History Main / TheSavageIndian

10th Apr '17 6:48:16 PM nombretomado
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* In ''ShamanKing'', in Hao's life 500 years ago, he went so far as to [[ANaziByAnyOtherName destroy cultures]] because they didn't want to join him in his quest to rid the world of {{muggles}}. One of the last survivors of that thinks that Silva and the rest are just like Hao. Which is...really weird in TheNineties.

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* In ''ShamanKing'', ''Manga/ShamanKing'', in Hao's life 500 years ago, he went so far as to [[ANaziByAnyOtherName destroy cultures]] because they didn't want to join him in his quest to rid the world of {{muggles}}. One of the last survivors of that thinks that Silva and the rest are just like Hao. Which is...really weird in TheNineties.
8th Apr '17 6:50:50 PM Fireblood
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* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.
8th Apr '17 6:41:59 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/HellOnWheels'' deconstructs this trope for the most part. The opening episode and series has a whole features numerous instances of native warriors raiding and killing civilians and unarmed men, and most characters in-universe see them as mindless savages, but it is made clear that they are no more villainous nor corrupt than the drunken laborers they have working on the train, that they are trying to defend their land and abide by a moral code that the settlers simply do not relate to.

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* ''Series/HellOnWheels'' deconstructs this trope for the most part. The opening episode and series has as a whole features numerous instances of native warriors raiding and killing civilians and unarmed men, and most characters in-universe see them as mindless savages, but it is made clear that they are no more villainous nor corrupt than the drunken laborers they have working on the train, that they are trying to defend their land and abide by a moral code that the settlers simply do not relate to.



* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings.

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* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings. Whatever the case then, the Yąnomam&ouml now are peaceful, but unfortunately their bad reputation has been used as an excuse to take their land at times.



*** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.

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*** ** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.



* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.

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* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish post-Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.
8th Apr '17 2:11:15 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]].

to:

* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]].
stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.
4th Mar '17 3:22:07 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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May get a touch of praise for [[VillainousVirtues courage, hardiness, or other stern virtues]], but do not rely on it.

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May get a touch of praise for [[VillainousVirtues [[EvilVirtues courage, hardiness, or other stern virtues]], but do not rely on it.
6th Jan '17 3:04:01 PM JesseMB27
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* ''VideoGame/SuperFighter'': The BigBad and FinalBoss Red Man is one of the rare cases of this trope being played straight in a post-1960s work without any hint of irony. Granted, while the game he is featured in is a VideoGame/StreetFighterII [[TheMockbuster knockoff]] developed by the Taiwanese company C&E without any intention of it ever going outside of its home country, but even then its pretty egregious regardless.
5th Jan '17 2:19:49 PM MartineBrooke
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-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions." Which BTW was perfectly true if Politically Incorrect.

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-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions." "
**
Which BTW was perfectly true if Politically Incorrect.
9th Dec '16 8:51:34 PM Fireblood
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* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace accustomed to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed them were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.

to:

* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace accustomed to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed them these were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.
9th Dec '16 3:54:24 AM johnnye
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* In ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues'', Wednesday gleefully depicts Pocahontas and her tribe in this manner when she hijacks the summer camp Thanksgiving play, with a little NobleSavage thrown in. It's at least partially justified as a reaction against the much more offensively patronising, twee, sanitised Manifest Destiny of the original script in which the natives are constantly insulted. Wednesday's version is an {{Exploitation}}-style preemptive-revenge fantasy in which Pocahontas is a JeanneDArchetype reacting to [[DreamingOfThingsToCome visions]] of the BadFuture the pilgrims represent. Whether that entirely serves as an excuse for the ensuing war whoops and scalpings and roasting people on spits...

to:

* In ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues'', Wednesday gleefully depicts Pocahontas and her tribe in this manner when she hijacks the summer camp Thanksgiving play, with a little NobleSavage thrown in. It's at least partially justified as a reaction against the much more offensively patronising, twee, sanitised Manifest Destiny of the original script in which the natives (and the children playing them) are constantly insulted. Wednesday's version is an {{Exploitation}}-style {{Exploitation|Film}}-style preemptive-revenge fantasy in which Pocahontas is a JeanneDArchetype reacting to [[DreamingOfThingsToCome visions]] of the BadFuture the pilgrims represent. Whether that entirely serves as an excuse for the ensuing war whoops and scalpings and roasting people on spits...
9th Dec '16 3:42:12 AM johnnye
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to:

* In ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues'', Wednesday gleefully depicts Pocahontas and her tribe in this manner when she hijacks the summer camp Thanksgiving play, with a little NobleSavage thrown in. It's at least partially justified as a reaction against the much more offensively patronising, twee, sanitised Manifest Destiny of the original script in which the natives are constantly insulted. Wednesday's version is an {{Exploitation}}-style preemptive-revenge fantasy in which Pocahontas is a JeanneDArchetype reacting to [[DreamingOfThingsToCome visions]] of the BadFuture the pilgrims represent. Whether that entirely serves as an excuse for the ensuing war whoops and scalpings and roasting people on spits...



* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace akin to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed them were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.

to:

* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace akin accustomed to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed them were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.



* A non-US example are the cannibal natives in ''Literature/RobinsonCrusoe'', which takes place off the coast of South America. Although often {{Race Lift}}ed in the novel's many adaptations, the cannibals are identified as Carib Indians in the original text. This makes sense, since the Caribs had a notorious (though highly exaggerated) reputation as ferocious man-eating savages for hundreds of years -- in fact, the very ''word'' "cannibal" comes from these guys ([[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking as does the name of the Caribbean Sea]]).
* In ''Literature/TheManitou'' and its sequels, the protaganist is the undead spirit of the most powerful Indian medicine man ever to walk North America, Misquamacus. Misquamacus is an Indian who completely loathes and despises the white man--and for that matter, the black and yellow-skinned immigrants who have displaced the Indians from their heritage. His goal is to physically re-enter the world and to bring about the genocide of all the non-native American races who have supplanted the Indians, and he uses some very savage magics to thwart those who are seeking to prevent his return.

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* A non-US example are the [[CannibalTribe cannibal natives natives]] in ''Literature/RobinsonCrusoe'', which takes place off the coast of South America. Although often {{Race Lift}}ed in the novel's many adaptations, the cannibals are identified as Carib Indians in the original text. This makes sense, since the Caribs had a notorious (though highly exaggerated) reputation as ferocious man-eating savages for hundreds of years -- in fact, the very ''word'' "cannibal" comes from these guys ([[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking as does the name of the Caribbean Sea]]).
* In ''Literature/TheManitou'' and its sequels, the protaganist protagonist is the undead spirit of the most powerful Indian medicine man ever to walk North America, Misquamacus. Misquamacus is an Indian who completely loathes and despises the white man--and for that matter, the black and yellow-skinned immigrants who have displaced the Indians from their heritage. His goal is to physically re-enter the world and to bring about the genocide of all the non-native American races who have supplanted the Indians, and he uses some very savage magics to thwart those who are seeking to prevent his return.



* In ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'' this is played surprisingly straight, due in equal parts to ProtagonistCentredMorality and DeliberateValuesDissonance. As the town is stuck right in the middle of Lakota territory, the Sioux and the local gold miners are in constant low-level conflict, so they're widely viewed by the townsfolk as savage heathen raiders. We actually see very few of them; they're credited with a couple of caravan raids, at least one of which may have been a cover story for someone else's guilt, and at one point Seth is attacked unprovoked by a lone horseman.

to:

* In ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'' this is played surprisingly straight, due in equal parts to ProtagonistCentredMorality and DeliberateValuesDissonance. As the town is stuck right in the middle of Lakota territory, the Sioux and the local gold miners are in constant low-level conflict, so they're widely viewed by the townsfolk as savage heathen raiders. We actually see very few of them; they're credited with a couple of caravan raids, at least one of which may have been a cover story [[LeaveNoWitnesses cover-up for someone else's guilt, crimes]], and at one point Seth is attacked unprovoked by a lone horseman.
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