History Main / TheSavageIndian

6th Dec '17 3:36:15 PM nombretomado
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* In North America, the Pawnee are the only ones who practiced HumanSacrifice, of virgins from neighboring groups, but [[LesCollaborateurs since they were allies of the U.S.]], they were typically portrayed more sympathetically. They underwent a meta-FaceHeelTurn in the movies around the time the Sioux underwent a meta-HeelFaceTurn. This was brought UpToEleven in ''DancesWithWolves'', when Pawnee warriors attack ''even their white allies'', which would have been suicidally stupid.

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* In North America, the Pawnee are the only ones who practiced HumanSacrifice, of virgins from neighboring groups, but [[LesCollaborateurs since they were allies of the U.S.]], they were typically portrayed more sympathetically. They underwent a meta-FaceHeelTurn in the movies around the time the Sioux underwent a meta-HeelFaceTurn. This was brought UpToEleven in ''DancesWithWolves'', ''Film/DancesWithWolves'', when Pawnee warriors attack ''even their white allies'', which would have been suicidally stupid.
6th Dec '17 12:19:57 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch: Fire Attack'' makes no effort to hide that the enemies trying to burn down your fort are supposed to be Native Americans, with the opposing Mr. Game & Watches wearing comically huge feathered headbands and your player character wearing a cowboy hat.

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* ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch: ''UsefulNotes/GameAndWatch: Fire Attack'' makes no effort to hide that the enemies trying to burn down your fort are supposed to be Native Americans, with the opposing Mr. Game & Watches wearing comically huge feathered headbands and your player character wearing a cowboy hat.
2nd Nov '17 3:33:44 PM foxley
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8 Zigzagged in ''Film/CanyonPassage''. Early on, there is some sympathy from the settlers to the Indians' plight, and some amiable - if guarded - interactions between the settlers and Indians. However, once the Indians are provoked into uprising, they are brutal: killing men, women and children indiscriminately. (And scalping Bragg, who was the one who triggered the war.)

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8 * Zigzagged in ''Film/CanyonPassage''. Early on, there is some sympathy from the settlers to the Indians' plight, and some amiable - if guarded - interactions between the settlers and Indians. However, once the Indians are provoked into uprising, they are brutal: killing men, women and children indiscriminately. (And scalping Bragg, who was the one who triggered the war.)
2nd Nov '17 3:32:16 PM foxley
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* In Westerns where the hero is an Indian or similar NobleSavage, the savage tropes are given to a rival tribe. Examples include the Pawnee in ''Film/DancesWithWolves'' or Wirepa's tribe in Film/DeadLands.

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* In Westerns where the hero is an Indian or similar NobleSavage, the savage tropes are given to a rival tribe. Examples include the Pawnee in ''Film/DancesWithWolves'' or Wirepa's tribe in Film/DeadLands.''Film/DeadLands''.




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8 Zigzagged in ''Film/CanyonPassage''. Early on, there is some sympathy from the settlers to the Indians' plight, and some amiable - if guarded - interactions between the settlers and Indians. However, once the Indians are provoked into uprising, they are brutal: killing men, women and children indiscriminately. (And scalping Bragg, who was the one who triggered the war.)



* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace accustomed to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed these were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.

