History Main / TheButlerDidIt

18th Jan '17 7:09:22 AM TheAmazingBlachman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


---> '''Drebin:''' Is there a ransom note?\\

to:

---> '''Drebin:''' -->'''Drebin:''' Is there a ransom note?\\
12th Jan '17 3:37:02 AM Luppercus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Snerdly in ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'''s movie ''Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cats'' is the main villain of the story. Is unable to kill someone (is a kid's movie) but certainly tries.
* Fred Flintstone has to deal with a murderous butler when he inherits a property in one episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones''.
4th Jan '17 5:27:17 AM GlitteringFlowers
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The stinking rich Saiki clan has a butler named Katou and a housekeeper/cook named Ohatsu. [[spoiler: Katou didn't do ''many'' things but was responsible for driving ''someone else'' to do terrible things. Until the end, where he snaps and stabs one of the main characters.]] [[spoiler: And Ohatsu did ''not'' do anything... [[MyGreatestFailure But can't forgive herself]] for not doing what she ''should'' have done.]]

to:

** The stinking rich Saiki clan has a butler named Katou and a housekeeper/cook named Ohatsu. [[spoiler: Katou didn't do ''many'' things but was responsible for driving ''someone else'' to do terrible things.them. Until the end, where he snaps and stabs one of the main characters.]] [[spoiler: And Ohatsu did ''not'' do anything... [[MyGreatestFailure But can't forgive herself]] for not doing what she ''should'' have done.]]



* In ''Anime/Danganronpa3'', the ([[FlockOfWolves most important]]) traitor turns out to be that housekeeper who was going around serving tea to everyone in the first episode.

to:

* In ''Anime/Danganronpa3'', the ([[FlockOfWolves most important]]) traitor turns out to be [[spoiler: that housekeeper who was going around serving tea to everyone in the first episode.]]
3rd Jan '17 11:14:09 AM GlitteringFlowers
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** During the very early [[ImperialJapan Meiji era]] (around 1865-1868), a butler from Yokohama named Shokichi led a gang that violently robbed his employer's house and killed the master's son. While the other robbers were "simply" [[OffWithHisHead beheaded]], Shokichi himself was ''crucified and speared''; this is because he ''was'' the servant of his victims, so he was considered the lowest of the low.
26th Dec '16 3:57:16 PM Rebu
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is used in the ''Series/{{Bones}}'' episode "Yanks in the UK", seemingly for the sole purpose of allowing them to use that line. On the other hand, it's arguably a subversion: The butler's confession conveniently stops the investigation and spares his employer's family the public scrutiny of a trial; it's unclear if he in fact "did it."

to:

* This is used in the ''Series/{{Bones}}'' episode "Yanks in the UK", seemingly for the sole purpose of allowing them possibly just to use that the line. On the other hand, it's arguably a subversion: subversion or deconstruction: The butler's confession conveniently stops the investigation and spares his employer's family the public scrutiny of a trial; he says he did it to protect the family's reputation, the family promises to provide him with the "finest legal representation", none of the cops present look convinced, and it's unclear if he in fact "did it."it".
20th Dec '16 10:17:06 AM Bissek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The whole trope came into being from the fact that in Victorian England serving staff were more often than not underpaid, overworked and typically disgruntled. Occasional murders of employees thus weren't unheard of. There is a record of a valet who had memorised his master's schedule to the last detail and once brought him his pillow just before he had intended to ask for it. The master, angry at his presumptuous servant, sent him away and called him immediately back to bring him the pillow. The valet shot him.

to:

* The whole trope came into being from the fact that in Victorian England serving staff were more often than not underpaid, overworked and typically disgruntled. Occasional murders of employees employers thus weren't unheard of. There is a record of a valet who had memorised his master's schedule to the last detail and once brought him his pillow just before he had intended to ask for it. The master, angry at his presumptuous servant, sent him away and called him immediately back to bring him the pillow. The valet shot him.
7th Dec '16 2:22:53 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Subverted twice over in the CabinPressure epsiode ''Paris''. It's Birling Day, when once a year the airline flies the extremely rich and obnoxious Mr. Birling to a rugby match. Every year Carolyn (the airline's owner) provides him with a bottle of very expensive whisky, and every year Douglas (the first officer) steals it. This time Carolyn charges Martin (the captain) with stopping Douglas, and Martin enlists the help of Arthur (Carolyn's son, the steward; he's an idiot, but there's no one else). When the whisky disappears, Douglas insists that he hasn't stolen it (yet). Martin and Douglas come up with a theory as to the guilt of each of the four regular characters (Martin, Douglas, Carolyn and Arthur), in some cases more than one theory per suspect, and one for Mr. Birling himself - ''and'' one for the 'butler' figure of Philip from the airport fire crew, whom Carolyn had frisk Douglas before he got on the plane. But it wasn't Philip. The one person whom ''nobody'' suspects is Mrs. Birling (who appeared briefly near the start of the episode to see off her husband, whom she hates and who hates her)); because of this, GenreSavvy listeners will realise that she must have done it. Except that, [[WordOfGod as the writer explains]] [[http://johnfinnemore.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/stage-direction-ding-ding-ding-ding.html here]], he carefully put her in and had nobody suspect her to trick such listeners into thinking just that - but she didn't steal it either. (Douglas stole it. Douglas ''always'' steals the whisky on Birling Day.)

to:

* Subverted twice over in the CabinPressure Radio/CabinPressure epsiode ''Paris''. It's Birling Day, when once a year the airline flies the extremely rich and obnoxious Mr. Birling to a rugby match. Every year Carolyn (the airline's owner) provides him with a bottle of very expensive whisky, and every year Douglas (the first officer) steals it. This time Carolyn charges Martin (the captain) with stopping Douglas, and Martin enlists the help of Arthur (Carolyn's son, the steward; he's an idiot, but there's no one else). When the whisky disappears, Douglas insists that he hasn't stolen it (yet). Martin and Douglas come up with a theory as to the guilt of each of the four regular characters (Martin, Douglas, Carolyn and Arthur), in some cases more than one theory per suspect, and one for Mr. Birling himself - ''and'' one for the 'butler' figure of Philip from the airport fire crew, whom Carolyn had frisk Douglas before he got on the plane. But it wasn't Philip. The one person whom ''nobody'' suspects is Mrs. Birling (who appeared briefly near the start of the episode to see off her husband, whom she hates and who hates her)); because of this, GenreSavvy listeners will realise that she must have done it. Except that, [[WordOfGod as the writer explains]] [[http://johnfinnemore.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/stage-direction-ding-ding-ding-ding.html here]], he carefully put her in and had nobody suspect her to trick such listeners into thinking just that - but she didn't steal it either. (Douglas stole it. Douglas ''always'' steals the whisky on Birling Day.)
5th Dec '16 6:21:30 PM binaroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The valet did it in ''Series/BatmanAndRobin''.

to:

* The In the 1949 ''Film/BatmanAndRobinSerial'', the valet did it in ''Series/BatmanAndRobin''.of the crotchety inventor was the BigBad.
30th Nov '16 7:43:49 AM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in ''WebComic/PvP'' by having the butler secretly playing the role of "hero". Creator Scott Kurtz explanation of the idea was essentially "if anyone ever discovered the secret lair beneath the mansion, they would obviously suspect the [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob millionaire playboy]] as the hero's secret identity. Meanwhile, [[BeneathSuspicion the butler]] would have skipped town and hired his services out to the next rich employer far away, where he would start his hero gig anew."

to:

* Played with in ''WebComic/PvP'' by having the butler secretly playing the role of "hero". Creator Scott Kurtz Kurtz's explanation of the idea was essentially "if anyone ever discovered the secret lair beneath the mansion, they would obviously suspect the [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob millionaire playboy]] as the hero's secret identity. Meanwhile, [[BeneathSuspicion the butler]] would have skipped town and hired his services out to the next rich employer far away, where he would start his hero gig anew."
22nd Nov '16 1:42:36 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Lampshaded by Jim in ''Film/TheHauntedMansion'' "The butler did it? You've got to be kidding me"

to:

* Lampshaded by Jim in ''Film/TheHauntedMansion'' "The butler did it? [[YouHaveGotToBeKiddingMe You've got to be kidding me"
me."]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 171. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheButlerDidIt