History Main / TheMedic

12th Jul '16 12:49:23 AM jormis29
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* The SquishyWizard part of this trope is subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}: Bad Company'', where the one class that can heal others actually has a light machine gun, compared to the other classes' relativly small arms (assault rifles, shotguns, and SMG's.)
** Also subverted in ''Battlefield 2142''. EA decided to merge some of the Battlefield 2 classes together, and that game's Assault and Medic classes were combined into the Assault kit in 2142.
*** And AGAIN in ''Battlefield 2''. The Medic class was basically an Assault soldier, but trades his assault rifle's under-barrel grenade launcher and heavy armor for healing capability (Both Assault and Medic classes within a faction use the same base rifle).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}''
**
The SquishyWizard part of this trope is subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}: Bad Company'', ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany'', where the one class that can heal others actually has a light machine gun, compared to the other classes' relativly small arms (assault rifles, shotguns, and SMG's.)
** Also subverted in ''Battlefield 2142''.''VideoGame/Battlefield2142''. EA decided to merge some of the Battlefield 2 classes together, and that game's Assault and Medic classes were combined into the Assault kit in 2142.
*** And AGAIN in ''Battlefield 2''.''VideoGame/Battlefield2''. The Medic class was basically an Assault soldier, but trades his assault rifle's under-barrel grenade launcher and heavy armor for healing capability (Both Assault and Medic classes within a faction use the same base rifle).
3rd Jul '16 10:17:59 AM FoolsEditAccount
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* Jimmy's Happy Little Sunflower form in ''VideoGame/JimmyAndThePulsatingMass''. Its skillset is comprised mainly of healing abilities; its one offensive skill is [[LightEmUp an anti-undead light spell]].
28th Jun '16 6:06:08 AM apm483@gmail.com
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* Fact: The US Army Medical Command is the branch of the Army with the highest amount of Medal Of Honor recipients. I think that fact speaks for itself.

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* Fact: The US Army Medical Command is the branch of the Army with the highest amount of Medal Of of Honor recipients. I think that fact speaks for itself.recipients.
8th Jun '16 3:50:34 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* While true of many heroic fantasy [=RPGs=], many darker games avert this trope by making healing magic rare, unavailable, weak, or corrupting. For example, you can play a physician (or equivalent) in any of ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness'' games, ''TabletopGame/UnknownArmies'', ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', ''TabletopGame/DarkHeresy'', and ''TabletopGame/CallOfCthulhu'', but don't expect to get a near-dead party member on their feet quickly in most cases. Even ''StarWars'' [=RPGs=] tend to allow healing abilities to only rarely provide significant short-term advantages; most likely your healer, even when using the Force, just lets you live long enough to make it to the bacta tank.
** Many of these games also let any of their "classes" be the Healer, rather than forcing it on a certain role or build. For example, in ''all'' of the ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' games where there is supernatural healing, pretty much every character in the game could decide to learn it or just ''start'' with it.
8th Jun '16 3:45:48 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Monk, the SEAL Medic in ''Film/TheAbyss'', is ([[CaptainObvious duh]]) one of these. Of all the [=SEALs=] that board Deep Core, he is the only one who seems inclined to deal with the rig crew as human beings. When faced with a medical situation he is not trained for (Jammer's coma) he does what little he can and apologises that he can't do more. Of course, since he has a [[MeaningfulName religious name]] in a Creator/JamesCameron film, his being a basically good guy was pretty much guaranteed from the get-go.

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* Monk, the SEAL Medic in ''Film/TheAbyss'', is ([[CaptainObvious duh]]) one of these.''Film/TheAbyss'. Of all the [=SEALs=] that board Deep Core, he is the only one who seems inclined to deal with the rig crew as human beings. When faced with a medical situation he is not trained for (Jammer's coma) he does what little he can and apologises that he can't do more. Of course, since he has a [[MeaningfulName religious name]] in a Creator/JamesCameron film, his being a basically good guy was pretty much guaranteed from the get-go.



* Reynolds in ''Film/{{Zulu}}''.
** Special mention goes to the fact that he managed to keep working while the attacking Zulu warriors were ''climbing in through the windows'', and he was a inspired by a real person.

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* Reynolds in ''Film/{{Zulu}}''.
**
''Film/{{Zulu}}''. Special mention goes to the fact that he managed to keep working while the attacking Zulu warriors were ''climbing in through the windows'', and he was a inspired by a real person.
8th Jun '16 1:50:34 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Many table top games have a healer archetype for the party. ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' clerics and druids tended to be looked upon as walking medical units rather than characters, so for 3rd edition the developers went...perhaps too far the other way, and a well-played cleric or druid can be easily the most powerful character in a game ("[=CoDzilla=]"). On the other hand, the representatives of gods and forces of nature being the strongest characters in the game makes a certain kind of sense. This was lampshaded in an [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0006.html early]] [[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]] strip, where after a fight Durkon the cleric asked what we do next, and in the next frame turned into a box of [[StuckOnBandAidBrand Band-aids]].
** D&D's recently-released fourth edition seems to reverse this trend by making it easy for any player character to recover by just taking a five-minute break after combat and spending enough 'healing surges'. Even after running out of those, a good night's rest will restore a character to full hit points (and reset the healing surge count to maximum as well). Actual healing powers still come into play ''during'' combat encounters, though, and Leader classes are the best source.
** D20 Modern includes 0 (that's ''zero'') basic healing classes, and 1 (that's ''one'') advanced class with healing abilities. In addition, there are 0 (''zee-ro'') instant healing items available in the vanilla setting. This makes combat significantly more dangerous, and a dungeon crawl is much more about avoiding damage than speeding through.
*** Technically, in a low-level or no-supernatural setting, the Wise Hero could serve as the healer, given that the Heal skill is based on the Wisdom score. Of course, this would come strictly in the form of minor healing and preventing a near-death character from dying, but such a character is often played as the medic anyhow.
*** There is a Surgery feat that lets a character heal a significant amount of damage, but requires several ''hours'' to do so.
** ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3rd Edition eventually created a base class known as healer. It's essentially the cleric, minus all the powerful buff spells that made it one of the most powerful classes in the game, without any offensive spells, without any armor proficiencies (in fact, explicitly unable to wear armor), and with a few more spells per day and some spell-like abilities (and a pet unicorn!), thus fitting this trope to a tee.
*** Making the class almost entirely useless, since despite the name, it is actually not all that good at healing, as clerics can access a large number of options that improve their healing, but the Healer, being from an obscure sourcebook, and thus largely unsupported with class options in other books, can benefit from only a pittance of these.
*** Furthermore, in D&D 3E, Attack bonus and Damage scale up numerically far faster than Armor Class (Defense), Hit Points (Health), or Cure spells, making Cure spells increasingly less useful as character level increases. Healing is not even listed as a viable combat role in most fan made game guides for this edition (the official guides do list it as one, but are widely considered to be full of BlatantLies, so it's not like that means anything), because as one such guide points out - killing the enemy before he can hit your ally again effectively "heals" her of all the damage she would have taken - which is, 99% of the time, more than your Cure spell could heal her for. Cost effective healing in D&D 3E consists of healing only small amounts at a time, but doing so in unlimited quantity, allowing characters to refill Hit Points during downtime between battles without using up limited resources like Spell Slots or Scrolls. There are many means of achieving this, but all are considered secondary functions, not primary roles.

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* Many table top games have a healer archetype for ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'': Divine casters (Clerics and Druids) traditionally fill this role. Clerics are sometimes seen as mobile healing delivery units, though this can vary based on the party. ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' edition and version:
** In third edition,
clerics and druids tended to be looked upon as walking medical units rather than characters, so for 3rd edition are not only the developers went...perhaps too far the other way, and a well-played cleric or druid best healers, but they can be easily argued to be the most powerful character in a game ("[=CoDzilla=]"). On the other hand, the representatives of gods and forces of nature being the strongest characters all-around class in the game makes game.
** One source book does offer
a certain kind of sense. This was lampshaded in an [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0006.html early]] [[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order base class called a Healer. It's essentially the cleric, minus all the powerful buff spells that made it one of the Stick]] strip, where after a fight Durkon the cleric asked what we do next, and most powerful classes in the next frame turned into game, without any offensive spells, without any armor proficiencies (in fact, explicitly unable to wear armor), and with a box of [[StuckOnBandAidBrand Band-aids]].
few more spells per day and some spell-like abilities.
** D&D's recently-released fourth Fourth edition seems to reverse this trend remove the cleric as a necessary component to any adventuring party by making it easy for any player character to recover by just taking a five-minute break after combat and spending enough 'healing surges'. "healing surges." Even after running out of those, a good night's rest will restore a character to full hit points (and reset the healing surge count to maximum as well). Actual healing powers still come into play ''during'' combat encounters, though, and Leader classes are the best source.
** D20 Modern includes 0 (that's ''zero'') basic healing classes, and 1 (that's ''one'') advanced class with healing abilities. In addition, there are 0 (''zee-ro'') instant healing items available in the vanilla setting. This makes combat significantly more dangerous, and a dungeon crawl is much more about avoiding damage than speeding through.
*** Technically, in a low-level or no-supernatural setting,
* ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' has the Wise Hero Hero, which could serve as the healer, given a healer considering that the Heal skill is based on Wisdom. However, the Wisdom score. Of course, this would come strictly in the form of minor healing and preventing a near-death character from dying, but such a character is often played as the medic anyhow.
*** There is a
modern setting offers virtually no ability to quickly heal. The Surgery feat that lets a character heal a significant amount of damage, but requires several ''hours'' to do so.
** ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3rd Edition eventually created a base class known as healer. It's essentially the cleric, minus all the powerful buff spells that made it one of the most powerful classes in the game, without any offensive spells, without any armor proficiencies (in fact, explicitly unable to wear armor), and with a few more spells per day and some spell-like abilities (and a pet unicorn!), thus fitting this trope to a tee.
*** Making the class almost entirely useless, since despite the name, it is actually not all that good at healing, as clerics can access a large number of options that improve their healing, but the Healer, being from an obscure sourcebook, and thus largely unsupported with class options in other books, can benefit from only a pittance of these.
*** Furthermore, in D&D 3E, Attack bonus and Damage scale up numerically far faster than Armor Class (Defense), Hit Points (Health), or Cure spells, making Cure spells increasingly less useful as character level increases. Healing is not even listed as a viable combat role in most fan made game guides for this edition (the official guides do list it as one, but are widely considered to be full of BlatantLies, so it's not like that means anything), because as one such guide points out - killing the enemy before he can hit your ally again effectively "heals" her of all the damage she would have taken - which is, 99% of the time, more than your Cure spell could heal her for. Cost effective healing in D&D 3E consists of healing only small amounts at a time, but doing so in unlimited quantity, allowing characters to refill Hit Points during downtime between battles without using up limited resources like Spell Slots or Scrolls. There are many means of achieving this, but all are considered secondary functions, not primary roles.
so.
7th Jun '16 7:50:03 PM Willbyr
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* Princess Millerna Sarah Aston, the RebelliousPrincess from ''Manga/VisionOfEscaflowne''. Also kind of a subversion, being a traditional medic instead of a WhiteMagicianGirl. In a fantasy environment.

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* Princess Millerna Sarah Aston, the RebelliousPrincess from ''Manga/VisionOfEscaflowne''.''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne''. Also kind of a subversion, being a traditional medic instead of a WhiteMagicianGirl. In a fantasy environment.



* In ''Manga/{{Aruosumente}}'', Moeran, one of the council members, turns out to have studied medicine at the Shengtalisi, the most prestigious university of his home country. His private rooms still look like those of a doctor, even though he's not actively practising medicine openly.

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* In ''Manga/{{Aruosumente}}'', Moeran, one of the council members, turns out to have studied medicine at the Shengtalisi, the most prestigious university of his home country. His private rooms still look like those of a doctor, even though he's not actively practising practicing medicine openly.



* Joshua "Josh" Foley, aka Elixir, from ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''. Elixir is quite possibly the most powerful mutant because he can manipulate DNA in order as his power and accelerate cell division. It manifests early on as healing powers, but he can just as easily kill you as he can heal you.

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* Joshua "Josh" Foley, aka Elixir, from ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''.''Comicbook/XMen''. Elixir is quite possibly the most powerful mutant because he can manipulate DNA in order as his power and accelerate cell division. It manifests early on as healing powers, but he can just as easily kill you as he can heal you.
7th Jun '16 7:48:01 PM Willbyr
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* Asa Shigure, Kareha, and Nerine from ''{{Shuffle}}!''. In a twist, [[spoiler: Asa [[RefusalOfTheCall rejects her "role" as healer]] due to her reluctance to use ''any'' kind of magic after [[BreakTheCutie all the crap]] her mom went through in the past, which becomes a plot point as the magic piles up in her body and [[IllGirl gets her gravely sick]]...]]

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* Asa Shigure, Kareha, and Nerine from ''{{Shuffle}}!''.''VisualNovel/{{Shuffle}}!''. In a twist, [[spoiler: Asa [[RefusalOfTheCall rejects her "role" as healer]] due to her reluctance to use ''any'' kind of magic after [[BreakTheCutie all the crap]] her mom went through in the past, which becomes a plot point as the magic piles up in her body and [[IllGirl gets her gravely sick]]...]]
2nd Jun '16 7:11:41 PM DevonianEcho
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Funny thing about adventure: People tend to get hurt and especially the heroes. Injuries are terribly inconvenient for questing, resulting in time lost recuperating (or making an out-of-the-way trip to the nearest TraumaInn) at best, and a TotalPartyKill at worst. So it's wonderfully convenient to have someone in the party who can make the hurting stop.

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Funny thing about adventure: People adventure; people tend to get hurt and hurt, especially the heroes. Injuries are terribly inconvenient for questing, resulting in time lost recuperating (or making an out-of-the-way trip to the nearest TraumaInn) at best, and a TotalPartyKill at worst. So it's wonderfully convenient to have someone in the party who can make the hurting stop.
28th May '16 7:49:47 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Konoe Konoka in ''MahouSenseiNegima'' increasingly fills this role as she becomes more experienced with healing magic. After a while, team members just don't bother restraining themselves during training, since all their injuries can be healed by her anyway. Unfortunately, this also makes her the team's biggest AchillesHeel, as in a battle she is [[ShootTheMedicFirst always targeted first]]. [[spoiler:In one MoodWhiplash chapter, she manages to completely heal the protagonist after ''he took a stone spear to the chest, pulled it out to sucker-punch the villain who delivered it, collapsed, and bled on the floor for a minute'', all until she got to him.]]

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* Konoe Konoka in ''MahouSenseiNegima'' ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'' increasingly fills this role as she becomes more experienced with healing magic. After a while, team members just don't bother restraining themselves during training, since all their injuries can be healed by her anyway. Unfortunately, this also makes her the team's biggest AchillesHeel, as in a battle she is [[ShootTheMedicFirst always targeted first]]. [[spoiler:In one MoodWhiplash chapter, she manages to completely heal the protagonist after ''he took a stone spear to the chest, pulled it out to sucker-punch the villain who delivered it, collapsed, and bled on the floor for a minute'', all until she got to him.]]
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