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* Curiously {{deconstructed}} and mirrored in Literature/ElConquistador.''Literature/ElConquistador''. The Aztec, although depicted as a ProudWarriorRace accustomed to human sacrifice, are actually shown to be a complex society, as their sacrifices are questioned by some of the elite classes, but even they aren't particularly painful or long and always are preceded by a life of excesses and privileges (they also believed these were necessary to ''save the universe''). The Spanish Inquisition's tortures and killings, conversely, seem to the Aztecs overly brutal and barbaric, and the religious wars and crusades are seen as hypocritical, dumb or overly evil. So the Savage Indians are mirrored in the Europeans, and some of the Middle East.
28th Oct '17 10:04:07 PM Actua11y
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* Subverted in the ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' comics ''The Seven Crystal Balls'' and ''Prisoners Of The Sun''. The Incas who target the Belgian archaeologists are arguably the smartest and most determined antagonists in the whole series, and only targeted the archaeologists to punish them for what they thought was the looting of an Incan ancestral tomb. When Tintin explains to the Incas that the Europeans were seeking knowledge rather than wealth, they immediately heal the archaeologists. That said, they still attempt to sacrifice Tintin and Haddock earlier, for their trespassing in sacred areas. Tintin foils this by realizing there's a solar eclipse for that day, which he used to fake control over the sun, scaring the Inca into releasing them. Herge later admitted this was a dumb story turn beneath his writing standards, as Incans were sophisticated astronomers and knew all about eclipses. ''Tintin in America'' features somewhat unfortunate depictions of a plains tribe as rather primitive and hostile towards outsiders. Still, it is sympathetic in portraying them as simply wanting to protect their land. With good reason-in the end, when oil is discovered there, they are all forced out.

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* Subverted in the ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' comics ''The Seven Crystal Balls'' and ''Prisoners Of The Sun''. The Incas who target the Belgian archaeologists are arguably the smartest and most determined antagonists in the whole series, and only targeted the archaeologists to punish them for what they thought was the looting of an Incan ancestral tomb. When Tintin explains to the Incas that the Europeans were seeking knowledge rather than wealth, they immediately heal the archaeologists. That said, they still attempt to sacrifice Tintin and Haddock earlier, for their trespassing in sacred areas. Tintin foils this by realizing there's a solar eclipse for that day, which he used to fake take control over the sun, scaring the Inca into releasing them. Herge later admitted this was a dumb story turn beneath his writing standards, as Incans were sophisticated astronomers and knew all about eclipses. ''Tintin in America'' features somewhat unfortunate depictions of a plains tribe as rather primitive and hostile towards outsiders. Still, it is sympathetic in portraying them as simply wanting to protect their land. With good reason-in reason--in the end, when oil is discovered there, they are all forced out.



* While ''Comicbook/JonahHex'' does generally portray Indians in a sympathetic light, it also doesn't shy away from just how savage they could be if you got on their bad side, in particular their penchant for torture. In ''Two Gun Mojo,'' Jonah cripples an especially nasty villain and leaves him for the approaching Apaches to find, knowing that they'll give him a long slow death.
* The Natives are a SpaceWestern equivalent in ''ComicBook/{{Copperhead}}'': they prowl outside town murdering anyone they find after dark. As of the first dozen issues there has been zero contact with them that didn't result in a fight to the death.

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* While ''Comicbook/JonahHex'' does generally portray Indians in a sympathetic light, it also doesn't shy away from just how savage they could be if you got on their bad side, in particular particular, their penchant for torture. In ''Two Gun Mojo,'' Jonah cripples an especially nasty villain and leaves him for the approaching Apaches to find, knowing that they'll give him a long slow death.
* The Natives are a SpaceWestern equivalent in ''ComicBook/{{Copperhead}}'': they prowl outside town murdering anyone they find after dark. As of the first dozen issues issues, there has been zero contact with them that didn't result in a fight to the death.



* In the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' continuum, the fictions ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5315107/1/Small-medium-large-headache Small Medium, Large Headache]]'' and ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5242627/1/Rincewind-among-the-Redskins Rincewind Among the Redskins]]'' expand on the throwaway joke from ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' which gives spirit medium Mrs Cake a Red Indian spirit guide, the hapless drunk One-Man-Bucket. Terry Pratchett places the Discworld's Red Indians in Howondaland, his [[{{Expy}} expy]] of Africa. In an attempt to resolve and expand on this, author[[Creator/AAPessimal A.A. Pessimal]] wrote a tale of how the Indian peoples of Howondaland fight and defeat a certain General Ruster, in a plot owing much to the movie ''Film/LittleBigMan'', with the wizzard Rincewind cast in the Dustin Hoffman role. Another Pessimal fic homages medium Tracy Potts in ''Literature/GoodOmens'' by giving her an Apache spirit guide, who has a fairly direct, [[Literature/TheManitou Manitou]]-like resemblance to Creator/GrahamMasterton's Misquamacus. Mayhem ensues as Mrs Cake and One-Man-Bucket confront the dread spirit of the heap powerful medicine man in a plot owing something to Masterton's horror fiction.

