History Main / TheAllSeeingAI

17th May '17 6:13:49 PM Grudgeal
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* At the highest difficulty level, the practice AI in ''VideoGame/AtlasReactor'' ignores the invisibility buff and will hit [[StealthExpert, Nix, PuP, Kaigin]] or [[GeoEffects anyone standing in invisibility panels]] with 100% accuracy.

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* At the highest difficulty level, the practice AI in ''VideoGame/AtlasReactor'' ignores the invisibility buff and will hit [[StealthExpert, [[StealthExpert Nix, PuP, Kaigin]] or [[GeoEffects anyone standing in invisibility panels]] with 100% accuracy.
17th May '17 6:13:28 PM Grudgeal
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Added DiffLines:

* At the highest difficulty level, the practice AI in ''VideoGame/AtlasReactor'' ignores the invisibility buff and will hit [[StealthExpert, Nix, PuP, Kaigin]] or [[GeoEffects anyone standing in invisibility panels]] with 100% accuracy.
16th Apr '17 4:01:59 PM nombretomado
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* If you kill a baby or eat an egg in {{Spore}}, the ''entire'' species ''[[AttackAttackAttack will]]'' [[ThisIsUnforgivable know.]] Always.

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* If you kill a baby or eat an egg in {{Spore}}, ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'', the ''entire'' species ''[[AttackAttackAttack will]]'' [[ThisIsUnforgivable know.]] Always.
29th Mar '17 2:53:07 AM plenum
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When it doesn't, you have an All Seeing AI: Stealth is useless, no surprises are possible, and it will (almost) never miss a shot. Consequently, players should not bother with misdirection, flanking, or other forms of deception and psychological warfare that would work wonderfully against actual humans. This is often the reason for UselessUsefulStealth in games that are not specifically stealth-centric. In a similar manner, high-difficulty-setting fighting game opponents can read your controller input to counter your move before you can even use it properly.

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When it doesn't, you have an All Seeing AI: Stealth is useless, no surprises are possible, and it will (almost) never miss a shot. Consequently, players should not bother with misdirection, flanking, or other forms of deception and psychological warfare that would work wonderfully against actual humans. This is often the reason for UselessUsefulStealth in games that are not specifically stealth-centric. In a similar manner, high-difficulty-setting fighting game opponents [[PerfectPlayAI can read your controller input to counter your move move]] before you can even use it properly.
8th Feb '17 9:51:52 PM jormis29
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* ''[[Franchise/TalesSeries Tales Of Link]]'' is notorious for the AI only turning on tile targeting attacks (which often do significantly more damage) when you are about to get those tiles. It will never try this when you're about to get tiles it wouldn't hit.

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* ''[[Franchise/TalesSeries Tales Of Link]]'' ''VideoGame/TalesOfLink'' is notorious for the AI only turning on tile targeting attacks (which often do significantly more damage) when you are about to get those tiles. It will never try this when you're about to get tiles it wouldn't hit.
10th Jan '17 7:00:19 AM erforce
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* In ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Airborne'', enemies know when you are scoped in while using a sniper rifle and move just out of the way. Paranoid Nazis.

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* In ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Airborne'', ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'', enemies know when you are scoped in while using a sniper rifle and move just out of the way. Paranoid Nazis.



** Same for the railgun snipers in ''RedFaction'', whose guns can also shoot through walls.
* ''OperationFlashpoint'' has enemies that will shoot you. Without any chance to see even one pixel of them even if you look exactly in the direction you see the bullet coming from. This starts going downhill but continues anyway in the later games - it isn't until ''{{ARMA}} II: Operation Arrowhead'' that the AI finally plays fair (which is rather ironic, given that the expansion's [[{{Qurac}} Takistan]] doesn't have as much foliage for the AI to magically see you through anyway).
** In ''OperationFlashpoint'', an AI soldier has his aiming and vision capacity very handicapped in night time... even when standing in a well-lit town or any other location where they really shouldn't be.

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** Same for the railgun snipers in ''RedFaction'', ''VideoGame/RedFaction'', whose guns can also shoot through walls.
* ''OperationFlashpoint'' ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint'' has enemies that will shoot you. Without any chance to see even one pixel of them even if you look exactly in the direction you see the bullet coming from. This starts going downhill but continues anyway in the later games - it isn't until ''{{ARMA}} II: Operation Arrowhead'' that the AI finally plays fair (which is rather ironic, given that the expansion's [[{{Qurac}} Takistan]] doesn't have as much foliage for the AI to magically see you through anyway).
** In ''OperationFlashpoint'', ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint'', an AI soldier has his aiming and vision capacity very handicapped in night time... even when standing in a well-lit town or any other location where they really shouldn't be.



* In ''SoldierOfFortune: Payback'''s final stage, "Club Evolution", the dancefloor's disco lights are blindingly bright to you, but they don't faze the {{Mooks}} one iota.

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* In ''SoldierOfFortune: ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune: Payback'''s final stage, "Club Evolution", the dancefloor's disco lights are blindingly bright to you, but they don't faze the {{Mooks}} one iota.
1st Jan '17 8:43:39 PM nizzemancer
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* In the Batman Arkham games Predator rooms, the mooks always know where you are, this can be tested by sitting on a gorgoyle or other "hidden" position while using the Remote batarang on the other side of the room to pester the henchmen, eventually one of them will get fed up, shout "he's over here", run across the room/map, look up and "find" you.
20th Nov '16 5:17:55 AM FloweyTheFlower006
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Added DiffLines:

*''VideoGame/TomodachiLife'''s VS Memory Match. The Miis know exactly where the matches are without one look at the board.
13th Nov '16 3:59:07 AM Skargoth
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[[folder:Board Games]]
* Some old ''TabletopGame/{{Battleship}}'' games fit this trope - you didn't know where the AI's ships were placed, yet for some reason, they knew where you placed yours. So imagine, to many players horror, that the AI absolutely ''never'' missed because it knew ''exactly'' where you placed your ships while you were left guessing as it hit every single one of your ships.
[[/folder]]



* Sometimes happens in poorly written computer poker games. If the computer makes large bets and multiple reraises while holding cards that are complete rubbish, and then proceeds to pull an improbable victory out of the draw - like if it bets huge on a 2-7 off-suit in Texas Hold 'Em and ends up with a full house, or replaces four cards in five-card draw and hits a straight flush - the odds are good that you're dealing with this trope, especially if you notice it happening multiple times per game. Another clue is if you notice the computer frequently drops whenever you get a strong hand, even if you bet minimally or not at all...as if it somehow knows it can't beat you.
* This is why winning a game of Microsoft Hearts is nigh impossible. Bad enough that [[GangUpOnTheHuman the AI will gang up on you]], they know what your cards are, and they know exactly which cards to play that will put you at disadvantage.



* In ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'', Xavier's InterfaceScrew spell is absolutely useless against AI opponents.



* ''VideoGame/{{DOOM}}'': Monsters that have been alerted to your presence will "know" where you are and attempt to get to you to attack regardless of where you are in the level, although this is mitigated by their lack of pathfinding A.I. If you enable monster visibility on the minimap, you can watch them bonking into walls like confused ducklings trying to random-walk through a maze.
* In early versions of ''Videogame/EYEDivineCybermancy'', mooks would always know where the player was the instant they deactivated their cloaking device, leading to annoying scenarios of players being sniped through the [[CyberpunkWithAChanceOfRain oppressive cyberpunk fog of doom]] from across the level by a mook with an anti-materiel rifle. Later updates gave AI reaction times, and proper line-of-sight detection.



* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor''. This rears its ugly head in the Command Post, where the guards will clairvoyantly detect you sneaking in and sound the alarm (especially on Hard difficulty), and in Sniper Town, where the snipers have greater visual range than you and will instantly hit you the moment you step into their line of sight, and enemies in general will accurately chuck grenades from places where they shouldn't be able to see you. And once you tip off a guard in a StealthBasedMission, all the enemies in the level know it.
* In ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Airborne'', enemies know when you are scoped in while using a sniper rifle and move just out of the way. Paranoid Nazis.
** Apparently, [[ProperlyParanoid it works out pretty good for them.]]
** Same for the railgun snipers in ''RedFaction'', whose guns can also shoot through walls.



* In VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, Mobs can actually see you from behind. While yes, you could say they simply heard you walking, but they'll do it from about twenty feet away. But even worse than this? Mobs can see you ''through walls''. As long as you step into their aggro range, a mob will come screaming at you, whether it makes any sense or not. This was particularly bad underwater, like in a shipwreck, adding to the infuriating nature of underwater quests.
** Stealth won't always save you either. In fact, some enemies have a larger radius for detecting stealthed players than their normal one.



[[folder:[=MOBA=]]]
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm'' offers up an amusing variation. A.I. bots know exactly where you are if you're cloaked [[note]]Nova and Zeratul cloak automatically, while other heroes have to talent into it.[[/note]], but do not realize you're there if you're hiding in concealing terrain like tall grass. If you're cloaked ''and'' hiding in said terrain, the former overrides the latter and the A.I knows where you are.
[[/folder]]



* In ''VideoGame/{{Test Drive}}'' Unlimited there's a 90% chance that if you hit a traffic car, the police will start looking for you immediately, even when there aren't any police cars in the area.



