History Main / TheEmpire

6th Jan '17 8:06:55 AM DarkPhoenix94
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-->-- '''Calgacus''', [[BraveScot Caledonian]] warlord on the [[AncientRome Roman Empire]][[note]]Quoted by '''Tacitus''', Roman historian, in ''Agricola''.[[/note]]

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-->-- '''Calgacus''', [[BraveScot Caledonian]] warlord on the [[AncientRome Roman Empire]][[note]]Quoted Empire]][[note]]'Quoted' by '''Tacitus''', Roman historian, in ''Agricola''.''Agricola''. It was probably invented as a rhetorical means to critique the Empire.[[/note]]
1st Jan '17 1:40:16 PM eowynjedi
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* If it's a ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' game it has one of these. Generally the Empire has somehow fallen into the power of some [[SealedEvilInACan dark evil God]]. ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'''s Daein and its King Ashnard are the best fitting, the others are all 'correct' but with a few details of note.
** The sequel, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'', gives this role to Begnion, which, unlike Daein, actually is an empire. The Dawn Brigade of Daein, the Greil Mercenaries of Crimea, and the empress of Begnion end up fighting against the empire's corrupt senate.

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* If it's a ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' game it has one of these. Generally the Empire has somehow fallen into the power of some [[SealedEvilInACan dark evil God]]. God]].
** Both ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral'' games have the Grannvalian Empire. The twist is that for the first half of ''Genealogy of the Holy War'', the ''main characters themselves'' build it unwittingly when Sigurd embarks on a series of military expeditions to help his friends and winds up conquering most of Grannvale's neighbors in the process. The unscrupulous nobles behind him are more than willing to take advantage of this.
**
''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'''s Daein and its King Ashnard are the best fitting, the others are all 'correct' but with a few details of note.
**
note. The sequel, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'', ''Radiant Dawn'', gives this role to Begnion, which, unlike Daein, actually is an empire. The Dawn Brigade of Daein, the Greil Mercenaries of Crimea, and the empress of Begnion end up fighting against the empire's corrupt senate.
31st Dec '16 1:00:23 PM StarSword
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** The Cardassian Union is an imperial military dictatorship, run by several military officials in governing body known as the Central Command, rather then one Emperor. It is more similar to the USSR or [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour Oceania]] then a traditional empire, controlled by a political body. The Cardassian Occupation of Bajor has shown the Cardassian Union to be particularly brutal.

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** The Cardassian Union is an imperial military dictatorship, run by several military officials in governing body known as the Central Command, rather then one Emperor. It is more similar to the USSR or [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour Oceania]] then a traditional empire, controlled by a political body. The Cardassian Occupation of Bajor has shown the Cardassian Union to be particularly brutal. Interestingly they're overthrown by an internal revolt



** And then TheMovie came and the Alliance crossed the MoralEventHorizon with what went down on Miranda. At least not until the Operative shows up on Serenity's dock with a HeelRealization to get off his chest, suggesting that even the Alliance has members too moral to tolerate that, and isn't unanimously 'evil'. Even the disaster on Miranda was almost the exact opposite of what they were ''trying'' to do.

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** And then TheMovie came and the Alliance crossed the MoralEventHorizon with what went down on Miranda. At least not until the Operative shows up on Serenity's ''Serenity'''s dock with a HeelRealization to get off his chest, suggesting that even the Alliance has members too moral to tolerate that, and isn't unanimously 'evil'. Even the disaster on Miranda was almost the exact opposite of what they were ''trying'' to do.


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* ''Series/BarbariansRising'' places the UsefulNotes/RomanEmpire in this role for most of its run, with the eponymous barbarians set as LaResistance or TheAlliance.
28th Dec '16 1:16:12 PM ZimFan89
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* In Creator/CSLewis's ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Chronicles of Narnia]]'', Calormen is a subtle instance. First introduced in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' as "a wise, wealthy, courteous, cruel and ancient people," they are also so heavily into the slave trade that the Duke Bern predicts war with Calormen as a result of Caspian ending slavery in the Lone Islands. Although this war is apparently averted (it is not mentioned in ''Literature/TheSilverChair''), the prequel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'' details Prince Rabadash's attempt to conquer Archenland, with a long-term eye on Narnia, some thousand years before. The curse on Rabadash is explicitly described as making life easier for small countries nearby, as he cannot conquer them himself, and is afraid of the power generals would amass if they did so for him. Of course, as ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' details, [[spoiler: Calormen does eventually conquer Narnia, but their triumph is short-lived.]] In the prequel novel ''Literature/TheMagiciansNephew'', the Kingdom of Charn in Jadis' home world was the this even more so. It was rich, powerful, practiced both [[Slavery]], HumanSacrifice and had conquered all other countries of it's world.

