History Main / TranslationConvention

23rd Mar '17 10:43:10 AM VulgarBee
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* In ''Manga/OnePiece'', WordOfGod stated that the main language in his world is English. Since it's about [[{{Pirate}} pirates]], the language can be "stolen" quite a lot.
2nd Mar '17 12:37:45 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* There have been at least three different Hylian languges, spoken over the course of different ages: ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' era Hylian, which is written in katakana-like syllables, the Hylian of the ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker's'' Great Sea, which is written in similar symbols but different enough to render the inhabitant of the Great Sea unable to understand the Hylian language from ''Ocarina'', and the Hylian language of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', which, unlike the previous two, is written in symbols similar to real world English and therefore thought to be radically different from the other two. Then, there's also the language of the Zoras and the language of the Gerudo. We, however, can't tell, because all the dialogue in the games is conveniently in Japanese/English/Whatever the language setting of your console is at the time. We get to hear clips of the Hylian language of ''Ocarina'' in ''Wind Waker'' (but it's little more than gibberish) and hear Midna talk TP era Hylian in ''Twilight Princess'' (same). It's taken to the extreme in the ''Wind Waker'' spin off "Navi Trackers", where three characters (Tetra, The King of Red Lions, and Sue Belle) are suddenly ''voiced'' in fluent Japanese, when their language was suggested to be simmilar to Portuguese (''Oi~!'') in the original game. The games have, however, also subverted this trope from time to time -- the Picori in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' are talking either PokemonSpeak or backwards, depending on your language setting (PokemonSpeak for English, backwards for pretty much everything else) and Link has to apply TranslatorMicrobes, in order to render their dialogue understandable. In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'', the Goron and Zora races have their own written languages which appear on monuments and signposts in their native regions. When Link attempts to read one of these monuments or signposts while transformed into a member of the race that created it, the words written on the monument or signpost appear on-screen in English (or Japanese or whatever real world language that specific copy of the game is in). When Link attempts to read one of these monuments or signposts while in his human form or while transformed into a member of a race other than the one that created it, a text box appears on-screen informing the player that Link is unable to read the symbols on the monument or signpost.

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* There In ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'', there have been at least three different Hylian languges, spoken over the course of different ages: ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' era ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]''-era Hylian, which is written in katakana-like syllables, the Hylian of the ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker's'' ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]''[='s=] Great Sea, which is written in similar symbols but different enough to render the inhabitant inhabitants of the Great Sea unable to understand the Hylian language from ''Ocarina'', and the Hylian language of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'', which, unlike the previous two, is written in symbols similar to real world English and therefore thought to be radically different from the other two. Then, there's also the language of the Zoras and the language of the Gerudo. We, however, can't tell, because all the dialogue in the games is conveniently in Japanese/English/Whatever the language setting of your console is at the time. We get to hear clips of the Hylian language of ''Ocarina'' in ''Wind Waker'' (but it's little more than gibberish) and hear Midna talk TP era TP-era Hylian in ''Twilight Princess'' (same). It's taken to the extreme in the ''Wind Waker'' spin off "Navi Trackers", spin-off ''Navi Trackers'', where three characters (Tetra, The King of Red Lions, and Sue Belle) are suddenly ''voiced'' in fluent Japanese, when their language was suggested to be simmilar to Portuguese (''Oi~!'') in the original game. The games have, however, also subverted this trope from time to time -- the Picori in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap The Minish Cap]]'' are talking either PokemonSpeak or backwards, depending on your language setting (PokemonSpeak for English, backwards for pretty much everything else) else), and Link has to apply TranslatorMicrobes, TranslatorMicrobes in order to render their dialogue understandable. In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'', ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'', the Goron and Zora races have their own written languages which appear on monuments and signposts in their native regions. When Link attempts to read one of these monuments or signposts while transformed into a member of the race that created it, the words written on the monument or signpost appear on-screen in English (or Japanese or whatever real world language that specific copy of the game is in). When Link attempts to read one of these monuments or signposts while in his human form or while transformed into a member of a race other than the one that created it, a text box appears on-screen informing the player that Link is unable to read the symbols on the monument or signpost.
28th Feb '17 4:12:20 AM Sabrewing
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* Used in ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' whenever Alex reads from the book of the same name. To indicate the presence of translation, several chapters (Such as Augustus Pious's) begin in Latin, which shifts into English after a few lines of dialogue. Interestingly, the mouth flaps often don't match the dialogue, giving the impression that it has been overdubbed.