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* In the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' continuum, the fictions ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5315107/1/Small-medium-large-headache Small Medium, Large Headache]]'' and ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5242627/1/Rincewind-among-the-Redskins Rincewind Among the Redskins]]'' expand on the throwaway joke from ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' which gives spirit medium Mrs Cake a Red Indian spirit guide, the hapless drunk One-Man-Bucket. Terry Pratchett places the Discworld's Red Indians in Howondaland, his [[{{Expy}} expy]] of Africa. In an attempt to resolve and expand on this, author[[Creator/AAPessimal A.A. Pessimal]] wrote a tale of how the Indian peoples of Howondaland fight and defeat a certain General Ruster, in a plot owing much to the movie ''Film/LittleBigMan'', with the wizzard wizard Rincewind cast in the Dustin Hoffman role. Another Pessimal fic homages medium Tracy Potts in ''Literature/GoodOmens'' by giving her an Apache spirit guide, who has a fairly direct, [[Literature/TheManitou Manitou]]-like resemblance to Creator/GrahamMasterton's Misquamacus. Mayhem ensues as Mrs Mrs. Cake and One-Man-Bucket confront the dread spirit of the heap powerful medicine man in a plot owing something to Masterton's horror fiction.



* In ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues'', Wednesday gleefully depicts Pocahontas and her tribe in this manner when she hijacks the summer camp Thanksgiving play, with a little NobleSavage thrown in. It's at least partially justified as a reaction against the much more offensively patronising, twee, sanitised Manifest Destiny of the original script in which the natives (and the children playing them) are constantly insulted. Wednesday's version is an {{Exploitation|Film}}-style preemptive-revenge fantasy in which Pocahontas is a JeanneDArchetype reacting to [[DreamingOfThingsToCome visions]] of the BadFuture the pilgrims represent. Whether that entirely serves as an excuse for the ensuing war whoops and scalpings and roasting people on spits...

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* In ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues'', Wednesday gleefully depicts Pocahontas and her tribe in this manner when she hijacks the summer camp Thanksgiving play, with a little NobleSavage thrown in. It's at least partially justified as a reaction against the much more offensively patronising, patronizing, twee, sanitised sanitized Manifest Destiny of the original script in which the natives (and the children playing them) are constantly insulted. Wednesday's version is an {{Exploitation|Film}}-style preemptive-revenge fantasy in which Pocahontas is a JeanneDArchetype reacting to [[DreamingOfThingsToCome visions]] of the BadFuture the pilgrims represent. Whether that entirely serves as an excuse for the ensuing war whoops and scalpings and roasting people on spits...



* A non-US example are the [[CannibalTribe cannibal natives]] in ''Literature/RobinsonCrusoe'', which takes place off the coast of South America. Although often {{Race Lift}}ed in the novel's many adaptations, the cannibals are identified as Carib Indians in the original text. This makes sense, since the Caribs had a notorious (though highly exaggerated) reputation as ferocious man-eating savages for hundreds of years -- in fact, the very ''word'' "cannibal" comes from these guys ([[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking as does the name of the Caribbean Sea]]).
* In ''Literature/TheManitou'' and its sequels, the protagonist is the undead spirit of the most powerful Indian medicine man ever to walk North America, Misquamacus. Misquamacus is an Indian who completely loathes and despises the white man--and for that matter, the black and yellow-skinned immigrants who have displaced the Indians from their heritage. His goal is to physically re-enter the world and to bring about the genocide of all the non-native American races who have supplanted the Indians, and he uses some very savage magics to thwart those who are seeking to prevent his return.