* In ''VideoGame/SevenKingdoms'', the AI ignores FogOfWar and unexplored areas, and always knows where everything is. This becomes especially noticeable when playing as Japan, as their Seat of Power lets them see when other players target their buildings -- from the other end of the map, without ever having seen that civilization before.



* The AI in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is coded so that it always knows where your characters are, but isn't allowed to target any being outside its sight range or under an invisibility effect. This makes stealth completely useless beyond a certain level because the AI is programmed to counter invisibility effects with the spell True Sight. This means that when you enter a mage's sight radius while stealthed it will immediately cast True Sight and dispel it, revealing that the AI always knew you were there.
** In the second game there is a cloak that makes the user immune to any form of magical detection, preventing enemies from succeeding with this trick. However they will still twitch and cast it over and over, showing that they know you are there and they would attack you if only the programming would allow it.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' being caught committing a crime or act of bad karma, such as pickpocketing, theft, murder, breaking and entering, or using the Mesmetron to enslave someone, will immediately alert all the people in the location and turn them hostile.
** Also, after getting a certain level of karma (either good or bad) you get hitmen sent after you. The first encounter is a scripted encounter that comes after you exit a metro station some time after attaining the required karma level. And they ''will'' find you. It doesn't matter if you're wearing the Chinese Stealth Suit at that moment, they'll walk right up to you and tell you they're going to kill you.
** A minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'': using silenced weapons in hiding can let you get away with killing people, but killing certain high-ranking [=NPCs=] will always earn you infamy and make members of that faction or town hostile. In the case of the NCR and Legion, killing one of their leaders will cause them to declare you a terrorist and become permanently hostile. Although the trope is in play with gameplay, it makes sense from a story perspective, as those characters are well guarded, so the player character is the only one with the opportunity and motive to kill them in the course of the game. The two major factions also send hitmen after you in scripted encounters ("The Caesar has marked you for death, ready yourself for battle!"); like ''Fallout 3'', they always track you down once you enter their patrol areas, even if you are in Sneak mode.
*** Inexplicably, the member of the Boomers using the artillery cannon can always tell where you are even if you're in hiding and using a Stealth Boy.
*** At the end of the ''Dead Money'' DLC, if you try to shortcut out of the vault, Elijah will automatically detect you and reactivate the force fields and turrets.
*** The Nightstalkers, Cazadores, Cyberdogs, and even Lobotomites in ''Old World Blues'' have ridiculously high perception that allows them to detect the player a half-mile away even when they have a stealthboy on.



* In ''Pro Cycling Manager 2014'', the AI can tell the difference between whether you have one rider relaying the regular way or a rider up front using individual effort to relay. This can actually work in the player's advantage, since the AI has a tendency to go into douchebag mode and relay harder than the player wants, but only if the player also relays, and stop immediately when the player does. Using this, it's possible to relay without dealing with annoying AI.



* Redcoats in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' are particularly good at tracking Connor through the busy streets of such bustling Colonial cities as New York and Boston, even if you dive under a fence, through a back yard, climb onto a roof and drop down onto the deck of a ship, you can bet at least one persistant Brit managed to follow you, and the rest are all figuring out another way to get to you. The only way to shake them is to either escape outside their search range, or to get out of their line of sight and dive into a hiding place, such as a pile of hay or cart full of greenery.
* As soon as you reveal that there's an intruder in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', even if you don't telegraph your position (say, by shooting somone in the head with a silenced pistol from behind cover), everyone comes running straight for you.
** In the sequel, since the ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Omar]]'' are a HiveMind, if you kill one, the entire race turns against you.



* In ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'', if 47 must avoid or kill a rival assassin before they can kill him, said rival always instantly sees through 47's current disguise, no matter what it is or how low the alert meter is.



* If you blow your cover in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell'', the enemies in the level will all know your position.
** ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellConviction Conviction]]'' refined this; enemies now fire and search Sam's last known position, allowing him to sneak around and flank them. Sam himself gains "Sonic Goggles" that let ''him'' see enemies through walls. [[spoiler:In the very level he gets them, he faces foes armed with similar devices. Uh-oh.]]
* In ''VideoGame/ThiefTheDarkProject'' and ''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge'', if you alert an NPC and then hide in a dark area, the NPC will always end up walking ''directly'' towards your precise location while "searching".
* In the ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'' series, enemies can detect you in pitch blackness even if they lack night vision goggles.



* In ''VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident'', the A.I. can see you clear across the map, unhindered by the huge jungle full of trees and foliage. This results in a lot of abrupt attacks from out of nowhere. At other times, the A.I. will completely ignore you when you're standing right in front of them.
* If you cause an explosion or some loud noise in ''VideoGame/DyingLight'', a fast zombie will literally burst out of nowhere and zero in on you, even if you're miles away from the explosion point, or dozens of feet above them. Note that the Volatiles, which hunt you down during the night aren't that good and will even lose track of you if you get away.



[[folder:Turn-Based Strategy]]
* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It kind of does this for you as well. In Civ 4, at least, the game will suggest where to settle your city, and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.

to:

[[folder:Turn-Based Strategy]]
[[folder:Survival Sandbox]]
* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting The hostiles in VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} are like this, but only after they've already spotted you the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource
normal way. Then they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It
track your movement through any kind of does this for wall and even [[ActionBomb explode]] from behind a thin wall. Results in ArtificialStupidity in that transparent blocks like glass count as walls, so mobs cannot see you as well. through glass unless you've already been spotted through just air.
** Played straight with Spiders and their poisonous relatives Cave Spiders. They can sense you through walls.
*
In Civ 4, at least, the game ''{{VideoGame/Unturned}}'', once you've been detected, zombies are extremely hard to shake and will suggest where to settle home in on your city, location regardless of line of sight or sound. Stand on top of a hangar with a horde of zombies chasing you at the northwest corner, crawl over the top to the southeast corner and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.watch the horde run around or through the building to your position.



[[folder:Third-Person Shooter]]
* In the middle of the [[spoiler:Rub' al Khali]] desert in ''VideoGame/Uncharted3DrakesDeception'', a sandstorm stirs up as the player reaches [[spoiler:Ubar]]. In the middle of the firefight (with a mounted turret, even) it's almost impossible to see a few feet past Drake, forcing the player to pay attention to the direction of the shots and make blind fire toward their general direction. Meanwhile, no matter how skillfully the player flanks the enemy or darts about the arena, they will ''always'' be tracked and targeted with accuracy by the AI.
* ''Videogame/{{Warframe}}'' has this as a gameplay element, in a sense. Enemies won't know you are nearby (and are [[ArtificialStupidity pretty bad at noticing the technicolor ninja with glowing lights]]) at first, but if you are detected, the enemies in the area will all become alerted and react in this way- and if one of them reaches a terminal to activate an alarm it'll cause every enemy for the rest of the level to automatically know where you are once you enter their area. Additionally, bosses and their spawned minions are automatically "alerted".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn-Based Strategy]]
* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It kind of does this for you as well. In Civ 4, at least, the game will suggest where to settle your city, and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.
[[/folder]]



* In ''VideoGame/JustCause 2'', causing any sabotage will set off the alarm, no matter where you are, even if you caused the sabotage by setting off a C4 in the next island, and even if you did not even cause the sabotage to happen. However, even if they ''do'' know where you are, [[ArtificialStupidity if they can't physically see and shoot at you while you're there, eventually they'll actually forget about you.]]




* If you blow your cover in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell'', the enemies in the level will all know your position.
** ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellConviction Conviction]]'' refined this; enemies now fire and search Sam's last known position, allowing him to sneak around and flank them. Sam himself gains "Sonic Goggles" that let ''him'' see enemies through walls. [[spoiler:In the very level he gets them, he faces foes armed with similar devices. Uh-oh.]]
* In VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, Mobs can actually see you from behind. While yes, you could say they simply heard you walking, but they'll do it from about twenty feet away. But even worse than this? Mobs can see you ''through walls''. As long as you step into their aggro range, a mob will come screaming at you, whether it makes any sense or not. This was particularly bad underwater, like in a shipwreck, adding to the infuriating nature of underwater quests.
** Stealth won't always save you either. In fact, some enemies have a larger radius for detecting stealthed players than their normal one.
* In ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'', Xavier's InterfaceScrew spell is absolutely useless against AI opponents.
* Some old ''TabletopGame/{{Battleship}}'' games fit this trope - you didn't know where the AI's ships were placed, yet for some reason, they knew where you placed yours. So imagine, to many players horror, that the AI absolutely ''never'' missed because it knew ''exactly'' where you placed your ships while you were left guessing as it hit every single one of your ships.
* In ''VideoGame/ThiefTheDarkProject'' and ''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge'', if you alert an NPC and then hide in a dark area, the NPC will always end up walking ''directly'' towards your precise location while "searching".
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor''. This rears its ugly head in the Command Post, where the guards will clairvoyantly detect you sneaking in and sound the alarm (especially on Hard difficulty), and in Sniper Town, where the snipers have greater visual range than you and will instantly hit you the moment you step into their line of sight, and enemies in general will accurately chuck grenades from places where they shouldn't be able to see you. And once you tip off a guard in a StealthBasedMission, all the enemies in the level know it.
* Sometimes happens in poorly written computer poker games. If the computer makes large bets and multiple reraises while holding cards that are complete rubbish, and then proceeds to pull an improbable victory out of the draw - like if it bets huge on a 2-7 off-suit in Texas Hold 'Em and ends up with a full house, or replaces four cards in five-card draw and hits a straight flush - the odds are good that you're dealing with this trope, especially if you notice it happening multiple times per game. Another clue is if you notice the computer frequently drops whenever you get a strong hand, even if you bet minimally or not at all...as if it somehow knows it can't beat you.
* In ''VideoGame/SevenKingdoms'', the AI ignores FogOfWar and unexplored areas, and always knows where everything is. This becomes especially noticeable when playing as Japan, as their Seat of Power lets them see when other players target their buildings -- from the other end of the map, without ever having seen that civilization before.
* The hostiles in VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} are like this, but only after they've already spotted you the normal way. Then they can track your movement through any kind of wall and even [[ActionBomb explode]] from behind a thin wall. Results in ArtificialStupidity in that transparent blocks like glass count as walls, so mobs cannot see you through glass unless you've already been spotted through just air.
** Played straight with Spiders and their poisonous relatives Cave Spiders. They can sense you through walls.
* As soon as you reveal that there's an intruder in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', even if you don't telegraph your position (say, by shooting somone in the head with a silenced pistol from behind cover), everyone comes running straight for you.
** In the sequel, since the ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Omar]]'' are a HiveMind, if you kill one, the entire race turns against you.
* In ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Airborne'', enemies know when you are scoped in while using a sniper rifle and move just out of the way. Paranoid Nazis.
** Apparently, [[ProperlyParanoid it works out pretty good for them.]]
** Same for the railgun snipers in ''RedFaction'', whose guns can also shoot through walls.

to:

\n* If you blow your cover in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell'', the enemies in the level will all know your position.\n** ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellConviction Conviction]]'' refined this; enemies now fire and search Sam's last known position, allowing him to sneak around and flank them. Sam himself gains "Sonic Goggles" that let ''him'' see enemies through walls. [[spoiler:In the very level he gets them, he faces foes armed with similar devices. Uh-oh.]]\n* In VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, Mobs can actually see you from behind. While yes, you could say they simply heard you walking, but they'll do it from about twenty feet away. But even worse than this? Mobs can see you ''through walls''. As long as you step into their aggro range, a mob will come screaming at you, whether it makes any sense or not. This was particularly bad underwater, like in a shipwreck, adding to the infuriating nature of underwater quests.\n** Stealth won't always save you either. In fact, some enemies have a larger radius for detecting stealthed players than their normal one.\n* In ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'', Xavier's InterfaceScrew spell is absolutely useless against AI opponents.\n* Some old ''TabletopGame/{{Battleship}}'' games fit this trope - you didn't know where the AI's ships were placed, yet for some reason, they knew where you placed yours. So imagine, to many players horror, that the AI absolutely ''never'' missed because it knew ''exactly'' where you placed your ships while you were left guessing as it hit every single one of your ships.\n* In ''VideoGame/ThiefTheDarkProject'' and ''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge'', if you alert an NPC and then hide in a dark area, the NPC will always end up walking ''directly'' towards your precise location while "searching".\n* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor''. This rears its ugly head in the Command Post, where the guards will clairvoyantly detect you sneaking in and sound the alarm (especially on Hard difficulty), and in Sniper Town, where the snipers have greater visual range than you and will instantly hit you the moment you step into their line of sight, and enemies in general will accurately chuck grenades from places where they shouldn't be able to see you. And once you tip off a guard in a StealthBasedMission, all the enemies in the level know it.\n* Sometimes happens in poorly written computer poker games. If the computer makes large bets and multiple reraises while holding cards that are complete rubbish, and then proceeds to pull an improbable victory out of the draw - like if it bets huge on a 2-7 off-suit in Texas Hold 'Em and ends up with a full house, or replaces four cards in five-card draw and hits a straight flush - the odds are good that you're dealing with this trope, especially if you notice it happening multiple times per game. Another clue is if you notice the computer frequently drops whenever you get a strong hand, even if you bet minimally or not at all...as if it somehow knows it can't beat you.\n* In ''VideoGame/SevenKingdoms'', the AI ignores FogOfWar and unexplored areas, and always knows where everything is. This becomes especially noticeable when playing as Japan, as their Seat of Power lets them see when other players target their buildings -- from the other end of the map, without ever having seen that civilization before.\n* The hostiles in VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} are like this, but only after they've already spotted you the normal way. Then they can track your movement through any kind of wall and even [[ActionBomb explode]] from behind a thin wall. Results in ArtificialStupidity in that transparent blocks like glass count as walls, so mobs cannot see you through glass unless you've already been spotted through just air.\n** Played straight with Spiders and their poisonous relatives Cave Spiders. They can sense you through walls.\n* As soon as you reveal that there's an intruder in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', even if you don't telegraph your position (say, by shooting somone in the head with a silenced pistol from behind cover), everyone comes running straight for you.\n** In the sequel, since the ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Omar]]'' are a HiveMind, if you kill one, the entire race turns against you.\n* In ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Airborne'', enemies know when you are scoped in while using a sniper rifle and move just out of the way. Paranoid Nazis.\n** Apparently, [[ProperlyParanoid it works out pretty good for them.]]\n** Same for the railgun snipers in ''RedFaction'', whose guns can also shoot through walls.[[folder:Other Games]]



* In ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'', if 47 must avoid or kill a rival assassin before they can kill him, said rival always instantly sees through 47's current disguise, no matter what it is or how low the alert meter is.
* In ''VideoGame/JustCause 2'', causing any sabotage will set off the alarm, no matter where you are, even if you caused the sabotage by setting off a C4 in the next island, and even if you did not even cause the sabotage to happen. However, even if they ''do'' know where you are, [[ArtificialStupidity if they can't physically see and shoot at you while you're there, eventually they'll actually forget about you.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' being caught committing a crime or act of bad karma, such as pickpocketing, theft, murder, breaking and entering, or using the Mesmetron to enslave someone, will immediately alert all the people in the location and turn them hostile.
** Also, after getting a certain level of karma (either good or bad) you get hitmen sent after you. The first encounter is a scripted encounter that comes after you exit a metro station some time after attaining the required karma level. And they ''will'' find you. It doesn't matter if you're wearing the Chinese Stealth Suit at that moment, they'll walk right up to you and tell you they're going to kill you.
** A minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'': using silenced weapons in hiding can let you get away with killing people, but killing certain high-ranking [=NPCs=] will always earn you infamy and make members of that faction or town hostile. In the case of the NCR and Legion, killing one of their leaders will cause them to declare you a terrorist and become permanently hostile. Although the trope is in play with gameplay, it makes sense from a story perspective, as those characters are well guarded, so the player character is the only one with the opportunity and motive to kill them in the course of the game. The two major factions also send hitmen after you in scripted encounters ("The Caesar has marked you for death, ready yourself for battle!"); like ''Fallout 3'', they always track you down once you enter their patrol areas, even if you are in Sneak mode.
*** Inexplicably, the member of the Boomers using the artillery cannon can always tell where you are even if you're in hiding and using a Stealth Boy.
*** At the end of the ''Dead Money'' DLC, if you try to shortcut out of the vault, Elijah will automatically detect you and reactivate the force fields and turrets.
*** The Nightstalkers, Cazadores, Cyberdogs, and even Lobotomites in ''Old World Blues'' have ridiculously high perception that allows them to detect the player a half-mile away even when they have a stealthboy on.
* Redcoats in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' are particularly good at tracking Connor through the busy streets of such bustling Colonial cities as New York and Boston, even if you dive under a fence, through a back yard, climb onto a roof and drop down onto the deck of a ship, you can bet at least one persistant Brit managed to follow you, and the rest are all figuring out another way to get to you. The only way to shake them is to either escape outside their search range, or to get out of their line of sight and dive into a hiding place, such as a pile of hay or cart full of greenery.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Test Drive}}'' Unlimited there's a 90% chance that if you hit a traffic car, the police will start looking for you immediately, even when there aren't any police cars in the area.
* The AI in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is coded so that it always knows where your characters are, but isn't allowed to target any being outside its sight range or under an invisibility effect. This makes stealth completely useless beyond a certain level because the AI is programmed to counter invisibility effects with the spell True Sight. This means that when you enter a mage's sight radius while stealthed it will immediately cast True Sight and dispel it, revealing that the AI always knew you were there.
** In the second game there is a cloak that makes the user immune to any form of magical detection, preventing enemies from succeeding with this trick. However they will still twitch and cast it over and over, showing that they know you are there and they would attack you if only the programming would allow it.
* ''VideoGame/{{DOOM}}'': Monsters that have been alerted to your presence will "know" where you are and attempt to get to you to attack regardless of where you are in the level, although this is mitigated by their lack of pathfinding A.I. If you enable monster visibility on the minimap, you can watch them bonking into walls like confused ducklings trying to random-walk through a maze.
* In the ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'' series, enemies can detect you in pitch blackness even if they lack night vision goggles.
* This is why winning a game of Microsoft Hearts is nigh impossible. Bad enough that [[GangUpOnTheHuman the AI will gang up on you]], they know what your cards are, and they know exactly which cards to play that will put you at disadvantage.
* ''Videogame/{{Warframe}}'' has this as a gameplay element, in a sense. Enemies won't know you are nearby (and are [[ArtificialStupidity pretty bad at noticing the technicolor ninja with glowing lights]]) at first, but if you are detected, the enemies in the area will all become alerted and react in this way- and if one of them reaches a terminal to activate an alarm it'll cause every enemy for the rest of the level to automatically know where you are once you enter their area. Additionally, bosses and their spawned minions are automatically "alerted".

