - many of the quest items look, from the descriptions, utterly pointless...

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* The net-based game ''VideoGame/ForumWarz'' has an entire item category of vendor trash called "Useless Junk". The value of the items ranges from the marble, which sells for only 1 unit of currency, to the nude Mary Magdalene, which sells for over 5000. To avoid quest items being mistaken for useless junk, they cannot be sold.
**
sold. Why is it necessary to make quest items unsellable? Because otherwise you couldn't tell the difference - many of the quest items look, from the descriptions, utterly pointless...



** ''VideoGame/PuzzlePirates'', similarly, features Fruit (everything else is useful for, well, a ''trade'', since tradeskills are literally half of the game).
* ''VideoGame/RuneScape'' has a lot of vendor trash, such as goblin armour (too small for you to wear) and unenchanted jewelry. However, there are also things that are useful if you're on a certain quest and never again, such as beads (technically, goblin armour is also used in a quest, although even then you have to paint it first). Those things are useful for selling to people who are working on the quest that requires that item, or just selling to the shopkeeper. Some minigames even reward the player with Vendor Trash.
** When you get to a high enough level a very large portion of item drops are vendor trash. This is due to the fact that by the time you are strong enough to easily fight a monster, nearly all of that monster's armor and weapon drops will be weaker than what you are capable of using at your current level, even the extremely rare ones, so you are better off selling most of the drops to lower leveled players. And in many cases the armor and weapons that are of a useful level will be dropped so rarely that trying to get them from that monster will take far too long, so it is better to just buy them.
* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'' has these in spades, with a very appropriate name of "etc items." While some etc items are needed for quests, there are many others that will never be used for anything but selling. Most are pretty standard but there are a few that are really bizarre like soiled rags, a fish's thoughts, werewolf toenails, and zombie teddy bears.
* ''VideoGame/TabulaRasa'' avoided the brunt of this trope by giving characters enormous amounts of backpack space and making truly useless items almost nonexistent (but rather valuable to compensate). Virtually all non-mission-critical items can, at the absolute least, be decomposed into their modular "stat bonuses" as well as the secondary resource needed to modify and install those modules, giving a distinct use to even the crappiest low-level gear in the game.
** These two aspects together led to the very common and rather comical sight of the your character harboring several dozen fully-functional and loaded weapons (ranging up to chainguns and [=RPG=]s), two whole characters' worth of body armor in addition to their own, hundreds of grenades in all 53 flavors, and tens of thousands of rounds of spare ammunition for weapons the player cannot even ''equip''. Any given low-level character could probably level a small town if they detonated the sheer volume of unstable materials they regularly lug around.

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** ''VideoGame/PuzzlePirates'', similarly, * ''VideoGame/PuzzlePirates'' features Fruit (everything else is useful for, well, a ''trade'', since tradeskills are literally half of the game).
* ''VideoGame/RuneScape'' has a lot of vendor trash, such as goblin armour (too small for you to wear) and unenchanted jewelry. However, there are also things that are useful if you're on a certain quest and never again, such as beads (technically, goblin armour is also used in a quest, although even then you have to paint it first). Those things are useful for selling to people who are working on the quest that requires that item, or just selling to the shopkeeper. Some minigames even reward the player with Vendor Trash.
**
Trash. When you get to a high enough level a very large portion of item drops are vendor trash. This is due to the fact that because by the time you are strong enough to easily fight a monster, nearly all of that monster's armor and weapon drops will be weaker than what you are capable of using at your current level, even the extremely rare ones, so you are better off selling most of the drops to lower leveled players. And in many cases the armor and weapons that are of a useful level will be dropped so rarely that trying to get them from that monster will take far too long, so it is better to just buy them.
* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'' has these in spades, with a very appropriate name of "etc items." While some etc items are needed for quests, [[TwentyBearAsses quests]], there are many others that will never be used for anything but selling. Most are pretty standard but there are a few that are really bizarre like soiled rags, a fish's thoughts, werewolf toenails, and zombie teddy bears.
* ''VideoGame/TabulaRasa'' avoided the brunt of this trope by giving characters enormous amounts of backpack space and making truly useless items almost nonexistent (but rather valuable to compensate). Virtually all non-mission-critical items can, at the absolute least, be decomposed into their modular "stat bonuses" as well as the secondary resource needed to modify and install those modules, giving a distinct use to even the crappiest low-level gear in the game.
**
game. These two aspects together led to the very common and rather comical sight of the your character harboring several dozen fully-functional and loaded weapons (ranging up to chainguns and [=RPG=]s), two whole characters' worth of body armor in addition to their own, hundreds of grenades in all 53 flavors, and tens of thousands of rounds of spare ammunition for weapons the player cannot even ''equip''. Any given low-level character could probably level a small town if they detonated the sheer volume of unstable materials they regularly lug around.



** The si isn't useless - it's a self replicating artifact that comes in useful on the ice level for moving around and can be wielded as an improvised weapon against enemies that damage/destroy non-artifact weaponry.



* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' has a lot of this in the form of enemy equipment - you can't wear most of the clothing that other races drop, seeing how it's too big or narrow for your dwarves. You ''can'' use most of the weapons, but they're usually poor-quality compared to what you can make locally or buy. However, depending on the material that it's made out of traders will sometimes give you quite a bit of money for it. Metal items can also be melted down, and the junk left behind on a battlefield acquired the FanNickname of "Goblinite, the fourth iron ore". As a result, goblin invaders starting to turn up in leather armour in the latest version had the perverse effect of making defending the fortress ''harder'' on metal-poor maps.
** In fact, nearly everything you can manufacture that your dwarves can't eat, wear or kill things with is Vendor Trash at this stage in the game's development; presumably at least some of it has another function that hasn't been implemented as of version 0.28.181.40d.
** This is true of Fortress Mode. In Adventure Mode, you can sell anything to most merchants, but different currencies are not interchangeable between different towns, so selling a bunch of stuff usually just nets you money with very limited use. But the money can still be thrown for massive damage.

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* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' has a lot of this in the form of enemy equipment ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress''
** [[UnusableEnemyEquipment Enemy equipment]]
- you can't wear most of the clothing that other races drop, seeing how it's too big or narrow for your dwarves. You ''can'' use most of the weapons, but they're usually poor-quality compared to what you can make locally or buy. However, depending on the material that it's made out of of, traders will sometimes give you quite a bit of money for it. Metal items can also be melted down, and the junk left behind on a battlefield acquired the FanNickname of "Goblinite, the fourth iron ore". As a result, goblin invaders starting were {{nerf}}ed to turn up in wear leather armour in the latest version armor, which had the perverse effect of making defending the fortress ''harder'' on metal-poor maps.
** In fact, nearly everything you can manufacture that your dwarves can't eat, wear or kill things with is Vendor Trash at this stage in
maps despite the game's development; presumably at least some of it has another function that hasn't been implemented as of version 0.28.181.40d.
weaker enemy armor.
** This is true of Fortress Mode. In Adventure Mode, you can sell anything to most merchants, but different currencies are not interchangeable between different towns, so selling a bunch of stuff usually just nets you money with very limited use. But the money can still be thrown for massive damage.



* ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' makes sure shops don't buy ''anything'', specifically to avert this trope; the author thinks lugging mountains of vendor trash back to the shops just isn't a fun game mechanic. Besides, apart from cursed and/or damaged equipment and a few malevolent pieces of jewelry, there actually isn't anything truly useless -- your lvl 20 Troll Monk might not need that book of lvl 1 completely useless spells, or that potion of poison, or that +2 dagger -- but for some other type of character those things might be very valuable.
** The only "vendor" who accept anything is god Nemelex Xobeh. Buy sacrificing all the trash you find you make day you get magic deck of cards come sooner and also determinate what kind of cards will be in it.

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* ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' makes sure shops don't buy ''anything'', specifically to avert this trope; the author thinks lugging mountains of vendor trash back to the shops just isn't a fun game mechanic. The sole exception is for followers of the god Nemelex Xobeh, who accepts just about anything as a sacrifice, so in a way you're "selling" items for piety. Besides, apart from cursed and/or damaged equipment and a few malevolent pieces of jewelry, there actually isn't anything truly useless -- your lvl 20 Troll Monk might not need that book of lvl 1 completely useless spells, or that potion of poison, or that +2 dagger -- but for some other type of character those things might be very valuable.
** The only "vendor" who accept anything is god Nemelex Xobeh. Buy sacrificing all the trash you find you make day you get magic deck of cards come sooner and also determinate what kind of cards will be in it.
valuable.



* ''VideoGame/NetHack'' restricts things by limiting the amount of cash each storekeeper actually has to buy your junk. Once that's depleted, the value of the trash is vastly depleted and you can only get store credit. [[WeBuyAnything General Stores]] are the friends here, where you can sell all the random encounter crud - including the elf armor, the elf weapon, the elf shield and the elf ''corpse''. (Well, it beats eating it - sometimes...)
** The real money in ''Nethack'' lies in gems - but you have to have magically identified which are valuable and which are just glass, otherwise the shopkeepers buy them priced as glass, and sell them priced as emeralds, amethysts, [[ShoutOut dilithium crystals]] or whatever...
* ''{{Moria}}'' had shopkeepers that would purchase unidentified items. In theory, you could stockpile 99 potions of Apple Juice, Slime Mold Juice and Water to get maximum profit (since their unidentified form is always the same from game to game.) However, trying to sell known vendor trash will offend the shopkeeper. The MorePopularSpinoff ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' makes it impossible to sell known trash.

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* ''VideoGame/NetHack'' restricts things by limiting the amount of cash each storekeeper actually has to buy your junk. Once that's depleted, the value of the trash is vastly depleted and you can only get store credit. [[WeBuyAnything General Stores]] are the friends here, where you can sell all the random encounter crud - including the elf armor, the elf weapon, the elf shield and the elf ''corpse''. (Well, it beats eating it - sometimes...)
**
) The real money in ''Nethack'' lies in best type of vendor trash is gems - but you have to have magically identified which are valuable and which are just glass, otherwise the shopkeepers buy them priced as glass, and sell them priced as emeralds, amethysts, [[ShoutOut dilithium crystals]] or whatever...
* ''{{Moria}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Moria}}'' had shopkeepers that would purchase unidentified items. In theory, you could stockpile 99 potions of Apple Juice, Slime Mold Juice and Water to get maximum profit (since their unidentified form is always the same from game to game.) However, trying to sell known vendor trash will offend the shopkeeper. The MorePopularSpinoff follow-up ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' makes it impossible to sell known trash.



* The shopkeeper of ''VideoGame/DungeonsOfDredmor'', Brax, will buy anything off you (even the sidequest-completion items, before it was fixed in a patch), but there is nothing in the game that is, by definition, Vendor Trash: it's either equipment, a consumable, or a crafting ingredient. However, if you don't have the relevant craft (Blacksmithing, Alchemy, or Tinkering) or skill set (e.g., booze, etc. when you've got no mana-using abilities or food when you're a Vampire), many items are functionally useless to you, making them effectively Vendor Trash (or Horadric Lutefisk Cube Trash).
** The expansion pack ''Conquest of the Wizardlands'' adds a new item, Horse Armour, which is a ShoutOut to ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. It would grant the wearer 20 piercing resistance and 20 armour absorption, except it can't be equipped, since you do not have a horse or a slot for horse armour. Selling it to Brax does give the player a good amount of gold, at least.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Elona}}'', killed monsters will sometimes drop [[OrganDrops a bone, skin, heart or bottle of blood]]. The only use for these is selling to merchant.

