History Main / ThinkInText

17th Aug '16 5:06:21 AM Euodiachloris
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So, if a writer wants to avoid the italic, he can play other games with the text[[note]]He can hit on something no easier to read than the italic option, though.[[/note]]. These may include: RainbowSpeak, fading the text slightly, changing the font size or using a different font entirely. This is always limited by the print options in a given medium, of course. Comics and manga love these options, for some reason.

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So, if a any writer wants to avoid the italic, he they can play other games with the text[[note]]He text[[note]]They can hit on something no easier to read than the italic option, though.however.[[/note]]. These may include: RainbowSpeak, fading the text slightly, changing the font size or using a different font entirely. This is always limited by the print options in a given medium, of course. Comics and manga love these options, for some reason.



Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second-most popular method. This--on the surface--often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]

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Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second-most popular method. This--on This --on the surface--often surface-- often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually actually, mostly is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]



Another common tactic is this: if a work usually uses "double-quotes," the author then switches 'to single' in thought-dialogue. Or vice versa. If the author wants to sneak telepathy on you for a [[FridgeBrilliance fridge moment]], this might well be what they're using to do it. Because of this handy low-impact nature, though, it can be very easily missed as a cue by speed readers.

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Another common tactic is this: if a work usually uses "double-quotes," "double-quotes" for standard dialogue, the author might then switches 'to single' in thought-dialogue. Or Or, vice versa. If the author wants to sneak telepathy on you for a [[FridgeBrilliance fridge moment]], this might well be what they're using to do it. Because of this handy handy, but low-impact nature, though, it can be very ''very'' easily missed as a cue by speed readers.



Mixing both italics and non-standard punctuation very definitely happens. As long as the author is consistent in where and when he uses what, it's hardly a problem. It's all a matter of style, taste and the subtext.

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Mixing both italics and non-standard punctuation very definitely happens. As long as the author is consistent in where and when he uses they use what, it's hardly a problem. It's all a matter of style, taste and the subtext.



Occasionally, some form of pop-up, [[AltText hover text]], widget or link is thrown in as an extra to the "normal" sentence, showing a character's true inner thoughts on a subject. Something no other medium can do.

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Occasionally, some form of pop-up, [[AltText hover text]], widget or link is thrown in as an extra to the "normal" sentence, showing a character's true inner thoughts on a subject. Something no other medium can do. FootnoteFever truely shines in hypertext[[note]]You might have spotted that...[[/note]].



This trope is closed to examples, but open to discussion when you find a distinctive method that merits inclusion. Should you feel a work needs mention of Think in Text's use, please use that work's page of tropes instead.

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This trope is closed to examples, examples for the simple reason that organising them all into overlapping sets would be highly problematic, but the page is open to discussion when you find a distinctive method that merits inclusion. Should you feel a work needs a special mention of Think in Text's use, please use that work's page of tropes instead.
3rd Mar '16 8:23:11 AM HeraldAlberich
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A common problem faced by many writers is how to convey thought or telepathic "speech" in text. After all, the written word doesn't lend itself to all those convenient editing tricks used in voice-overs for film, music or radio. Yes, that famous [[RadioVoice slightly hollow sound]] is the one we're thinking of, here.

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A common problem faced by many writers is how to convey thought or telepathic {{telepath|y}}ic "speech" in text. After all, the written word doesn't lend itself to all those convenient editing tricks used in voice-overs for film, music or radio. Yes, that famous [[RadioVoice slightly hollow sound]] is the one we're thinking of, here.
22nd Jan '15 4:07:01 PM jcsalomon
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ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.[[note]]Sadly, these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert them here. For this example, say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot.]][[/note]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.

to:

ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.letter, something like ⚞this⚟.[[note]]Sadly, although these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert the fonts on your computer probably don't show them here.well. For this example, say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot.]][[/note]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.
10th Sep '14 1:04:38 PM Pastykake
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But, as in all things, just using a single method is not to everybody's taste. Some like to hold the quotation marks and just go with the italics. Others mix and match what they use, when, depending whether a character is just thinking, inner monologuing or actively broadcasting telegraphically. Done well, this can really work and blends into the background.

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But, as in all things, just using a single method is not to everybody's taste. Some like to hold the quotation marks and just go with the italics. Others mix and match what they use, when, depending whether a character is just thinking, inner monologuing or actively broadcasting telegraphically.telepathically. Done well, this can really work and blends into the background.