to:

* In ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'', if 47 must avoid or kill a rival assassin before they can kill him, said rival always instantly sees through 47's current disguise, no matter what it is or how low the alert meter is.
* In ''VideoGame/JustCause 2'', causing any sabotage will set off the alarm, no matter where you are, even if you caused the sabotage by setting off a C4 in the next island, and even if you did not even cause the sabotage to happen. However, even if they ''do'' know where you are, [[ArtificialStupidity if they can't physically see and shoot at you while you're there, eventually they'll actually forget about you.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' being caught committing a crime or act of bad karma, such as pickpocketing, theft, murder, breaking and entering, or using the Mesmetron to enslave someone, will immediately alert all the people in the location and turn them hostile.
** Also, after getting a certain level of karma (either good or bad) you get hitmen sent after you. The first encounter is a scripted encounter that comes after you exit a metro station some time after attaining the required karma level. And they ''will'' find you. It doesn't matter if you're wearing the Chinese Stealth Suit at that moment, they'll walk right up to you and tell you they're going to kill you.
** A minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'': using silenced weapons in hiding can let you get away with killing people, but killing certain high-ranking [=NPCs=] will always earn you infamy and make members of that faction or town hostile. In the case of the NCR and Legion, killing one of their leaders will cause them to declare you a terrorist and become permanently hostile. Although the trope is in play with gameplay, it makes sense from a story perspective, as those characters are well guarded, so the player character is the only one with the opportunity and motive to kill them in the course of the game. The two major factions also send hitmen after you in scripted encounters ("The Caesar has marked you for death, ready yourself for battle!"); like ''Fallout 3'', they always track you down once you enter their patrol areas, even if you are in Sneak mode.
*** Inexplicably, the member of the Boomers using the artillery cannon can always tell where you are even if you're in hiding and using a Stealth Boy.
*** At the end of the ''Dead Money'' DLC, if you try to shortcut out of the vault, Elijah will automatically detect you and reactivate the force fields and turrets.
*** The Nightstalkers, Cazadores, Cyberdogs, and even Lobotomites in ''Old World Blues'' have ridiculously high perception that allows them to detect the player a half-mile away even when they have a stealthboy on.
* Redcoats in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' are particularly good at tracking Connor through the busy streets of such bustling Colonial cities as New York and Boston, even if you dive under a fence, through a back yard, climb onto a roof and drop down onto the deck of a ship, you can bet at least one persistant Brit managed to follow you, and the rest are all figuring out another way to get to you. The only way to shake them is to either escape outside their search range, or to get out of their line of sight and dive into a hiding place, such as a pile of hay or cart full of greenery.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Test Drive}}'' Unlimited there's a 90% chance that if you hit a traffic car, the police will start looking for you immediately, even when there aren't any police cars in the area.
* The AI in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is coded so that it always knows where your characters are, but isn't allowed to target any being outside its sight range or under an invisibility effect. This makes stealth completely useless beyond a certain level because the AI is programmed to counter invisibility effects with the spell True Sight. This means that when you enter a mage's sight radius while stealthed it will immediately cast True Sight and dispel it, revealing that the AI always knew you were there.
** In the second
[[/folder]]

!!Non-video
game there is a cloak that makes the user immune to any form of magical detection, preventing enemies from succeeding with this trick. However they will still twitch and cast it over and over, showing that they know you are there and they would attack you if only the programming would allow it.
* ''VideoGame/{{DOOM}}'': Monsters that have been alerted to your presence will "know" where you are and attempt to get to you to attack regardless of where you are in the level, although this is mitigated by their lack of pathfinding A.I. If you enable monster visibility on the minimap, you can watch them bonking into walls like confused ducklings trying to random-walk through a maze.
* In the ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'' series, enemies can detect you in pitch blackness even if they lack night vision goggles.
* This is why winning a game of Microsoft Hearts is nigh impossible. Bad enough that [[GangUpOnTheHuman the AI will gang up on you]], they know what your cards are, and they know exactly which cards to play that will put you at disadvantage.
* ''Videogame/{{Warframe}}'' has this as a gameplay element, in a sense. Enemies won't know you are nearby (and are [[ArtificialStupidity pretty bad at noticing the technicolor ninja with glowing lights]]) at first, but if you are detected, the enemies in the area will all become alerted and react in this way- and if one of them reaches a terminal to activate an alarm it'll cause every enemy for the rest of the level to automatically know where you are once you enter their area. Additionally, bosses and their spawned minions are automatically "alerted".
examples

[[folder:Western Animation]]



* In ''{{VideoGame/Unturned}}'', once you've been detected, zombies are extremely hard to shake and will home in on your location regardless of line of sight or sound. Stand on top of a hangar with a horde of zombies chasing you at the northwest corner, crawl over the top to the southeast corner and watch the horde run around or through the building to your position.
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm'' offers up an amusing variation. A.I. bots know exactly where you are if you're cloaked [[note]]Nova and Zeratul cloak automatically, while other heroes have to talent into it.[[/note]], but do not realize you're there if you're hiding in concealing terrain like tall grass. If you're cloaked ''and'' hiding in said terrain, the former overrides the latter and the A.I knows where you are.
* If you cause an explosion or some loud noise in ''VideoGame/DyingLight'', a fast zombie will literally burst out of nowhere and zero in on you, even if you're miles away from the explosion point, or dozens of feet above them. Note that the Volatiles, which hunt you down during the night aren't that good and will even lose track of you if you get away.
* In ''VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident'', the A.I. can see you clear across the map, unhindered by the huge jungle full of trees and foliage. This results in a lot of abrupt attacks from out of nowhere. At other times, the A.I. will completely ignore you when you're standing right in front of them.
* In ''Pro Cycling Manager 2014'', the AI can tell the difference between whether you have one rider relaying the regular way or a rider up front using individual effort to relay. This can actually work in the player's advantage, since the AI has a tendency to go into douchebag mode and relay harder than the player wants, but only if the player also relays, and stop immediately when the player does. Using this, it's possible to relay without dealing with annoying AI.
* In early versions of ''Videogame/EYEDivineCybermancy'', mooks would always know where the player was the instant they deactivated their cloaking device, leading to annoying scenarios of players being sniped through the [[CyberpunkWithAChanceOfRain oppressive cyberpunk fog of doom]] from across the level by a mook with an anti-materiel rifle. Later updates gave AI reaction times, and proper line-of-sight detection.

[[AC:ThirdPersonShooter]]
* In the middle of the [[spoiler:Rub' al Khali]] desert in ''VideoGame/Uncharted3DrakesDeception'', a sandstorm stirs up as the player reaches [[spoiler:Ubar]]. In the middle of the firefight (with a mounted turret, even) it's almost impossible to see a few feet past Drake, forcing the player to pay attention to the direction of the shots and make blind fire toward their general direction. Meanwhile, no matter how skillfully the player flanks the enemy or darts about the arena, they will ''always'' be tracked and targeted with accuracy by the AI.

to:

* In ''{{VideoGame/Unturned}}'', once you've been detected, zombies are extremely hard to shake and will home in on your location regardless of line of sight or sound. Stand on top of a hangar with a horde of zombies chasing you at the northwest corner, crawl over the top to the southeast corner and watch the horde run around or through the building to your position.
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm'' offers up an amusing variation. A.I. bots know exactly where you are if you're cloaked [[note]]Nova and Zeratul cloak automatically, while other heroes have to talent into it.[[/note]], but do not realize you're there if you're hiding in concealing terrain like tall grass. If you're cloaked ''and'' hiding in said terrain, the former overrides the latter and the A.I knows where you are.
* If you cause an explosion or some loud noise in ''VideoGame/DyingLight'', a fast zombie will literally burst out of nowhere and zero in on you, even if you're miles away from the explosion point, or dozens of feet above them. Note that the Volatiles, which hunt you down during the night aren't that good and will even lose track of you if you get away.
* In ''VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident'', the A.I. can see you clear across the map, unhindered by the huge jungle full of trees and foliage. This results in a lot of abrupt attacks from out of nowhere. At other times, the A.I. will completely ignore you when you're standing right in front of them.
* In ''Pro Cycling Manager 2014'', the AI can tell the difference between whether you have one rider relaying the regular way or a rider up front using individual effort to relay. This can actually work in the player's advantage, since the AI has a tendency to go into douchebag mode and relay harder than the player wants, but only if the player also relays, and stop immediately when the player does. Using this, it's possible to relay without dealing with annoying AI.
* In early versions of ''Videogame/EYEDivineCybermancy'', mooks would always know where the player was the instant they deactivated their cloaking device, leading to annoying scenarios of players being sniped through the [[CyberpunkWithAChanceOfRain oppressive cyberpunk fog of doom]] from across the level by a mook with an anti-materiel rifle. Later updates gave AI reaction times, and proper line-of-sight detection.