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* * The shopkeeper of ''VideoGame/DungeonsOfDredmor'', Brax, will buy anything off you (even the sidequest-completion items, before it was fixed in a patch), but there is nothing in the game that is, by definition, Vendor Trash: it's either equipment, a consumable, or a crafting ingredient. However, if you don't have the relevant craft (Blacksmithing, Alchemy, or Tinkering) or skill set (e.g., booze, etc. when you've got no mana-using abilities or food when you're a Vampire), many items are functionally useless to you, making them effectively Vendor Trash (or Horadric Lutefisk Cube Trash).
**
Trash). The expansion pack ''Conquest of the Wizardlands'' adds a new item, Horse Armour, which is a ShoutOut to ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. It would grant the wearer 20 piercing resistance and 20 armour absorption, except it can't be equipped, since you do not have a horse or a slot for horse armour. Selling it to Brax does give the player a good amount of gold, at least.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Elona}}'', killed monsters will sometimes drop [[OrganDrops a bone, skin, heart or bottle of blood]]. The only use for these is selling to merchant. However, shopkeepers have limited gold, which prevents you from abusing this too much.



* The ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games have such items as Nuggets, Pearls, Stardust, and Tiny Mushrooms.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games have such items ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''
** Items
as Nuggets, Pearls, Stardust, and Tiny Mushrooms.Mushrooms. But even then, some games give some of them specific uses:
*** In [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=], Mushrooms are used in Sevii by the Mushroom Maniac Move Re-Tutor.
*** You can give Star Pieces to the guy at Fuego Ironworks in exchange for shards, which are used for getting [=TMs=] on Diamond and Pearl, or use them to pay various move tutors on Platinum.



** As of [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=], Mushrooms are all used in Sevii by the Mushroom Maniac Move Re-Tutor, so the specific Vendor Trash is now mostly Rare Bones (dug up Underground), the classic Nuggets, Star Pieces, and Pearls.
*** However, every other Move Relearner in the series takes Heart Scales, and since items can't be sent back to the GBA games, the Mushrooms return to Vendor Trash status in Generation IV.
** The Star Pieces aren't entirely useless on [=D/P/Pt=], since you can just give them to the guy at Fuego Ironworks in exchange for shards, which are used for getting [=TMs=] on Diamond and Pearl, or to pay various move tutors on Platinum.
** Once you get to the Department Store in each game, you can purchase "Fresh Water" from the rooftop vending machines, which are equally effective as Super Potions, but cost only a fraction of the price. The only disadvantage is that you have to purchase them one at a time.
** Ethers are also outclassed by Leppa Berries, which have the effect but activate automatically when held by a Pokemon; the player can get a sustainable supply of them with careful gardening. Neither of these two can be purchased from shops, but Ethers fetch a surprisingly high price in resale.
** To make up for the lack of trainer rematches, ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' added three collectors that will buy certain regular items for more than what you'd usually get and will also give you ''tremendous'' amounts of money for rare items you can't sell to anyone else (some of which you only get one of). Star Pieces can also be traded to a guy in Anville Town for PP Ups (but he's only there on weekends).
*** There's also the billionaire in Undella Town who will pay you a LOT of money for the Relics you find in the Abyssal Ruins, which you really can't do anything else with.
*** ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' adds another item maniac who collects Mulch (items used in berry growing in ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'', but rendered useless in ''Pokémon Black and White''.) The amount of items that are counted as vendor trash is almost absurd. With {{Disc One Nuke}}s such as Join Avenue and Pokéstar Studios, you'll have more than enough money than you'll know what to do with.

to:

** As of [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=], Mushrooms are all used in Sevii by the Mushroom Maniac Move Re-Tutor, so the specific Vendor Trash is now mostly Rare Bones (dug up Underground), the classic Nuggets, Star Pieces, and Pearls.
*** However, every other Move Relearner in the series takes Heart Scales, and since items can't be sent back to the GBA games, the Mushrooms return to Vendor Trash status in Generation IV.
** The Star Pieces aren't entirely useless on [=D/P/Pt=], since you can just give them to the guy at Fuego Ironworks in exchange for shards, which are used for getting [=TMs=] on Diamond and Pearl, or to pay various move tutors on Platinum.
** Once you get to the Department Store in each game, you can purchase "Fresh Water" from the rooftop vending machines, which are equally effective as Super Potions, but cost only a fraction of the price.price, effectively making Super Potions into this. The only disadvantage is that you have to purchase them one at a time.
** Ethers are also outclassed by Leppa Berries, which have the effect but activate automatically when held by a Pokemon; the player can get a sustainable supply of them with careful gardening. Neither of these two can be purchased from shops, but Ethers fetch a surprisingly high price in resale.
** ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''
***
To make up for the lack of trainer rematches, ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' added there are three collectors that will buy certain regular items for more than what you'd usually get and will also give you ''tremendous'' amounts of money for rare items you can't sell to anyone else (some of which you only get one of). Star Pieces can also be traded to a guy in Anville Town for PP Ups (but he's only there on weekends).
*** There's also the The billionaire in Undella Town who will pay you a LOT of money for the Relics you find in the Abyssal Ruins, which you really can't do anything else with.
*** ** ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' adds another item maniac who collects Mulch (items used in berry growing in ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'', but rendered useless in ''Pokémon Black and White''.) The amount of items that are counted as vendor trash is almost absurd. With {{Disc One Nuke}}s such as Join Avenue and Pokéstar Studios, you'll have more than enough money than you'll know what to do with.