However, this very look makes them difficult to read, sometimes, though. This is the main reason why comics and manga try to avoid this if it is at all possible and usually play with their bubbles instead. See BoldInflation, SpeechBubble, ThoughtBubble and ThoughtCaption for related tropes.

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However, this very look makes them difficult to read, sometimes, though. sometimes. This is the main reason why comics and manga try to avoid this if it is at all possible and usually play with their bubbles instead. See BoldInflation, SpeechBubble, ThoughtBubble and ThoughtCaption for related tropes.



'''Bold occasionally happens, but it's incredibly rare.''' As are the practically endangered [[AC:Small Caps]] and underline. [[BuffySpeak Clunky-shouty]]. Italics[[note]]And practically anything else, probably.[[/note]] just look more "thinky" than they do.

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'''Bold occasionally happens, but it's incredibly rare.''' As are the practically endangered [[AC:Small Caps]] and underline. [[BuffySpeak Clunky-shouty]]. Italics[[note]]And Italics[[note]]and practically anything else, probably.[[/note]] probably,[[/note]] just look more "thinky" than they do.



Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second most popular method. This--on the surface--often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]

to:

Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second most second-most popular method. This--on the surface--often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]



Another common tactic is this: if a work usually uses "double-quotes", the author then switches 'to single' in thought-dialogue. Or vice versa. If the author wants to sneak telepathy on you for a [[FridgeBrilliance fridge moment]], this might well be what they're using to do it. Because of this handy low-impact nature, though, it can be very easily missed as a cue by speed readers.

> Other ways can have have more oomph.\\

to:

Another common tactic is this: if a work usually uses "double-quotes", "double-quotes," the author then switches 'to single' in thought-dialogue. Or vice versa. If the author wants to sneak telepathy on you for a [[FridgeBrilliance fridge moment]], this might well be what they're using to do it. Because of this handy low-impact nature, though, it can be very easily missed as a cue by speed readers.

> Other ways can have have more oomph.\\



Some people like to use exaggerated indentation, non-standard paragraph spacing, sub-sectional divides, innovative tabbing and word-spacing, or quote-like block-text[[note]]And, never forget the thoughtfully provided FootnoteFever.[[/note]]. Colouring or greying the background is optional, as is framing, as well. Bullets? Have been spotted, but they're not that common at all.

You have to admit, however space-hungry these may be, they certainly mirror how thoughts aren't exactly pinned to the ground. These can give a distinctive look that can actually reach artwork levels at times, but which mostly hints at inserts from articles or another medium. However, if slightly overblown, these can become very difficult to read. Particularly when colouring the background. It all depends on the author.

to:

Some people like to use exaggerated indentation, non-standard paragraph spacing, sub-sectional divides, innovative tabbing and word-spacing, or quote-like block-text[[note]]And, never forget the thoughtfully provided FootnoteFever.[[/note]]. Colouring or greying the background as well is optional, as is framing, as well.framing. Bullets? Have been spotted, but they're not that common at all.

You have to admit, however space-hungry these may be, they certainly mirror how thoughts aren't exactly pinned to the ground. These can give a distinctive look that can actually reach artwork levels at times, but which mostly hints at inserts from articles or another medium. However, if slightly overblown, these can become very difficult to read. Particularly read, particularly when colouring the background. It all depends on the author.



This trope is closed to examples, but open to discussion when you find a distinctive method that merits inclusion. Should you feel a work needs mention of Think in Text's use, please use that work's page of tropes, instead.

to:

This trope is closed to examples, but open to discussion when you find a distinctive method that merits inclusion. Should you feel a work needs mention of Think in Text's use, please use that work's page of tropes, tropes instead.
3rd Sep '13 1:32:16 PM Korodzik
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So predominant is the italic option, it's become a convention! Listing all the examples of works that use standard dialogue, ''but, in italics'', would take forever. [[ShmuckBait So please, don't start even thinking about it.]][[hottip:*:Betcha you did--and you've come up with three already, with more on the way, right?]]

to:

So predominant is the italic option, it's become a convention! Listing all the examples of works that use standard dialogue, ''but, in italics'', would take forever. [[ShmuckBait So please, don't start even thinking about it.]][[hottip:*:Betcha ]][[note]]Betcha you did--and you've come up with three already, with more on the way, right?]]
right?[[/note]]



So, if a writer wants to avoid the italic, he can play other games with the text[[hottip:*:He can hit on something no easier to read than the italic option, though.]]. These may include: RainbowSpeak, fading the text slightly, changing the font size or using a different font entirely. This is always limited by the print options in a given medium, of course. Comics and manga love these options, for some reason.

