History Main / UnwinnableTrainingSimulation

16th May '17 7:12:38 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Many {{fanfiction}} writers have written their take on how they would win the ''Kobayashi Maru'' scenario, but very few have felt as within the realm of the possible as "The Final Simulation," a mini-story featured in the [[http://www.eyrie.net/ Eyrie Productions]] universe, ''UndocumentedFeatures''. In this story, Ben Hutchins' AuthorAvatar, Gryphon, captains the simulated ''Enterprise'' through the encounter with Klingons menacing the wayward fuel carrier with a plan to beat the "no-win scenario." Monitoring them are Admirals Christopher Pike (the original Jeffrey Hunter version) and Roger Cartwright (from the classic ''[[Franchise/StarTrek Trek]]'' movies) as he and his crew pull off the ultimate Starfleet Academy stunt -- outsmarting the scenario '''without cheating'''. Aiding him are fellow Starfleet cadets from a wide range of sources:

to:

* Many {{fanfiction}} writers have written their take on how they would win the ''Kobayashi Maru'' scenario, but very few have felt as within the realm of the possible as "The Final Simulation," a mini-story featured in the [[http://www.eyrie.net/ Eyrie Productions]] universe, ''UndocumentedFeatures''.''Fanfic/UndocumentedFeatures''. In this story, Ben Hutchins' AuthorAvatar, Gryphon, captains the simulated ''Enterprise'' through the encounter with Klingons menacing the wayward fuel carrier with a plan to beat the "no-win scenario." Monitoring them are Admirals Christopher Pike (the original Jeffrey Hunter version) and Roger Cartwright (from the classic ''[[Franchise/StarTrek Trek]]'' movies) as he and his crew pull off the ultimate Starfleet Academy stunt -- outsmarting the scenario '''without cheating'''. Aiding him are fellow Starfleet cadets from a wide range of sources:
16th Apr '17 7:02:54 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Two characters ''deliberately'' blew it up, [[StarTrekNewFrontier one]] rationalizing that either it was screwed to hell anyway, or that it was actually working with the enemy to lure him into a trap. The other was completely apathetic to the plight of the Maru's crew, and simply exploited the ship's volatile cargo to win the fight with the Klingons.

to:

** Two characters ''deliberately'' blew it up, [[StarTrekNewFrontier [[Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier one]] rationalizing that either it was screwed to hell anyway, or that it was actually working with the enemy to lure him into a trap. The other was completely apathetic to the plight of the Maru's crew, and simply exploited the ship's volatile cargo to win the fight with the Klingons.
15th Apr '17 12:41:35 AM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There's a NightmareFuel equivalent, based on RealLife, in the novel of RAF life in the nuclear era, Creator/DerekRobinson's ''Literature/HulloRussia,GoodbyeEngland''. A long and horrible sequence takes place in an RAF flight simulator where crews of the Vulcan jet bombers, tasked with delivering Britain's nuclear deterrent to the Soviet Union, get everything that could go wrong on a mission thrown at them. And that's ''everything''. The bomb arms itself prematurely, or jams in the bomb-bay with the clock ticking down to detonation, they are under attack by Russian countermeasures, they fly too close to nuclear explosions brought about by other missiles or planes, the aircraft itself develops escalating mechanical problems... the test is unwinnable. It is designed to test the aircrews to the limit and weed out those who might panic or freze or simply refuse to go through with it.

to:

* There's a NightmareFuel equivalent, based on RealLife, in the novel of RAF life in the nuclear era, Creator/DerekRobinson's ''Literature/HulloRussia,GoodbyeEngland''.''Literature/HulloRussiaGoodbyeEngland''. A long and horrible sequence takes place in an RAF flight simulator where crews of the Vulcan jet bombers, tasked with delivering Britain's nuclear deterrent to the Soviet Union, get everything that could go wrong on a mission thrown at them. And that's ''everything''. The bomb arms itself prematurely, or jams in the bomb-bay with the clock ticking down to detonation, they are under attack by Russian countermeasures, they fly too close to nuclear explosions brought about by other missiles or planes, the aircraft itself develops escalating mechanical problems... the test is unwinnable. It is designed to test the aircrews to the limit and weed out those who might panic or freze or simply refuse to go through with it.
15th Apr '17 12:39:32 AM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* There's a NightmareFuel equivalent, based on RealLife, in the novel of RAF life in the nuclear era, Creator/DerekRobinson's ''Literature/HulloRussia,GoodbyeEngland''. A long and horrible sequence takes place in an RAF flight simulator where crews of the Vulcan jet bombers, tasked with delivering Britain's nuclear deterrent to the Soviet Union, get everything that could go wrong on a mission thrown at them. And that's ''everything''. The bomb arms itself prematurely, or jams in the bomb-bay with the clock ticking down to detonation, they are under attack by Russian countermeasures, they fly too close to nuclear explosions brought about by other missiles or planes, the aircraft itself develops escalating mechanical problems... the test is unwinnable. It is designed to test the aircrews to the limit and weed out those who might panic or freze or simply refuse to go through with it.
13th Mar '17 2:47:12 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** If we're playing the Kobayashi Maru example straight, then chances are the true test is a test of character, judging how well a pony can accept failure and realize where their flaws lie. Given how Twilight takes the thought of failure, it's not exactly a surprise she failed in the many alternate timelines.
* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] in ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse''. The Gems give Steven a test of skill engineered so that it's actually impossible to fail. Steven is less than amused when he figures this out.

to:

** If we're playing the Kobayashi Maru example straight, then chances are the true test is a test of character, judging how well a pony can accept failure and realize where their flaws lie. Given how Twilight takes the thought of failure, failure (before the Rainboom boosts her power, she quickly gives up and apologizes for wasting the instructor's time), it's not exactly a surprise she failed in the many alternate timelines.
* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] in ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse''. The Gems give Steven a test of skill engineered rigged so that it's actually impossible to fail. fail (the idea was to boost Steven's confidence in himself). Steven is less than amused upset when he figures this out.out, because he feels like the Gems don't trust him enough to actually challenge him.
15th Jan '17 5:00:19 PM KeithM
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In one of the prequel series Travis complains about a no-win scenario he was observing because the reason the trainees lost was because the Opposing Force pulled out a weapon that was ''physically impossible to produce'', which he then proceeds to explain exactly why you couldn't make one. This gets him in trouble with the officer who came up with the simulation, as he'd been trying to get the funding to develop said system (A multi-drive missile). While [=MDMs=] were eventually developed, Hemphill had an additional 400 years of further R&D to build on to make it practical, and even then one of Travis' objections (That an MDM would be significantly larger than a single-drive missile, and thus have a different sensor return) still applied.

to:

** In one of the prequel series Travis complains about a no-win scenario he was observing because the reason the trainees lost was because the Opposing Force pulled pulling out a weapon that was ''physically impossible to produce'', which he then proceeds to explain exactly why you couldn't make one. This gets him in trouble with the officer who came up with the simulation, as he'd been trying to get the funding to develop said system (A multi-drive missile). While [=MDMs=] were eventually developed, Hemphill had an additional 400 years of further R&D to build on to make it practical, and even then one of Travis' objections (That an MDM would be significantly larger than a single-drive missile, and thus have a different sensor return) still applied.
15th Jan '17 4:45:13 PM KeithM
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A fairly common practice after a particularly notable air disaster involving some kind of failure of the aircraft is to program a simulator with the scenario, put experienced pilots in the cockpit, and see if there was anything at all that could have been done. Even if the test pilots know what's coming, it's not unusual for it to be demonstrated to be utterly impossible to have saved the aircraft. In cases of ''near'' disaster, running the simulation often shows how ridiculously lucky and/or skilled the original pilots were to have pulled off what they did.
15th Jan '17 4:28:05 PM KeithM
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In one of the prequel series Travis complains about a no-win scenario because the reason he couldn't win was because the Opposing Force pulled out a weapon that was ''physically impossible to produce'', which he then proceeds to explain exactly why you couldn't make one. This gets him in trouble with the officer who came up with the simulation, as he'd been trying to get the funding to develop said system (A multi-drive missile). While [=MDMs=] were eventually developed, Hemphill had an additional 400 years of further R&D to build on to make it practical, and even then one of Travis' objections (That an MDM would be significantly larger than a single-drive missile, and thus have a different sensor return) still applied.

to:

** In one of the prequel series Travis complains about a no-win scenario he was observing because the reason he couldn't win the trainees lost was because the Opposing Force pulled out a weapon that was ''physically impossible to produce'', which he then proceeds to explain exactly why you couldn't make one. This gets him in trouble with the officer who came up with the simulation, as he'd been trying to get the funding to develop said system (A multi-drive missile). While [=MDMs=] were eventually developed, Hemphill had an additional 400 years of further R&D to build on to make it practical, and even then one of Travis' objections (That an MDM would be significantly larger than a single-drive missile, and thus have a different sensor return) still applied.
10th Jan '17 3:07:02 PM StarSword
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Fanfic/TheUniverseDoesntCheat" was written for a ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' forum prompt on the ''Maru'', and somewhat {{deconstruct|ion}}s it. Kanril Eleya attempts XanatosSpeedChess against the computer[[note]]She negotiates with the Klingons as a delaying tactic while she sets up her ''real'' plan, which is to fire on the ''Maru'' to disrupt its shields and beam everybody off, while simultaneously {{ramming|AlwaysWorks}} her way out of the Klingon pincer by going to warp ''through'' a battlecruiser, then spraying torpedoes out her rear launcher to discourage pursuit.[[/note]], but unusually for fan fiction ''doesn't'' win: she and T'Var figure out that the computer is cheating when a pair of pursuing battlecruisers hit a physically impossible speed, then changes tactics ''again''[[note]]This time she's prepared to sacrifice herself and the stardrive in a holding action to let the saucer containing the ''Maru'' crew and her nonessentials escape.[[/note]] and the computer basically gives up and drops a battleship on her head. T'Var calls the logic behind the test fallacious and notes that with their WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief broken by the computer's obvious cheating, the accuracy of the test is questionable. Meanwhile Eleya comments that, while she believes actual no-win scenarios to be ''possible'', they usually happen "because somebody ''fucked up''!"

to:

* "Fanfic/TheUniverseDoesntCheat" was written for a ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' forum prompt on the ''Maru'', and somewhat {{deconstruct|ion}}s it. Kanril Eleya attempts XanatosSpeedChess against the computer[[note]]She negotiates with the Klingons as a delaying tactic while she sets up her ''real'' plan, which is to fire on the ''Maru'' to disrupt its shields and beam everybody off, while simultaneously {{ramming|AlwaysWorks}} her way out of the Klingon pincer by going to warp ''through'' a battlecruiser, then spraying torpedoes out her rear launcher to discourage pursuit.[[/note]], but unusually for fan fiction ''doesn't'' win: she and T'Var figure out that the computer is cheating when a pair of pursuing battlecruisers hit a physically impossible speed, then changes tactics ''again''[[note]]This time she's prepared to sacrifice herself and the stardrive in a holding action to let the saucer containing the ''Maru'' crew and her nonessentials escape.[[/note]] and [[RocksFallEveryoneDies the computer basically gives up and drops a battleship on her head.head]]. T'Var calls the logic behind the test fallacious and notes that with their WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief broken by the computer's obvious cheating, the accuracy of the test is questionable. Meanwhile Eleya comments that, while she believes actual no-win scenarios to be ''possible'', they usually happen "because somebody ''fucked up''!"
6th Jan '17 8:39:51 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Used in the "Glitter N' Gold" episode of ''{{Jem}}''. Jerrica wants to tell her boyfriend, Rio, that she is Jem's secret identity. She uses Synergy, her hologram-making super-computer to make an illusion of Rio to see what will happen; it goes badly. Synergy assumes that she might be wrong--but then the real Rio explodes at Kimber after she reveals that she made a mistake -- using almost the exact same words the holographic Rio did. This came from Christy Marx, the writer of most of the episodes of the ''Jem'' series, who wanted Jerrica to have a reason to keep her other identity a secret from Rio.

to:

* Used in the "Glitter N' Gold" episode of ''{{Jem}}''.''WesternAnimation/{{Jem}}''. Jerrica wants to tell her boyfriend, Rio, that she is Jem's secret identity. She uses Synergy, her hologram-making super-computer to make an illusion of Rio to see what will happen; it goes badly. Synergy assumes that she might be wrong--but then the real Rio explodes at Kimber after she reveals that she made a mistake -- using almost the exact same words the holographic Rio did. This came from Christy Marx, the writer of most of the episodes of the ''Jem'' series, who wanted Jerrica to have a reason to keep her other identity a secret from Rio.
This list shows the last 10 events of 296. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.UnwinnableTrainingSimulation