[[AC:ThirdPersonShooter]]
* In the middle of the [[spoiler:Rub' al Khali]] desert in ''VideoGame/Uncharted3DrakesDeception'', a sandstorm stirs up as the player reaches [[spoiler:Ubar]]. In the middle of the firefight (with a mounted turret, even) it's almost impossible to see a few feet past Drake, forcing the player to pay attention to the direction of the shots and make blind fire toward their general direction. Meanwhile, no matter how skillfully the player flanks the enemy or darts about the arena, they will ''always'' be tracked and targeted with accuracy by the AI.
[[/folder]]
13th Nov '16 3:22:38 AM Skargoth
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[[foldercontrol]]



[[folder:Card Games]]
* A lot of the ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' games before the DS's release have done this:
** While this was perfectly justified for Pegasus, who actually had this ability in the series, it doesn't excuse the other opponents. Pegasus is always extra blatant about this in any game he's in. This is most obvious in Duelist of the Roses. In this game terrain bonuses and penalties come into effect. Most of the AIs will walk into losing battles if you play your card face down on occasion, and can be bluffed some of the time. Pegasus will accurately calculate the attack of your facedown card after all effects, and make sound decisions based on it.
** ''Yu-Gi-OH! World Championship Tournament 2004'' has ''every single opponent in the game'' know what your face down cards are. You try to set a monster with low defense? Their lowest attack monster that can surmount it attacks and destroys it. Set a different monster with more defense than their weakest monster's attack but has less than their second weakest? Their second weakest monster attacks and takes it out. In short, you just can't bluff them.
** Yu-Gi-OH! Forbidden Memories'' has Pegasus again. He can't be bluffed and will always change his monsters' positions if he can't attack. The same can be said for every opponent in the endgame as well as Heishin in the early HopelessBossFight; they all know what card you've set and attack based on that.
** In particular, this made the card Magical Hats utterly useless; the AI would always attack the monster you were trying to protect!
** More amusingly, this actually turns Fusilier Dragon, the Dual-Mode Beast into a minor AIBreaker. Fusilier Dragon is a Level 7 monster with the effect that it can be Summoned or Set without Tributing monsters (normally it would cost 2), at the cost of halving its ATK and DEF points. Setting it this way causes the AI to refuse to attack it until they've gotten out their own big guns, because it doesn't take this effect into account and just sees a face-down Level 7 monster.
[[/folder]]



* Go ahead and use Reptile's invisibility on any difficulty setting for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2'', and see if the AI is at all inhibited by it.



* In just about every shooter, there will often be a lot of dust and smoke and explosions and whatnot cluttering up your vision, but the enemy AI will almost always be able to clearly see and shoot you through it unless it's specifically caused by a smoke grenade or a flashbang.
** And in ''SoldierOfFortune II'' and the later ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, they can see you through smokescreens too!
** In most shooters, darkness doesn't inhibit the AI's vision either.
* ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' has this as a moderate problem in the campaign. Any time there is something obstructing your view, it is basically non-existent to the AI. Dust? They see right through it. Snow? Fat chance that'll slow their snipers down. A SOLID CONCRETE WALL!? Haha, they know exactly where you are at ALL times, and if you try to hide there and regenerate your health they'll immediately pull out an RPG and ''break the wall down''. This makes certain sections FAR more difficult than they should be.
** Perhaps as a nod to this, one of the most frequently used Glitch powers is a scanner pinpointing the exact location of the user (i.e: the human player) and his progress.
* In the VideoGame/CallOfDuty series, stealth missions suffer from this. In ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', the enemies will instantly where you are if you are revealed, even by guy you killed immediately after while he was alone. For a particularly egregious example of this trope, see Roach's first mission in Modern Warfare 2.
* Bots in ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}'' are schizophrenic in this. If you throw a smoke grenade they run right past you if you stand in the smoke, other times on a labyrinth-like map with 3-4 paths leading to where the bot is standing, he will place himself to exactly the path the next enemy will come from and then to the next, the next...
** And other times when he is all alone and you come from behind a corner he waits long enough with firing so you could introduce yourself.
* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'', the AI most prominently exhibits this asshole behavior on [[HarderThanHard Insane difficulty]]. They can even track you if you have an InvisibilityCloak.



* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
** ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' introduces unlockable skulls that make the game harder. One of them, the Whuppapotamus (aka "That's Just Wrong") skull, allows enemies [[UselessUsefulStealth to effectively see you when you have the]] InvisibilityCloak on, among other AI upgrades.
** On Legendary difficulty in any game, once alerted to your presence, the AI will be able to send pinpoint fire to your location every time you poke your nose out. They can actually be ''facing away from the player'', but the second the Chief/The Rookie/Noble Six/etc. exposes themselves, they are ''instantly'' alerted.
* ''OperationFlashpoint'' has enemies that will shoot you. Without any chance to see even one pixel of them even if you look exactly in the direction you see the bullet coming from. This starts going downhill but continues anyway in the later games - it isn't until ''{{ARMA}} II: Operation Arrowhead'' that the AI finally plays fair (which is rather ironic, given that the expansion's [[{{Qurac}} Takistan]] doesn't have as much foliage for the AI to magically see you through anyway).
** In ''OperationFlashpoint'', an AI soldier has his aiming and vision capacity very handicapped in night time... even when standing in a well-lit town or any other location where they really shouldn't be.



* In ''SoldierOfFortune: Payback'''s final stage, "Club Evolution", the dancefloor's disco lights are blindingly bright to you, but they don't faze the {{Mooks}} one iota.
* In ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'', AIs know when and where double damage and other valuable powerups spawn and will go for them immediately. In certain matches, this effectively means that you're forced into a metagame that revolves around continually monitoring those spots unless you enjoy facing enemies with a constant advantage on you. Good players often behave this way, too, which the AI is presumably designed to mimic.



* In ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes'' the Computer AI can see through the fog, this means that AT Guns and Mortars are able to attack your units as long as you are in range.
** It's not as bad as it used to be though, the AI used to fire mortars at cloaked units.



* Oddly inverted in ''VideoGame/MetalMarines'', at least in the PC version. A side loses when all three of its "bases" are destroyed. Normally, the AI will ruthlessly attack any assets of yours it "discovers", but it will completely ignore any base hidden under a camouflage unit until one of its missiles, [[AIRoulette which it fires at random locations on your map]], happens to hit its location. A human player, on the other hand, will recognize the distinctive camouflage unit icon and immediately target it with a missile. This particular bit of ArtificialStupidity turns the camouflage unit into a complete GameBreaker; you can just build a single missile launcher, fire it, let it get destroyed, and repeat this process until the AI no army left, because it never quite gets around to actually killing you.



* The ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' AI doesn't need radars or radar-equipped units to spot a cloaked ACU and blow it to hell with two tactical missiles (which aren't even homing, yet the AI always hits dead-on).



[[folder:Rhythm Games]]
* Inverted in ''VideoGame/GuitarHero III'', which has a battle mode famous for its {{Interface Screw}}s. In this game, the attacks actually cause the AI to screw up far more than a human player would. Go ahead: try the "raise difficulty" attack on an easy portion of a song. The AI will still miss half the notes, even if they all happen to be green.
[[/folder]]



* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games are notorious for this. Along with the all-seeing enemies that home in on you as soon as you're within 500 yards of them ([[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]] even let enemies see you through entire floors and closed doors), there's the all-knowing guards. Any time you kill someone even in the same general area of a guard, regardless of whether or not they see or hear you, you get a bounty on your head. Even if you're completely invisible, they'll still know you did it. Fortunately, their pathfinding in their attempts to arrest you doesn't benefit from this clairvoyance in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''.
** It's not quite as bad in ''Oblivion''; enemies actually have to see you, and there has to be a witness to the murder for you to get a bounty.
*** ...Except for a special condition for both of those. Enemies know exactly where you are even if you 1-shotted their friend with a Stealth shot from a bow (even if they were looking away from you and their friend AND there's no way they could see your hiding spot), and killing a guard gets you an automatic bounty even without a witness.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' is ''extremely'' bad about this. Often, even when the enemy you just killed is a totally blind Falmer, whom you killed with a stealth attack, with a bow, from 500 yards away, instantly, his friends (who are also totally blind) will all begin running STRAIGHT towards you with laser-perfect accuracy. All at once. It can get pretty ridiculous sometimes.
*** Another striking example are the "Hired Thug" groups that are sent after you in retribution for stealing stuff. They slowly and magnetically home in on you, no matter where in the game world you are. Even if you manage to fool them for a moment, they will only roam around disoriented for a couple of seconds - afterwards, all of them will turn your way again. And slowly start creeping towards your new position. Invisibility potions, shadow, heavy fog, perfect stealth, cliffs and 10foot-thick rock cover be damned.
*** Guards will also home in on you with perfect accuracy (regardless of your concealment) to complain about your Shouting. Even if you just used Aura Whisper (which, as the name suggests, is a barely heard whispering) to spot the guards in the Dwemer Museum. Who will, after telling you to stop, promptly attack you for trespassing.
*** Even more egregious, you can silently sneak into a house, pocket a small item, and escape undetected, and there's still a chance that the item's owner will hire thugs to track you down ''by name!'' Even worse, they may call upon the ''Dark Brotherhood'', a top-tier assassin's guild, to '''assassinate''' you. This can happen even if the victim is a simple farmer and the stolen item is a tomato. [[DisproportionateRetribution Disproportionate retribution]], indeed.
** Merchants and guards in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' have another kind of clairvoyance: every item has its owner's name baked inside, so when you steal something (and so ownership doesn't change), even if no one sees you and no alarms are raised ALL guards all over the world will know that it's stolen and should you be fined for sleeping in someone's bed without permission they will also confiscate the previously stolen item. Similarly, a merchant will recognize an item if you try to sell them back what you stole from them, even if it is a single arrow in a 300 arrow stock.
*** It's even worse than that. If you steal say a loaf of bread from one merchant and discard it, then find another loaf of bread in a dungeon and return to the merchant you originally stole from they will accuse you of trying to sell them THEIR loaf of bread. For the rest of the game this will remain the case with that merchant and that item. For this reason in ''Morrowind'' when playing as a thief it's a good idea to not steal from every merchant you meet.



* ''[[Franchise/TalesSeries Tales Of Link]]'' is notorious for the AI only turning on tile targeting attacks (which often do significantly more damage) when you are about to get those tiles. It will never try this when you're about to get tiles it wouldn't hit.



* In ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' AI does not have it's vision hurt by foggy/night battlefield. As the player is the only one that can use archers properly without Warband's AI upgrades (that is, put them on top of a hill and wait for the enemy), this tends to be in your favor.



* Guards in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'' are practically psychic. Even if you're playing as one of them, wearing the same face-obscuring uniform, with the same equipment, if ''anything'' suspicious happens, such as an explosion, they will instantly know you were behind it, even if it would be completely impossible for any of them to have seen you plant the bomb.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' with the tranquilizer. When human players are hit, the screen goes blurry and it becomes hard to see. When the AI is hit, they essentially lose their ability to see entirely, resulting in them firing their guns at everything except you.
** If you enter a lit area with your night vision goggles, it becomes blurry and impossible to see. In one stage, if the lights go out in a place where the female guards are wearing night vision goggles and you turn the lights back on, they are also blinded and are unable to shoot you.



[[folder:Survival Horror]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'', it's {{averted|Trope}}: NPC's only know what they can see or hear, so if you get out of their line of perception and stay quiet, they'll base their tactics on where they last saw or heard you. The problem is that their perception radius is absurd and pinpoint accurate, so once you blow your cover, all nearby enemies will know exactly where you did so. Fortunately, this is fixed in just about every [[GameMod mod]] out there (by reducing their perception radius to more reasonable levels), except for Oblivion Lost, when the AI gets ImprobableAimingSkills and can see you from a hundred meters away in pitch darkness.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn-Based Strategy]]
* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It kind of does this for you as well. In Civ 4, at least, the game will suggest where to settle your city, and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.
[[/folder]]



* In ''FireEmblem'' games, (6 to 10), on fog of war maps the enemies will know where you are. Always. What makes this even more frustrating is the fact that if the player runs into an enemy (in a space they cannot see) the character that was moving cannot perform any other actions for that turn. Enemies can charge right into your characters and attack anyway, crossing this into MyRulesAreNotYourRules.



* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* A lot of the ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' games before the DS's release have done this:
** While this was perfectly justified for Pegasus, who actually had this ability in the series, it doesn't excuse the other opponents. Pegasus is always extra blatant about this in any game he's in. This is most obvious in Duelist of the Roses. In this game terrain bonuses and penalties come into effect. Most of the AIs will walk into losing battles if you play your card face down on occasion, and can be bluffed some of the time. Pegasus will accurately calculate the attack of your facedown card after all effects, and make sound decisions based on it.
** ''Yu-Gi-OH! World Championship Tournament 2004'' has ''every single opponent in the game'' know what your face down cards are. You try to set a monster with low defense? Their lowest attack monster that can surmount it attacks and destroys it. Set a different monster with more defense than their weakest monster's attack but has less than their second weakest? Their second weakest monster attacks and takes it out. In short, you just can't bluff them.
** Yu-Gi-OH! Forbidden Memories'' has Pegasus again. He can't be bluffed and will always change his monsters' positions if he can't attack. The same can be said for every opponent in the endgame as well as Heishin in the early HopelessBossFight; they all know what card you've set and attack based on that.
** In particular, this made the card Magical Hats utterly useless; the AI would always attack the monster you were trying to protect!
** More amusingly, this actually turns Fusilier Dragon, the Dual-Mode Beast into a minor AIBreaker. Fusilier Dragon is a Level 7 monster with the effect that it can be Summoned or Set without Tributing monsters (normally it would cost 2), at the cost of halving its ATK and DEF points. Setting it this way causes the AI to refuse to attack it until they've gotten out their own big guns, because it doesn't take this effect into account and just sees a face-down Level 7 monster.
* The ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' AI doesn't need radars or radar-equipped units to spot a cloaked ACU and blow it to hell with two tactical missiles (which aren't even homing, yet the AI always hits dead-on).
* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games are notorious for this. Along with the all-seeing enemies that home in on you as soon as you're within 500 yards of them ([[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]] even let enemies see you through entire floors and closed doors), there's the all-knowing guards. Any time you kill someone even in the same general area of a guard, regardless of whether or not they see or hear you, you get a bounty on your head. Even if you're completely invisible, they'll still know you did it. Fortunately, their pathfinding in their attempts to arrest you doesn't benefit from this clairvoyance in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''.
** It's not quite as bad in ''Oblivion''; enemies actually have to see you, and there has to be a witness to the murder for you to get a bounty.
*** ...Except for a special condition for both of those. Enemies know exactly where you are even if you 1-shotted their friend with a Stealth shot from a bow (even if they were looking away from you and their friend AND there's no way they could see your hiding spot), and killing a guard gets you an automatic bounty even without a witness.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' is ''extremely'' bad about this. Often, even when the enemy you just killed is a totally blind Falmer, whom you killed with a stealth attack, with a bow, from 500 yards away, instantly, his friends (who are also totally blind) will all begin running STRAIGHT towards you with laser-perfect accuracy. All at once. It can get pretty ridiculous sometimes.
*** Another striking example are the "Hired Thug" groups that are sent after you in retribution for stealing stuff. They slowly and magnetically home in on you, no matter where in the game world you are. Even if you manage to fool them for a moment, they will only roam around disoriented for a couple of seconds - afterwards, all of them will turn your way again. And slowly start creeping towards your new position. Invisibility potions, shadow, heavy fog, perfect stealth, cliffs and 10foot-thick rock cover be damned.
*** Guards will also home in on you with perfect accuracy (regardless of your concealment) to complain about your Shouting. Even if you just used Aura Whisper (which, as the name suggests, is a barely heard whispering) to spot the guards in the Dwemer Museum. Who will, after telling you to stop, promptly attack you for trespassing.
*** Even more egregious, you can silently sneak into a house, pocket a small item, and escape undetected, and there's still a chance that the item's owner will hire thugs to track you down ''by name!'' Even worse, they may call upon the ''Dark Brotherhood'', a top-tier assassin's guild, to '''assassinate''' you. This can happen even if the victim is a simple farmer and the stolen item is a tomato. [[DisproportionateRetribution Disproportionate retribution]], indeed.
** Merchants and guards in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' have another kind of clairvoyance: every item has its owner's name baked inside, so when you steal something (and so ownership doesn't change), even if no one sees you and no alarms are raised ALL guards all over the world will know that it's stolen and should you be fined for sleeping in someone's bed without permission they will also confiscate the previously stolen item. Similarly, a merchant will recognize an item if you try to sell them back what you stole from them, even if it is a single arrow in a 300 arrow stock.
*** It's even worse than that. If you steal say a loaf of bread from one merchant and discard it, then find another loaf of bread in a dungeon and return to the merchant you originally stole from they will accuse you of trying to sell them THEIR loaf of bread. For the rest of the game this will remain the case with that merchant and that item. For this reason in ''Morrowind'' when playing as a thief it's a good idea to not steal from every merchant you meet.
* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
** ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' introduces unlockable skulls that make the game harder. One of them, the Whuppapotamus (aka "That's Just Wrong") skull, allows enemies [[UselessUsefulStealth to effectively see you when you have the]] InvisibilityCloak on, among other AI upgrades.
** On Legendary difficulty in any game, once alerted to your presence, the AI will be able to send pinpoint fire to your location every time you poke your nose out. They can actually be ''facing away from the player'', but the second the Chief/The Rookie/Noble Six/etc. exposes themselves, they are ''instantly'' alerted.
* In just about every shooter, there will often be a lot of dust and smoke and explosions and whatnot cluttering up your vision, but the enemy AI will almost always be able to clearly see and shoot you through it unless it's specifically caused by a smoke grenade or a flashbang.
** And in ''SoldierOfFortune II'' and the later ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, they can see you through smokescreens too!
** In most shooters, darkness doesn't inhibit the AI's vision either.
* In the VideoGame/CallOfDuty series, stealth missions suffer from this. In ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', the enemies will instantly where you are if you are revealed, even by guy you killed immediately after while he was alone. For a particularly egregious example of this trope, see Roach's first mission in Modern Warfare 2.
* ''[[Franchise/TalesSeries Tales Of Link]]'' is notorious for the AI only turning on tile targeting attacks (which often do significantly more damage) when you are about to get those tiles. It will never try this when you're about to get tiles it wouldn't hit.
* Go ahead and use Reptile's invisibility on any difficulty setting for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2'', and see if the AI is at all inhibited by it.
* Bots in ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}'' are schizophrenic in this. If you throw a smoke grenade they run right past you if you stand in the smoke, other times on a labyrinth-like map with 3-4 paths leading to where the bot is standing, he will place himself to exactly the path the next enemy will come from and then to the next, the next...
** And other times when he is all alone and you come from behind a corner he waits long enough with firing so you could introduce yourself.
* Guards in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'' are practically psychic. Even if you're playing as one of them, wearing the same face-obscuring uniform, with the same equipment, if ''anything'' suspicious happens, such as an explosion, they will instantly know you were behind it, even if it would be completely impossible for any of them to have seen you plant the bomb.
* In ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' AI does not have it's vision hurt by foggy/night battlefield. As the player is the only one that can use archers properly without Warband's AI upgrades (that is, put them on top of a hill and wait for the enemy), this tends to be in your favor.
* Oddly inverted in ''VideoGame/MetalMarines'', at least in the PC version. A side loses when all three of its "bases" are destroyed. Normally, the AI will ruthlessly attack any assets of yours it "discovers", but it will completely ignore any base hidden under a camouflage unit until one of its missiles, [[AIRoulette which it fires at random locations on your map]], happens to hit its location. A human player, on the other hand, will recognize the distinctive camouflage unit icon and immediately target it with a missile. This particular bit of ArtificialStupidity turns the camouflage unit into a complete GameBreaker; you can just build a single missile launcher, fire it, let it get destroyed, and repeat this process until the AI no army left, because it never quite gets around to actually killing you.
* In ''SoldierOfFortune: Payback'''s final stage, "Club Evolution", the dancefloor's disco lights are blindingly bright to you, but they don't faze the {{Mooks}} one iota.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' with the tranquilizer. When human players are hit, the screen goes blurry and it becomes hard to see. When the AI is hit, they essentially lose their ability to see entirely, resulting in them firing their guns at everything except you.
** If you enter a lit area with your night vision goggles, it becomes blurry and impossible to see. In one stage, if the lights go out in a place where the female guards are wearing night vision goggles and you turn the lights back on, they are also blinded and are unable to shoot you.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It kind of does this for you as well. In Civ 4, at least, the game will suggest where to settle your city, and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.
* Inverted in ''VideoGame/GuitarHero III'', which has a battle mode famous for its {{Interface Screw}}s. In this game, the attacks actually cause the AI to screw up far more than a human player would. Go ahead: try the "raise difficulty" attack on an easy portion of a song. The AI will still miss half the notes, even if they all happen to be green.
* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'', the AI most prominently exhibits this asshole behavior on [[HarderThanHard Insane difficulty]]. They can even track you if you have an InvisibilityCloak.
* In ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes'' the Computer AI can see through the fog, this means that AT Guns and Mortars are able to attack your units as long as you are in range.
** It's not as bad as it used to be though, the AI used to fire mortars at cloaked units.
* ''OperationFlashpoint'' has enemies that will shoot you. Without any chance to see even one pixel of them even if you look exactly in the direction you see the bullet coming from. This starts going downhill but continues anyway in the later games - it isn't until ''{{ARMA}} II: Operation Arrowhead'' that the AI finally plays fair (which is rather ironic, given that the expansion's [[{{Qurac}} Takistan]] doesn't have as much foliage for the AI to magically see you through anyway).
** In ''OperationFlashpoint'', an AI soldier has his aiming and vision capacity very handicapped in night time... even when standing in a well-lit town or any other location where they really shouldn't be.
* ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' has this as a moderate problem in the campaign. Any time there is something obstructing your view, it is basically non-existent to the AI. Dust? They see right through it. Snow? Fat chance that'll slow their snipers down. A SOLID CONCRETE WALL!? Haha, they know exactly where you are at ALL times, and if you try to hide there and regenerate your health they'll immediately pull out an RPG and ''break the wall down''. This makes certain sections FAR more difficult than they should be.
** Perhaps as a nod to this, one of the most frequently used Glitch powers is a scanner pinpointing the exact location of the user (i.e: the human player) and his progress.
* In ''FireEmblem'' games, (6 to 10), on fog of war maps the enemies will know where you are. Always. What makes this even more frustrating is the fact that if the player runs into an enemy (in a space they cannot see) the character that was moving cannot perform any other actions for that turn. Enemies can charge right into your characters and attack anyway, crossing this into MyRulesAreNotYourRules.
* In ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'', it's {{averted|Trope}}: NPC's only know what they can see or hear, so if you get out of their line of perception and stay quiet, they'll base their tactics on where they last saw or heard you. The problem is that their perception radius is absurd and pinpoint accurate, so once you blow your cover, all nearby enemies will know exactly where you did so. Fortunately, this is fixed in just about every [[GameMod mod]] out there (by reducing their perception radius to more reasonable levels), except for Oblivion Lost, when the AI gets ImprobableAimingSkills and can see you from a hundred meters away in pitch darkness.
* In ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'', AIs know when and where double damage and other valuable powerups spawn and will go for them immediately. In certain matches, this effectively means that you're forced into a metagame that revolves around continually monitoring those spots unless you enjoy facing enemies with a constant advantage on you. Good players often behave this way, too, which the AI is presumably designed to mimic.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', subjecting the AI to FogOfWar is not yet implemented. This is probably why the single-player campaigns don't use FogOfWar most of the time.
