History Main / TheyDontMakeThemLikeTheyUsedTo

8th Aug '16 5:02:37 PM Morgenthaler
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* Synthesizers, out of all things. In the early to mid-[[TheNineties 90s]], while the leading Japanese manufacturers in particular tried all they could to snag market shares from each other with more and more advanced romplers, the synth nerds lusted for the classic analog machines, the last ones of which had just been discontinued a couple of years ago. They didn't care how much more faithfully modern romplers could reproduce acoustic sounds, or how big the patch memory was. In fact, they could go with no patch memory at all as long as they could get the warm and fat sound, the flexibility in sound design and [[BillionsOfButtons Billions of Knobs]] for tweaking the sound in real time�instead walking through menus and programming, say, the filter cutoff frequency, they wanted a dedicated cutoff knob. The small Swedish company Clavia was the first to react: The Nord Lead combined the sound and the tweakability of an analog synth with the stability of a digital synth and the reliability of a new synth (as opposed to a used second-hand machine in need of spare parts that aren't even made anymore).

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* Synthesizers, out of all things. In the early to mid-[[TheNineties 90s]], while the leading Japanese manufacturers in particular tried all they could to snag market shares from each other with more and more advanced romplers, the synth nerds lusted for the classic analog machines, the last ones of which had just been discontinued a couple of years ago. They didn't care how much more faithfully modern romplers could reproduce acoustic sounds, or how big the patch memory was. In fact, they could go with no patch memory at all as long as they could get the warm and fat sound, the flexibility in sound design and [[BillionsOfButtons Billions of Knobs]] for tweaking the sound in real time�instead time--instead walking through menus and programming, say, the filter cutoff frequency, they wanted a dedicated cutoff knob. The small Swedish company Clavia was the first to react: The Nord Lead combined the sound and the tweakability of an analog synth with the stability of a digital synth and the reliability of a new synth (as opposed to a used second-hand machine in need of spare parts that aren't even made anymore).
8th Aug '16 5:02:10 PM Morgenthaler
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* In the climax of the 1989 ''Film/{{Batman}}'' film, the hero clings to an unstable cathedral ledge, while Joker stomps out the bricks around him yelling "They don't make them like they used to, eh, Batsy?!"

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* In the climax of the 1989 ''Film/{{Batman}}'' film, the hero clings to an unstable cathedral ledge, while Joker stomps out the bricks around him yelling "They don't make them like they used to, eh, Batsy?!" Batsy?!"



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* Synthesizers, out of all things. In the early to mid-[[TheNineties 90s]], while the leading Japanese manufacturers in particular tried all they could to snag market shares from each other with more and more advanced romplers, the synth nerds lusted for the classic analog machines, the last ones of which had just been discontinued a couple of years ago. They didn't care how much more faithfully modern romplers could reproduce acoustic sounds, or how big the patch memory was. In fact, they could go with no patch memory at all as long as they could get the warm and fat sound, the flexibility in sound design and [[BillionsOfButtons Billions of Knobs]] for tweaking the sound in real time—instead walking through menus and programming, say, the filter cutoff frequency, they wanted a dedicated cutoff knob. The small Swedish company Clavia was the first to react: The Nord Lead combined the sound and the tweakability of an analog synth with the stability of a digital synth and the reliability of a new synth (as opposed to a used second-hand machine in need of spare parts that aren't even made anymore).

to:

* Synthesizers, out of all things. In the early to mid-[[TheNineties 90s]], while the leading Japanese manufacturers in particular tried all they could to snag market shares from each other with more and more advanced romplers, the synth nerds lusted for the classic analog machines, the last ones of which had just been discontinued a couple of years ago. They didn't care how much more faithfully modern romplers could reproduce acoustic sounds, or how big the patch memory was. In fact, they could go with no patch memory at all as long as they could get the warm and fat sound, the flexibility in sound design and [[BillionsOfButtons Billions of Knobs]] for tweaking the sound in real time—instead time�instead walking through menus and programming, say, the filter cutoff frequency, they wanted a dedicated cutoff knob. The small Swedish company Clavia was the first to react: The Nord Lead combined the sound and the tweakability of an analog synth with the stability of a digital synth and the reliability of a new synth (as opposed to a used second-hand machine in need of spare parts that aren't even made anymore).
16th Jul '16 7:03:20 PM SSJMagus
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* Ford's Panther Platform (Crown Victoria, Mercury Grand Marquis, Lincoln Town Car) was a major beneficiary of this sort of thinking, to the point that some police departments stocked up on Crown Vics when it was finally discontinued at the end of 2011. The basic design dates back to 1979, and the perimeter-frame, RWD V8 design wasn't much beyond the state of the art of the 1950s. They are, indeed, extremely durable cars, but also handle poorly and are rather cramped for something the size of a limo. Interestingly, the similarly-antiquated GM competitor, the Chevrolet Caprice, was discontinued in 1996 but is widely considered by police and taxi drivers to be the superior car. Indeed, they don't make them like they used to.

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* Ford's Panther Platform (Crown Victoria, Mercury Grand Marquis, Lincoln Town Car) was a major beneficiary of this sort of thinking, to the point that some police departments stocked up on Crown Vics when it was finally discontinued at the end of 2011. The basic design dates back to 1979, and the perimeter-frame, RWD V8 design wasn't much beyond the state of the art of the 1950s. They are, indeed, extremely durable cars, cars (and, equally important to police who sometimes have to subject their cars to such things as ramming maneuvers, relatively easy to repair after taking damage), but also handle poorly and are rather cramped for something the size of a limo. Interestingly, the similarly-antiquated GM competitor, the Chevrolet Caprice, was discontinued in 1996 but is widely considered by police and taxi drivers to be the superior car. Indeed, they don't make them like they used to.
29th Jun '16 9:12:06 PM FordPrefect
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* On ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle'''s "Fractured Fairy Tales" the Prince attempts to enter the castle of Sleeping Beauty, breaking his sword on the overgrowth surrounding it and lamenting "They don't make them like they used to." After easily getting through with the help of a lawn-mowner, he adds triumphantly, "They make ''these'' like they used to."

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* On ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle'''s "Fractured Fairy Tales" the Prince attempts to enter the castle of Sleeping Beauty, breaking his sword on the overgrowth surrounding it and lamenting "They don't make them like they used to." After easily getting through with the help of a lawn-mowner, lawn-mower, he adds triumphantly, "They make ''these'' like they used to."



* Interestingly used in the current home console generation. They actually don't make [=PS3s=] like they used to - the older models with the Emotion Engine reverse-compatability went out of production in favor of newer and cheaper models, in order for Sony to close the price-gap with Microsoft. Meanwhile, the Xbox 360 reverses this - due to a number of very loud issues with the early batches of [=X360's=], Microsoft has been forced to shape up and improve the quality, making the newest versions much less likely to burn out than the old ones.

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* Interestingly used in the current home console generation. They actually don't make [=PS3s=] like they used to - the older models with the Emotion Engine reverse-compatability reverse-compatibility went out of production in favor of newer and cheaper models, in order for Sony to close the price-gap with Microsoft. Meanwhile, the Xbox 360 reverses this - due to a number of very loud issues with the early batches of [=X360's=], Microsoft has been forced to shape up and improve the quality, making the newest versions much less likely to burn out than the old ones.



** Note that it is thoroughly justified in the case of Keyboard, the old popular keyboard that was made with springs and individual switches for each key; they were heavy, durable as hell and are literally solid enough to bash over someone's head while remaining functional afterwards. Not surprisingly, these keyboards can survive an ''immense'' amount of abuse and can last decades of typing by the most prolific typist without losing effectiveness. Fast forward to modern day however, where keyboards are made of the much cheaper but unfortunately much more fragile membrane, which can fall apart or lose tactile feedback in less than a year of heavy use. Ironically, there's a very strong trend to return to these old type mechanical keyboards (though not the spring types) in the gaming community, taking advantage of their inherent durability to endure the massive abuse. Several manufacturers that cater to gamers have produced their own modern take on mechanical keyboards for the sake of feedback and rapid key presses. This can be a double-edged sword, as keyboards in this style can suffer in ergonomics and potentially raise stress on the hands.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury]]