* In ''[[VideoGame/MountAndBlade Mount & Blade]]'', enemy drops are useful early on for equipping your character and [=NPC=]s; however once you have everybody decked out in the nicest armor drops, enemy drops essentially become Vendor Trash, as do the enemies themselves if you manage to take any prisoners. Prisoners can be recruited to your army, but the chances of that happening are low; the point is moot if your army is at capacity anyway. To sell them, you have to go from town to town until you can find a ransom broker, meanwhile with the prisoners dipping into your food supply. Captured lords and kings can be the most annoying to have to drag around, since the usual ransom brokers won't purchase them from you; you just have to wait until someone makes you an offer for them. There are also items that you can purchase from vendors for the sole purpose of reselling them elsewhere for a profit, some of which have absolutely no function apart from their inherent money-making value.

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/MountAndBlade Mount & Blade]]'', ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'', enemy drops are useful early on for equipping your character and [=NPC=]s; however once you have everybody decked out in the nicest armor drops, enemy drops essentially become Vendor Trash, as do the enemies themselves if you manage to take any prisoners. Prisoners can be recruited to your army, but the chances of that happening are low; the point is moot if your army is at capacity anyway. To sell them, you have to go from town to town until you can find a ransom broker, meanwhile with the prisoners dipping into your food supply. Captured lords and kings can be the most annoying to have to drag around, since the usual ransom brokers won't purchase them from you; you just have to wait until someone makes you an offer for them. There are also items that you can purchase from vendors for the sole purpose of reselling them elsewhere for a profit, some of which have absolutely no function apart from their inherent money-making value.



* In ''VideoGame/RaidouKuzunohaVsTheSoullessArmy'', Raidou can acquire "artifacts", such as old coins and pottery, that are only useful when you sell them to Konnou-Ya, the crotchety old owner of the store that shares his name. Given that Konnou-Ya is a pawn shop whenever you're not buying magical elemental bullets and magical booze for your familiars, it's sort of justified.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has a similar system. Coins you get by killing the game's MetalSlime are usually worth a lot of money, and some of the items dropped by bosses are only there for you to sell.

to:

* ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei''/''Franchise/{{Persona}}'':
**
In ''VideoGame/RaidouKuzunohaVsTheSoullessArmy'', Raidou can acquire "artifacts", such as old coins and pottery, that are only useful when you sell them to Konnou-Ya, the crotchety old owner of the store that shares his name. Given that Konnou-Ya is a pawn shop whenever you're not buying magical elemental bullets and magical booze for your familiars, it's sort of justified.
* ** I ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has a similar system. Coins 3}}'', coins you get by killing the game's MetalSlime are usually worth a lot of money, and some of the items dropped by bosses are only there for you to sell.



** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Most of the treasure you steal from the various Palaces, include the main Treasure each of your heists are targeting, can only be sold at the weapon shop for cash. They have no other uses and stay in a seperate tab from equipment and other usable items.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Most of the treasure you steal from the various Palaces, include the main Treasure each of your heists are targeting, can only be sold at the weapon shop for cash. They have no other uses and stay in a seperate separate tab from equipment and other usable items.items.
** ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' and ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse'':
*** Relics, AKA everyday items from before the game's events, are the main source of Macca in this game. The game even sells them automatically as soon as you enter a shop. The reason for their value depends on where you sell them: in the medieval kingdom of Mikado, they are valued for being modern-day items, while in Tokyo they are pre-apocalyptic conveniences.



* [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] encounters the Goodie Bag in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG: Legend of the Seven Stars'', an item that gives you one coin when used, and never runs out. This can be used to create unlimited wealth (very, very slowly), but [[MoneyForNothing there are faster ways to make unlimited money]] (like using the combat turns you would be using for the Goodie Bag to, y'know, ''[[BoringButPractical fight enemies that drop money]]''), so it's often better to sell it for a quick influx of 555 coins instead.
** There's also the Pure Water item, which is frequently won from beating undead enemies. The Pure Water item only has one purpose, which is to instantly defeat undead monsters. They also have a hefty resale value of 75 coins a piece, making Pure Water a good way to rack up some coins.

to:

* [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] encounters the Goodie Bag in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG: Legend of the Seven Stars'', Stars''
** The Goodie Bag is
an item that gives you one coin when used, and never runs out. This can be used to create unlimited wealth (very, very slowly), but [[MoneyForNothing there are faster ways to make unlimited money]] (like using the combat turns you would be using for the Goodie Bag to, y'know, ''[[BoringButPractical fight enemies that drop money]]''), so it's often better to sell it for a quick influx of 555 coins instead.
** There's also the The Pure Water item, which is frequently won from beating undead enemies. The Pure Water item only has one purpose, which is to instantly defeat undead monsters. They also have a hefty resale value of 75 coins a piece, making Pure Water a good way to rack up some coins.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' is the first game in the series to introduce {{Random Drop}}s. Imperial magicians and certain other enemies frequently drop spell tomes, with the ones that aren't available from shops often netting thousands of gil more than you'd receive from fighting monsters.
* Selling Vendor Trash is your main source of income in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII''. It should be noted that a lot of items are available earlier, cheaper, and/or exclusively if you sell a certain quota of Vendor Trash.
** ''FFXII'' actually adds justification to most vendor trash. Info in the bestiary frequently describes which items a monster drops and what they're used for, making the fact that they sell for decent money more plausible. And there's also a direct correlation between what you sell and what stuff you can buy from the Bazaar.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' has loot you could either use for synthesis or selling. The real Vendor Trash are items that are specifically described as having a high sale value, as they provide very little benefit for synthesis anyway.

to:

* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
**
''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' is the first game in the series to introduce {{Random Drop}}s. Imperial magicians and certain other enemies frequently drop spell tomes, with the ones that aren't available from shops often netting thousands of gil more than you'd receive from fighting monsters.
* ** Selling Vendor Trash is your main source of income in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII''. It should be noted that a lot of items are available earlier, cheaper, and/or exclusively if you sell a certain quota of Vendor Trash.
** ''FFXII'' actually adds justification to most vendor trash.
Trash. Info in the bestiary frequently describes which items a monster drops and what they're used for, making the fact that they sell for decent money more plausible. And there's also a direct correlation between what you sell and what stuff you can buy from the Bazaar.
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' has loot you could either use for synthesis or selling. The real Vendor Trash are items that are specifically described as having a high sale value, as they provide very little benefit for synthesis anyway.



* Chickens, rulers, and protractors in ''VideoGame/EarthBound''. Luckily the game also has a "For Sale" sign which causes random people to wander up to you and [[WeBuyAnything buy your things]]. There's also the semi-rare Meteotite, which is dropped by some enemies and (as the description states) doesn't do anything but can be sold for a high price.
** And then there's the Insignificant Item...though it actually has a use.

to:

* ''Mother'':
**
Chickens, rulers, and protractors in ''VideoGame/EarthBound''. Luckily the game also has a "For Sale" sign which causes random people to wander up to you and [[WeBuyAnything buy your things]]. There's also the semi-rare Meteotite, which is dropped by some enemies and (as the description states) doesn't do anything but can be sold for a high price.
**
price. And then there's the Insignificant Item...though it actually has a use.



* ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' is an example of the rarer "appreciating value" Vendor Trash, in which it sells (at an incredible price) a bottle of what was translated to "Seltzer". It rapidly increases in value based on the number of squares you've moved since the beginning of the game. It should be noted that this appreciation happens whether or not you own the item, meaning if you want to buy it you'll have to progress far enough that your ability to make money outstrips the time you've spent playing. You can also create it using ultra-rare cooking ingredients.
** ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' also had reverse vendor-trash in the item Bounced Cheque. In order to get rid of it, you had to pay a shopkeeper to take it off you.
** Hell, half the stuff you make using ItemCrafting can be considered Vendor Trash. Many items have little or no use and there are over a ''thousand'' of them.

to:

* ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'':
** Half the stuff you make using ItemCrafting can be considered Vendor Trash. Many items have little or no use and there are over a ''thousand'' of them.
** There
is an example of the rarer "appreciating value" Vendor Trash, in which it sells (at an incredible price) a bottle of what was translated to "Seltzer". It rapidly increases in value based on the number of squares you've moved since the beginning of the game. It should be noted that this appreciation happens whether or not you own the item, meaning if you want to buy it you'll have to progress far enough that your ability to make money outstrips the time you've spent playing. You can also create it using ultra-rare cooking ingredients.
** ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' also had reverse vendor-trash in {{Inverted}} with the item Bounced Cheque. In order to get rid of it, you had to pay a shopkeeper to take it off you.
** Hell, half the stuff you make using ItemCrafting can be considered Vendor Trash. Many items have little or no use and there are over a ''thousand'' of them.
you.



* The ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' and ''Monster Hunter Freedom'' series. While on missions you can find such rare and valuable items as shiny shells, rare bugs, monster guts, fruit, mushrooms that have sat in the stomachs of giant bugs, and living fish made out of gold(no really, read the FlavorText). With a few exceptions, these items serve absolutely no purpose but for cash, and are sold off automatically when the mission ends. These are usually referred to as Account Items. A surprising number of them are described as delicacies.
** Oddly enough, Some items will come with you, even if their purpose is just to be sold (like, oddly enough, the younger versions of the solid gold fish). You should be fairly used to saving everything because you never know when you'll need it. Even those seemingly useless ROCKS (does 1 damage, same as a paintball) can eventually be used to forge the Basarios series. (High defense but looks like a ton of bricks.)
*** The general rule of thumb is: If the FlavorText describes the item as highly valuable and especially if it's followed up by "...but of no use to a Hunter", you can safely sell it without compromising an opportunity for new equipment, assuming the game doesn't sell it for you.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' and ''Monster Hunter Freedom'' series. series
**
While on missions you can find such rare and valuable items as shiny shells, rare bugs, monster guts, fruit, mushrooms that have sat in the stomachs of giant bugs, and living fish made out of gold(no really, read the FlavorText). With a few exceptions, these items serve absolutely no purpose but for cash, and are sold off automatically when the mission ends. These are usually referred to as Account Items. A surprising number of them are described as delicacies. \n** Oddly enough, Some items will come with you, even if their purpose is just to be sold (like, oddly enough, the younger versions of the solid gold fish). You should be fairly used to saving everything because you never know when you'll need it. Even those seemingly useless ROCKS (does 1 damage, same as a paintball) can eventually be used to forge the Basarios series. (High defense but looks like a ton of bricks.)\n*** The general rule of thumb is: If the FlavorText describes the item as highly valuable and especially if it's followed up by "...but of no use to a Hunter", you can safely sell it without compromising an opportunity for new equipment, assuming the game doesn't sell it for you.



* In ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'' Vendor Trash is your ''only'' source of income.
** Not only that, but the shops' selection increases mostly by selling off various quantities of it.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'' Vendor Trash is your ''only'' source of income.
** Not only that, but
income. It's also used to improve the shops' selection increases mostly by selling off various quantities of it.shop's inventory: sell the required materials, and new items go on sale.