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* Used in ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' whenever Alex reads from the book of the same name. To indicate the presence of translation, several chapters (Such as Augustus Pious's) two chapters, those of Pious and Anthony, begin in Latin, which shifts into English after a few lines of dialogue. Interestingly, the mouth flaps often don't match the dialogue, giving the impression that it has been overdubbed.
27th Feb '17 9:21:17 PM Averagemoe
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* ''Literature/ThePlaniverse'' contains an in-universe example. Whatever fluke allowed the computer to contact Yendred also translates between English and his unnamed language, in somewhat scrambled sentences. His actual language is spoken with hisses, squeaks, and choking noises.
26th Feb '17 11:28:15 PM gewunomox
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* Megadeth's Spanish versions of "Trust" and "Promises" feature Spanish choruses but the English verses are left as they are.
** The same is done in AvrilLavigne's Japanese version of "Girlfriend".
* The English versions of Rammstein's "Du Hast" and "Engel" start in English, switch to the original German for a part that was previously sung in English, then switch back to English to end the song.
* KMFDM's "Godlike" has a spoken-word portion of the song that repeats the English lyrics of the first verse in German. "A Hole in the Wall" is a strange case where an entire song consists of an English translation of one of their earlier German songs ("Liebeslied") even though the two songs are unrelated musically.

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* Megadeth's Music/{{Megadeth}}'s Spanish versions of "Trust" and "Promises" feature Spanish choruses but the English verses are left as they are.
** The same is done in AvrilLavigne's Music/AvrilLavigne's Japanese version of "Girlfriend".
* The English versions of Rammstein's Music/{{Rammstein}}'s "Du Hast" and "Engel" start in English, switch to the original German for a part that was previously sung in English, then switch back to English to end the song.
* KMFDM's Music/{{KMFDM}}'s "Godlike" has a spoken-word portion of the song that repeats the English lyrics of the first verse in German. "A Hole in the Wall" is a strange case where an entire song consists of an English translation of one of their earlier German songs ("Liebeslied") even though the two songs are unrelated musically.
26th Feb '17 12:18:00 PM nombretomado
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* ''IpMan'' was originally in Cantonese, with the Foshaners speaking Cantonese while Jin's Northerner troupe speaks Mandarin instead of a true northern Chinese dialect. In the Mandarin dub, both the Foshaners and the Northerners speak Mandarin. However, the Japanese characters still speak in Japanese with subtitles.

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* ''IpMan'' ''Film/IpMan'' was originally in Cantonese, with the Foshaners speaking Cantonese while Jin's Northerner troupe speaks Mandarin instead of a true northern Chinese dialect. In the Mandarin dub, both the Foshaners and the Northerners speak Mandarin. However, the Japanese characters still speak in Japanese with subtitles.
11th Feb '17 4:19:10 AM Arcorann
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* In ''LightNovel/TheFamiliarOfZero'', the first episode involves the lead hero falling into the heroine's world, and isn't able to understand anything they say until she accidentally uses a translation spell. In the dub, they meet and ask each other what language the other is speaking in...in perfect English.
** To their credit they represented this by having Saito speak with an echo effect applied to his voice until Louise spelled him, at least in the Japanese version. It had to be Saito even though he's the actual Japanese speaker because just ''imagine'' how annoying it would have been to have the entire cast apart from him using the echo effect for the entire episode up to that point.
** In the original they both speak perfect Japanese to each other from the beginning. It is hinted that a translation spell is embedded into the summoning.

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* In Justified in ''LightNovel/TheFamiliarOfZero'', where Saito receives a magical translation effect as part of his summoning, allowing him to perceive all the first episode involves other characters' speech as Japanese from the lead hero falling into beginning. In the heroine's world, and anime version this isn't present, though, so Saito isn't able to understand anything they say until she accidentally uses a translation spell. In the dub, they meet and ask each other what language the other is speaking in...in perfect English.
** To their credit they represented this by having
English. The Japanese version had Saito speak with an echo effect applied to his voice until Louise spelled him, at least in the Japanese version. It had to be Saito even though he's the actual Japanese speaker because just ''imagine'' how annoying it would have been to have the entire cast apart from him using the echo effect for the entire episode up to that point.
** In the original they both speak perfect Japanese to each other from the beginning. It is hinted that a translation spell is embedded into the summoning.
him.
26th Jan '17 11:59:38 PM PaulA
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''[[Literature/{{Foundation}} Second Foundation]]'' lampshades the use of this trope for the OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness scenes with the titular TelepathicSpacemen, using standard dialogue to represent meaningful gestures and cryptic sentence fragments.