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* In Creator/CSLewis's ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Chronicles of Narnia]]'', Calormen is a subtle instance. First introduced in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' as "a wise, wealthy, courteous, cruel and ancient people," they are also so heavily into the slave trade that the Duke Bern predicts war with Calormen as a result of Caspian ending slavery in the Lone Islands. Although this war is apparently averted (it is not mentioned in ''Literature/TheSilverChair''), the prequel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'' details Prince Rabadash's attempt to conquer Archenland, with a long-term eye on Narnia, some thousand years before. The curse on Rabadash is explicitly described as making life easier for small countries nearby, as he cannot conquer them himself, and is afraid of the power generals would amass if they did so for him. Of course, as ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' details, [[spoiler: Calormen does eventually conquer Narnia, but their triumph is short-lived.]] In the prequel novel ''Literature/TheMagiciansNephew'', the Kingdom of Charn in Jadis' home world was the this even more so. It was rich, powerful, practiced both [[Slavery]], slavery, HumanSacrifice and had conquered all other countries of it's world.
16th Dec '16 11:25:57 PM BillyH666
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** Though it is played straight in the spinoff game Redguard, as it is set during the period when Tiber Septim was still conquering all of Tamriel, and one of the main villains is a corrupt Imperial governor.

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** Though it is played straight in the spinoff game Redguard, ''Redguard'', as it is set during the period when Tiber Septim was still conquering all of Tamriel, and one of the main villains is a corrupt Imperial governor.
16th Dec '16 11:25:15 PM BillyH666
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** Though it is played straight in the spinoff game Redguard, as it is set during the period when Tiber Septim was still conquering all of Tamriel, and one of the main villains is a corrupt Imperial governor.
16th Dec '16 2:03:20 PM Rippingtons60
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* In Creator/CSLewis's ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Chronicles of Narnia]]'', Calormen is a subtle instance. First introduced in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' as "a wise, wealthy, courteous, cruel and ancient people," they are also so heavily into the slave trade that the Duke Bern predicts war with Calormen as a result of Caspian ending slavery in the Lone Islands. Although this war is apparently averted (it is not mentioned in ''Literature/TheSilverChair''), the prequel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'' details Prince Rabadash's attempt to conquer Archenland, with a long-term eye on Narnia, some thousand years before. The curse on Rabadash is explicitly described as making life easier for small countries nearby, as he cannot conquer them himself, and is afraid of the power generals would amass if they did so for him. Of course, as ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' details, [[spoiler: Calormen does eventually conquer Narnia, but their triumph is short-lived.]]

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* In Creator/CSLewis's ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Chronicles of Narnia]]'', Calormen is a subtle instance. First introduced in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' as "a wise, wealthy, courteous, cruel and ancient people," they are also so heavily into the slave trade that the Duke Bern predicts war with Calormen as a result of Caspian ending slavery in the Lone Islands. Although this war is apparently averted (it is not mentioned in ''Literature/TheSilverChair''), the prequel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'' details Prince Rabadash's attempt to conquer Archenland, with a long-term eye on Narnia, some thousand years before. The curse on Rabadash is explicitly described as making life easier for small countries nearby, as he cannot conquer them himself, and is afraid of the power generals would amass if they did so for him. Of course, as ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' details, [[spoiler: Calormen does eventually conquer Narnia, but their triumph is short-lived.]]]] In the prequel novel ''Literature/TheMagiciansNephew'', the Kingdom of Charn in Jadis' home world was the this even more so. It was rich, powerful, practiced both [[Slavery]], HumanSacrifice and had conquered all other countries of it's world.
30th Nov '16 10:03:04 PM Fireblood
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* ''Literature/TheCrimsonShadow'': The kingdom of Avon under King Greensparrow.
30th Nov '16 1:32:56 AM Morgenthaler
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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has the Empire of Palamecia, which conquers, destroys, and enslaves seemingly for the heck of it. Partway through the game the Emperor [[spoiler:[[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu kills the devil and usurps his throne]]]]. And as if that weren't enough to make him a {{badass}}, [[spoiler:the expanded GBA release reveals that his "good" side has also taken over the equivalent of Heaven]].