* When you're fighting human (or humanoid, anyway) opponents, the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series most definitely falls into this trope, since you can usually scavenge a weapon, a piece of armor, and a trinket or two from hostiles, and they're usually things you either don't need, or already have (or have something better,) leading to huge mounds of Vendor Trash after a fight.
** An interesting part of the ''Fallout'' game economy is that actual cash is relatively limited. It is often easier to trade for vendor trash to make up for what the NPC merchants lack in money. It gives the game's barter system a more realistic feel (in a post-apocalyptic sort of way), as you'll end up with transactions that go along the lines of "four scavenged shot guns for all of your cash, several bottles of hooch, and some ammo".

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}''
**
When you're fighting human (or humanoid, anyway) opponents, the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series most definitely falls into this trope, since you can usually scavenge a weapon, a piece of armor, and a trinket or two from hostiles, and they're usually things you either don't need, or already have (or have something better,) leading to huge mounds of Vendor Trash after a fight.
**
fight. An interesting part of the ''Fallout'' game economy is that actual cash is relatively limited. It is often easier to trade for vendor trash to make up for what the NPC merchants lack in money. It gives the game's barter system a more realistic feel (in a post-apocalyptic sort of way), as you'll end up with transactions that go along the lines of "four scavenged shot guns for all of your cash, several bottles of hooch, and some ammo".



** In addition, in VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas items such as Scrap Metal and Fission Batteries can be used to repair machinery if you have a poor repair stat, making it somewhat useful to keep some on you at all times.
** Generally, the best way to make money in any Fallout game is to travel around, find a bunch of raiders, kill them, and sell their weapons in the nearest town. Raiders respawn (albeit in small numbers after you've destroyed the big hubs) in ''all'' games and carry weaponry that's usually useless to the player but ''very'' useful to the average wastelander, so they sell for tons of caps. A standout example is the Fiends of New Vegas, who frequently drop energy weapons. They even spawn a couple hundred yards from the game's main merchants at Crimson Caravan and the Gun Runner HQ.
** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' finally makes ''almost'' all of the the bottles and plates and sticks and toenail clippings scattered around the wasteland useful, for crafting things.
** Fallout 4 even turns actual useful items into this; in its predecessors, where items could be literally worthless when you finally trekked to a vendor to unload, thus forcing you to learn which items were worth collecting (cigarettes, for example, had a good value-to-weight ratio). In 4, possibly as a consequence of the designated junk vendors who sell items to use for crafting, the game assigns a value of at least one bottlecap (the in-game currency) to every single item. .38 ammo is only used for pipe guns, and since you find a superior 10mm pistol before you've even left the vault, chances are you'll stack up thousands of .38 bullets without even realising from fighting lower level raiders who continually use pipe guns throughout the world, even after you've long since moved onto laser guns and missile launchers. Every one of those bullets is worth at least a cap, and unless you're playing on survival mode, ammo has no weight. Basically, never take the perk that increases the amount of money you find in containers; take the one that increases the amount of ammo you find, because you can sell the ones you don't need and keep the ones you do.
* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' sees fit to dump upon the player piles of assault rifles, shotguns, pistols, and sniper rifles, not to mention armor and upgrades for all the above. Most of it is actually sub-par equipment, and a quick check of the weapon or armor's manufacturer by a reasonably experienced player can tell you off the bat which ones are worth keeping before you even check the stats.

to:

** In addition, in VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas items such as Scrap Metal and Fission Batteries can be used to repair machinery if you have a poor repair stat, making it somewhat useful to keep some on you at all times.
** Generally, the best way to make money in any Fallout game is to travel around, find a bunch of raiders, kill them, and sell their weapons in the nearest town. Raiders respawn (albeit in small numbers after you've destroyed the big hubs) in ''all'' games and carry weaponry that's usually useless to the player but ''very'' useful to the average wastelander, so they sell for tons of caps. A standout example is the Fiends of New Vegas, who frequently drop energy weapons. They even spawn a couple hundred yards from the game's main merchants at Crimson Caravan and the Gun Runner HQ.
** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' finally makes ''almost'' all of the the bottles and plates and sticks and toenail clippings scattered around the wasteland useful, for crafting things.
** Fallout 4 even
things.\\
It also
turns actual useful items into this; in its predecessors, where items could be literally worthless when you finally trekked to a vendor to unload, thus forcing you to learn which items were worth collecting (cigarettes, for example, had a good value-to-weight ratio). In 4, possibly as a consequence of the designated junk vendors who sell items to use for crafting, the game assigns a value of at least one bottlecap (the in-game currency) to every single item. .38 ammo is only used for pipe guns, and since you find a superior 10mm pistol before you've even left the vault, chances are you'll stack up thousands of .38 bullets without even realising from fighting lower level raiders who continually use pipe guns throughout the world, even after you've long since moved onto laser guns and missile launchers. Every one of those bullets is worth at least a cap, and unless you're playing on survival mode, ammo has no weight. Basically, never take the perk that increases the amount of money you find in containers; take the one that increases the amount of ammo you find, because you can sell the ones you don't need and keep the ones you do.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
**
''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' sees fit to dump upon the player piles of assault rifles, shotguns, pistols, and sniper rifles, not to mention armor and upgrades for all the above. Most of it is actually sub-par equipment, and a quick check of the weapon or armor's manufacturer by a reasonably experienced player can tell you off the bat which ones are worth keeping before you even check the stats.



