History Main / TheSavageIndian

20th Sep '17 3:07:17 PM MercutioDreams
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* Played with in ''Series/{{Westworld}}'', as Lee Sizemore planned to depict the Ghost Nation hosts as bloodthirsty, rape-happy stereotypes for his proposed narrative. However, since the hosts' individual personalities can be altered in whatever way the park's employees deem fit, this is arguably more to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment showcase]] Sizemore's [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain racist tendencies]].
18th Aug '17 9:33:28 PM Daedalis
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* The Natives are a SpaceWestern equivalent in ''ComicBook/{{Copperhead}}'': they prowl outside town murdering anyone they find after dark. As of the first dozen issues there has been zero contact with them that didn't result in a fight to the death.
29th Jul '17 10:51:10 AM INH5
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** Which was perfectly true if Politically Incorrect.
18th Jun '17 5:03:04 PM Fireblood
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A subtrope of HollywoodNatives. Often overlaps with other stereotypes including BraidsBeadsAndBuckskins and TontoTalk. Compare and Contrast MagicalNativeAmerican and NobleSavage.

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A subtrope of HollywoodNatives. Often overlaps with other stereotypes including BraidsBeadsAndBuckskins and TontoTalk. Compare and Contrast MagicalNativeAmerican and NobleSavage.
NobleSavage. It should be noted that in older works (even with anthropology) the term "savage" is used for all cultures that are less technologically sophisticated than the (usually Western) writers. It didn't necessarily mean brutal, though other negative connotations are implied, like inferior intelligence, morality etc. Nowadays the term has long been discredited, and the similar "primitive" seems to be going the same way.
18th Jun '17 3:07:34 PM WillKeaton
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[[folder: Real Life ]]

* The Aztecs are almost always portrayed as bloodthirsty and war-loving, even in modern works. Of course, there are [[HumanSacrifice reasons for]] [[UpToEleven this bad reputation]].
* In North America, the Pawnee are the only ones who practiced HumanSacrifice, of virgins from neighboring groups, but [[LesCollaborateurs since they were allies of the U.S.]], they were typically portrayed more sympathetically. They underwent a meta-FaceHeelTurn in the movies around the time the Sioux underwent a meta-HeelFaceTurn. This was brought UpToEleven in ''DancesWithWolves'', when Pawnee warriors attack ''even their white allies'', which would have been suicidally stupid.
* This used to be a major draw at [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Disneyland]], back when Westerns were popular. Aside from the Indian Village, Literature/TomSawyer's Island included an eternally burning shack with arrows in the side of it. As attitudes changed, it was given [[MultipleChoicePast several different backstories]] before it became just a shack.
* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings. Whatever the case then, the Yąnomam&ouml now are peaceful, but unfortunately their bad reputation has been used as an excuse to take their land at times.
* As late as February 2011, Radio/BryanFischer, Director of Issues Analysis for the [[MoralGuardians American Family Association]], [[http://newspaperrock.bluecorncomics.com/2011/02/text-of-fischers-racist-screed.html argued that]] Indians were "morally disqualified from sovereign control of American soil" by their "superstition, savagery and sexual immorality". How wrong is this statement? Let us count the ways:
** He also stated that "the Europeans proved superior in battle, taking possession of contested lands through right of conquest. So in all respects, Europeans gained rightful and legal sovereign control of American soil." So [[MightMakesRight might clearly equals legal right]] in his worldview (shared by many European nations in those days).
** The Europeans ''didn't'' always prove superior in battle, and that the United States acquired much of its land not by force, but by making treaties and business deals whose terms the US [[ILied never intended to keep]]. Several Indian tribes had their lands taken over despite never being officially beaten on the battlefield.
** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.
* "When we arrived in the New World God pleased to show us the vanity of managing our arms in the European mode. Now we are pleased to learn the skulking way of war." One of the reasons a bunch of untrained farmers were able to beat back the British at Lexington was the years they had spent fighting the Native Americans.
* Pick a US military helicopter. The Iroquois (better known as the Huey). The Black Hawk. The Apache. The Chinook. There's a reason for those names.
* Some native Americans were essentially this trope (most prominently, and successfully, the Comanches). So were many other nations at various times in their history (just read the Iliad, "the greatest epic of Western civilization"). The racism is in assuming that this was somehow inherent to native Americans, rather than particular to certain cultures at certain times.
* Mentioned in the U.S. [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution Declaration of Independence]], in a passage [[ValuesDissonance rarely quoted today]]:
-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions."
** Which was perfectly true if Politically Incorrect.
* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post-Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.
* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:


[[folder: Real Life ]]

* The Aztecs are almost always portrayed as bloodthirsty and war-loving, even in modern works. Of course, there are [[HumanSacrifice reasons for]] [[UpToEleven this bad reputation]].
* In North America, the Pawnee are the only ones who practiced HumanSacrifice, of virgins from neighboring groups, but [[LesCollaborateurs since they were allies of the U.S.]], they were typically portrayed more sympathetically. They underwent a meta-FaceHeelTurn in the movies around the time the Sioux underwent a meta-HeelFaceTurn. This was brought UpToEleven in ''DancesWithWolves'', when Pawnee warriors attack ''even their white allies'', which would have been suicidally stupid.
* This used to be a major draw at [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Disneyland]], back when Westerns were popular. Aside from the Indian Village, Literature/TomSawyer's Island included an eternally burning shack with arrows in the side of it. As attitudes changed, it was given [[MultipleChoicePast several different backstories]] before it became just a shack.
* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings. Whatever the case then, the Yąnomam&ouml now are peaceful, but unfortunately their bad reputation has been used as an excuse to take their land at times.
* As late as February 2011, Radio/BryanFischer, Director of Issues Analysis for the [[MoralGuardians American Family Association]], [[http://newspaperrock.bluecorncomics.com/2011/02/text-of-fischers-racist-screed.html argued that]] Indians were "morally disqualified from sovereign control of American soil" by their "superstition, savagery and sexual immorality". How wrong is this statement? Let us count the ways:
** He also stated that "the Europeans proved superior in battle, taking possession of contested lands through right of conquest. So in all respects, Europeans gained rightful and legal sovereign control of American soil." So [[MightMakesRight might clearly equals legal right]] in his worldview (shared by many European nations in those days).
** The Europeans ''didn't'' always prove superior in battle, and that the United States acquired much of its land not by force, but by making treaties and business deals whose terms the US [[ILied never intended to keep]]. Several Indian tribes had their lands taken over despite never being officially beaten on the battlefield.
** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.
* "When we arrived in the New World God pleased to show us the vanity of managing our arms in the European mode. Now we are pleased to learn the skulking way of war." One of the reasons a bunch of untrained farmers were able to beat back the British at Lexington was the years they had spent fighting the Native Americans.
* Pick a US military helicopter. The Iroquois (better known as the Huey). The Black Hawk. The Apache. The Chinook. There's a reason for those names.
* Some native Americans were essentially this trope (most prominently, and successfully, the Comanches). So were many other nations at various times in their history (just read the Iliad, "the greatest epic of Western civilization"). The racism is in assuming that this was somehow inherent to native Americans, rather than particular to certain cultures at certain times.
* Mentioned in the U.S. [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution Declaration of Independence]], in a passage [[ValuesDissonance rarely quoted today]]:
-->"[King George III] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions."
** Which was perfectly true if Politically Incorrect.
* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post-Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.
* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.
[[/folder]]
18th Jun '17 3:06:50 PM WillKeaton
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* In Westerns where the hero is an Indian or similar NobleSavage, the savage tropes are given to a rival tribe. Examples include the Pawnee in Film/DancesWithWolves or Wirepa's tribe in Film/DeadLands.

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* In Westerns where the hero is an Indian or similar NobleSavage, the savage tropes are given to a rival tribe. Examples include the Pawnee in Film/DancesWithWolves ''Film/DancesWithWolves'' or Wirepa's tribe in Film/DeadLands.
14th Jun '17 12:59:50 PM Delphi
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* While ''Comicbook/JonahHex'' does generally portray Indians in a sympathetic light, it also doesn't shy away from just how savage they could be if you got on their bad side, in particular their penchant for torture. In ''Two Gun Mojo,'' Jonah cripples an especially nasty villain and leaves him for the approaching Apaches to find, knowing that they'll give him a long slow death.
10th Apr '17 6:48:16 PM nombretomado
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* In ''ShamanKing'', in Hao's life 500 years ago, he went so far as to [[ANaziByAnyOtherName destroy cultures]] because they didn't want to join him in his quest to rid the world of {{muggles}}. One of the last survivors of that thinks that Silva and the rest are just like Hao. Which is...really weird in TheNineties.

to:

* In ''ShamanKing'', ''Manga/ShamanKing'', in Hao's life 500 years ago, he went so far as to [[ANaziByAnyOtherName destroy cultures]] because they didn't want to join him in his quest to rid the world of {{muggles}}. One of the last survivors of that thinks that Silva and the rest are just like Hao. Which is...really weird in TheNineties.
8th Apr '17 6:50:50 PM Fireblood
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to:

* Though no one knows the exact people or circumstances involved, archaeologists have found evidence for a massacre which took place at Crow Creek, South Dakota where more than 500 men, women and children were slaughtered, scalped and mutilated after their village was attacked. This occurred about AD 1325. Again, of course, this was hardly behavior unique to indigenous Americans.
8th Apr '17 6:41:59 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/HellOnWheels'' deconstructs this trope for the most part. The opening episode and series has a whole features numerous instances of native warriors raiding and killing civilians and unarmed men, and most characters in-universe see them as mindless savages, but it is made clear that they are no more villainous nor corrupt than the drunken laborers they have working on the train, that they are trying to defend their land and abide by a moral code that the settlers simply do not relate to.

to:

* ''Series/HellOnWheels'' deconstructs this trope for the most part. The opening episode and series has as a whole features numerous instances of native warriors raiding and killing civilians and unarmed men, and most characters in-universe see them as mindless savages, but it is made clear that they are no more villainous nor corrupt than the drunken laborers they have working on the train, that they are trying to defend their land and abide by a moral code that the settlers simply do not relate to.



* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings.

to:

* The anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon, who ventured into the Venezuelan jungle in the 1960s to study the Yąnomamö tribe, released accounts of a perpetually violent society beset by wars and constant strife. Chagnon believed he found a society in which homicide and warfare were common and most violent men wound up with the most wives and children. Whether or not his views were really founded on actual fact or visualizing the Yąnomamö through his rough childhood (as was claimed in the book ''Darkness in El Dorado'', that also accused him of deliberating infecting them with measles) created a huge controversy in the anthropological world. The allegations were investigated and refuted by the American Anthropological Association, but his work was taken to justify Christian missionaries' subversion of the native culture and escalated clashes between them and nearby miners. Ironically, the local Catholic Silesian missionaries were actually the sole source of the allegations, whose ire Chagnon had earned for criticizing them over supplying the Yąnomamö with shotguns, which he said escalated their violence (for a further irony, he was then accused of giving them weapons himself to secure their cooperation). Accounts of Yąnomamö violence predated Chagnon's work, or even his life, and seem to confirm his findings. Whatever the case then, the Yąnomam&ouml now are peaceful, but unfortunately their bad reputation has been used as an excuse to take their land at times.



*** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.

to:

*** ** Enormous numbers of Native Americans throughout the entire New World were also wiped out by Eurasian diseases. That's probably the single biggest factor that led to their conquest.



* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.

to:

* Supposedly inverted if Christopher Columbus's account of the Taino being a generous peaceful people who loved their neighbors before the Spanish got done with them is true. Not that Christopher Columbus thought the Spanish were wrong or anything, but the initial Spanish stereotype made them sound like a Christian community right out of the New Testament. The island that came to be known as Puerto Rico was even called "The Land Of The Noble Lord". The post Spanish post-Spanish Taino stereotype became [[KnifeNut people who stab]]. A culture they openly adopted from the Spanish.
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