'''Bold occasionally happens, but it's incredibly rare.''' As are the practically endangered [[AC:Small Caps]] and underline. [[BuffySpeak Clunky-shouty]]. Italics[[hottip:*:And practically anything else, probably.]] just look more "thinky" than they do.

to:

So, if a writer wants to avoid the italic, he can play other games with the text[[hottip:*:He text[[note]]He can hit on something no easier to read than the italic option, though.]].[[/note]]. These may include: RainbowSpeak, fading the text slightly, changing the font size or using a different font entirely. This is always limited by the print options in a given medium, of course. Comics and manga love these options, for some reason.

'''Bold occasionally happens, but it's incredibly rare.''' As are the practically endangered [[AC:Small Caps]] and underline. [[BuffySpeak Clunky-shouty]]. Italics[[hottip:*:And Italics[[note]]And practically anything else, probably.]] [[/note]] just look more "thinky" than they do.



ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.[[hottip:*:Sadly, these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert them here. For this example, say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot.]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.

to:

ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.[[hottip:*:Sadly, [[note]]Sadly, these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert them here. For this example, say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot.]] ]][[/note]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.



Some people like to use exaggerated indentation, non-standard paragraph spacing, sub-sectional divides, innovative tabbing and word-spacing, or quote-like block-text[[hottip:*: And, never forget the thoughtfully provided FootnoteFever.]]. Colouring or greying the background is optional, as is framing, as well. Bullets? Have been spotted, but they're not that common at all.

to:

Some people like to use exaggerated indentation, non-standard paragraph spacing, sub-sectional divides, innovative tabbing and word-spacing, or quote-like block-text[[hottip:*: And, block-text[[note]]And, never forget the thoughtfully provided FootnoteFever.]].[[/note]]. Colouring or greying the background is optional, as is framing, as well. Bullets? Have been spotted, but they're not that common at all.
12th May '13 12:21:33 AM Korodzik
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Several ways to use the textual paint palette have had to evolve for the thunken word. And, here they are.

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Several ways to use the textual paint palette have had to evolve for the thunken word. And, here they are. (Obviously, these refer mostly to texts written in the English language; other languages might have their own rules or standard ways to format thoughts.)
6th Jun '12 1:13:03 PM Euodiachloris
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Several ways to use the fourth wall paint palette have had to evolve for the thunken word. And, here they are.

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Several ways to use the fourth wall textual paint palette have had to evolve for the thunken word. And, here they are.
6th Jun '12 1:09:52 PM Euodiachloris
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Italics lend themselves to Think in Text because, well, ''just look at them''. Not so substantial-looking as normal type, are they? Also, their go-faster, slanty-look just lends itself to thoughts.

to:

Italics lend themselves to Think in Text because, well, ''just look at them''. Not so as substantial-looking as normal type, are they? Also, their go-faster, slanty-look just lends itself to thoughts.



ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.[[hottip:*:Sadly, these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert them here. Say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot]] for showing you, instead.]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.

to:

ComicBooks have their own little quirk when it comes to punctuation: the breath mark (note, not the same as similar-named creations in musical notation or the various diacritical marks used in Ancient Greek Poetry as hints). This breath mark is a triple-lined bit of punctuation, rather than some take on a comma, apostrophe or letter.[[hottip:*:Sadly, these're not included in the Unicode fontset, or we'd insert them here. Say For this example, say thank you to [[http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml Blambot]] for showing you, instead.Blambot.]] More commonly used for sighs, coughs and whispers, breath marks can and do lend themselves to the occasional thought, whatever balloon they find themselves in.
29th May '12 7:29:08 AM SingingRain
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Think in Text is, therefore, a distinctive subtrope of PaintingTheFourthWall and sister trope of TranslationConvention mixed with UnconventionalFormatting. It's very closely related to InnerMonologue in some way, as well, especially when its tricks have been used there.

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Think in Text is, therefore, a distinctive subtrope of PaintingTheFourthWall PaintingTheMedium and sister trope of TranslationConvention mixed with UnconventionalFormatting. It's very closely related to InnerMonologue in some way, as well, especially when its tricks have been used there.
9th Mar '12 12:57:05 PM Euodiachloris
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Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second most popular method. This==on the surface--often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]

to:

Say hello to non-standard punctuation as the second most popular method. This==on This--on the surface--often looks like a case of WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma. Um... Well... Err... To be truthful... [[NecessaryWeasel It actually is]]. [[TropesAreTools But, it's all in a good cause!]] [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Honest!]]
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