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* A non-US example are is the [[CannibalTribe cannibal natives]] in ''Literature/RobinsonCrusoe'', which takes place off the coast of South America. Although often {{Race Lift}}ed in the novel's many adaptations, the cannibals are identified as Carib Indians in the original text. This makes sense, since the Caribs had a notorious (though highly exaggerated) reputation as ferocious man-eating savages for hundreds of years -- in fact, the very ''word'' "cannibal" comes from these guys ([[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking as does the name of the Caribbean Sea]]).
* In ''Literature/TheManitou'' and its sequels, the protagonist is the undead spirit of the most powerful Indian medicine man ever to walk North America, Misquamacus. Misquamacus is an Indian who completely loathes and despises the white man--and for that matter, the black and yellow-skinned immigrants who have displaced the Indians from their heritage. His goal is to physically re-enter the world and to bring about the genocide of all the non-native American races who have supplanted the Indians, and he uses some very savage magics magic to thwart those who are seeking to prevent his return.



* The Reavers in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' are uncomfortably close to [[TheSavageIndian Savage Indians]] InSpace! A more optimistic reading--given that the Reavers are colonists who went mad on the fringes of society, and not some already-present race lurking in the depths of space--is that they're more of a bunch of astro-{{wendigo}}s.

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* The Reavers in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' are uncomfortably close to [[TheSavageIndian Savage Indians]] InSpace! A more optimistic reading--given that the Reavers are colonists who went mad on the fringes of society, and not some already-present race lurking in the depths of space--is that they're more of a bunch of astro-{{wendigo}}s.astro-{{Wendigo}}s.



* Apache Bull Ramos, the bookers wanted him to be a {{face}} because he could wrestle well but had very little charisma. He refused though and became one of the greatest {{heel}}s ever, when it came to drawing crowd heat. He mainly suffered the WorfEffect to establish the new champion's credibility.

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* Apache Bull Ramos, the bookers wanted him to be a {{face}} {{Face}} because he could wrestle well but had very little charisma. He refused though and became one of the greatest {{heel}}s {{Heel}}s ever, when it came to drawing crowd heat. He mainly suffered the WorfEffect to establish the new champion's credibility.



* ''VideoGame/SuperFighter'': The BigBad and FinalBoss Red Man is one of the rare cases of this trope being played straight in a post-1960s work without any hint of irony. Granted, while the game he is featured in is a VideoGame/StreetFighterII [[TheMockbuster knockoff]] developed by the Taiwanese company C&E without any intention of it ever going outside of its home country, but even then its pretty egregious regardless.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperFighter'': The BigBad and FinalBoss Red Man is one of the rare cases of this trope being played straight in a post-1960s work without any hint of irony. Granted, while the game he is featured in is a VideoGame/StreetFighterII [[TheMockbuster knockoff]] developed by the Taiwanese company C&E without any intention of it ever going outside of its home country, but even then its it's pretty egregious regardless.



-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions."

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-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes sexes, and conditions."



* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.

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* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women women, and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.
20th Oct '17 4:45:09 PM Fireblood
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* Some native Americans were essentially this trope (most prominently, and successfully, the Comanches). So were many other nations at various times in their history (just read the Iliad, "the greatest epic of Western civilization"). The racism is in assuming that this was somehow inherent to native Americans, rather than particular to certain cultures at certain times.

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* Some native Native Americans were essentially this trope (most prominently, and successfully, the Comanches). So were many other nations at various times in their history (just read the Iliad, "the greatest epic of Western civilization"). The racism is in assuming that this was somehow inherent to native Native Americans, rather than particular to certain cultures at certain times.
20th Oct '17 4:41:00 PM Fireblood
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* Subverted in the ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' comics ''The Seven Crystal Balls'' and ''Prisoners Of The Sun''. The Incas who target the Belgian archaeologists are arguably the smartest and most determined antagonists in the whole series, and only targeted the archaeologists to punish them for what they thought was the looting of an Incan ancestral tomb. When Tintin explains to the Incas that the Europeans were seeking knowledge rather than wealth, they immediately heal the archaeologists. That said, they still attempt to sacrifice Tintin and Haddock earlier, for their trespassing in sacred areas. Tintin foils this by realizing there's a solar eclipse for that day, which he used to fake control over the sun, scaring the Inca into releasing them.
** Herge later admitted this was a dumb story turn beneath his writing standards, as Incans were sophisticated astronomers and knew all about eclipses.
* Averted in many FrancoBelgianComics (to the point of MagicalNativeAmerican), where the Indians are almost always manipulated into attacking by whites (almost every ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' featuring Indians ends on a peace treaty). Their biggest flaw is often being hotheaded and temperamental, not unlike many white heads. There are also friendly and nice tribes.

to:

* Subverted in the ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' comics ''The Seven Crystal Balls'' and ''Prisoners Of The Sun''. The Incas who target the Belgian archaeologists are arguably the smartest and most determined antagonists in the whole series, and only targeted the archaeologists to punish them for what they thought was the looting of an Incan ancestral tomb. When Tintin explains to the Incas that the Europeans were seeking knowledge rather than wealth, they immediately heal the archaeologists. That said, they still attempt to sacrifice Tintin and Haddock earlier, for their trespassing in sacred areas. Tintin foils this by realizing there's a solar eclipse for that day, which he used to fake control over the sun, scaring the Inca into releasing them.
**
them. Herge later admitted this was a dumb story turn beneath his writing standards, as Incans were sophisticated astronomers and knew all about eclipses.
eclipses. ''Tintin in America'' features somewhat unfortunate depictions of a plains tribe as rather primitive and hostile towards outsiders. Still, it is sympathetic in portraying them as simply wanting to protect their land. With good reason-in the end, when oil is discovered there, they are all forced out.
* Averted in many FrancoBelgianComics (to the point of MagicalNativeAmerican), where the Indians are almost always manipulated into attacking by whites (almost every ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' featuring Indians ends on a peace treaty). Their biggest flaw is often being hotheaded and temperamental, not unlike many white heads.people. There are also friendly and nice tribes.



* ''Streets of Glory'': Red Crow is an evil murderous bastard, hired on the strength of his reputation by a railroad baron. When he think his employer has betrayed him, he scalps his bodyguard, leaving him with an exposed cranium.

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* ''Streets of Glory'': Red Crow is an evil murderous bastard, hired on the strength of his reputation by a railroad baron. When he think thinks his employer has betrayed him, he scalps his bodyguard, leaving him with an exposed cranium.
20th Oct '17 12:38:13 PM Chabal2
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* ''Streets of Glory'': Red Crow is an evil murderous bastard, hired on the strength of his reputation by a railroad baron. When he think his employer has betrayed him, he scalps his bodyguard, leaving him with an exposed cranium.
20th Sep '17 3:07:17 PM MercutioDreams
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* Played with in ''Series/{{Westworld}}'', as Lee Sizemore planned to depict the Ghost Nation hosts as bloodthirsty, rape-happy stereotypes for his proposed narrative. However, since the hosts' individual personalities can be altered in whatever way the park's employees deem fit, this is arguably more to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment showcase]] Sizemore's [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain racist tendencies]].
18th Aug '17 9:33:28 PM Daedalis
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* The Natives are a SpaceWestern equivalent in ''ComicBook/{{Copperhead}}'': they prowl outside town murdering anyone they find after dark. As of the first dozen issues there has been zero contact with them that didn't result in a fight to the death.
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