** Lampshaded (sort of) in-universe
*** Shepard: ''"We can use this!"''



* In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', certain types of creature always drop a specific body part; fire beetles, for instance, drop fire beetle bellies. Shrubs and piles of rock typically yield fenberries and quartz crystals (though the piles of rock can hide more valuable gems). All of these sell for one gold apiece. But just when you've learned to recognize Vendor Trash in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 changes the rules... Now, there's one vendor who won't deal with you until you give her an item of Vendor Trash (an 'arcane reagent') -- ''every single time'' you deal with her -- and you can also find out how to use some of them in ItemCrafting. But you still collect so many of them that they still by and large count as trash. At the same time, certain rare items from the first chapter, worth holding on to for their use in that chapter's ItemCrafting, now themselves become Vendor Trash, showing up everywhere. (But fire beetle bellies remain trash.)
** Oh, and the books. You can ransack the PamphletShelf for the same dozen or so books the world over. (And the occasional magic scroll.) Once you've read the page of setting-enhancing text once, they become pure Vendor Trash.
** Can't forget gems, which exist solely to keep money in reserve so that when you die you don't lose too much dough. Admittedly, selling gems for money makes sense, but apart from diamonds (which are used in item crafting) they're rarely worth more than 100gp, which is a pitifully small amount of money when you get up to level 10.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', certain ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'':
** cCrtain
types of creature always drop a specific body part; fire beetles, for instance, drop fire beetle bellies. Shrubs and piles of rock typically yield fenberries and quartz crystals (though the piles of rock can hide more valuable gems). All of these sell for one gold apiece. But just when you've learned to recognize Vendor Trash in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 changes the rules... Now, there's one vendor who won't deal with you until you give her an item of Vendor Trash (an 'arcane reagent') -- ''every single time'' you deal with her -- and you can also find out how to use some of them in ItemCrafting. But you still collect so many of them that they still by and large count as trash. At the same time, certain rare items from the first chapter, worth holding on to for their use in that chapter's ItemCrafting, now themselves become Vendor Trash, showing up everywhere. (But fire beetle bellies remain trash.)
** Oh, and the books.Books. You can ransack the PamphletShelf for the same dozen or so books the world over. (And the occasional magic scroll.) Once you've read the page of setting-enhancing text once, they become pure Vendor Trash.
** Can't forget gems, which Gems exist solely to keep money in reserve so that when you die you don't lose too much dough. Admittedly, selling gems for money makes sense, but apart from diamonds (which are used in item crafting) they're rarely worth more than 100gp, which is a pitifully small amount of money when you get up to level 10.



* In ''VideoGame/LunarDragonSong'', you have the option of getting experience or vendor trash from killed enemies. Said trash can either be sold directly or used in the delivery miniquests that ask you to give an NPC TwentyBearAsses.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Lunar}}'':
**
In ''VideoGame/LunarDragonSong'', you have the option of getting experience or vendor trash from killed enemies. Said trash can either be sold directly or used in the delivery miniquests that ask you to give an NPC TwentyBearAsses.



** The ''VideoGame/{{X}}'' series tops that, though. Sometimes, the guy you're shooting will ''abandon his ship'', allowing you to claim it and sell it for probably more than the cargo was worth. Not to mention [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential snatching up the jettisoned pilot and selling him into slavery.]]

to:

** The ''VideoGame/{{X}}'' series tops that, though. Sometimes, * In ''VideoGame/{{X}}'', sometimes, the guy you're shooting will ''abandon his ship'', allowing you to claim it and sell it for probably more than the cargo was worth. Not to mention [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential snatching up the jettisoned pilot and selling him into slavery.]]



* In roleplaying games like ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', anything you can convince the GM to give a value can become vendor trash. As a wise gamer once wrote: "if all else fails, steal the doors straight out of the dungeon".
** To be fair, a high-level dungeon would probably have pretty valuable doors. Enough parties got frustrated with the ''TabletopGame/TombOfHorrors''' lack of treasure and looted the thick, enchanted [[{{Unobtainium}} adamantium]] doors instead that 3[[superscript:rd]] edition revised them to be enchanted steel.
** Hell, this was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by no less than Creator/GaryGygax himself in the 1st Edition ''Dungon Master's Guide''. Gygax pointed out that things like flasks of oil, the weapons and armor belonging to human enemies, and pack animals could all be resold for decent prices, even if the enemies the players are looting didn't otherwise have a lot of cash on hand.

to:

* In roleplaying games like ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', anything ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** Anything
you can convince the GM to give a value can become vendor trash. As a wise gamer once wrote: "if all else fails, steal the doors straight out of the dungeon".
** To be fair, a high-level dungeon would probably have pretty valuable doors. Enough parties got frustrated with the ''TabletopGame/TombOfHorrors''' lack of treasure and that they just looted the thick, enchanted [[{{Unobtainium}} adamantium]] doors instead that instead. 3[[superscript:rd]] edition revised them to be enchanted steel.
** Hell, this This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by no less than Creator/GaryGygax himself in the 1st Edition ''Dungon Master's Guide''. Gygax pointed out that things like flasks of oil, the weapons and armor belonging to human enemies, and pack animals could all be resold for decent prices, even if the enemies the players are looting didn't otherwise have a lot of cash on hand.



* Many alien items in ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' have little or no use for the player, but can be sold for big bucks. Particularly noticeable with [[EnemyScan Mind Probes]] - of questionable utility on the battlefield, but worth more than even the heaviest guns when sold. Of course, it's not hard to imagine why various civilian and military bodies would be quite interested in mind-reading devices.
** Alien corpses can also be sold for a pretty penny, which leads to the question of what these people are doing with all these dead aliens...

to:

* ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}''
**
Many alien items in ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' have little or no use for the player, but can be sold for big bucks. Particularly noticeable with [[EnemyScan Mind Probes]] - of questionable utility on the battlefield, but worth more than even the heaviest guns when sold. Of course, it's not hard to imagine why various civilian and military bodies would be quite interested in mind-reading devices.
**
devices. Alien corpses can also be sold for a pretty penny, which leads to the question of what these people are doing with all these dead aliens...