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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''[[Literature/{{Foundation}} Second Foundation]]'' Creator/IsaacAsimov:
** ''Literature/SecondFoundation''
lampshades the use of this trope for the OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness scenes with the titular TelepathicSpacemen, using standard dialogue to represent meaningful gestures and cryptic sentence fragments.



** And of course, there's the entire second section of ''Literature/TheGodsThemselves'', told about and by StarfishAliens. The Earth/Moon language used in the other two sections may also be an example.

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** And of course, there's the The entire second section of ''Literature/TheGodsThemselves'', told about and by StarfishAliens. The Earth/Moon language used in the other two sections may also be an example.
24th Jan '17 2:08:52 PM Willbyr
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* The "NodameCantabile" movie begins with the Frenchmen that appear speaking in French for about a minute or so, then notes that all non-Japanese dialogue beyond that point would be dubbed in Japanese for the convenience of the viewers.

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* The "NodameCantabile" ''Manga/NodameCantabile'' movie begins with the Frenchmen that appear speaking in French for about a minute or so, then notes that all non-Japanese dialogue beyond that point would be dubbed in Japanese for the convenience of the viewers.
20th Jan '17 4:06:58 PM StFan
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!!Examples

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!!Examples
!!Examples:



[[folder:Anime]]

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[[folder:Anime]][[folder:Anime & Manga]]



** In one scene, 'No Smoking' signs can be seen in various languages. Out of all those, Jet picks the one in Chinese to point his finger on.

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** In one scene, 'No Smoking' "No Smoking" signs can be seen in various languages. Out of all those, Jet picks the one in Chinese to point his finger on.



* In ''TheFiveStarStories'', signs & other things are labelled in {{Engrish}}, though everybody seems to be speaking Japanese (or whatever language it's translated into). The use of English lettering is particularily odd, as the people are aliens who evolved to be identical to humans apparently through sheer coincidence & have no connection whatsoever to Earth. Stranger still, the language of the ancient, mystical Farus Di Kanarn civilization is rendered as Chinese and the Kingdom of Fortune's as French. When Mugumica recites a poem from there it's written bilingually, but earlier when Lachesis changes into her final form for the first time & begins speaking it, it is left untranslated.

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* In ''TheFiveStarStories'', ''Manga/TheFiveStarStories'', signs & other things are labelled in {{Engrish}}, though everybody seems to be speaking Japanese (or whatever language it's translated into). The use of English lettering is particularily odd, as the people are aliens who evolved to be identical to humans apparently through sheer coincidence & have no connection whatsoever to Earth. Stranger still, the language of the ancient, mystical Farus Di Kanarn civilization is rendered as Chinese and the Kingdom of Fortune's as French. When Mugumica recites a poem from there it's written bilingually, but earlier when Lachesis changes into her final form for the first time & begins speaking it, it is left untranslated.



* ''Manga/FairyTail'' has signs and place names in English, plus everyone's names are in western order (even the protagonist Natsu Dragneel), thus English is implied to be the official language of the Fairy Tail universe.
** WordOfGod says that a language very similar to English was the spoken language in the author's initial work, ''Manga/RaveMaster'', this probably is a decent assumption.

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* ''Manga/FairyTail'' has signs and place names in English, plus everyone's names are in western order (even the protagonist Natsu Dragneel), thus English is implied to be the official language of the Fairy Tail universe.
**
universe. WordOfGod says that a language very similar to English was the spoken language in the author's initial work, ''Manga/RaveMaster'', so this probably is a decent assumption.



[[folder:Comic Books ]]

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[[folder:Comic Books ]]Books]]



* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' does this well with each language being represented [[PaintingTheMedium as their own font]]. Exceptions include Egyptian which consists of a bunch of symbols vaguely resembling hieroglyphics. For humour, certain expletives are left "untranslated", simply being shown as a bunch of symbols.
** The exception being the unremarked-upon distinction between the legionaries' Latin and the villagers' Gaulish - unless of course you're reading a translation into something like Swiss German, when Swiss can be used for Gaulish and the more 'official' Hochdeutsch for Latin.
** Another exception is whenever someone makes a [[AltumVidetur classic Latin quote]] ("Alea jacta est", "O tempora o mores", etc) which appears untranslated (Pegleg the pirate does this [[OncePerEpisode Once Per Album]]).
** However, the expletives can still have national flavor - a Goth's expletive will have slightly more angular symbols, and the skulls will wear Goth helmets, for example.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' does this well with each language being represented [[PaintingTheMedium as their own font]]. Exceptions include Egyptian which consists of a bunch of symbols vaguely resembling hieroglyphics. hieroglyphics.
**
For humour, certain expletives are left "untranslated", simply being shown as a bunch of symbols.
symbols. However, the expletives can still have national flavor -- a Goth's expletive will have slightly more angular symbols, and the skulls will wear Goth helmets, for example.
** The exception being the unremarked-upon distinction between the legionaries' Latin and the villagers' Gaulish - -- unless of course you're reading a translation into something like Swiss German, when Swiss can be used for Gaulish and the more 'official' "official" Hochdeutsch for Latin.
** Another exception is whenever someone makes a [[AltumVidetur classic Latin quote]] ("Alea jacta est", "O tempora o mores", etc) which appears untranslated (Pegleg the pirate does this [[OncePerEpisode Once Per Album]]).
** However, the expletives can still have national flavor - a Goth's expletive will have slightly more angular symbols, and the skulls will wear Goth helmets, for example.
per Album]]).



* This is played to the T in ComicBook/{{Ronin}}. Japanese characters speak English while in feudal Japan. Once the title character makes the jump to futuristic America, he is blatantly shown to only be able to speak Japanese.
** [[spoiler: Of course, those "feudal Japan" scenes are actually the English translations of a Japanese television show.]]

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* This is played to the T in ComicBook/{{Ronin}}. Japanese characters speak English while in feudal Japan. Once the title character makes the jump to futuristic America, he is blatantly shown to only be able to speak Japanese.
** [[spoiler: Of
Japanese. [[spoiler:Of course, those "feudal Japan" scenes are actually the English translations of a Japanese television show.]]



* ''Fanfic/CodePonyEvolution'' has a strange one. Since the story takes place in France, all the French is translated to English. However, [[StarfishLanguage "Fancy"]] is translated into... [[GratuitousFrench French]]
* Used in [[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/81159/racer-and-the-geek chapter 3]] of ''FanFic/RacerAndTheGeek''. As it turns out, Telny and Keffiyeh were holding a conversation in a language other than Equestrian, as revealed by Goggles asking Telny what language he was using. It is later revealed to be Zebrische, which is the zebra language and spoken in Zebricy. This is a massive plot point.
* ''FanFic/HarmonyTheory'': There are at least three languages in the fic. All three are represented by English in the fic. A switch in languages is represented by writing the language which is spoken less in that scene italics.

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* ''Fanfic/CodePonyEvolution'' has a strange one. Since the story takes place in France, all the French is translated to English. However, [[StarfishLanguage "Fancy"]] is translated into... [[GratuitousFrench French]]
French]].
* Used in [[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/81159/racer-and-the-geek chapter 3]] of ''FanFic/RacerAndTheGeek''.''Fanfic/RacerAndTheGeek''. As it turns out, Telny and Keffiyeh were holding a conversation in a language other than Equestrian, as revealed by Goggles asking Telny what language he was using. It is later revealed to be Zebrische, which is the zebra language and spoken in Zebricy. This is a massive plot point.
* ''FanFic/HarmonyTheory'': ''Fanfic/HarmonyTheory'': There are at least three languages in the fic. All three are represented by English in the fic. A switch in languages is represented by writing the language which is spoken less in that scene italics.



* ''FanFic/{{Fractured}}'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]'']] [[MassiveMultiplayerCrossover crossover]] becomes this once TranslatorMicrobes are developed. Speech from asari, batarian, salarian, et. al. (which were specifically noted to be incomprehensible by the Trans-Galactic Republic) is always rendered in English, but only after the TranslatorMicrobes is it noted that the newcomers ''also'' understand what is being said. Linguistic barriers are not mentioned again.

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* ''FanFic/{{Fractured}}'', ''Fanfic/{{Fractured}}'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]'']] ''Franchise/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]'']] [[MassiveMultiplayerCrossover crossover]] becomes this once TranslatorMicrobes are developed. Speech from asari, batarian, salarian, et. al. (which were specifically noted to be incomprehensible by the Trans-Galactic Republic) is always rendered in English, but only after the TranslatorMicrobes is it noted that the newcomers ''also'' understand what is being said. Linguistic barriers are not mentioned again.



** Strangely done in ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''. For almost the entire movie both the Algonquians and the Brits speak English. However, when John meets the [[CharacterTitle title character]], she speaks Algonquin - until the magic tree tells her to 'listen with [her] heart', at which point she can understand Smith. The movie carefully avoids having other Native Americans and Englishmen talk to each other -- only Smith and Pocahontas are shown communicating.

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** Strangely done in ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''. For almost the entire movie both the Algonquians and the Brits speak English. However, when John meets the [[CharacterTitle title character]], she speaks Algonquin - -- until the magic tree tells her to 'listen "listen with [her] heart', heart", at which point she can understand Smith. The movie carefully avoids having other Native Americans and Englishmen talk to each other -- only Smith and Pocahontas are shown communicating.



* In the ''[[Franchise/DisneyFairies TinkerBell]]'' films, Tink speaks English as do all fairies, a stark contrast to the jingling bell sounds made by the mute Tink in the Disney ''Disney/PeterPan'' movies. You can imagine how [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks that went over]]. However, when Tink leaves Pixie Hollow and meets a human, when she tries to communicate, we find that the human hears only jingling when she talks. This makes all fairy dialogue that we can understand TranslationConvention - they do talk, but humans just can't understand.

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* In the ''[[Franchise/DisneyFairies TinkerBell]]'' films, Tink speaks English as do all fairies, a stark contrast to the jingling bell sounds made by the mute Tink in the Disney ''Disney/PeterPan'' movies. You can imagine how [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks that went over]]. However, when Tink leaves Pixie Hollow and meets a human, when she tries to communicate, we find that the human hears only jingling when she talks. This makes all fairy dialogue that we can understand TranslationConvention - -- they do talk, but humans just can't understand.



** Compare and contrast that one particular preface at the start of each of his ''Literature/MissionEarth'' series of books is signed as being written by a machine translator (not ''technically'' a TranslatorMicrobes system) created solely to be responsible for giving us the English version of the text. The MT openly wonders (largely safe from comprehension by the alien race allegedly responsible for publishing the book in the first place) why and how he is making such a translation, given that the very next Preface written prior to that book's main text (and thus also being translated by the MT for our benefit) is an official statement that the story within is ''entirely'' fictional and that the planet Earth (and thus the English language itself) does not actually exist. This bothers the MT, for rather obvious existensial reasons.

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** * Compare and contrast that one particular preface at the start of each of his ''Literature/MissionEarth'' series of books is signed as being written by a machine translator (not ''technically'' a TranslatorMicrobes system) created solely to be responsible for giving us the English version of the text. The MT openly wonders (largely safe from comprehension by the alien race allegedly responsible for publishing the book in the first place) why and how he is making such a translation, given that the very next Preface written prior to that book's main text (and thus also being translated by the MT for our benefit) is an official statement that the story within is ''entirely'' fictional and that the planet Earth (and thus the English language itself) does not actually exist. This bothers the MT, for rather obvious existensial reasons.



* Played with in DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire. All of the names of the characters and institutions in the story are translated into their Germanic/English equivalents. Unlike most examples of this trope, this is actually done to deliberately mislead the audience, as the reader would instantly recognize the characters and institutions if they went untranslated (or in some cases, if they were translated less directly).

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* Played with in DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire.''Literature/DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire''. All of the names of the characters and institutions in the story are translated into their Germanic/English equivalents. Unlike most examples of this trope, this is actually done to deliberately mislead the audience, as the reader would instantly recognize the characters and institutions if they went untranslated (or in some cases, if they were translated less directly).



* Also often seen in the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise. In one notable ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' episode, Quark, Rom and Nog find themselves in a 20th century American military facility. Whenever a scene is shown from the humans' perspective, the humans speak English and the three Ferengi are incomprehensible. When the scene switches to the Ferengi's perspective, they speak English and the humans are incomprehensible, even though the humans can be assumed to speaking English "in reality". Chalked up to UniversalTranslator damage. Ferengi speak is heard in the Ferengi language created for the show (or something that ''sounds'' like a well-thought-out language - contrast ''Series/StargateSG1'', where "kree" is half the Goa'uld vocabulary. However, it's doubtful that the producers went as far as they did with the Klingon language since we only get to hear Ferengi spoken twice ever[[note]]The other time is Enterprise's "Acquisition."[[/note]].) while the English is still English, but heavily garbled.

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* Also often seen in the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise. In one notable ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' episode, Quark, Rom and Nog find themselves in a 20th century American military facility. Whenever a scene is shown from the humans' perspective, the humans speak English and the three Ferengi are incomprehensible. When the scene switches to the Ferengi's perspective, they speak English and the humans are incomprehensible, even though the humans can be assumed to speaking English "in reality". Chalked up to UniversalTranslator damage. Ferengi speak is heard in the Ferengi language created for the show (or something that ''sounds'' like a well-thought-out language - -- contrast ''Series/StargateSG1'', where "kree" is half the Goa'uld vocabulary. However, it's doubtful that the producers went as far as they did with the Klingon language since we only get to hear Ferengi spoken twice ever[[note]]The other time is Enterprise's "Acquisition."[[/note]].) while the English is still English, but heavily garbled.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'': In the "Summit"/"Last Stand" two-parter, the seven remaining System Lords meet to decide the fate of the beleaguered Goa'uld Empire [[spoiler:and whether to allow Anubis to rejoin their ranks]], and the viewers hear them speaking English. However, Daniel Jackson was inserted into the meeting by the Tok'ra, and early in "Summit" Jacob Carter said that the person to be inserted had to speak fluent Goa'uld (which Daniel does). The implication is that there's a translation convention in effect for the duration of the meeting, and possibly other instances where [[AliensSpeakingEnglish the Goa'uld speak English to each other and their troops]].

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* ''Series/StargateSG1'': ''Series/StargateSG1'':
**
In the "Summit"/"Last Stand" two-parter, the seven remaining System Lords meet to decide the fate of the beleaguered Goa'uld Empire [[spoiler:and whether to allow Anubis to rejoin their ranks]], and the viewers hear them speaking English. However, Daniel Jackson was inserted into the meeting by the Tok'ra, and early in "Summit" Jacob Carter said that the person to be inserted had has to speak fluent Goa'uld (which Daniel does). The implication is that there's a translation convention in effect for the duration of the meeting, and possibly other instances where [[AliensSpeakingEnglish the Goa'uld speak English to each other and their troops]].



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' renders "The Common Tongue" as English; all other languages are consistently represented by {{Con Lang}}s.
** In Mereen, we see the words "Kill the masters" written on the walls when Dany encourages the slaves to rise up and overthrow them. After Dany declares herself queen of the city, we see "Mhysa (Dany) is a master" written in response. Since most of the city does not speak the Common Tongue, this trope is probably at play here.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' renders "The Common Tongue" as English; all other languages are consistently represented by {{Con Lang}}s.
**
Lang}}s. In Mereen, we see the words "Kill the masters" written on the walls when Dany encourages the slaves to rise up and overthrow them. After Dany declares herself queen of the city, we see "Mhysa (Dany) is a master" written in response. Since most of the city does not speak the Common Tongue, this trope is probably at play here.



* ''Series/{{Sense 8}}'':

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* ''Series/{{Sense 8}}'':''Series/Sense8'':






* The background information for ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' indicates that humanity has moved on to speak "Gothic", but all records and dialogues are rendered in English. While the alien races also have their own languages, the Translation usually does not kick in and second-hand interpretation needs to come in. In some of the spinoff media though, like the ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar'' series, the Convention is in full force regardless of what race the player uses (Eldar get VoiceOfTheLegion, Tau get a stilted Japanese accent, and Orks get a heavy cockney brouge). Then there's "High Gothic", which is rendered as Latin with occasional bits of other languages, usually German, thrown in.

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* The background information for ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' indicates that humanity has moved on to speak "Gothic", but all records and dialogues are rendered in English. While the alien races also have their own languages, the Translation usually does not kick in and second-hand interpretation needs to come in. In some of the spinoff media though, like the ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar'' series, the Convention is in full force regardless of what race the player uses (Eldar get VoiceOfTheLegion, Tau get a stilted Japanese accent, and Orks get a heavy cockney brouge). Then there's "High Gothic", which is rendered as Latin with occasional bits of other languages, usually German, thrown in.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TranslationConvention