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** Note that it is thoroughly justified in the case of the Model M Keyboard, the old popular keyboard that was made with springs and individual switches for each key; they were heavy, durable as hell and are literally solid enough to bash over someone's head while remaining functional afterwards. Not surprisingly, these keyboards can survive an ''immense'' amount of abuse and can last decades of typing by the most prolific typist without losing effectiveness. Fast forward to modern day however, where keyboards are made of the much cheaper but unfortunately much more fragile full-travel membrane, which can fall apart or lose tactile feedback in less than a year of heavy use. Ironically, there's a very strong trend to return to these old type mechanical keyboards (though not the spring types) in the gaming community, taking advantage of their inherent durability to endure the massive abuse. Several manufacturers that cater to gamers have produced their own modern take on mechanical keyboards for the sake of feedback and rapid key presses. This can be a double-edged sword, as keyboards in this style can suffer in ergonomics and potentially raise stress on the hands.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury]]org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury raise stress on the hands.]]
29th Jun '16 8:57:22 PM FordPrefect
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Houses are another good example. Sometimes after a major disaster- like a hurricane- all the houses built before a certain date will have survived with minor damage, while newer houses are destroyed. This shows something of a selection bias; the older houses had to survive the previous hurricane, leaving only the most durable to face this one(this applies to cars as well). Due to the evolution of building codes, sometimes the newest houses also survive. In flooding situations, barring ''really'' record-breaking floods a rather similar selection process will take place, though in this case it's more a case of ''where'' the houses are built; the locations least at risk from flooding will be built upon first, with development spreading into more vulnerable areas as the town grows, or, again, the old houses on the floodplain were destroyed in the previous flood.

to:

Houses are another good example. Sometimes after a major disaster- like a hurricane- all the houses built before a certain date will have survived with minor damage, while newer houses are destroyed. This shows something of a selection bias; the older houses had to survive the previous hurricane, leaving only the most durable to face this one(this one (this applies to cars as well). Due to the evolution of building codes, sometimes the newest houses also survive. In flooding situations, barring ''really'' record-breaking floods a rather similar selection process will take place, though in this case it's more a case of ''where'' the houses are built; the locations least at risk from flooding will be built upon first, with development spreading into more vulnerable areas as the town grows, or, again, the old houses on the floodplain were destroyed in the previous flood.
29th Jun '16 8:56:06 PM FordPrefect
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Often older things are over-engineered, which causes them to last longer and endure hard usage. A business that has been producing an item for awhile starts to find ways to either reduce cost, or improve some other important attribute (such as reducing weight), often at the cost of reducing durability for the end user. Once a product has been around long enough multiple businesses compete in a race to the bottom to produce the cheapest product that will hold together until it leaves the shop. This applies to everything from microwaves to things as mundane as shoes. (Shoes made with older technology cost more, but they also tend to last longer).

to:

Often older things are over-engineered, which causes them to last longer and endure hard usage. A business that has been producing an item for awhile starts to find ways to either reduce cost, or improve some other important attribute (such as reducing weight), often at the cost of reducing durability for the end user. Once a product has been around long enough enough, multiple businesses compete in a race to the bottom to produce the cheapest product that will hold together until it leaves long enough to leave the shop. This applies to everything from microwaves to things as mundane as shoes. (Shoes made with older technology cost more, but they also tend to last longer).
21st Jun '16 2:27:56 PM Brick3621
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* In former USSR, there's quite an amount of nostalgia about Soviet industrial goods which were renowned for their ''extreme'' durability and reliability. It wasn't uncommon for an off-the-shelf appliance to stay on duty for ''decades'' and be passed between generations. A large number of them are still in use today, 25 years after TheGreatPoliticalMessUp, and it's not a miracle (though still rare) to see, say, a fridge or a vacuum cleaner that's ''half a century'' old and has retained almost all the original parts. They do require occasional maintenance, yet since they've been built with simplicity and repairability in mind, the repair can be done with common tools and consumables. Spares ''are'' a problem, but custom parts are the minority and typically last the longest, and in the worst case, a broken piece can typically be reinforced with available materials or outright made from them anew without any industrial-grade equipment. The downside is their durability and repairability comes at the cost of performance. In comparison to modern equipment, Soviet goods are bulky, heavy, power-hungry, inefficient, technically obsolete and severely lacking in the aesthetic department (though [[{{Retraux}} this is a matter of taste]]) and ergonomics. These characteristics have given birth to many a joke (e.g.: "American scientists have 10 times as much equipment as ours, but each piece of our equipment is 10 times as much!"). Household appliances typically end up on {{Dacha}}s where everyday efficiency and ergonomics are less of a requirement, and "good" stuff can quickly degrade from adverse conditions or be stolen by winter-time thieves which dachas are largely defenseless against. To summarize, many who had experience with Soviet equipment are nostalgic about it, but few would actually trade a modern piece for one of those.