** In the reboot ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'', some stuff you can find in [=UFOs=], like alien surgery or damaged flight computers, are only useful as source of cash when you sell them. In a rare display of benevolence from the interface, the player is explicitely notified that those items have no research benefits and should be sold.

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** In the reboot ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'', some stuff you can find in [=UFOs=], like alien surgery or damaged flight computers, are only useful as source of cash when you sell them. In a rare display of benevolence from the interface, the player is explicitely explicitly notified that those items have no research benefits and should be sold.
22nd Feb '18 9:00:39 AM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/MasterOfTheMonsterLair'': Animal enemies will often drop pelts, while humanoid enemies will sometimes drop rare coins.
22nd Jan '18 1:50:21 AM Cryoclaste
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* [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] encounters the Goodie Bag in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG: Legend of the Seven Stars'', an item that gives you one coin when used, and never runs out. This can be used to create unlimited wealth (very, very slowly), but [[MoneyForNothing there are faster ways to make unlimited money]] (like using the combat turns you would be using for the Goodie Bag to, y'know, ''[[BoringButPractical fight enemies that drop money]]''), so it's often better to sell it for a quick influx of 555 coins instead.

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* [[SuperMarioBros [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] encounters the Goodie Bag in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG: Legend of the Seven Stars'', an item that gives you one coin when used, and never runs out. This can be used to create unlimited wealth (very, very slowly), but [[MoneyForNothing there are faster ways to make unlimited money]] (like using the combat turns you would be using for the Goodie Bag to, y'know, ''[[BoringButPractical fight enemies that drop money]]''), so it's often better to sell it for a quick influx of 555 coins instead.
6th Jan '18 3:55:20 PM wingedcatgirl
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** In Book II of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem Mystery of the Emblem]]''you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.

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** In Book II of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem Mystery of the Emblem]]''you Emblem]]'' you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.
6th Jan '18 3:54:45 PM wingedcatgirl
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'': In Book II you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.
** Similarly, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn Radiant Dawn]]'' gave you a chance to find (and buy!) Dark magic tomes near the very end of the game, which at first seems silly without anyone in your party able to use them... [[EquipmentSpoiler keywords being "at first"]]; in a NewGamePlus, you can recruit [[spoiler:Pelleas (who specializes in Dark magic]] and [[spoiler:Lehran, who can use them in the final battle, but comes with no tomes of his own, so you have give some to him in the middle of the fight, [[AwesomeButImpractical which is a waste of time]]]].
** Throughout the series, enemies or chests will drop gems or bullion that have no purpose except to be sold.

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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'': ''Franchise/FireEmblem'':
** Throughout the series, enemies or chests will drop gems or bullion that have no purpose except to be sold -- except on a ranking run, where selling them kills your Funds score due to the exact definition of the requirement.
**
In Book II you of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem Mystery of the Emblem]]''you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.
** Similarly, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn Radiant Dawn]]'' gave you a chance to find (and buy!) Dark magic tomes near the very end of the game, which at first seems silly without anyone in your party able to use them... [[EquipmentSpoiler keywords being "at first"]]; in a NewGamePlus, you can recruit [[spoiler:Pelleas (who specializes in Dark magic]] and [[spoiler:Lehran, who can use them in the final battle, but comes with no tomes of his own, so you have give some to him in the middle of the fight, [[AwesomeButImpractical which is a waste of time]]]].
** Throughout the series, enemies or chests will drop gems or bullion that have no purpose except to be sold.
time]]]].
28th Dec '17 7:54:51 AM Cryoclaste
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* The ''{{Pokemon}}'' games have such items as Nuggets, Pearls, Stardust, and Tiny Mushrooms.

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* The ''{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games have such items as Nuggets, Pearls, Stardust, and Tiny Mushrooms.
26th Dec '17 10:46:03 AM Silverblade2
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem: [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Mystery of the Emblem]]'': In Book II you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.
** Similarly, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' gave you a chance to find (and buy!) Dark magic tomes near the very end of the game, which at first seems silly without anyone in your party able to use them... [[EquipmentSpoiler keywords being "at first"]]; in a NewGamePlus, you can recruit [[spoiler:Pelleas (who specializes in Dark magic]] and [[spoiler:Lehran, who can use them in the final battle, but comes with no tomes of his own, so you have give some to him in the middle of the fight, [[AwesomeButImpractical which is a waste of time]]]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem: [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Mystery of the Emblem]]'': ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'': In Book II you occasionally find Silver Axes, and never recruit anybody who can equip them. Averted in the DS remake where you do get several axe fighters, and the Silver Axes are replaced with what they were worth in the first place: gold.
** Similarly, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn Radiant Dawn]]'' gave you a chance to find (and buy!) Dark magic tomes near the very end of the game, which at first seems silly without anyone in your party able to use them... [[EquipmentSpoiler keywords being "at first"]]; in a NewGamePlus, you can recruit [[spoiler:Pelleas (who specializes in Dark magic]] and [[spoiler:Lehran, who can use them in the final battle, but comes with no tomes of his own, so you have give some to him in the middle of the fight, [[AwesomeButImpractical which is a waste of time]]]].
8th Dec '17 5:06:57 PM LinTaylor
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryV'' had this happen unintentionally. The designers were going to let players use bows and arrows for the first time in the series, but the game was rushed to market and thus the feature had to be [[DummiedOut cut]]. The player can still find arrows on defeated enemies, but since there's no way to ever obtain a bow they ended up becoming this trope.
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