History Main / TonkaTough

9th Feb '17 4:04:29 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The products from Creator/WilliamsElectronics are not as tough as most (or) any of the other objects on this list, but they were able to create the illusion of such: Williams had a patent (and, unlike most of their other ones, they still own it) in which if a mechanical part broke down, other mechanical parts' duties are redistributed such that it would appear the machine was still working fine. This was particularly handy with their {{pinball}} machines: Parts break down frequently, and Williams got an edge over its competitors due to this principle's sheer lastability, allowing operators to continue to make money for years, even decades, after their machines had come out. This trait would come back to [[GoneHorriblyRight bite them hard]]: By TheNineties, there were so many still-working Williams pinball machines in existence that Williams had trouble selling to operators, as most were already satisfied with what they had. The model simply could not function under the shrinking arcade presence in the west either, and Williams had to leave the market in 1999. Williams's substitution system is still in use in their gambling machines, however--learning their lesson with pinball, Williams instead rents out its slot machines and video poker machines so they could continue to make money for as long as the machines remained in working condition.

to:

* The products from Creator/WilliamsElectronics are not as tough as most (or) any of the other objects on this list, but they were able to create the illusion of such: Williams had a patent (and, unlike most of their other ones, they still own it) in which if a mechanical part broke down, other mechanical parts' duties are redistributed such that it would appear the machine was still working fine. This was particularly handy with their {{pinball}} machines: Parts break down frequently, and Williams got an edge over its competitors due to this principle's sheer lastability, allowing operators to continue to make money for years, even decades, after their machines had come out.out, with little to no maintenance. This trait would come back to [[GoneHorriblyRight bite them hard]]: By TheNineties, there were so many still-working Williams pinball machines in existence that Williams had trouble selling to operators, as most were already satisfied with what they had. The model simply could not function under the shrinking arcade presence in the west either, and Williams had to leave the market in 1999. Williams's substitution system is still in use in their gambling machines, however--learning their lesson with pinball, Williams instead rents out its slot machines and video poker machines so they could continue to make money for as long as the machines remained in working condition.
9th Feb '17 4:01:43 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The products from Creator/WilliamsElectronics are not as tough as most (or) any of the other objects on this list, but they were able to create the illusion of such: Williams had a patent (and, unlike most of their other ones, they still own it) in which if a mechanical part broke down, other mechanical parts' duties are redistributed such that it would appear the machine was still working fine. This was particularly handy with their {{pinball}} machines: Parts break down frequently, and Williams got an edge over its competitors due to this principle's sheer lastability, allowing operators to continue to make money for years, even decades, after their machines had come out. This trait would come back to [[GoneHorriblyRight bite them hard]]: By TheNineties, there were so many still-working Williams pinball machines in existence that Williams had trouble selling to operators, as most were already satisfied with what they had. The model simply could not function under the shrinking arcade presence in the west either, and Williams had to leave the market in 1999. Williams's substitution system is still in use in their gambling machines, however--learning their lesson with pinball, Williams instead rents out its slot machines and video poker machines so they could continue to make money for as long as the machines remained in working condition.
28th Jan '17 4:06:08 AM 4444jdm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** And, it has been tested that a Nintendo3DS can survive, with no damage, being kept in the left jacket pocket of the coat of a driver, that hits a stationary vehicle at 35 miles per hour. However, the PSP can as well.

to:

*** And, it has been tested that a Nintendo3DS can survive, with no damage, being kept in the left jacket pocket of the coat of a driver, that hits a stationary vehicle at 35 miles per hour. However, the PSP PlayStationPortable can as well.



** The WiiU.

to:

** The WiiU.WiiU, despite a commercial failure, is also Tonka Tough as well.
24th Jan '17 10:30:15 AM Nohbody
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Takatoku VF-1. [[SuperpowerfulGenetics By extension]], all later VF-1 toys based on the same mold qualify: Matsuhiro VF-1J, Bandai's 1980s VF-1's, Bandai's early 2000nds VF-1 reissues, Bandai's late 2000nds VF-1 reissues and [[TransformersGenerationOne Jetfire]].

to:

* The Takatoku VF-1. [[SuperpowerfulGenetics By extension]], all later VF-1 toys based on the same mold qualify: Matsuhiro VF-1J, Bandai's 1980s VF-1's, Bandai's early 2000nds VF-1 reissues, Bandai's late 2000nds VF-1 reissues and [[TransformersGenerationOne [[Franchise/TransformersGenerationOne Jetfire]].



* Quite a few ''{{Transformers}}'' toys are well known for the fact that they simply refuse to be destroyed, including quite a few of the 1987-1988 toy releases, which started using tougher, thicker plastic than many of the Diaclone-based toys, and several of the ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' era toys, where the use of ball and socket joints as well as thick hinges meant that they could survive much tougher play. The main issue for those particular toys tends to be losing small, independent parts rather than damage or destruction of the toy. Other toys, however, are known to break at the drop of a hat, including many of the 1984-release toys and anything that suffers from [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Gold_Plastic_Syndrome Gold Plastic Syndrome.]]

to:

* Quite a few ''{{Transformers}}'' ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' toys are well known for the fact that they simply refuse to be destroyed, including quite a few of the 1987-1988 toy releases, which started using tougher, thicker plastic than many of the Diaclone-based toys, and several of the ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' era toys, where the use of ball and socket joints as well as thick hinges meant that they could survive much tougher play. The main issue for those particular toys tends to be losing small, independent parts rather than damage or destruction of the toy. Other toys, however, are known to break at the drop of a hat, including many of the 1984-release toys and anything that suffers from [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Gold_Plastic_Syndrome Gold Plastic Syndrome.]]
15th Jan '17 6:13:35 PM Jake
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Volvo enjoys a similar reputation, particularly their iconic [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_200_Series 200 Series.]]
15th Jan '17 2:41:48 PM TheCuza
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** WebVideo/FPSRussia has a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ENZioGLjMI Glock torture test video]] which starts out with the gun frozen in a block of ice, which he gets out by shooting it with another pistol. Then he tries to get all the ice out of the inside by hammering nails into wood with it, shooting it some more, and putting it in a wood stove for several minutes. The Glock was still fine, if a bit stiff. The only thing it didn't survive was having a pound of explosives detonated underneath it. Even then, there were only a couple of parts that were unusable.
30th Oct '16 5:08:00 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This isn't entirely true, especially regarding ''Toys/{{BIONICLE}}[=/=]HeroFactory'' socket joints, infamous for shattering with very little effort (especially when lime-coloured).

to:

** This isn't entirely true, especially regarding ''Toys/{{BIONICLE}}[=/=]HeroFactory'' ''Toys/{{BIONICLE}}[=/=]Toys/HeroFactory'' socket joints, infamous for shattering with very little effort (especially when lime-coloured).
30th Oct '16 12:57:39 AM Sandman87
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The cases of NeXT_computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPU heat sinks, and they were darned difficult to damage so long as they weren't set on fire.

to:

* The cases of NeXT_computers [=NeXT=] computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPU heat sinks, and they were darned difficult to damage so long as they weren't set on fire.
30th Oct '16 12:25:05 AM Sandman87
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The cases of NeXT computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPU heat sinks, and they were darned difficult to damage so long as they weren't set on fire.

to:

* The cases of NeXT computers NeXT_computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPU heat sinks, and they were darned difficult to damage so long as they weren't set on fire.
29th Oct '16 11:55:47 PM Sandman87
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The cases of NeXT computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPUs' heat sinks, and were darned difficult to damage as long as they weren't set on fire.

to:

* The cases of NeXT computers were massive hunks of die-cast magnesium that also doubled as the CPUs' CPU heat sinks, and they were darned difficult to damage as so long as they weren't set on fire.
This list shows the last 10 events of 248. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TonkaTough