to:

* In former USSR, there's quite an amount of nostalgia about Soviet industrial goods which were renowned for their ''extreme'' extreme durability and reliability. It wasn't uncommon for an off-the-shelf appliance to stay on duty for ''decades'' and be passed between generations. A large number of them are still in use today, 25 years after TheGreatPoliticalMessUp, and it's not a miracle (though still rare) to see, say, a fridge or a vacuum cleaner that's ''half a century'' old and has retained almost all the original parts. They do require occasional maintenance, yet since they've been built with simplicity and repairability in mind, the repair can be done with common tools and consumables. Spares ''are'' a problem, but custom parts are the minority and typically last the longest, and in the worst case, a broken piece can typically be reinforced with available materials or outright made from them anew without any industrial-grade equipment. The downside is their durability and repairability comes at the cost of performance. In comparison to modern equipment, Soviet goods are bulky, heavy, power-hungry, inefficient, technically obsolete and severely lacking in the aesthetic department (though [[{{Retraux}} this is a matter of taste]]) and ergonomics. These characteristics have given birth to many a joke (e.g.: "American scientists have 10 times as much equipment as ours, but each piece of our equipment is 10 times as much!"). Household appliances typically end up on {{Dacha}}s UsefulNotes/{{dacha}}s where everyday efficiency and ergonomics are less of a requirement, and "good" stuff can quickly degrade from adverse conditions or be stolen by winter-time wintertime thieves which dachas are largely defenseless against. To summarize, many who had experience with Soviet equipment are nostalgic about it, but few would actually trade a modern piece for one of those.



* Band-Aids - Johnson & Johnson used to have an ad campaign about how well they stayed on, even in bathtubs and pools. Today, they fall off if the air is a little humid.

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* Band-Aids - Johnson & Johnson used to have an ad campaign about how well they stayed on, even in bathtubs and pools. Today, they fall off if the air is a little too humid.
19th May '16 8:23:56 PM erforce
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* Played with in ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' when Peter and Ray are discussing the unusual architecture of Dana's building:

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* Played with in ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' when Peter and Ray are discussing the unusual architecture of Dana's building:
30th Apr '16 11:11:24 AM Kalaong
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Houses are another good example. Sometimes after a major disaster- like a hurricane- all the houses built before a certain date will have survived with minor damage, while newer houses are destroyed. This shows something of a selection bias; the older houses had to survive the previous hurricane, leaving only the most durable to face this one. Due to the evolution of building codes, sometimes the newest houses also survive. In flooding situations, barring ''really'' record-breaking floods a rather similar selection process will take place, though in this case it's more a case of ''where'' the houses are built; the locations least at risk from flooding will be built upon first, with development spreading into more vulnerable areas as the town grows, or, again, the old houses on the floodplain were destroyed in the previous flood.

to:

Houses are another good example. Sometimes after a major disaster- like a hurricane- all the houses built before a certain date will have survived with minor damage, while newer houses are destroyed. This shows something of a selection bias; the older houses had to survive the previous hurricane, leaving only the most durable to face this one.one(this applies to cars as well). Due to the evolution of building codes, sometimes the newest houses also survive. In flooding situations, barring ''really'' record-breaking floods a rather similar selection process will take place, though in this case it's more a case of ''where'' the houses are built; the locations least at risk from flooding will be built upon first, with development spreading into more vulnerable areas as the town grows, or, again, the old houses on the floodplain were destroyed in the previous flood.
30th Apr '16 11:09:43 AM Kalaong
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* Creator/StephenColbert, as usual, has [[http://www.thedailyshow.com/video/index.jhtml?videoId=220622&title=Daily/Colbert---Car-Collection a different take]] on it.

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* Creator/StephenColbert, as usual, has [[http://www.thedailyshow.com/video/index.jhtml?videoId=220622&title=Daily/Colbert---Car-Collection cc.com/video-clips/csetwa/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-daily-colbert---car-collection a different take]] on it.
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