* A lot of the ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' games before the DS's release have done this:
** While this was perfectly justified for Pegasus, who actually had this ability in the series, it doesn't excuse the other opponents. Pegasus is always extra blatant about this in any game he's in. This is most obvious in Duelist of the Roses. In this game terrain bonuses and penalties come into effect. Most of the AIs will walk into losing battles if you play your card face down on occasion, and can be bluffed some of the time. Pegasus will accurately calculate the attack of your facedown card after all effects, and make sound decisions based on it.
** ''Yu-Gi-OH! World Championship Tournament 2004'' has ''every single opponent in the game'' know what your face down cards are. You try to set a monster with low defense? Their lowest attack monster that can surmount it attacks and destroys it. Set a different monster with more defense than their weakest monster's attack but has less than their second weakest? Their second weakest monster attacks and takes it out. In short, you just can't bluff them.
** Yu-Gi-OH! Forbidden Memories'' has Pegasus again. He can't be bluffed and will always change his monsters' positions if he can't attack. The same can be said for every opponent in the endgame as well as Heishin in the early HopelessBossFight; they all know what card you've set and attack based on that.
** In particular, this made the card Magical Hats utterly useless; the AI would always attack the monster you were trying to protect!
** More amusingly, this actually turns Fusilier Dragon, the Dual-Mode Beast into a minor AIBreaker. Fusilier Dragon is a Level 7 monster with the effect that it can be Summoned or Set without Tributing monsters (normally it would cost 2), at the cost of halving its ATK and DEF points. Setting it this way causes the AI to refuse to attack it until they've gotten out their own big guns, because it doesn't take this effect into account and just sees a face-down Level 7 monster.
* The ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' AI doesn't need radars or radar-equipped units to spot a cloaked ACU and blow it to hell with two tactical missiles (which aren't even homing, yet the AI always hits dead-on).
* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games are notorious for this. Along with the all-seeing enemies that home in on you as soon as you're within 500 yards of them ([[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]] even let enemies see you through entire floors and closed doors), there's the all-knowing guards. Any time you kill someone even in the same general area of a guard, regardless of whether or not they see or hear you, you get a bounty on your head. Even if you're completely invisible, they'll still know you did it. Fortunately, their pathfinding in their attempts to arrest you doesn't benefit from this clairvoyance in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''.
** It's not quite as bad in ''Oblivion''; enemies actually have to see you, and there has to be a witness to the murder for you to get a bounty.
*** ...Except for a special condition for both of those. Enemies know exactly where you are even if you 1-shotted their friend with a Stealth shot from a bow (even if they were looking away from you and their friend AND there's no way they could see your hiding spot), and killing a guard gets you an automatic bounty even without a witness.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' is ''extremely'' bad about this. Often, even when the enemy you just killed is a totally blind Falmer, whom you killed with a stealth attack, with a bow, from 500 yards away, instantly, his friends (who are also totally blind) will all begin running STRAIGHT towards you with laser-perfect accuracy. All at once. It can get pretty ridiculous sometimes.
*** Another striking example are the "Hired Thug" groups that are sent after you in retribution for stealing stuff. They slowly and magnetically home in on you, no matter where in the game world you are. Even if you manage to fool them for a moment, they will only roam around disoriented for a couple of seconds - afterwards, all of them will turn your way again. And slowly start creeping towards your new position. Invisibility potions, shadow, heavy fog, perfect stealth, cliffs and 10foot-thick rock cover be damned.
*** Guards will also home in on you with perfect accuracy (regardless of your concealment) to complain about your Shouting. Even if you just used Aura Whisper (which, as the name suggests, is a barely heard whispering) to spot the guards in the Dwemer Museum. Who will, after telling you to stop, promptly attack you for trespassing.
*** Even more egregious, you can silently sneak into a house, pocket a small item, and escape undetected, and there's still a chance that the item's owner will hire thugs to track you down ''by name!'' Even worse, they may call upon the ''Dark Brotherhood'', a top-tier assassin's guild, to '''assassinate''' you. This can happen even if the victim is a simple farmer and the stolen item is a tomato. [[DisproportionateRetribution Disproportionate retribution]], indeed.
** Merchants and guards in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' have another kind of clairvoyance: every item has its owner's name baked inside, so when you steal something (and so ownership doesn't change), even if no one sees you and no alarms are raised ALL guards all over the world will know that it's stolen and should you be fined for sleeping in someone's bed without permission they will also confiscate the previously stolen item. Similarly, a merchant will recognize an item if you try to sell them back what you stole from them, even if it is a single arrow in a 300 arrow stock.
*** It's even worse than that. If you steal say a loaf of bread from one merchant and discard it, then find another loaf of bread in a dungeon and return to the merchant you originally stole from they will accuse you of trying to sell them THEIR loaf of bread. For the rest of the game this will remain the case with that merchant and that item. For this reason in ''Morrowind'' when playing as a thief it's a good idea to not steal from every merchant you meet.
* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
** ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' introduces unlockable skulls that make the game harder. One of them, the Whuppapotamus (aka "That's Just Wrong") skull, allows enemies [[UselessUsefulStealth to effectively see you when you have the]] InvisibilityCloak on, among other AI upgrades.
** On Legendary difficulty in any game, once alerted to your presence, the AI will be able to send pinpoint fire to your location every time you poke your nose out. They can actually be ''facing away from the player'', but the second the Chief/The Rookie/Noble Six/etc. exposes themselves, they are ''instantly'' alerted.
* In just about every shooter, there will often be a lot of dust and smoke and explosions and whatnot cluttering up your vision, but the enemy AI will almost always be able to clearly see and shoot you through it unless it's specifically caused by a smoke grenade or a flashbang.
** And in ''SoldierOfFortune II'' and the later ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, they can see you through smokescreens too!
** In most shooters, darkness doesn't inhibit the AI's vision either.
* In the VideoGame/CallOfDuty series, stealth missions suffer from this. In ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', the enemies will instantly where you are if you are revealed, even by guy you killed immediately after while he was alone. For a particularly egregious example of this trope, see Roach's first mission in Modern Warfare 2.
* ''[[Franchise/TalesSeries Tales Of Link]]'' is notorious for the AI only turning on tile targeting attacks (which often do significantly more damage) when you are about to get those tiles. It will never try this when you're about to get tiles it wouldn't hit.
* Go ahead and use Reptile's invisibility on any difficulty setting for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2'', and see if the AI is at all inhibited by it.
* Bots in ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}'' are schizophrenic in this. If you throw a smoke grenade they run right past you if you stand in the smoke, other times on a labyrinth-like map with 3-4 paths leading to where the bot is standing, he will place himself to exactly the path the next enemy will come from and then to the next, the next...
** And other times when he is all alone and you come from behind a corner he waits long enough with firing so you could introduce yourself.
* Guards in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'' are practically psychic. Even if you're playing as one of them, wearing the same face-obscuring uniform, with the same equipment, if ''anything'' suspicious happens, such as an explosion, they will instantly know you were behind it, even if it would be completely impossible for any of them to have seen you plant the bomb.
* In ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' AI does not have it's vision hurt by foggy/night battlefield. As the player is the only one that can use archers properly without Warband's AI upgrades (that is, put them on top of a hill and wait for the enemy), this tends to be in your favor.
* Oddly inverted in ''VideoGame/MetalMarines'', at least in the PC version. A side loses when all three of its "bases" are destroyed. Normally, the AI will ruthlessly attack any assets of yours it "discovers", but it will completely ignore any base hidden under a camouflage unit until one of its missiles, [[AIRoulette which it fires at random locations on your map]], happens to hit its location. A human player, on the other hand, will recognize the distinctive camouflage unit icon and immediately target it with a missile. This particular bit of ArtificialStupidity turns the camouflage unit into a complete GameBreaker; you can just build a single missile launcher, fire it, let it get destroyed, and repeat this process until the AI no army left, because it never quite gets around to actually killing you.
* In ''SoldierOfFortune: Payback'''s final stage, "Club Evolution", the dancefloor's disco lights are blindingly bright to you, but they don't faze the {{Mooks}} one iota.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' with the tranquilizer. When human players are hit, the screen goes blurry and it becomes hard to see. When the AI is hit, they essentially lose their ability to see entirely, resulting in them firing their guns at everything except you.
** If you enter a lit area with your night vision goggles, it becomes blurry and impossible to see. In one stage, if the lights go out in a place where the female guards are wearing night vision goggles and you turn the lights back on, they are also blinded and are unable to shoot you.
* Oftentimes in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the computer will send out settlers to claim every strategic resource they can find before you can. This includes resources that only become visible later in the TechTree.
** It kind of does this for you as well. In Civ 4, at least, the game will suggest where to settle your city, and sometimes it is suggesting a place where you will find iron/coal/uranium/etc later on.
* Inverted in ''VideoGame/GuitarHero III'', which has a battle mode famous for its {{Interface Screw}}s. In this game, the attacks actually cause the AI to screw up far more than a human player would. Go ahead: try the "raise difficulty" attack on an easy portion of a song. The AI will still miss half the notes, even if they all happen to be green.
* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'', the AI most prominently exhibits this asshole behavior on [[HarderThanHard Insane difficulty]]. They can even track you if you have an InvisibilityCloak.
* In ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes'' the Computer AI can see through the fog, this means that AT Guns and Mortars are able to attack your units as long as you are in range.
** It's not as bad as it used to be though, the AI used to fire mortars at cloaked units.
* ''OperationFlashpoint'' has enemies that will shoot you. Without any chance to see even one pixel of them even if you look exactly in the direction you see the bullet coming from. This starts going downhill but continues anyway in the later games - it isn't until ''{{ARMA}} II: Operation Arrowhead'' that the AI finally plays fair (which is rather ironic, given that the expansion's [[{{Qurac}} Takistan]] doesn't have as much foliage for the AI to magically see you through anyway).
** In ''OperationFlashpoint'', an AI soldier has his aiming and vision capacity very handicapped in night time... even when standing in a well-lit town or any other location where they really shouldn't be.
* ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' has this as a moderate problem in the campaign. Any time there is something obstructing your view, it is basically non-existent to the AI. Dust? They see right through it. Snow? Fat chance that'll slow their snipers down. A SOLID CONCRETE WALL!? Haha, they know exactly where you are at ALL times, and if you try to hide there and regenerate your health they'll immediately pull out an RPG and ''break the wall down''. This makes certain sections FAR more difficult than they should be.
** Perhaps as a nod to this, one of the most frequently used Glitch powers is a scanner pinpointing the exact location of the user (i.e: the human player) and his progress.
* In ''FireEmblem'' games, (6 to 10), on fog of war maps the enemies will know where you are. Always. What makes this even more frustrating is the fact that if the player runs into an enemy (in a space they cannot see) the character that was moving cannot perform any other actions for that turn. Enemies can charge right into your characters and attack anyway, crossing this into MyRulesAreNotYourRules.
* In ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'', it's {{averted|Trope}}: NPC's only know what they can see or hear, so if you get out of their line of perception and stay quiet, they'll base their tactics on where they last saw or heard you. The problem is that their perception radius is absurd and pinpoint accurate, so once you blow your cover, all nearby enemies will know exactly where you did so. Fortunately, this is fixed in just about every [[GameMod mod]] out there (by reducing their perception radius to more reasonable levels), except for Oblivion Lost, when the AI gets ImprobableAimingSkills and can see you from a hundred meters away in pitch darkness.
* In ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'', AIs know when and where double damage and other valuable powerups spawn and will go for them immediately. In certain matches, this effectively means that you're forced into a metagame that revolves around continually monitoring those spots unless you enjoy facing enemies with a constant advantage on you. Good players often behave this way, too, which the AI is presumably designed to mimic.
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