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has the Empire of Palamecia, which conquers, destroys, and enslaves seemingly for the heck of it. Partway through the game the Emperor [[spoiler:[[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu kills the devil and usurps his throne]]]]. And as if that weren't enough to make him a {{badass}}, badass, [[spoiler:the expanded GBA release reveals that his "good" side has also taken over the equivalent of Heaven]].
29th Nov '16 5:21:35 AM StFan
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* The Confederacy in ''Film/AbrahamLincolnVampireHunter''. The vampires effectively control the south, using the slave system as an endless supply of food. [[spoiler: With Adam's death and the end of the slave system, the empire collapses and most of the vampires flee the country.]]
* ''[[WesternAnimation/StarWreck Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning]]'': when Pirk recreates the [[SpaceNavy P-fleet]] by conquering Earth with the help of the Russian president and advanced technology, he quickly [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness disposes of the president]] and titles himself Emperor. However, his "glorious rule" then takes a swan dive, as the new empire seems more concerned with building a SpaceNavy than worrying about the people. They also find out that, being unable to reverse-engineer the FTL drive means that they're stuck in the Solar System without any other habitable worlds to conquer.

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* The Confederacy in ''Film/AbrahamLincolnVampireHunter''. The vampires effectively control the south, using the slave system as an endless supply of food. [[spoiler: With [[spoiler:With Adam's death and the end of the slave system, the empire collapses and most of the vampires flee the country.]]
* ''[[WesternAnimation/StarWreck ''[[WebAnimation/StarWreck Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning]]'': when Pirk recreates the [[SpaceNavy P-fleet]] by conquering Earth with the help of the Russian president and advanced technology, he quickly [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness disposes of the president]] and titles himself Emperor. However, his "glorious rule" then takes a swan dive, as the new empire seems more concerned with building a SpaceNavy than worrying about the people. They also find out that, being unable to reverse-engineer the FTL drive means that they're stuck in the Solar System without any other habitable worlds to conquer.



* The Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Empire'' and ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' novels is a state which has already achieved this goal in the distant past - by the end of the ''Foundation'' series, the Foundation is on its way to achieving the same. Partially subverted in that Asimov doesn't treat these either of these political entities as overtly villainous.\\
\\
Asimov's Empire is explicitly modeled on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire, and the Foundation's therefore bears some resemblance to Byzantium, the Greek-centered "Eastern Roman Empire" that lasted a thousand years longer - but not exactly, as it was set up specifically to reestablish the Empire within a single millennium.
** In the ''Empire'' series, only one novel (''Pebble in the Sky'') has the Galactic Empire. ''The Currents of Space'' has the Trantorian Empire, which is the same polity as the Galactic Empire but before it had grown to cover the entire galaxy (it's still not presented as overtly villainous). ''The Stars, Like Dust'' has the Tyranni, a relatively small empire of some fifty worlds, who ''are'' presented in a villainous light, although not entirely unsympathetic

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* The Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Empire'' and ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' novels is a state which has already achieved this goal in the distant past - by the end of the ''Foundation'' series, the Foundation is on its way to achieving the same. Partially subverted in that Asimov doesn't treat these either of these political entities as overtly villainous.\\
\\
Asimov's Empire is explicitly modeled on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire, and the Foundation's therefore bears some resemblance to Byzantium, the Greek-centered "Eastern Roman Empire" that lasted a thousand years longer - -- but not exactly, as it was set up specifically to reestablish the Empire within a single millennium.
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millennium.\\\
In the ''Empire'' series, only one novel (''Pebble in the Sky'') has the Galactic Empire. ''The Currents of Space'' has the Trantorian Empire, which is the same polity as the Galactic Empire but before it had grown to cover the entire galaxy (it's still not presented as overtly villainous). ''The Stars, Like Dust'' has the Tyranni, a relatively small empire of some fifty worlds, who ''are'' presented in a villainous light, although not entirely unsympatheticunsympathetic.



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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheEmpire