History Main / ThatOneSidequest

16th Apr '17 1:22:07 PM CountDorku
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** ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' has the pickup runs, which require driving quickly between inconveniently located mailboxes to pick up either human arms or refund cheques for Zed and Marcus respectively, then racing back to the bounty board. The missions are timed and the mailboxes are miles apart, and in the Arms Dealing one, there's one located inside a [[GoddamnedBats stalker-infested]] cave. Fortunately, there are only two of them. The best approach is generally to find the furthest mailbox from your starting point, park a car there, then use the Catch-a-Ride to teleport there.
** Donating fifty white guns to a local rebellious movement in ''VideoGame/BorderlandsThePreSequel''. You can only donate ten at a time, and every tenth gun will cause an event where you need to go and kill some people and recover the guns. It eats up a lot of inventory space and takes forever. Fortunately, you get a legendary Oz Kit as the quest reward.
16th Apr '17 4:25:31 AM PrinnyOverlord
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** The Hyrule Compendium. It requires you to take pictures of every weapon, shield, arrow, plant, and enemy in the game. This includes bosses and super hard enemies like Yiga Clan assassins and ''Lynels''. Many enemies have only a single chance to be photographed.

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** The Hyrule Compendium. It requires you to take pictures of every weapon, shield, arrow, plant, and enemy in the game. This includes bosses and super hard enemies like Yiga Clan assassins and ''Lynels''. Many enemies have only a single chance to be photographed. You can buy pictures from the assistant at the Hateno Research Center to make it easier at the cost of 100 rupees a pop(including bosses once you defeat the final boss) though.
9th Apr '17 5:52:23 PM nombretomado
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* Mention the tow truck missions to any player of ''SaintsRow2'', and they will regale you with how frustratingly hard and annoying it is. To start, the tow truck is slow. And the cars you hitch behind it love to wobble and wave, and eventually jackknife, usually getting you stuck. Especially on the higher levels when you have several gang cars shooting at you, it's a hair puller. And to top it off, you can't heal. If the tow truck starts smoking before level 6, you don't have a chance. And there's no checkpoint. Blow up 2 feet from your destination on level 9? Too bad skippy, back to level 1 with you.

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* Mention the tow truck missions to any player of ''SaintsRow2'', ''VideoGame/SaintsRow2'', and they will regale you with how frustratingly hard and annoying it is. To start, the tow truck is slow. And the cars you hitch behind it love to wobble and wave, and eventually jackknife, usually getting you stuck. Especially on the higher levels when you have several gang cars shooting at you, it's a hair puller. And to top it off, you can't heal. If the tow truck starts smoking before level 6, you don't have a chance. And there's no checkpoint. Blow up 2 feet from your destination on level 9? Too bad skippy, back to level 1 with you.
9th Apr '17 12:23:07 AM karategal
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** Like with Zodiac, Ramza can only learn the Ultima spell in three places (one of which is the final battle). The first two require you to convince Assassins with 100% success rate Stop, Charm and InsantDeath status effects to use a simple damage spell on you. And it requires you draw out fights with these said units much longer than might be considered sane.

to:

** Like with Zodiac, Ramza can only learn the Ultima spell in three places (one of which is the final battle). The first two require you to convince Assassins with 100% success rate Stop, Charm Charm, and InsantDeath InstantDeath status effects to use a simple damage spell on you. And it requires you draw out fights with these said units much longer than might be considered sane.
9th Apr '17 12:21:41 AM karategal
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* ''VideoGame/BitTrip COMPLETE'' comes with 120 Challenges; 20 in each of the six games. To complete a challenge, you have to make a perfect run through it -- hit all the Beats, dodge any Avoid Beats, etc. In ''RUNNER'', this also extends to hitting everything that gives points -- but not all of them, or else you jump into a pit or another enemy. Challenges like Labyrinth (''VOID'': get through a maze of Avoid Beats and collect the Beats in a strict time limit); Fool You Once (''RUNNER'': a large portion of stuff that give you points actually forces you into enemies, also needs to time the jump pads for specific spots); Back Attack (''FATE'': a large portion of enemies come from the back, and so must stay alive to fire off at least a few shots to collect their Cores); and Harder, Faster (''FLUX'': starts slow, increases in speed and difficulty, and essentially limits your view to nothing in the middle of it all) require near mastery of the system being used.
* ''VideoGame/CrossBeats'':
** The unlock requirement for "Blue Destiny Blue ETERNAL" in ''crossbeats REV.'' A select few players in Japan received the song, and for other players to unlock it, [[SocializationBonus they have to match with someone who has the song, play the song, and clear it]]. It's worse if you're playing at a Round 1 USA location (as Round 1 is the only arcade chain in the US that has ''crossbeats REV.'' cabinets), as there's the matter of an entire ocean separating you from Japan. Some players on both sides of the Pacific have managed to coordinate getting the song to the US (by way of having a Japanese player lend their account to someone in the US using a fresh [=BanaPass=] or SEGA Aime card), but even then, it's still a hassle to spread the song to other Round 1 locations when the number of Round 1's in the US per unit of area is far lower than the density of arcades in Japan.
** Unlocking [[HarderThanHard Unlimited]] charts in ''crossbeats REV.'' For licensed songs with Unlimited charts rated level 69 or less, the unlock condition is to get an S on the Master chart, and for Unlimited charts for licensed songs rated 70 to 79, an S+ on the Master chart. Challenging conditions, but at least there's room for mistakes. For charts rated 80 and above, as well as all non-licensed songs with Unlimited charts, however, you need a ''[[NoDamageRun Full Combo]]'' on the Master chart, which means a single lapse in focus can completely botch an unlock attempt.
* Some of the ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution DDR]]'' releases have one step chart [[note]]well, one on Single and another on Double, but of the same song and difficulty[[/note]] that's clearly much more difficult than the rest. ''DDRMAX'' had the first stepchart (i.e. the sequence of arrows you have to hit) with a difficulty rating of 10, on a song named Max 300 for its very fast BPM. ''[=DDRMAX2=]'' continued the tradition with Maxx Unlimited. On any given difficulty, these songs usually have the hardest stepchart on that difficulty. In the home versions, mastering a difficulty meant getting an "A" grade in every song on that difficulty, which basically boiled down to beating the Max song on that difficulty. (Later games tended to have several songs this hard).
* ''VideoGame/{{DJ MAX}} Portable 2'' has missions that require you to complete a set of songs while fulfilling one or two goals at the same time (such as getting a high enough combo, keeping your accuracy high enough as you go from one song to the next, etc.). The earlier missions aren't too bad...with the exception of the "Rave 2 Wave" mission, which forces you to use the annoying CHAOS-W modifier, which causes notes to move in a wave-like fashion. And then you have the entirety of the later missions -- one mission tasks you with getting a high score, but at the same time increasing your scroll speed every time you use Fever. Another picks 4 random songs for you, turns on the Random Max modifier, and must be completed with less than 20 Breaks. Perhaps the most infamous missions is "Just 1%", which requires you to, on top of using Fever a certain amount of times in a row per song, automatically fails you if you get the MAX 1% judgment on a single note, all while having you play some of the [[ThatOneBoss hardest songs in the game]].



* ''VideoGame/{{jubeat}} copious'' had some of the most unforgiving unlock conditions in the entire series, and is the reason later ''jubeat'' games just use more straightforward unlock methods, even if they require tons of grinding:
** Unlocking "[E]" required a perfect score on a level 10 song.
** Unlocking "Ryoushi no Umi no Lindwurm" required that you [[SocializationBonus and three other players in the same match]] achieve a [[NoDamageRun full combo]] on a level 10 song. Did one player miss a note? Well, the unlock attempt is ruined for everybody!
** "Red Goose" combined the above two requirements to take SocializationBonus [[TropesAreNotGood way too far]]: You and three other players in the same match must achieve a perfect score on a level 10 song.



* Some of the ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution DDR]]'' releases have one step chart [[note]]well, one on Single and another on Double, but of the same song and difficulty[[/note]] that's clearly much more difficult than the rest. ''DDRMAX'' had the first stepchart (i.e. the sequence of arrows you have to hit) with a difficulty rating of 10, on a song named Max 300 for its very fast BPM. ''[=DDRMAX2=]'' continued the tradition with Maxx Unlimited. On any given difficulty, these songs usually have the hardest stepchart on that difficulty. In the home versions, mastering a difficulty meant getting an "A" grade in every song on that difficulty, which basically boiled down to beating the Max song on that difficulty. (Later games tended to have several songs this hard).
* ''VideoGame/{{DJ MAX}} Portable 2'' has missions that require you to complete a set of songs while fulfilling one or two goals at the same time (such as getting a high enough combo, keeping your accuracy high enough as you go from one song to the next, etc.). The earlier missions aren't too bad...with the exception of the "Rave 2 Wave" mission, which forces you to use the annoying CHAOS-W modifier, which causes notes to move in a wave-like fashion. And then you have the entirety of the later missions -- one mission tasks you with getting a high score, but at the same time increasing your scroll speed every time you use Fever. Another picks 4 random songs for you, turns on the Random Max modifier, and must be completed with less than 20 Breaks. Perhaps the most infamous missions is "Just 1%", which requires you to, on top of using Fever a certain amount of times in a row per song, automatically fails you if you get the MAX 1% judgment on a single note, all while having you play some of the [[ThatOneBoss hardest songs in the game]].



* ''VideoGame/BitTrip COMPLETE'' comes with 120 Challenges; 20 in each of the six games. To complete a challenge, you have to make a perfect run through it -- hit all the Beats, dodge any Avoid Beats, etc. In ''RUNNER'', this also extends to hitting everything that gives points -- but not all of them, or else you jump into a pit or another enemy. Challenges like Labyrinth (''VOID'': get through a maze of Avoid Beats and collect the Beats in a strict time limit); Fool You Once (''RUNNER'': a large portion of stuff that give you points actually forces you into enemies, also needs to time the jump pads for specific spots); Back Attack (''FATE'': a large portion of enemies come from the back, and so must stay alive to fire off at least a few shots to collect their Cores); and Harder, Faster (''FLUX'': starts slow, increases in speed and difficulty, and essentially limits your view to nothing in the middle of it all) require near mastery of the system being used.
* ''VideoGame/{{jubeat}} copious'' had some of the most unforgiving unlock conditions in the entire series, and is the reason later ''jubeat'' games just use more straightforward unlock methods, even if they require tons of grinding:
** Unlocking "[E]" required a perfect score on a level 10 song.
** Unlocking "Ryoushi no Umi no Lindwurm" required that you [[SocializationBonus and three other players in the same match]] achieve a [[NoDamageRun full combo]] on a level 10 song. Did one player miss a note? Well, the unlock attempt is ruined for everybody!
** "Red Goose" combined the above two requirements to take SocializationBonus [[TropesAreNotGood way too far]]: You and three other players in the same match must achieve a perfect score on a level 10 song.
* ''VideoGame/CrossBeats'':
** The unlock requirement for "Blue Destiny Blue ETERNAL" in ''crossbeats REV.'' A select few players in Japan received the song, and for other players to unlock it, [[SocializationBonus they have to match with someone who has the song, play the song, and clear it]]. It's worse if you're playing at a Round 1 USA location (as Round 1 is the only arcade chain in the US that has ''crossbeats REV.'' cabinets), as there's the matter of an entire ocean separating you from Japan. Some players on both sides of the Pacific have managed to coordinate getting the song to the US (by way of having a Japanese player lend their account to someone in the US using a fresh [=BanaPass=] or SEGA Aime card), but even then, it's still a hassle to spread the song to other Round 1 locations when the number of Round 1's in the US per unit of area is far lower than the density of arcades in Japan.
** Unlocking [[HarderThanHard Unlimited]] charts in ''crossbeats REV.'' For licensed songs with Unlimited charts rated level 69 or less, the unlock condition is to get an S on the Master chart, and for Unlimited charts for licensed songs rated 70 to 79, an S+ on the Master chart. Challenging conditions, but at least there's room for mistakes. For charts rated 80 and above, as well as all non-licensed songs with Unlimited charts, however, you need a ''[[NoDamageRun Full Combo]]'' on the Master chart, which means a single lapse in focus can completely botch an unlock attempt.



* The original ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' had that infamous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDdqKVrh-dU "Saving the Ralari"]] mission, which classifies as both EscortMission and LuckBasedMission. You don't need to save the Ralari to win the game and there is no way to do a HundredPercentCompletion due to the mission branching, but if you want to complete the game without losing any mission, this one is the 13th mission.



* The original ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' had that infamous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDdqKVrh-dU "Saving the Ralari"]] mission, which classifies as both EscortMission and LuckBasedMission. You don't need to save the Ralari to win the game and there is no way to do a HundredPercentCompletion due to the mission branching, but if you want to complete the game without losing any mission, this one is the 13th mission.



* Most of the Side Quests in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' that feature you [[BonusBoss killing some sort of diabolical critter could count.]] You will die at [[ThatOneBoss Moe and Marley]], and [[ShoutOut Mothrakk]], many, many times[[note]]Mothrakk's easy if you pick up one of the rocket cars, spacebar to target lock him, then drive in circles spamming rockets. It'll take a while, the rockets don't compensate for moving enemies, but you'll eventually get him[[/note]].
* Picking up all the orbs in ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}''. Unlike ''Grand Theft Auto's'' packages, there are hundreds upon hundreds orbs, many small and easy to miss, and with such density (and vertical displacement) as to be maddening to find even with a map. Reaching a scenario where one or two orbs are missing is extremely easy. To finish, the save likes to corrupt on people shortly after or before getting all the orbs.
* In ''VideoGame/EndlessOcean: Blue World'', after completing the main plot, you find out that you need to save up a million [[GlobalCurrency pelagos]] in order to continue further. Your side jobs typically only reward you a couple thousand at best, and you've likely already been spending lots of money on gear upgrades. And what's worse, once you make the million, [[spoiler:you're only charged half that amount anyway]].



* Picking up all the orbs in ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}''. Unlike ''Grand Theft Auto's'' packages, there are hundreds upon hundreds orbs, many small and easy to miss, and with such density (and vertical displacement) as to be maddening to find even with a map. Reaching a scenario where one or two orbs are missing is extremely easy. To finish, the save likes to corrupt on people shortly after or before getting all the orbs.



* Collecting every last blast shard in ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS'', it doesn't help that after a certain amount of them your Electricity storage stops going up. Also adding insult to the injury, you only get a bronze trophy for collecting them all. You at least have an ability to sense nearby shards, although one of them is hidden so far off the coast that you can neither sense nor see it...
** ''VideoGame/{{inFAMOUS 2}}'' made this much easier. After completing 60 sidequests you can buy Blast Shard Sense, which will spot the closest blast shard to your location. Of course, by that point you're almost finished with the game and have collected most of them anyway, but it's nice to have. (They also give you a gold trophy for collecting them all as opposed to a bronze.)
* Getting 100% completion in every area of ''VideoGame/LittleBigPlanet'' is an exercise in futility. Completion of some of the harder areas like "The Metropolis" or "The Canyons" is possible, but to ace "The Islands," "The Temples," and "The Wilderness" AND obtain all of the items in the stage is practically a superhuman feat. The worst offender is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47MF6o5_Uto a spinning wheel of death that will throw you into an instant-death electrocution]] if you have not either: A) perfectly memorized the working's of LBP's physics system, or B) inherited a sort of muscle memory due to playing that part of the stage over and over. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T29bgo-ZDls You'll still feel stupid when you find out how to do it the easy way]].
** Getting 100% displayed for an area does not involve finishing the whole level without dying, it is simply a matter of getting all the treasure bubbles. However, getting the Play trophy is very difficult.
*** Acing the first Don Jalepeno level. You have to beat the level without dying. Said level's primary theme is explosives. That you handle manually. Which is easy enough to do if you're careful (provided you don't accidentally stand on the wrong part of one of the switches). Then you get to the final stretch, and they throw jetpacks into the mix (more specifically flying under a series of three pillars with precise timing, then dropping a bomb on some terrain. At least twice).
*** Really getting 100% completion on this level is arguably worse, given that at least one chunk of items requires another player (and reminding you once more that this is the explosives level... With friends like these...).
** There's also getting hundred percent completion on the [[ThatOneLevel Serpent Shrine level.]] It's not acing the level that is difficult [[ThatOneBoss (Although the boss fight is pretty irritating)]], it's the multiplayer puzzle where you must have one person manually raise and lower the fuzzy balls that bring safety, while another person goes through a tunnel of snakes. While most multiplayer puzzles can actually be completed by yourself using two controllers, this is not one of them. Only people with videogame-themed superpowers are able to pass through the tunnel with success. Even worse, what the other person is doing is always far easier-looking then it actually is, which can lead to profanity.
* Starting your very own kingdom in ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade''. It involves such an amount of politic and logistic elements it must be played as an entirely different game. It's also much more difficult just to stay alive unless you have done your deal of public relationships work beforehand, as every lord will otherwise see you as a threat to their status as hand-picked vassals of their Kings.
** Also the [[EnemyCivilWar Claimant quests]]. Each faction has a claimant to the throne with a sob story behind it. You require ''200'' renown just to be eligible for the quest. Then, a war ensues between the claimant's significantly smaller faction and the original faction. Your reward, should you succeed, is a lifetime appointment as the marshall of the new faction, which is a mixed blessing at best. It ''does'' help towards the ultimate goal of seizing your own kingdom since being a marshall gives you a lot of respect with your subordinate vassals.
* ''VideoGame/RetroCityRampage'' has those arcade games that Player can play. They aren't too difficult, except for the one based on Bit Trip Video. The first 2 levels are really simple, but from level 3 up to level 7, it's a real pain to finish, especially if you want to get all the gold in every level to unlock Commander Video. Not to mention, [[ScrappyMechanic crocodiles will only let you jump on them when they feel like it]].



** Come ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'', the baton gets handed to Genki's Mind Over Murder, in which you need to throw people, cars, and pink plastic heads through the appropriate circles. It sounds easy enough until you look at the areas where the targets are actually found, which are so encrusted in barriers, balloons and other paraphernalia that there's barely room for the people and cars, while the heads come in strictly limited supply so if you run out it's time to start over. For extra fun, many of the target circles are in inconvenient places, such as trying to fit a car through a narrow alley or throw it past the inexplicably indestructible power lines, and the areas are far enough apart that trying to get Gold in the hardest of the three missions is difficult even with all the super-speed upgrades (and if you accidentally burned through a gauge on a couple of barriers, just restart). Just for additional giggles, you do not benefit from an unlimited power gauge in these missions - unlike the TK Mayhem ones - and those without particularly beefy machines may find it extremely jerky and hard to aim, especially in mid-jump.
* Getting 100% completion in every area of ''VideoGame/LittleBigPlanet'' is an exercise in futility. Completion of some of the harder areas like "The Metropolis" or "The Canyons" is possible, but to ace "The Islands," "The Temples," and "The Wilderness" AND obtain all of the items in the stage is practically a superhuman feat. The worst offender is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47MF6o5_Uto a spinning wheel of death that will throw you into an instant-death electrocution]] if you have not either: A) perfectly memorized the working's of LBP's physics system, or B) inherited a sort of muscle memory due to playing that part of the stage over and over. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T29bgo-ZDls You'll still feel stupid when you find out how to do it the easy way]].
** Getting 100% displayed for an area does not involve finishing the whole level without dying, it is simply a matter of getting all the treasure bubbles. However, getting the Play trophy is very difficult.
*** Acing the first Don Jalepeno level. You have to beat the level without dying. Said level's primary theme is explosives. That you handle manually. Which is easy enough to do if you're careful (provided you don't accidentally stand on the wrong part of one of the switches). Then you get to the final stretch, and they throw jetpacks into the mix (more specifically flying under a series of three pillars with precise timing, then dropping a bomb on some terrain. At least twice).
*** Really getting 100% completion on this level is arguably worse, given that at least one chunk of items requires another player (and reminding you once more that this is the explosives level... With friends like these...).
** There's also getting hundred percent completion on the [[ThatOneLevel Serpent Shrine level.]] It's not acing the level that is difficult [[ThatOneBoss (Although the boss fight is pretty irritating)]], it's the multiplayer puzzle where you must have one person manually raise and lower the fuzzy balls that bring safety, while another person goes through a tunnel of snakes. While most multiplayer puzzles can actually be completed by yourself using two controllers, this is not one of them. Only people with videogame-themed superpowers are able to pass through the tunnel with success. Even worse, what the other person is doing is always far easier-looking then it actually is, which can lead to profanity.
* Most of the Side Quests in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' that feature you [[BonusBoss killing some sort of diabolical critter could count.]] You will die at [[ThatOneBoss Moe and Marley]], and [[ShoutOut Mothrakk]], many, many times[[note]]Mothrakk's easy if you pick up one of the rocket cars, spacebar to target lock him, then drive in circles spamming rockets. It'll take a while, the rockets don't compensate for moving enemies, but you'll eventually get him[[/note]].
* Collecting every last blast shard in ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS'', it doesn't help that after a certain amount of them your Electricity storage stops going up. Also adding insult to the injury, you only get a bronze trophy for collecting them all. You at least have an ability to sense nearby shards, although one of them is hidden so far off the coast that you can neither sense nor see it...
** ''VideoGame/{{inFAMOUS 2}}'' made this much easier. After completing 60 sidequests you can buy Blast Shard Sense, which will spot the closest blast shard to your location. Of course, by that point you're almost finished with the game and have collected most of them anyway, but it's nice to have. (They also give you a gold trophy for collecting them all as opposed to a bronze.)
* In ''VideoGame/EndlessOcean: Blue World'', after completing the main plot, you find out that you need to save up a million [[GlobalCurrency pelagos]] in order to continue further. Your side jobs typically only reward you a couple thousand at best, and you've likely already been spending lots of money on gear upgrades. And what's worse, once you make the million, [[spoiler:you're only charged half that amount anyway]].
* Starting your very own kingdom in ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade''. It involves such an amount of politic and logistic elements it must be played as an entirely different game. It's also much more difficult just to stay alive unless you have done your deal of public relationships work beforehand, as every lord will otherwise see you as a threat to their status as hand-picked vassals of their Kings.
** Also the [[EnemyCivilWar Claimant quests]]. Each faction has a claimant to the throne with a sob story behind it. You require ''200'' renown just to be eligible for the quest. Then, a war ensues between the claimant's significantly smaller faction and the original faction. Your reward, should you succeed, is a lifetime appointment as the marshall of the new faction, which is a mixed blessing at best. It ''does'' help towards the ultimate goal of seizing your own kingdom since being a marshall gives you a lot of respect with your subordinate vassals.

to:

** Come ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'', the baton gets handed to Genki's Mind Over Murder, in which you need to throw people, cars, and pink plastic heads through the appropriate circles. It sounds easy enough until you look at the areas where the targets are actually found, which are so encrusted in barriers, balloons and other paraphernalia that there's barely room for the people and cars, while the heads come in strictly limited supply so if you run out it's time to start over. For extra fun, many of the target circles are in inconvenient places, such as trying to fit a car through a narrow alley or throw it past the inexplicably indestructible power lines, and the areas are far enough apart that trying to get Gold in the hardest of the three missions is difficult even with all the super-speed upgrades (and if you accidentally burned through a gauge on a couple of barriers, just restart). Just for additional giggles, you do not benefit from an unlimited power gauge in these missions - -- unlike the TK Mayhem ones - -- and those without particularly beefy machines may find it extremely jerky and hard to aim, especially in mid-jump.
* Getting 100% completion in every area of ''VideoGame/LittleBigPlanet'' is an exercise in futility. Completion of some of the harder areas like "The Metropolis" or "The Canyons" is possible, but to ace "The Islands," "The Temples," and "The Wilderness" AND obtain all of the items in the stage is practically a superhuman feat. The worst offender is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47MF6o5_Uto a spinning wheel of death that will throw you into an instant-death electrocution]] if you have not either: A) perfectly memorized the working's of LBP's physics system, or B) inherited a sort of muscle memory due to playing that part of the stage over and over. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T29bgo-ZDls You'll still feel stupid when you find out how to do it the easy way]].
** Getting 100% displayed for an area does not involve finishing the whole level without dying, it is simply a matter of getting all the treasure bubbles. However, getting the Play trophy is very difficult.
*** Acing the first Don Jalepeno level. You have to beat the level without dying. Said level's primary theme is explosives. That you handle manually. Which is easy enough to do if you're careful (provided you don't accidentally stand on the wrong part of one of the switches). Then you get to the final stretch, and they throw jetpacks into the mix (more specifically flying under a series of three pillars with precise timing, then dropping a bomb on some terrain. At least twice).
*** Really getting 100% completion on this level is arguably worse, given that at least one chunk of items requires another player (and reminding you once more that this is the explosives level... With friends like these...).
** There's also getting hundred percent completion on the [[ThatOneLevel Serpent Shrine level.]] It's not acing the level that is difficult [[ThatOneBoss (Although the boss fight is pretty irritating)]], it's the multiplayer puzzle where you must have one person manually raise and lower the fuzzy balls that bring safety, while another person goes through a tunnel of snakes. While most multiplayer puzzles can actually be completed by yourself using two controllers, this is not one of them. Only people with videogame-themed superpowers are able to pass through the tunnel with success. Even worse, what the other person is doing is always far easier-looking then it actually is, which can lead to profanity.
* Most of the Side Quests in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' that feature you [[BonusBoss killing some sort of diabolical critter could count.]] You will die at [[ThatOneBoss Moe and Marley]], and [[ShoutOut Mothrakk]], many, many times[[note]]Mothrakk's easy if you pick up one of the rocket cars, spacebar to target lock him, then drive in circles spamming rockets. It'll take a while, the rockets don't compensate for moving enemies, but you'll eventually get him[[/note]].
* Collecting every last blast shard in ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS'', it doesn't help that after a certain amount of them your Electricity storage stops going up. Also adding insult to the injury, you only get a bronze trophy for collecting them all. You at least have an ability to sense nearby shards, although one of them is hidden so far off the coast that you can neither sense nor see it...
** ''VideoGame/{{inFAMOUS 2}}'' made this much easier. After completing 60 sidequests you can buy Blast Shard Sense, which will spot the closest blast shard to your location. Of course, by that point you're almost finished with the game and have collected most of them anyway, but it's nice to have. (They also give you a gold trophy for collecting them all as opposed to a bronze.)
* In ''VideoGame/EndlessOcean: Blue World'', after completing the main plot, you find out that you need to save up a million [[GlobalCurrency pelagos]] in order to continue further. Your side jobs typically only reward you a couple thousand at best, and you've likely already been spending lots of money on gear upgrades. And what's worse, once you make the million, [[spoiler:you're only charged half that amount anyway]].
* Starting your very own kingdom in ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade''. It involves such an amount of politic and logistic elements it must be played as an entirely different game. It's also much more difficult just to stay alive unless you have done your deal of public relationships work beforehand, as every lord will otherwise see you as a threat to their status as hand-picked vassals of their Kings.
** Also the [[EnemyCivilWar Claimant quests]]. Each faction has a claimant to the throne with a sob story behind it. You require ''200'' renown just to be eligible for the quest. Then, a war ensues between the claimant's significantly smaller faction and the original faction. Your reward, should you succeed, is a lifetime appointment as the marshall of the new faction, which is a mixed blessing at best. It ''does'' help towards the ultimate goal of seizing your own kingdom since being a marshall gives you a lot of respect with your subordinate vassals.
mid-jump.



* ''VideoGame/RetroCityRampage'' has those arcade games that Player can play. They aren't too difficult, except for the one based on Bit Trip Video. The first 2 levels are really simple, but from level 3 up to level 7, it's a real pain to finish, especially if you want to get all the gold in every level to unlock Commander Video. Not to mention, [[ScrappyMechanic crocodiles will only let you jump on them when they feel like it]].
9th Apr '17 12:10:41 AM karategal
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* ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' has the 151 Accomplishments system (basically Trophies or Achievements). Many of them (Defeat all characters 30 times each, participate in 300 battles, etc.) will be easily accomplished over the course of normal gameplay, and more even tell you the conditions for fulfilling them, so while they may require more grinding (one requires the player to deal 1.5 ''million'' points of HP damage over the course of the game. Max HP for any one opponent is 9999. This takes a while.), they're not ''difficult'' per se. [[ThisIsGonnaSuck Then you have the others]].
** Time Attacker (Accomplishment #61) requires the player to clear the Arcade Mode (Preset character with preset abilities vs. a gauntlet of foes, ending with the game's SNKBoss) within 1200 seconds. For extra fun, the SNKBoss has a LimitBreak that he can use as often as he likes, whenever he likes, cannot be stopped from executing it, and its animation takes up ''[[OverlyLongFightingAnimation over a minute]]'', adding elements of the dreaded LuckBasedMission.
** Obtaining all weapons and equipment (Accomplishment #145, The Ravenous Collector) requires not only an unholy amount of treasure-hunting and [[ItemCrafting trading]], but also random drops from enemies. The base item drop rate in Dissidia hovers around 1%. The enemies who have the gear you need dropped are generally only to be found in the Lunar Whale or Blackjack course of randomized computer-selected opponents -- where the opponents are anywhere from level 120 to 150, when the player is capped at 100 and are all at maximum CPU strength, in addition to the bonuses from having said best gear in the game. Even with all possible boosters to item drop rate, it's still under 10% for any one item. So, to sum up: First the player has to be lucky enough to get to face an opponent with the armament they need. Then, they have to be lucky and skilled enough to beat the opponent. Then they have to be lucky enough to get the drop. And if they don't get the drop, the opponent is gone and they have to wait until the computer then generates another opponent with the gear. And incidentally? These courses operate on a three-strikes-and-you're-out system. Lose three times and you have to start the process allll over again. (By the way, unless you're looking at a guide, you have no idea that this is the only way to get this armor or even that there ''is'' an accomplishment for getting said gear). Then is had to be done, ''again'', for Accomplishment #146, My Road To El Dorado, which is acquiring all accessories. Suffice to say that it requires the same as the all-gear one, except with ''even more'' [[ItemCrafting trading for items.]]
** The accomplishments for battlegen-ing the colored gems (Numbers 126-133). Battlegen, for the uninitiated, is the Dissidia system wherein performing a specific action to the opponent, such as landing an [[LimitBreak Exburst]] or [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom slamming them into the wall]] has a chance to generate a pre-determined item. So, you can see from the get-go that it's a LuckBasedMission. Making it worse are the many elements of GuideDangIt inherent to the process. First off, the game never tells you that Battlegen-ing these items is what will fulfill the conditions of the accomplishments. Second, the game never even tells you that these gems ''exist''. Thirdly, the game never mentions that the only way to get at opponents from whom you can battlegen the gems is via either friend cards (in other words, online multiplayer elements) or the Stiltzkin cards. And finally, the game will never tell you how to get the Stiltzkin cards, you need either trial and error or a guide to figure out how to get all eight. That you will then have to fight. Until the game decides to have mercy on you and randomly generate the gem. And you'll be doing these multiple times, because accomplishment of this is part and parcel of the accessory accomplishment.
* ''VideoGame/Dissidia012Duodecim'' tops everything the past game did, by changing the method of gaining crafting materials to having to go through multiple mirror matches to be able to farm materials. Or simply battlegen it off self-generated friend cards [[GuideDangIt if you knew you could do that]].
** In addition, it has the ultimate exercise in masochism, the Labyrinth. Which is the airships from the previous game, in a new wrapping where you progress through a hundred floors with multiple different areas with different challenges to each area. It's also been reduced from three strikes to one strike, but you can increase the number of strikes by collecting backup characters, you also only get to use whatever gear you find in the labyrinth and don't get to bring any of it outside (except for a few pieces, of course you don't want to bring them back into the labyrinth because if you die in the labyrinth you lose everything you've collected so far). Progressing far into the labyrinth is the only way to get several item sets that are the only ways to pull off several builds. And don't forget that it lives up to it's name with every path forward having multiple branches, which will often require some rather difficult combat actions to unlock, like getting a certain amount of medals from a card, achieving a certain level of boosting multiplier or [[NoDamageRun '''taking no damage''']], so it's fully possible that the path forward becomes impossible to unlock and that you therefore have to exit and start over again. Needless to say, doing a full clear of the entire thing will consume hours upon hours.
** Note also that the labyrinth doesn't have a quicksave feature, so you can't take a break from your loong run through of it and do something else with your PSP, like play in other game modes or play other games entirely.
* ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse'' brings us ''Parallel Quest 47'': Super-Super Ultimate Series of Battles! You have to fight pretty much every good-aligned character, some multiple times! It starts off easy enough with Piccolo, Tien, and Yamcha, followed by Android 18 and Krillin. It gets easier with the appearance of Hercule and Videl, whom you can take out in seconds. Then Majin Buu shows up. [[FromBadToWorse Then SS Vegeta, SS Future Trunks, and SS Kid Trunks show up. After them is SS Goku, SS Goten, and Ultimate Gohan]], who can and '''will''' juggle you with spammed Ultimate attacks. And if you're going for the Ultimate Finish? You get to fight SS3 Goku, followed by SS Gotenks, SS Vegeta, and SS Goku. [[UpToEleven AND THEN you have to go up against Gogeta and a revived SS3 Gotenks]]. And you've got to do '''all that''' in 15 minutes. Oh, and the first time you clear this mission, you've got to do it '''''alone'''''. It's also necessary if you want to complete Gohan and Videl's training, since this is where you get the I...I'm OK Z-Soul, meaning you've got to deal with the games cruel, stingy RNG. So unless you're EXTREMELY lucky, expect to do this mission '''A LOT''''.
* Survival mode in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters Maximum Impact 2'', required to unlock all the stages in the game. Got a few hours to spare against increasingly difficult characters (everyone you're unlocked so far, trickier if the final boss is included among those characters), with a pumped-up version of one of them every 10 fights with additional perks you can't access? 200 fights, so even if you've unlocked up to Armor Ralf so getting hit isn't as much of an issue, you've got hours ahead of you, since you can't save your progress. Fail once, and you have to start over. Reading about the final challenges in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters 2002 UM'' alone is downright scary if you haven't devoted your life and sacrificed your unlikely first-born for the skills required in the challenge mode.
* ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' gives us Shujinko. Getting his moves is a GuideDangIt that you can only do after kompleting Konquest mode. Krap.
* The Soul Arena in ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur 3'' have the challenge Beloved which is manageable on easy or medium but becomes insane on hard. You have to fight in succession: Raphael, Kilik, and Amy (Her attacks can not be blocked). If the player got the Queen's Guard sword for Raphael it becomes almost a LuckBasedMission.
** Chronicles of the sword can become this. It is a sidequest because you unlock all canonical characters without it and any you unlock can only be played when you can play custom characters, who can easily get their moveset. It starts out easy and even fun, but as you go on you're either going to be spamming AI breaker moves constantly or cursing the now apparently psychic and cheating AI enemies in battlefields that just screw you over, such as ice where you fall off if you move to the edge, rather than being hit off it. You have to go through to get all the armor pieces for the character customization.



* ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' gives us Shujinko. Getting his moves is a GuideDangIt that you can only do after kompleting Konquest mode. Krap.
* Survival mode in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters Maximum Impact 2'', required to unlock all the stages in the game. Got a few hours to spare against increasingly difficult characters (everyone you're unlocked so far, trickier if the final boss is included among those characters), with a pumped-up version of one of them every 10 fights with additional perks you can't access? 200 fights, so even if you've unlocked up to Armor Ralf so getting hit isn't as much of an issue, you've got hours ahead of you, since you can't save your progress. Fail once, and you have to start over. Reading about the final challenges in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters 2002 UM'' alone is downright scary if you haven't devoted your life and sacrificed your unlikely first-born for the skills required in the challenge mode.
* ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' has the 151 Accomplishments system (basically Trophies or Achievements). Many of them (Defeat all characters 30 times each, participate in 300 battles, etc.) will be easily accomplished over the course of normal gameplay, and more even tell you the conditions for fulfilling them, so while they may require more grinding (one requires the player to deal 1.5 ''million'' points of HP damage over the course of the game. Max HP for any one opponent is 9999. This takes a while.), they're not ''difficult'' per se. [[ThisIsGonnaSuck Then you have the others]].
** Time Attacker (Accomplishment #61) requires the player to clear the Arcade Mode (Preset character with preset abilities vs. a gauntlet of foes, ending with the game's SNKBoss) within 1200 seconds. For extra fun, the SNKBoss has a LimitBreak that he can use as often as he likes, whenever he likes, cannot be stopped from executing it, and its animation takes up ''[[OverlyLongFightingAnimation over a minute]]'', adding elements of the dreaded LuckBasedMission.
** Obtaining all weapons and equipment (Accomplishment #145, The Ravenous Collector) requires not only an unholy amount of treasure-hunting and [[ItemCrafting trading]], but also random drops from enemies. The base item drop rate in Dissidia hovers around 1%. The enemies who have the gear you need dropped are generally only to be found in the Lunar Whale or Blackjack course of randomized computer-selected opponents -- where the opponents are anywhere from level 120 to 150, when the player is capped at 100 and are all at maximum CPU strength, in addition to the bonuses from having said best gear in the game. Even with all possible boosters to item drop rate, it's still under 10% for any one item. So, to sum up: First the player has to be lucky enough to get to face an opponent with the armament they need. Then, they have to be lucky and skilled enough to beat the opponent. Then they have to be lucky enough to get the drop. And if they don't get the drop, the opponent is gone and they have to wait until the computer then generates another opponent with the gear. And incidentally? These courses operate on a three-strikes-and-you're-out system. Lose three times and you have to start the process allll over again. (By the way, unless you're looking at a guide, you have no idea that this is the only way to get this armor or even that there ''is'' an accomplishment for getting said gear). Then is had to be done, ''again'', for Accomplishment #146, My Road To El Dorado, which is acquiring all accessories. Suffice to say that it requires the same as the all-gear one, except with ''even more'' [[ItemCrafting trading for items.]]
** The accomplishments for battlegen-ing the colored gems (Numbers 126-133). Battlegen, for the uninitiated, is the Dissidia system wherein performing a specific action to the opponent, such as landing an [[LimitBreak Exburst]] or [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom slamming them into the wall]] has a chance to generate a pre-determined item. So, you can see from the get-go that it's a LuckBasedMission. Making it worse are the many elements of GuideDangIt inherent to the process. First off, the game never tells you that Battlegen-ing these items is what will fulfill the conditions of the accomplishments. Second, the game never even tells you that these gems ''exist''. Thirdly, the game never mentions that the only way to get at opponents from whom you can battlegen the gems is via either friend cards (in other words, online multiplayer elements) or the Stiltzkin cards. And finally, the game will never tell you how to get the Stiltzkin cards, you need either trial and error or a guide to figure out how to get all eight. That you will then have to fight. Until the game decides to have mercy on you and randomly generate the gem. And you'll be doing these multiple times, because accomplishment of this is part and parcel of the accessory accomplishment.
* ''VideoGame/Dissidia012Duodecim'' tops everything the past game did, by changing the method of gaining crafting materials to having to go through multiple mirror matches to be able to farm materials. Or simply battlegen it off self-generated friend cards [[GuideDangIt if you knew you could do that]].
** In addition, it has the ultimate exercise in masochism, the Labyrinth. Which is the airships from the previous game, in a new wrapping where you progress through a hundred floors with multiple different areas with different challenges to each area. It's also been reduced from three strikes to one strike, but you can increase the number of strikes by collecting backup characters, you also only get to use whatever gear you find in the labyrinth and don't get to bring any of it outside (except for a few pieces, of course you don't want to bring them back into the labyrinth because if you die in the labyrinth you lose everything you've collected so far). Progressing far into the labyrinth is the only way to get several item sets that are the only ways to pull off several builds. And don't forget that it lives up to it's name with every path forward having multiple branches, which will often require some rather difficult combat actions to unlock, like getting a certain amount of medals from a card, achieving a certain level of boosting multiplier or [[NoDamageRun '''taking no damage''']], so it's fully possible that the path forward becomes impossible to unlock and that you therefore have to exit and start over again. Needless to say, doing a full clear of the entire thing will consume hours upon hours.
** Note also that the labyrinth doesn't have a quicksave feature, so you can't take a break from your loong run through of it and do something else with your PSP, like play in other game modes or play other games entirely.
* The Soul Arena in ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur 3'' have the challenge Beloved which is manageble on easy or medium but becomes insane on hard. You have to fight in sucession: Raphael, Kilik and Amy (Her attacks can not be blocked). If the player got the Queen's Guard sword for Raphael it becomes almost a LuckBasedMission.
** Chronicles of the sword can become this. It is a sidequest because you unlock all canonical characters without it and any you unlock can only be played when you can play custom characters, who can easily get their moveset. It starts out easy and even fun, but as you go on you're either going to be spamming AI breaker moves constantly or cursing the now apparently psychic and cheating AI enemies in battlefeilds that just screw you over, such as ice where you fall off if you move to the edge, rather than being hit off it. You have to go through to get all the armor pieces for the character customization.
* VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse brings us ''Parallel Quest 47'': Super-Super Ultimate Series of Battles! You have to fight pretty much every good-aligned character, some multiple times! It starts off easy enough with Piccolo, Tien, and Yamcha, followed by Android 18 and Krillin. It gets easier with the appearance of Hercule and Videl, whom you can take out in seconds. Then Majin Buu shows up. [[FromBadToWorse Then SS Vegeta, SS Future Trunks, and SS Kid Trunks show up. After them is SS Goku, SS Goten, and Ultimate Gohan]], who can and '''will''' juggle you with spammed Ultimate attacks. And if you're going for the Ultimate Finish? You get to fight SS3 Goku, followed by SS Gotenks, SS Vegeta, and SS Goku. [[UpToEleven AND THEN you have to go up against Gogeta and a revived SS3 Gotenks]]. And you've got to do '''all that''' in 15 minutes. Oh, and the first time you clear this mission, you've got to do it '''''alone'''''. It's also necessary if you want to complete Gohan and Videl's training, since this is where you get the I...I'm OK Z-Soul, meaning you've got to deal with the games cruel, stingy RNG. So unless you're EXTREMELY lucky, expect to do this mission '''A LOT''''.



* ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' has "If They Came to Hear me Beg..." The challenge here is to air-assassinate an Elite on the penultimate level from a height that would kill you. You'll mostly find yourself missing and going splat, hitting a Grunt instead, hitting the Elite with a normal beatdown, or the game just not recognizing your assassination. Have fun reloading the checkpoint.
* Playing ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' on Veteran difficulty merits honors on its own. It's incredibly frustrating, and most players find themselves spending hours to get past single checkpoints. However, nothing beats out the Epilogue stage "Mile High Club." Beating this single level requires you to blast your way through an airplane full terrorists with no fragmentation grenades (you are in a plane, after all). Stopping in any place for too long means you won't make it to the objective in time. Simply lasting past the first row of seats is worth a few achievement points, and it's easily the hardest stage of the game. And at the end, if you've manage to get past the hellhole of enemies to get to the hostage situation, you MUST get a headshot on the terrorist holding the VIP. Otherwise, it's back to square one for you, because apparently "veterans only get headshots".
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'':
** The XboxLiveArcade version features some unlockable trophies that are needed to HundredPercentCompletion. Among them, there is one that requires you to [[SpeedRun speed-running]] through the highest difficulty setting, one that asks you to complete the entire aforementioned highest difficulty setting [[UnexpectedGameplayChange with your auto-aim off]], and even one that nobody on the internet have any clues about the requisites for it to unlock and just [[LuckBasedMission seems to pop-out once in a blue moon]].
** The original ''Perfect Dark'' has some difficult side items as well -- specifically, the firing range. A skilled gamer could probably get most of the silver stars with a little practice. Getting all the gold stars, however, is nearly impossible. The major stumbling block is the [=AR34=]: You must get 500 points (a bulls-eye is 10 points) in 20 seconds with 100% accuracy, using an assault rifle. Oh, and the targets break when shot too much, so if you break a target and let even a single bullet through afterwards, you fail.
* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** Some of the achievements are borderline impossible without staging them with a few friends. This was most painful when the achievements were required for new unlockable equipment. An example achievement: killing ten enemies in a row while paired with a Heavy without either he or the Medic dying. For the Demoman, destroying five Engineer buildings within the span of a single ten-second Ubercharge (one Engineer can only place four buildings, and teleporter exits and entrances are usually placed far from their entrances, so buildings are usually found in threes at most).
** Many of the medic achievements in particular require counterintuitive or downright counterproductive play. Ubercharging a Scout is the most obvious example, but [[BlatantLies First Do No Harm]] requires you to get the highest score on your team without scoring any kills. The easiest way of obtaining it is to heal people who are about to score a kill instead of people who are injured. Oh, and to let people die if they're scoring too high (i.e. actively sabotage your best players). [[LoopholeAbuse Or you can just switch to medic after getting the highest score as a different class.]]
** Ironically, this is after a patch changed a few of the worst Medic achievements. The one for ten kills in one life while paired with a Heavy used to require ''twenty'' kills. Nevermind that you can be killed in less than a second by the more offensive classes as a Medic, and that there are two classes that can one-shot a Heavy, even with you healing him to 150% of his normal health. Oh, and the best part? The Heavy ''has his own version of the achievement'', so you get to do it ''twice''.
** The other classes' achievements are more reasonable, in general, but some are still extremely difficult to get in normal gameplay (I'm looking at you, Scout).
** One of the most aggravating ones to get is Full Spectrum Warrior for Pyro. This achievement requires you to ignite three enemies with the Rainblower's taunt. For those who don't know, the Rainblower's taunt creates a very loud noise, then emits a ring of fire around the feet of the Pyro, dealing enormous damage to those within the ring. However, the Pyro is completely immobilized and vulnerable for the duration of the taunt, and the loud noise draws loads of attention to the Pyro. In addition, if you kill an enemy with the taunt, it ''isn't counted as igniting them'', so you need to abuse the taunt mechanics (each player caught in the taunt receives half of the damage the last player took, the first player takes 400) and somehow pull off a loud, immobilizing move in a crowded area of four or five people bent on killing you. Very not fun.
** Many of the achievements are luck-based, which makes for getting 100% completion nigh impossible. The most notable one is Search Engine, where you have to kill 3 invisible spies with your wrangled sentry. The only possible way to get this achievement consciously is to have a Pyro set an invisible spy on fire and land a killing blow. Otherwise, just have your sentry permanently wrangled and shoot everywhere, praying you hit a nitwit of a spy.
** With Friends Like This is the hardest achievement to get, which requires you to [[SocializationBonus play on a server with 7 or more of your friends.]] Currently the fewest number of players hold this achievement.
** And even that pales to the achievements for gathering enough views on a Website/YouTube replay. You read that right. There are achievements for having your Team Fortress 2 Replays gather enough views on Website/YouTube. How many? The final achievement for this requires, oh, 100,000 views. LastLousyPoint, indeed...



* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** Some of the achievements are borderline impossible without staging them with a few friends. This was most painful when the achievements were required for new unlockable equipment. An example achievement: killing ten enemies in a row while paired with a Heavy without either he or the Medic dying. For the Demoman, destroying five Engineer buildings within the span of a single ten-second Ubercharge (one Engineer can only place four buildings, and teleporter exits and entrances are usually placed far from their entrances, so buildings are usually found in threes at most).
** Many of the medic achievements in particular require counterintuitive or downright counterproductive play. Ubercharging a Scout is the most obvious example, but [[BlatantLies First Do No Harm]] requires you to get the highest score on your team without scoring any kills. The easiest way of obtaining it is to heal people who are about to score a kill instead of people who are injured. Oh, and to let people die if they're scoring too high (i.e. actively sabotage your best players). [[LoopholeAbuse Or you can just switch to medic after getting the highest score as a different class.]]
** Ironically, this is after a patch changed a few of the worst Medic achievements. The one for ten kills in one life while paired with a Heavy used to require ''twenty'' kills. Nevermind that you can be killed in less than a second by the more offensive classes as a Medic, and that there are two classes that can one-shot a Heavy, even with you healing him to 150% of his normal health. Oh, and the best part? The Heavy ''has his own version of the achievement'', so you get to do it ''twice''.
** The other classes' achievements are more reasonable, in general, but some are still extremely difficult to get in normal gameplay (I'm looking at you, Scout).
** One of the most aggravating ones to get is Full Spectrum Warrior for Pyro. This achievement requires you to ignite three enemies with the Rainblower's taunt. For those who don't know, the Rainblower's taunt creates a very loud noise, then emits a ring of fire around the feet of the Pyro, dealing enormous damage to those within the ring. However, the Pyro is completely immobilized and vulnerable for the duration of the taunt, and the loud noise draws loads of attention to the Pyro. In addition, if you kill an enemy with the taunt, it ''isn't counted as igniting them'', so you need to abuse the taunt mechanics (each player caught in the taunt receives half of the damage the last player took, the first player takes 400) and somehow pull off a loud, immobilizing move in a crowded area of four or five people bent on killing you. Very not fun.
** Many of the achievements are luck-based, which makes for getting 100% completion nigh impossible. The most notable one is Search Engine, where you have to kill 3 invisible spies with your wrangled sentry. The only possible way to get this achievement consciously is to have a Pyro set an invisible spy on fire and land a killing blow. Otherwise, just have your sentry permanently wrangled and shoot everywhere, praying you hit a nitwit of a spy.
** With Friends Like This is the hardest achievement to get, which requires you to [[SocializationBonus play on a server with 7 or more of your friends.]] Currently the fewest number of players hold this achievement.
** And even that pales to the achievements for gathering enough views on a Website/YouTube replay. You read that right. There are achievements for having your Team Fortress 2 Replays gather enough views on Website/YouTube. How many? The final achievement for this requires, oh, 100,000 views. LastLousyPoint, indeed...
* Playing ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' on Veteran difficulty merits honors on its own. It's incredibly frustrating, and most players find themselves spending hours to get past single checkpoints. However, nothing beats out the Epilogue stage "Mile High Club." Beating this single level requires you to blast your way through an airplane full terrorists with no fragmentation grenades (you are in a plane, after all). Stopping in any place for too long means you won't make it to the objective in time. Simply lasting past the first row of seats is worth a few achievement points, and it's easily the hardest stage of the game. And at the end, if you've manage to get past the hellhole of enemies to get to the hostage situation, you MUST get a headshot on the terrorist holding the VIP. Otherwise, it's back to square one for you, because apparently "veterans only get headshots".
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'':
** The XboxLiveArcade version features some unlockable trophies that are needed to HundredPercentCompletion. Among them, there is one that requires you to [[SpeedRun speed-running]] through the highest difficulty setting, one that asks you to complete the entire aforementioned highest difficulty setting [[UnexpectedGameplayChange with your auto-aim off]], and even one that nobody on the internet have any clues about the requisites for it to unlock and just [[LuckBasedMission seems to pop-out once in a blue moon]].
** The original ''Perfect Dark'' has some difficult side items as well -- specifically, the firing range. A skilled gamer could probably get most of the silver stars with a little practice. Getting all the gold stars, however, is nearly impossible. The major stumbling block is the [=AR34=]: You must get 500 points (a bulls-eye is 10 points) in 20 seconds with 100% accuracy, using an assault rifle. Oh, and the targets break when shot too much, so if you break a target and let even a single bullet through afterwards, you fail.
* ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' has "If They Came to Hear me Beg..." The challenge here is to air-assassinate an Elite on the penultimate level from a height that would kill you. You'll mostly find yourself missing and going splat, hitting a Grunt instead, hitting the Elite with a normal beatdown, or the game just not recognizing your assassination. Have fun reloading the checkpoint.



* The process required to obtain Legendary items in ''VideoGame/DawnOfTheDragons'', especially the Shield of Ryndor and Sword of Conquered Kingdoms gear. The steps needed to get the fully-upgraded sword in particular are infuriatingly long. Getting the sword itself is the easy part -- complete four boss raids and craft the components. Its second evolution requires getting three stones from quest areas and three raid crafting items that are not listed on the in-game loot tables. The third evolution requires the acquisition of five "Enigmatic Items", which (like the aforementioned crafting items) aren't seen on any loot tables, and require using five specific combinations of armor/weapons/troops/Legions/mounts for specific raids on specific difficulties. Miss an item required for one of the Enigmatic Items? You can't get the upgraded sword. Forgot to or can't fight the Nightmare-level bosses that drop the specific component? No sword. It takes a minimum of 15 raids on the low end to have a chance to get all the pieces, and there is nothing in-game that explains how to get the final evolution. And the ultimate reward? A sword that, while great in its own right for PVP battles, is vastly outclassed by most premium weapons.
* Epic quest for each class in ''VideoGame/EverQuest''.
* In ''[[VideoGame/EyeOfTheBeholder Eye of The Beholder II: Legend of Darkmoon]]'', you have a sidequest where you have to trap 4 medusas in a room so they stand on a pressure plate. Not that they'll cooperate quietly; they'll keep poisoning and petrifying you.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'':
** [[InfinityPlusOneSword Relic weapons]]. You just have to be lucky enough to have the correct base relic drop during a Dynamis run, buy over a hundred million gil worth of Dynamis currency (and your linkshell will at best give you a discount since selling currency is how Dynamis runs are funded), convince your linkshell to take the time to beat up a foe that RandomlyDrops a certificate you need, then convince them to stop after beating up fifteen other bosses to try to defeat an easily bored MetalSlime that drops the final ingredient. Easy, right?
** Then there are the Near Eastern equivalents, the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Mythic Weapons]]. First, you have to beat the ''Treasures of Aht Urghan'' storyline and [[OneHundredPercentCompletion complete every Assault mission]], including getting to floor 100 of Nyzul Isle, and get the desired base weapon from Nyzul Isle (each RandomlyDrops from bosses) just to open the quest. Then you have to beat up eight endgame bosses across Aht Urghan. Then you have to beat all the Assaults ''again'', buy or acquire tens of millions of gil worth of Alexandrite, earn 150,000 tokens in Nyzul Isle (which in practical terms means doing it without buying any items), and earn 100,000 ampules of therion ichor in Einherjar. ''Then'' you have to acquire three proofs which [[RandomlyDrops randomly drop]] from the three penultimate bosses in a long ladder of bosses. Finally, you have one last boss fight to complete, solo -- and if you manage to screw this part up, you have to get those last three random drops again. Even easier, right?
** As for quests that sane players actually regularly perform, the journey to obtain the Utsusemi: Ichi spell probably qualifies. It entails collecting a large number of randomly dropped items (between about 100 and 200, depending on the item) to gain notoriety in a far-away settlement. Then one needs to travel to this settlement and take on a final quest, involving traveling through an area infested with aggressive, high-level enemies. The real challenge in this barrage of quests is that it is not only very tedious, but also quite dangerous and difficult for newer characters. And what bites the hardest is that you ''need'' this spell if you are going to try the Ninja job class for any given reason.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has the Chocobo Challenges where you race chocobos like normal, except now you have designated rivals and the tracks will have set gimmicks for that challenge. The first few are easy as long as you been training your bird, but the very last one is an absolute nightmare since you have to beat ''three'' rivals and the track takes place in the Black Shroud, which has a lot of turns, malboros that can reduce your speed, imps that can steal your items, and mandragoas that almost perfectly blend in with the scenery. One rival in particular, Max Power, will always be ahead of everyone else and you'll likely never beat him (even if your chocobo has perfect stats) unless you get ''extremely'' lucky with items and the weather being in your favor.
* ''[[Videogame/GuildWars Guild Wars: Eye of the North]]'':
** The Rabid Bear. To score points with the [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Norn]], you need to fight this bear with just a wooden club that does pathetic amounts of damage. Not a single player was expecting said bear to be a Level 24 tank with naturally regenerating-health, an ability that boosts his health AND grants him damage resistance, and another skill that lets him regenerate 8 points of health per second. By the way, that last skill casts and recharges in half the time even though he isn't technically a boss. The bear ALSO can make himself immune to knockdowns at times, and not all classes have fast enough interrupts to stop him. Some of the game's best builds have failed against this thing, and nowadays most players simply switch to a Ritualist or Necromancer secondary, then take him down with ghosts or curses. Oh, and if you manage to beat the Rabid Bear, then you can look forward to the Glacial Griffon, which not only is a boss, but is ''also'' a spirit-spammer. And thanks to a Ritualist update, all of its skills practically recharge immediately. Have fun!
** The Great Norn Alemoot quest. The first task, moving ale barrels from a stack to a pole not ten feet away (after taking your first swig of booze) is easy enough. After running back to the start for your second helping of booze, comes the slalom: rather than simply running between posts, the mechanics of this part of the quest requires you to run to a certain point away from the posts after running between them. Running too close to either post, or running through the next part of the slalom without correctly running through the previous pair of posts will completely fail the quest and you have to start over. THEN if you manage to complete the slalom, is the incredibly tricky pig-herding (after taking a third swig of ale). Rather than pushing the pigs into their pen, they have to be body-blocked so they MIGHT move in the right direction..! All this within a time limit of a couple of minutes, all while your screen is fuzzing around because of the effects of the alcohol (though the screen effects can be disabled in the options menu). At least the Feel No Pain skill reward is worth it.



* ''Videogame/{{Latale}}'' has several, with the most prominent being Dotnuri. It's the perfect combination of ''PlatformHell'' (despite being a 2-D game!), ''FakeLongevity'' (each stage needs to be completed 20 times before you get the real reward...), ''BraggingRightsReward'' (the skill point from stage 1 is pretty good. The money boost from stage 2 can be made a joke with the enchanting system), ''FakeDifficulty'' (lag was already a problem with the normal game, much less one that requires surgical precision), ''OneHitPointWonder'' (it is a Super Mario Bros. ''ShoutOut'' after all) and ''LuckBasedMission'' (the enemies that can kill you move completely randomly. The only thing they won't do is fall off a ledge or die). Others include:
** The Selki quests, which involves completing three ''separate'' quests ''multiple'' times against a mini-boss level opponent in a game where every time you first meet a boss, it will be ''ThatOneBoss''. All that, for a rather unimpressive exp reward.
** The elemental totems, which involves finding 50 of an item that has a mid to low chance of randomly dropping from a specific and rather uncommon enemy, which shoots elemental magic at you (which you aren't likely to have a resistance to). Then once you're done, you have to do the quest ''three'' more times. And then you have to do the ''other'' three elemental totem quests four times before you're done with them for good.
* ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'' quests tend to be of the "Collect Three Hundred X" variety, which is not in itself all that bad. The "Veins Siblings" quest (which is part of the quest-line to open the high-end Nameless Island dungeon) combines "Collect Three Hundred X" with a luck-based payoff. It becomes necessary to collect some innocuous low-end drops to feed to a camel so it will poop for you, allowing you to continue with the quest. Unless you're amazingly lucky, you'll not get the requisite amounts of poop from your first try (or even your first few tries), requiring you to go gather more low-end drops. The poop-rate is random, which means a player might have to feed the camel literally thousands of items, translating into dozens of hours of competing with starting characters for trash mobs, in order to continue the quest. Even though [[ShaggyDogStory you never end up actually having to use the camel poop]], it does lead to a CrowningMomentOfFunny as (after finally gathering the requisite poop) your character [[SarcasmMode reflects on his or her accomplishments.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'' has a fair few quests that make you think that the dev team is just evil.
** [[BlatantLies One Small Favor]], a ChainOfDeals FetchQuest that's taken UpToEleven.
** The infamous and widely-hated Elemental Workshop III. It tasks you with solving ThatOnePuzzle, an enormous, multi-layered BlockPuzzle to start an elemental forge. The controls are rather wonky, it's extremely time-consuming, and the number of moves you can make is limited. If you run out, then the puzzle resets to the last checkpoint.
* ''Videogame/TheSecretWorld'': Two of the Investigation missions (puzzle-based sidequests) require the player to transcribe Morse code and translate it for the next clue. The first of these is in audio form[[note]]with accompanying video that is too fast to be useful as a visual aid[[/note]] and plays at normal speed, rendering it almost impossible for someone not trained in Morse code to follow. The second one is in blinking lights form, and while slower than the first, is still quite difficult to transcribe properly.
** One mission in Transylvania, [[http://wiki.crygaia.com/view/The_Cost_of_Magic The Cost of Magic]], is absolutely ''despised'' for combining stealth, environmental hazards that have to be tanked, precision platforming, and overpowered mobs -- to the point where the general suggestion is to give it a miss until your equipment is HIGHLY overleveled, if not specialized.
* Most of the Datacrons in ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' can be fairly annoying to get, often involving lengthy platforming sequences, but particularly annoying is the Tatooine strength datacron, which is on top of a sandcrawler that you can't reach from the ground. To get there you have to ride a Jawa balloon from another sandcrawler halfway across the map. A balloon which takes about twenty minutes both ways to get between the sandcrawlers. Miss the couple seconds that the balloon is accessible or jump off at the wrong time, and you'd better be ready to sit around waiting for the next forty minutes.
* ''Videogame/{{Wizard 101}}'' has Sunken City, a dungeon with the hardest enemies you can find in [[NoobCave Wizard City]]. Towers that the girl you're doing it for commands you to enter to defeat some more of the hard enemies, unavoidable battles with the [[RunningGag hard enemies]], only to find that you need to enter a tower with multiple floors to get a key for Grubb's place, and have to fight a boss with ''one thousand health''. And after the battle, you STILL have to go defeat Grub and collect the amulet.
** Sunken City (and it tougher cousins Tomb of the Beguiler and Kensington Park) are actually meant for to be a challenge for teams of four wizards that had beaten the world so that is why they are so difficult.
** The true That One Sidequest are Briskbreeze Tower and the Warehouse. Both are ten floors tall and contain [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules cheating bosses]]. Oh, and for those people that use the "flee, use potion, port to friend" technique, people cannot port into these towers. These are so tough the first floor is there just to warn people how tough they are.
** Another dungeon, The Waterworks, was made for a new challenge for the new level cap. Five normal battles, two puzzle rooms (which can act as either additional battles or heal locations), and two bosses that have complex and powerful cheats.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'':
** [[InfinityPlusOneSword Relic weapons]]. You just have to be lucky enough to have the correct base relic drop during a Dynamis run, buy over a hundred million gil worth of Dynamis currency (and your linkshell will at best give you a discount since selling currency is how Dynamis runs are funded), convince your linkshell to take the time to beat up a foe that RandomlyDrops a certificate you need, then convince them to stop after beating up fifteen other bosses to try to defeat an easily bored MetalSlime that drops the final ingredient. Easy, right?
** Then there are the Near Eastern equivalents, the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Mythic Weapons]]. First, you have to beat the ''Treasures of Aht Urghan'' storyline and [[OneHundredPercentCompletion complete every Assault mission]], including getting to floor 100 of Nyzul Isle, and get the desired base weapon from Nyzul Isle (each RandomlyDrops from bosses) just to open the quest. Then you have to beat up eight endgame bosses across Aht Urghan. Then you have to beat all the Assaults ''again'', buy or aquire tens of millions of gil worth of Alexandrite, earn 150,000 tokens in Nyzul Isle (which in practical terms means doing it without buying any items), and earn 100,000 ampules of therion ichor in Einherjar. ''Then'' you have to aquire three proofs which [[RandomlyDrops randomly drop]] from the three penultimate bosses in a long ladder of bosses. Finally, you have one last boss fight to complete, solo -- and if you manage to screw this part up, you have to get those last three random drops again. Even easier, right?
** As for quests that sane players actually regularly perform, the journey to obtain the Utsusemi: Ichi spell probably qualifies. It entails collecting a large number of randomly dropped items (between about 100 and 200, depending on the item) to gain notoriety in a far-away settlement. Then one needs to travel to this settlement and take on a final quest, involving travelling through an area infested with aggressive, high-level enemies. The real challenge in this barrage of quests is that it is not only very tedious, but also quite dangerous and difficult for newer characters. And what bites the hardest is that you ''need'' this spell if you are going to try the Ninja job class for any given reason.
* ''Videogame/{{Latale}}'' has several, with the most prominent being Dotnuri. It's the perfect combination of ''PlatformHell'' (despite being a 2-D game!), ''FakeLongevity'' (each stage needs to be completed 20 times before you get the real reward...), ''BraggingRightsReward'' (the skill point from stage 1 is pretty good. The money boost from stage 2 can be made a joke with the enchanting system), ''FakeDifficulty'' (lag was already a problem with the normal game, much less one that requires surgical precision), ''OneHitPointWonder'' (it is a Super Mario Bros. ''ShoutOut'' after all) and ''LuckBasedMission'' (the enemies that can kill you move completely randomly. The only thing they won't do is fall off a ledge or die). Others include:
** The Selki quests, which involves completing three ''separate'' quests ''multiple'' times against a mini-boss level opponent in a game where every time you first meet a boss, it will be ''ThatOneBoss''. All that, for a rather unimpressive exp reward.
** The elemental totems, which involves finding 50 of an item that has a mid to low chance of randomly dropping from a specific and rather uncommon enemy, which shoots elemental magic at you (which you aren't likely to have a resistance to). Then once you're done, you have to do the quest ''three'' more times. And then you have to do the ''other'' three elemental totem quests four times before you're done with them for good.
* ''[[Videogame/GuildWars Guild Wars: Eye of the North]]'':
** The Rabid Bear. To score points with the [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Norn]], you need to fight this bear with just a wooden club that does pathetic amounts of damage. Not a single player was expecting said bear to be a Level 24 tank with naturally regenerating-health, an ability that boosts his health AND grants him damage resistance, and another skill that lets him regenerate 8 points of health per second. By the way, that last skill casts and recharges in half the time even though he isn't technically a boss. The bear ALSO can make himself immune to knockdowns at times, and not all classes have fast enough interrupts to stop him. Some of the game's best builds have failed against this thing, and nowadays most players simply switch to a Ritualist or Necromancer secondary, then take him down with ghosts or curses. Oh, and if you manage to beat the Rabid Bear, then you can look forward to the Glacial Griffon, which not only is a boss, but is ''also'' a spirit-spammer. And thanks to a Ritualist update, all of its skills practically recharge immediately. Have fun!
** The Great Norn Alemoot quest. The first task, moving ale barrels from a stack to a pole not ten feet away (after taking your first swig of booze) is easy enough. After running back to the start for your second helping of booze, comes the slalom: rather than simply running between posts, the mechanics of this part of the quest requires you to run to a certain point away from the posts after running between them. Running too close to either post, or running through the next part of the slalom without correctly running through the previous pair of posts will completely fail the quest and you have to start over. THEN if you manage to complete the slalom, is the incredibly tricky pig-herding (after taking a third swig of ale). Rather than pushing the pigs into their pen, they have to be body-blocked so they MIGHT move in the right direction..! All this within a time limit of a couple of minutes, all while your screen is fuzzing around because of the effects of the alcohol (though the screen effects can be disabled in the options menu). At least the Feel No Pain skill reward is worth it.
* ''Videogame/{{Wizard 101}}'' has Sunken City, a dungeon with the hardest enemies you can find in [[NoobCave Wizard City]]. Towers that the girl you're doing it for commands you to enter to defeat some more of the hard enemies, unavoidable battles with the [[RunningGag hard enemies]], only to find that you need to enter a tower with multiple floors to get a key for Grubb's place, and have to fight a boss with ''one thousand health''. And after the battle, you STILL have to go defeat Grub and collect the amulet.
** Sunken City (and it tougher cousins Tomb of the Beguiler and Kensington Park) are actually meant for to be a challenge for teams of four wizards that had beaten the world so that is why they are so difficult.
** The true That One Sidequest are Briskbreeze Tower and the Warehouse. Both are ten floors tall and contain [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules cheating bosses]]. Oh, and for those people that use the "flee, use potion, port to friend" technique, people cannot port into these towers. These are so tough the first floor is there just to warn people how tough they are.
** Another dungeon, The Waterworks, was made for a new challenge for the new level cap. Five normal battles, two puzzle rooms (which can act as either additional battles or heal locations), and two bosses that have complex and powerful cheats.
* ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'' has a fair few quests that make you think that the dev team is just evil.
** [[BlatantLies One Small Favor]], a ChainOfDeals FetchQuest that's taken UpToEleven.
** The infamous and widely-hated Elemental Workshop III. It tasks you with solving ThatOnePuzzle, an enormous, multi-layered BlockPuzzle to start an elemental forge. The controls are rather wonky, it's extremely time-consuming, and the number of moves you can make is limited. If you run out, then the puzzle resets to the last checkpoint.
* ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'' quests tend to be of the "Collect Three Hundred X" variety, which is not in itself all that bad. The "Veins Siblings" quest (which is part of the quest-line to open the high-end Nameless Island dungeon) combines "Collect Three Hundred X" with a luck-based payoff. It becomes necessary to collect some innocuous low-end drops to feed to a camel so it will poop for you, allowing you to continue with the quest. Unless you're amazingly lucky, you'll not get the requisite amounts of poop from your first try (or even your first few tries), requiring you to go gather more low-end drops. The poop-rate is random, which means a player might have to feed the camel literally thousands of items, translating into dozens of hours of competing with starting characters for trash mobs, in order to continue the quest. Even though [[ShaggyDogStory you never end up actually having to use the camel poop]], it does lead to a CrowningMomentOfFunny as (after finally gathering the requisite poop) your character [[SarcasmMode reflects on his or her accomplishments.]]
* The process required to obtain Legendary items in ''VideoGame/DawnOfTheDragons'', especially the Shield of Ryndor and Sword of Conquered Kingdoms gear. The steps needed to get the fully-upgraded sword in particular are infuriatingly long. Getting the sword itself is the easy part -- complete four boss raids and craft the components. Its second evolution requires getting three stones from quest areas and three raid crafting items that are not listed on the in-game loot tables. The third evolution requires the acquisition of five "Enigmatic Items", which (like the aforementioned crafting items) aren't seen on any loot tables, and require using five specific combinations of armor/weapons/troops/Legions/mounts for specific raids on specific difficulties. Miss an item required for one of the Enigmatic Items? You can't get the upgraded sword. Forgot to or can't fight the Nightmare-level bosses that drop the specific component? No sword. It takes a minimum of 15 raids on the low end to have a chance to get all the pieces, and there is nothing in-game that explains how to get the final evolution. And the ultimate reward? A sword that, while great in its own right for PVP battles, is vastly outclassed by most premium weapons.
* ''Videogame/TheSecretWorld'': Two of the Investigation missions (puzzle-based sidequests) require the player to transcribe Morse code and translate it for the next clue. The first of these is in audio form[[note]]with accompanying video that is too fast to be useful as a visual aid[[/note]] and plays at normal speed, rendering it almost impossible for someone not trained in Morse code to follow. The second one is in blinking lights form, and while slower than the first, is still quite difficult to transcribe properly.
** One mission in Transylvania, [[http://wiki.crygaia.com/view/The_Cost_of_Magic The Cost of Magic]], is absolutely ''despised'' for combining stealth, environmental hazards that have to be tanked, precision platforming, and overpowered mobs -- to the point where the general suggestion is to give it a miss until your equipment is HIGHLY overleveled, if not specialized.
* Most of the Datacrons in ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' can be fairly annoying to get, often involving lengthy platforming sequences, but particularly annoying is the Tatooine strength datacron, which is on top of a sandcrawler that you can't reach from the ground. To get there you have to ride a Jawa balloon from another sandcrawler halfway across the map. A balloon which takes about twenty minutes both ways to get between the sandcrawlers. Miss the couple seconds that the balloon is accessible or jump off at the wrong time, and you'd better be ready to sit around waiting for the next forty minutes.
* Epic quest for each class in ''VideoGame/EverQuest''.
* In ''[[VideoGame/EyeOfTheBeholder Eye of The Beholder II: Legend of Darkmoon]]'', you have a sidequest where you have to trap 4 medusas in a room so they stand on a pressure plate. Not that they'll cooperate quietly; they'll keep poisoning and petrifying you.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has the Chocobo Challenges where you race chocobos like normal, except now you have designated rivals and the tracks will have set gimmicks for that challenge. The first few are easy as long as you been training your bird, but the very last one is an absolute nightmare since you have to beat ''three'' rivals and the track takes place in the Black Shroud, which has a lot of turns, malboros that can reduce your speed, imps that can steal your items, and mandragoas that almost perfectly blend in with the scenery. One rival in particular, Max Power, will always be ahead of everyone else and you'll likely never beat him (even if your chocobo has perfect stats) unless you get ''extremely'' lucky with items and the weather being in your favor.
9th Apr '17 12:00:45 AM karategal
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** The Big Poes. You have to use your horse and start in a specific location in Hyrule Field and head in a specific direction to make the Poe even ''appear'', and you have to chase - at high speed - said Poe and shoot it twice before it disappears. And you have to find all ten in order to have access to the final empty bottle. One in particular near Gerudo Valley has a nasty habit of vanishing into a wall almost instantly.

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** The Big Poes. You have to use your horse and start in a specific location in Hyrule Field and head in a specific direction to make the Poe even ''appear'', and you have to chase - -- at high speed - -- said Poe and shoot it twice before it disappears. And you have to find all ten in order to have access to the final empty bottle. One in particular near Gerudo Valley has a nasty habit of vanishing into a wall almost instantly.



* The figurine quest in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' is a pain. There's 136 different figurines, which are gradually unlocked throughout the game. To get them, you have to pay special Mysterious Shells. The more figurines you own, the less likely it is you'll get a unique one-- unless you pay more shells. Eventually, you'll probably ''run out'' of shells, which means you have to buy them, at the low, low price of 200 Rupees for 30. To cap that, you have to ''beat the game once'' to get access to the last 6 figurines. Once you've collected the first 130, you gain access to the sound test and the final Heart Piece.

to:

* The figurine quest in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' is a pain. There's 136 different figurines, which are gradually unlocked throughout the game. To get them, you have to pay special Mysterious Shells. The more figurines you own, the less likely it is you'll get a unique one-- one -- unless you pay more shells. Eventually, you'll probably ''run out'' of shells, which means you have to buy them, at the low, low price of 200 Rupees for 30. To cap that, you have to ''beat the game once'' to get access to the last 6 figurines. Once you've collected the first 130, you gain access to the sound test and the final Heart Piece.



** One of the Heart Pieces comes from a minigame where you must shoot tossed pumpkins with your bow. This is ''extremely'' difficult, since you have to hit almost every pumpkin to earn the prize, requiring very careful aim and shot-leading with a really drifty and wobbly motion controller. It's especially frustrating because the pumpkins aren't worth fixed amounts of points--their value goes up as you hit more of them in a row, and [[RageQuit drops back to the lowest level if you miss one]]. As if that's not bad enough, some of the pumpkins are worth double points, but they show up purely randomly (you could get several 2X-kins or none at all in any given round). Plus, the guy throwing them often waits an irritatingly long time between throws (it's a TimedMission!). ''[[UpToEleven And]]'' he throws them farther and farther later in the game, [[FakeDifficulty often over the top of the screen so you can't even see the damn things for half of their trajectories]], but sometimes he'll switch back to throwing them a short distance without warning just to mess with you.

to:

** One of the Heart Pieces comes from a minigame where you must shoot tossed pumpkins with your bow. This is ''extremely'' difficult, since you have to hit almost every pumpkin to earn the prize, requiring very careful aim and shot-leading with a really drifty and wobbly motion controller. It's especially frustrating because the pumpkins aren't worth fixed amounts of points--their points -- their value goes up as you hit more of them in a row, and [[RageQuit drops back to the lowest level if you miss one]]. As if that's not bad enough, some of the pumpkins are worth double points, but they show up purely randomly (you could get several 2X-kins or none at all in any given round). Plus, the guy throwing them often waits an irritatingly long time between throws (it's a TimedMission!). ''[[UpToEleven And]]'' he throws them farther and farther later in the game, [[FakeDifficulty often over the top of the screen so you can't even see the damn things for half of their trajectories]], but sometimes he'll switch back to throwing them a short distance without warning just to mess with you.



** [[TimedMission Hyrule Hotfoot]], where you have to run all the way across the world map from Lake Hylia to the north of Kakariko Village within a time limit. The first time it's not so bad; 75 seconds should be enough without much effort, but if you're going for the Piece of Heart, you have to do it in 65 seconds. This requires [[SprintShoes Pegasus booting]] ''everywhere'', and the path is filled to the brim with rocks, trees, statues and other junk to bump into, as well as caves to accidentally enter, which isn't helped by the short line of sight due to the TopDownView. And don't even think about calling the broom - the timekeeper will call you out on it and disqualify you.

to:

** [[TimedMission Hyrule Hotfoot]], where you have to run all the way across the world map from Lake Hylia to the north of Kakariko Village within a time limit. The first time it's not so bad; 75 seconds should be enough without much effort, but if you're going for the Piece of Heart, you have to do it in 65 seconds. This requires [[SprintShoes Pegasus booting]] ''everywhere'', and the path is filled to the brim with rocks, trees, statues and other junk to bump into, as well as caves to accidentally enter, which isn't helped by the short line of sight due to the TopDownView. And don't even think about calling the broom - -- the timekeeper will call you out on it and disqualify you.



** Devil May Cry 4 has LOTS of secret missions like this, but the two that really take this trope to the extreme are "Unbreakable", where you must kill 3 [[GoddamnBats Assaults]] and 3 [[DemonicSpiders Chimera Assaults]] without taking damage and without being captured by a [[GoddamnBats Fault]], and "Royal Blocker", where you must execute a Royal Block 5 times in a row against two Mephistos, so if you're hit or mess up the timing of the Block anytime during the sequence, you must restart it all over again. "Free Running" and "Steelplechase" have the potential to become this if you wish to complete them without "tricks", but if you don't care about completing them "cleanly", then they're not really all that difficult.

to:

** Devil ''Devil May Cry 4 4'' has LOTS of secret missions like this, but the two that really take this trope to the extreme are "Unbreakable", where you must kill 3 [[GoddamnBats Assaults]] and 3 [[DemonicSpiders Chimera Assaults]] without taking damage and without being captured by a [[GoddamnBats Fault]], and "Royal Blocker", where you must execute a Royal Block 5 times in a row against two Mephistos, so if you're hit or mess up the timing of the Block anytime during the sequence, you must restart it all over again. "Free Running" and "Steelplechase" have the potential to become this if you wish to complete them without "tricks", but if you don't care about completing them "cleanly", then they're not really all that difficult.



** Obtaining all weapons and equipment (Accomplishment #145, The Ravenous Collector) requires not only an unholy amount of treasure-hunting and [[ItemCrafting trading]], but also random drops from enemies. The base item drop rate in Dissidia hovers around 1%. The enemies who have the gear you need dropped are generally only to be found in the Lunar Whale or Blackjack course of randomized computer-selected opponents--where the opponents are anywhere from level 120 to 150, when the player is capped at 100 and are all at maximum CPU strength, in addition to the bonuses from having said best gear in the game. Even with all possible boosters to item drop rate, it's still under 10% for any one item. So, to sum up: First the player has to be lucky enough to get to face an opponent with the armament they need. Then, they have to be lucky and skilled enough to beat the opponent. Then they have to be lucky enough to get the drop. And if they don't get the drop, the opponent is gone and they have to wait until the computer then generates another opponent with the gear. And incidentally? These courses operate on a three-strikes-and-you're-out system. Lose three times and you have to start the process allll over again. (By the way, unless you're looking at a guide, you have no idea that this is the only way to get this armor or even that there ''is'' an accomplishment for getting said gear). Then is had to be done, ''again'', for Accomplishment #146, My Road To El Dorado, which is acquiring all accessories. Suffice to say that it requires the same as the all-gear one, except with ''even more'' [[ItemCrafting trading for items.]]

to:

** Obtaining all weapons and equipment (Accomplishment #145, The Ravenous Collector) requires not only an unholy amount of treasure-hunting and [[ItemCrafting trading]], but also random drops from enemies. The base item drop rate in Dissidia hovers around 1%. The enemies who have the gear you need dropped are generally only to be found in the Lunar Whale or Blackjack course of randomized computer-selected opponents--where opponents -- where the opponents are anywhere from level 120 to 150, when the player is capped at 100 and are all at maximum CPU strength, in addition to the bonuses from having said best gear in the game. Even with all possible boosters to item drop rate, it's still under 10% for any one item. So, to sum up: First the player has to be lucky enough to get to face an opponent with the armament they need. Then, they have to be lucky and skilled enough to beat the opponent. Then they have to be lucky enough to get the drop. And if they don't get the drop, the opponent is gone and they have to wait until the computer then generates another opponent with the gear. And incidentally? These courses operate on a three-strikes-and-you're-out system. Lose three times and you have to start the process allll over again. (By the way, unless you're looking at a guide, you have no idea that this is the only way to get this armor or even that there ''is'' an accomplishment for getting said gear). Then is had to be done, ''again'', for Accomplishment #146, My Road To El Dorado, which is acquiring all accessories. Suffice to say that it requires the same as the all-gear one, except with ''even more'' [[ItemCrafting trading for items.]]



* The Head of Cerberus missions in ''VideoGame/DeadIsland.'' You are tasked with activating speakers on rooftops, which doesn't sound so bad. However the waypoints are seemingly coded by trolls, they disappear when you get near them requiring you to set your own marker. To get to these locations you have to fight through waves of armed criminals, zombies, and the odd Ram or six, with a Suicider hiding just behind a corner. That's the first part. Later parts include RoofHopping, just finding a way up to the roofs is a challenge, then it turns into ''KaizoMarioWorld'' in first person. The third part of the quest takes place in the Quarantine Zone, maybe the toughest section of the game. [[ThatOneBoss Jason, The Butcher]] and [[FinalBoss Ryder White]] are easy in comparison.



* The Head of Cerberus missions in ''VideoGame/DeadIsland.'' You are tasked with activating speakers on rooftops, which doesn't sound so bad. However the waypoints are seemingly coded by trolls, they disappear when you get near them requiring you to set your own marker. To get to these locations you have to fight through waves of armed criminals, zombies, and the odd Ram or six, with a Suicider hiding just behind a corner. That's the first part. Later parts include RoofHopping, just finding a way up to the roofs is a challenge, then it turns into ''KaizoMarioWorld'' in first person. The third part of the quest takes place in the Quarantine Zone, maybe the toughest section of the game. [[ThatOneBoss Jason, The Butcher]] and [[FinalBoss Ryder White]] are easy in comparison.



** More time has been spent devising Hobopolis run strategies than anything else in the game, and for good reason. In order to get the best gear in the zone (a hamster which transfers the "Hobo Power" of several separate clothing items to meat and item drops/HP and MP regeneration), you must (a) join a clan and donate hundreds of thousands to gain access to their basement; (b) spend millions in meat to get enough healing items, turn increaser items and optimal gear to survive; (c) permanently acquire several skills that will make keeping fight counts low easier; (d) complete a sidequest outside of the zone where you use a binder to pick up "hobo glyphs" - you can't even enter the area without all the glyphs, and this requires multiple ascensions to get access to all of them; (e) plan your strategy with a group of other people, and execute the plan with near-pinpoint accuracy, and (f) defeat the Hobopolis boss, Hodgman, in under 1100 turns. In a single day. And since you don't have enough time to kill any of the other bosses in Hobopolis, Hodgman will be at full power.

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** More time has been spent devising Hobopolis run strategies than anything else in the game, and for good reason. In order to get the best gear in the zone (a hamster which transfers the "Hobo Power" of several separate clothing items to meat and item drops/HP and MP regeneration), you must (a) join a clan and donate hundreds of thousands to gain access to their basement; (b) spend millions in meat to get enough healing items, turn increaser items and optimal gear to survive; (c) permanently acquire several skills that will make keeping fight counts low easier; (d) complete a sidequest outside of the zone where you use a binder to pick up "hobo glyphs" - -- you can't even enter the area without all the glyphs, and this requires multiple ascensions to get access to all of them; (e) plan your strategy with a group of other people, and execute the plan with near-pinpoint accuracy, and (f) defeat the Hobopolis boss, Hodgman, in under 1100 turns. In a single day. And since you don't have enough time to kill any of the other bosses in Hobopolis, Hodgman will be at full power.



** The universally-loathed "Swabbing Duty" quest in Cape of Stranglethorn. To elucidate -- the captain of a pirate crew that you're trying to infiltrate charges you with [[MundaneMadeAwesome cleaning the ship's deck]], which takes the form of a minigame in which you have to keep the deck free of stains for two minutes. Unfortunately, the stains spawn at a ''ridiculously'' fast rate and have to be dealt with in a few seconds otherwise it's game over. If you have any kind of lag at all on your system the quest becomes near impossible. There are reports on various game forums of frustrated players giving up after ''days'' of fruitlessly trying to complete it, while others have had to resort to remapping their keyboards and creating macros. For a ''two-minute minigame''. The worst thing about it is that unlike 99.9% of the quests in VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, it's impossible to level past it, so if you're no good at the type of "twitch" gaming this quest requires you can get hopelessly stuck and left with no option but to abandon the quest. Yep - no matter how powerful your character, you can be forced to forfeit an entire questline because you can't ''mop'' fast enough. In 4.2, possibly earlier, you can just talk to the whiny deckhand and pay him 1 Gold to do it for you. The captain even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this when you turn the quest in, telling you he "heard frenzied mopping" and figures it must have been you.

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** The universally-loathed "Swabbing Duty" quest in Cape of Stranglethorn. To elucidate -- the captain of a pirate crew that you're trying to infiltrate charges you with [[MundaneMadeAwesome cleaning the ship's deck]], which takes the form of a minigame in which you have to keep the deck free of stains for two minutes. Unfortunately, the stains spawn at a ''ridiculously'' fast rate and have to be dealt with in a few seconds otherwise it's game over. If you have any kind of lag at all on your system the quest becomes near impossible. There are reports on various game forums of frustrated players giving up after ''days'' of fruitlessly trying to complete it, while others have had to resort to remapping their keyboards and creating macros. For a ''two-minute minigame''. The worst thing about it is that unlike 99.9% of the quests in VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, it's impossible to level past it, so if you're no good at the type of "twitch" gaming this quest requires you can get hopelessly stuck and left with no option but to abandon the quest. Yep - -- no matter how powerful your character, you can be forced to forfeit an entire questline because you can't ''mop'' fast enough. In 4.2, possibly earlier, you can just talk to the whiny deckhand and pay him 1 Gold to do it for you. The captain even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this when you turn the quest in, telling you he "heard frenzied mopping" and figures it must have been you.



** On entirely different level, fishing achievements. Half of them require you to catch absurdly rare fishes or similar stuff. Mr. Pinchy probably being the worst. There are only about a dozen or so spots where you can fish for him (pools that need to respawn after 5-6 catches), and once you have it, the pet needed for the achievement is only one of four possible outcomes. You may use him three times over 6 days, and if you are unlucky enough, you never get the pet and need to fish for him AGAIN. And back when achievements were introduced, you had to be at the highest possible fishing skill and top fishing equipment to reliably fish in these pools, and they were highly contested for the normal catches. On the bright side, this makes the already boring task of leveling fishing all the way seem comparably tame (unlike other gathering skills, the difficulty doesn't influence the rate at which it increases - you simply need like 30 sucessful catches at higher levels to advance a single point).

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** On entirely different level, fishing achievements. Half of them require you to catch absurdly rare fishes or similar stuff. Mr. Pinchy probably being the worst. There are only about a dozen or so spots where you can fish for him (pools that need to respawn after 5-6 catches), and once you have it, the pet needed for the achievement is only one of four possible outcomes. You may use him three times over 6 days, and if you are unlucky enough, you never get the pet and need to fish for him AGAIN. And back when achievements were introduced, you had to be at the highest possible fishing skill and top fishing equipment to reliably fish in these pools, and they were highly contested for the normal catches. On the bright side, this makes the already boring task of leveling fishing all the way seem comparably tame (unlike other gathering skills, the difficulty doesn't influence the rate at which it increases - -- you simply need like 30 sucessful catches at higher levels to advance a single point).



** Also consider the Meta achievement What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been - You need to complete all of the holiday event Meta achievements, and each one of those usually has a few that are extremely annoying. Also, good luck if you're out of town during the 1 week some of these events run.

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** Also consider the Meta achievement What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been - -- You need to complete all of the holiday event Meta achievements, and each one of those usually has a few that are extremely annoying. Also, good luck if you're out of town during the 1 week some of these events run.



* The process required to obtain Legendary items in ''VideoGame/DawnOfTheDragons'', especially the Shield of Ryndor and Sword of Conquered Kingdoms gear. The steps needed to get the fully-upgraded sword in particular are infuriatingly long. Getting the sword itself is the easy part - complete four boss raids and craft the components. Its second evolution requires getting three stones from quest areas and three raid crafting items that are not listed on the in-game loot tables. The third evolution requires the acquisition of five "Enigmatic Items", which (like the aforementioned crafting items) aren't seen on any loot tables, and require using five specific combinations of armor/weapons/troops/Legions/mounts for specific raids on specific difficulties. Miss an item required for one of the Enigmatic Items? You can't get the upgraded sword. Forgot to or can't fight the Nightmare-level bosses that drop the specific component? No sword. It takes a minimum of 15 raids on the low end to have a chance to get all the pieces, and there is nothing in-game that explains how to get the final evolution. And the ultimate reward? A sword that, while great in its own right for PVP battles, is vastly outclassed by most premium weapons.

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* The process required to obtain Legendary items in ''VideoGame/DawnOfTheDragons'', especially the Shield of Ryndor and Sword of Conquered Kingdoms gear. The steps needed to get the fully-upgraded sword in particular are infuriatingly long. Getting the sword itself is the easy part - -- complete four boss raids and craft the components. Its second evolution requires getting three stones from quest areas and three raid crafting items that are not listed on the in-game loot tables. The third evolution requires the acquisition of five "Enigmatic Items", which (like the aforementioned crafting items) aren't seen on any loot tables, and require using five specific combinations of armor/weapons/troops/Legions/mounts for specific raids on specific difficulties. Miss an item required for one of the Enigmatic Items? You can't get the upgraded sword. Forgot to or can't fight the Nightmare-level bosses that drop the specific component? No sword. It takes a minimum of 15 raids on the low end to have a chance to get all the pieces, and there is nothing in-game that explains how to get the final evolution. And the ultimate reward? A sword that, while great in its own right for PVP battles, is vastly outclassed by most premium weapons.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'':
** There's the warp pipe on the desert island - simply unlocking it requires maneuvering the [[SuperDrowningSkills water-soluble]] Yoshi through a time-consuming and tricky series of platform jumps over water. Once you're in, you have to collect 8 red coins over lethally toxic water, which is flowing irrevocably one way and contains strong currents that carry you away from the coins, by performing precisely timed jumps from a ''moving leaf-raft that is rapidly dissolving beneath your feet''; and you have to steer it with FLUDD. And if you run out of lives, you have to get Yoshi back on to that island all over again. There's a Warp Pipe at the end, which any sane person would think sends you back to the beginning to get any coins they missed, that ''sends you back to Delfino Plaza'', meaning you have to do the tedious section with Yoshi ''again'' just to try the level again.
** Watermelon Festival, requiring the player to maneuver a very fragile, difficult to control fruit through a huge group of enemies which can for the most part only be stunned temporarily. Those that can be killed don't usually get in your way anyways.
** The Pachinko course. You're in a giant pachinko machine, and you jump on a bouncy part of the floor to get launched way up to the top. Then you have to navigate along thin nails in the wall to get to the red coins. Missing the outcroppings in the wall is quite easy when you can't easily maneuver yourself and rotate the camera at the same time. Miss even one and you'll fall to the inescapable bottom which has a hole you jump down to your death. Then you have to start over. To make matters worse, the level has [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard wonky physics]]: sometimes Mario will bump what amounts to an invisible wall, and other times an invisible force will thrust him in a direction you don't want to go.
** The 240 Blue Coins. There are hidden coins scattered throughout every level in the game. Including [[NintendoHard most of the "secrets"]]. The blue coins vary in where they're found from obvious spots that require an unlockable power-up to [[GuideDangIt doing out of the way things like spraying the moon in a specific spot]] to [[NintendoHard controlling a boat toward one]] to just spraying anything you can find. And you need 10 to get a Shine Sprite and the game doesn't tell you where to find them or even provide you with a checklist.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'':
** The three Trial galaxies, all extremely difficult {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s:
** The Toy Time Galaxy has ''Luigi's Purple Coins''. The time limit imposed may as well not exist, as the [[OneHitKO Green Slime of Death]] will see to it that you die ''long'' before your time runs out.
** Dreadnought Galaxy's Purple Coin challenge is a giant pain in the ass, simply because the MinecartMadness style of the level means you can't miss a single one.
** The Daredevil challenge in Melty Molten Galaxy. In it, you have to play the first mission unharmed at all times. The vast array of hazards and potential ways to die, as well as the lack of checkpoints, will make you wish you had just fought Fiery Dino Piranha (which is already [[ThatOneBoss very difficult]] to do in normal gameplay).
** The Cosmic Mario races can be tricky, but not overly difficult. The Cosmic Luigi races, on the other hand, are infuriatingly difficult. Cosmic Luigi employs many tricks that players themselves use to go quickly, such as the long jump, and makes stunts that a standard player could achieve maybe one in every ten times.
** Not even Mario and bombs can make cleaning up garbage fun. There are two stars in Mario Galaxy that require you to clean up piles of garbage within thirty seconds, by using bombs that take ten seconds to explode.
** The Daredevil challenge in Ghostly Galaxy. It makes the player go up against [[Main/ThatOneBoss Bouldergeist]] with only [[Main/OneHitPointWonder one bit of health]].
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' has the Grand Master Galaxy Daredevil Run. The star is aptly called "The Perfect Run" because if you make a single mistake anywhere (and there are dozens of places to make mistakes) it kills you and forces you to start over from the beginning.
* In ''VideoGame/KirbyMassAttack'', completing all of the list objectives with "Gold Star Champion" standing out as the toughest one due to the fact that you have to beat each level and the bosses [[NoDamageRun without getting hurt]] to get all of the gold stars.
* In ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamland'', after you beat the main game, there's EX-mode which is basically the game's hard mode. [[spoiler: There's also [[BossRush The True Arena]] after you finish that, which borders on SelfImposedChallenge if you take it on with only one player, so hopefully you have some skilled friends to help you, as some of the bosses are nearly impossible for one person alone, even if they are very skilled.]]
** From the same game, one of the final gear pieces requires you to brave the game's [[MarathonLevel very long]] final level, use a Trumpet to retrieve a key from a rodent, then bring that key to the next screen, through an incredibly difficult series of obstacles to the door holding the gear. The next screen is full of lava, incidentally- lava that instantly destroys the key. And as you got the key on the previous screen, that means playing through the very long level all over again just to get another shot. Is it any wonder cross-screen puzzles were removed by the time Triple Deluxe came along?
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Tomba}} Tomba 2]]'':
** "Go Fast on the Trolley!" If you brake for even a ''millisecond'' longer than you should, you'll miss the time limit. And you do it ''twice'', with an even ''worse'' time limit the second time. That assumes the ridiculous speed the trolley moves doesn't throw you off the rails beforehand. And to add salt to your wounds, the game gives you a condescending "Awww, you failed!" every time you lose. ''Tips and Tricks'' magazine, asked why the quest was so hard, answered that Whoopie Camp were sadists.
** The [[BonusLevelOfHell Secret Towers]]. Each of which requires a pair of GuideDangIt sidequests to even get the key to open. ''Then'' you have to find the door to each (also a GuideDangIt, as the game gives ''no'' hint as to where the doors are, and they're ''invisible''). And there are ''[[UpToEleven three]]'' of them. Most players give up long before discovering the PlatformHell within. And one of the Tower Song Parts are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you don't complete another sidequest before defeating a certain Evil Pig.
** The Go Kart track from the first game. The Bronze and Silver medals are easy enough to attain, but the amount of precision and timing needed to get the Gold is insane. Completionists looking to get the ultimate buff item (which you need the gold medal for) and thereby beat the game 100%, will require likely require dozens of attempts. It's even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by the mermaid at the end of the racetrack when you do finally get it, as she says that [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall the developers are going to be disappointed with themselves.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'':
''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'':
** There's the warp pipe on the desert island - simply unlocking it requires maneuvering the [[SuperDrowningSkills water-soluble]] Yoshi through a time-consuming and tricky series of platform jumps over water. Once you're in, you have to collect 8 red coins over lethally toxic water, which is flowing irrevocably one way and contains strong currents that carry you away from the coins, by performing precisely timed jumps from a ''moving leaf-raft The game features an infamous jigsaw piece in Rusty Bucket Bay that is rapidly dissolving beneath your feet''; and you have to steer it with FLUDD. And if you run out of lives, you have to get Yoshi back on to that island all over again. There's a Warp Pipe at widely regarded as the end, which any sane person would think sends you back to the beginning to get any coins they missed, that ''sends you back to Delfino Plaza'', meaning you have to do the tedious section with Yoshi ''again'' just to try the level again.
** Watermelon Festival, requiring the player to maneuver a very fragile,
most difficult to control fruit through a huge group of enemies which can for the most part only be stunned temporarily. Those that can be killed don't usually get in your way anyways.
** The Pachinko course. You're in a giant pachinko machine, and you jump on a bouncy part of the floor to get launched way up to the top. Then you have to navigate along thin nails in the wall to get to the red coins. Missing the outcroppings in the wall is quite easy when you can't easily maneuver yourself and rotate the camera at the same time. Miss even one and you'll fall to the inescapable bottom which has a hole you jump down to your death. Then you have to start over. To make matters worse, the level has [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard wonky physics]]: sometimes Mario will bump what amounts to an invisible wall, and other times an invisible force will thrust him in a direction you don't want to go.
** The 240 Blue Coins. There are hidden coins scattered throughout every level
jigsaw in the game. Including [[NintendoHard most It requires you to head down deep into the engine room of the "secrets"]]. The blue coins vary level's ship, press a switch, navigate through a series of very narrow platforms with rotating fans, climb a ladder to exit the ship, jump into the water, and grab the jigsaw in where they're found from obvious spots the ship's propellers. All within a [[TimedMission strict time limit]]. Exacerbated by the fact that require an unlockable power-up to [[GuideDangIt doing one misstep means failure, the difficulty of seeing the exact location of the jigsaw in the level's murky waters (which drain your OxygenMeter at double the rate, no less), touching the blades of the propellers mean instant death, and the game's relatively imprecise swimming controls. Nuts & Bolts even pokes fun at the difficulty of said Jiggy.
** Mr. Vile's minigame in Bubblegloop Swamp is another irritating one. It seems pretty simple, at first glance: fruit pop
out of the way things like spraying holes, and the moon in a specific spot]] task given is to [[NintendoHard controlling a boat toward one]] eat more fruit than Mr. Vile does. Mr. Vile, however, is pretty darn fast, and the player must transform into an incredibly slow crocodile to just spraying anything you access the minigame. A powerup can find. And you need 10 to get a Shine Sprite and be unlocked later in the game doesn't tell that gives you where to find them or even provide super speed, making it relatively easier in that respect. But once you with a checklist.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'':
** The three Trial galaxies, all extremely difficult {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s:
** The Toy Time Galaxy has ''Luigi's Purple Coins''. The time limit imposed may as well not exist, as the [[OneHitKO Green Slime of Death]]
beat him, you have to beat him again, only this time, worms will see to it that pop up alongside the fruit, and eating a worm causes you die ''long'' before your time runs out.
** Dreadnought Galaxy's Purple Coin challenge is a giant pain in the ass, simply because the MinecartMadness style of the level means you can't miss a single one.
** The Daredevil challenge in Melty Molten Galaxy. In it,
to become temporarily stunned. Finally, you have to play the first mission unharmed at all times. The vast array of hazards game a third time. ''This'' time, both fruit and potential ways to die, as well as worms pop up again, but you can only eat whatever is displayed at the lack top of checkpoints, the screen. (ex: If it shows a worm, you must eat worms, and eating fruit will make you wish you had just fought Fiery Dino Piranha (which is already [[ThatOneBoss very difficult]] to do in normal gameplay).
**
stun you.) The Cosmic Mario races can be tricky, but not overly difficult. display changes randomly from fruit to worms. The Cosmic Luigi races, on the other hand, are infuriatingly difficult. Cosmic Luigi employs many tricks that players fruit and worms themselves use spawn randomly as well. And it all has to go quickly, such as be done in succession to get the long jump, and makes stunts that a standard player could achieve maybe one in every ten times.
** Not even Mario and bombs can make cleaning up garbage fun. There are two stars in Mario Galaxy that require you to clean up piles of garbage within thirty seconds, by using bombs that take ten seconds to explode.
Jiggy.
** The Daredevil challenge in Ghostly Galaxy. It makes sequel, ''Banjo-Tooie'', has Canary Mary. This probably wouldn't be so bad if you didn't have to race her on a vehicle powered by [[ButtonMashing repeatedly mashing the player go up A button]]. To make things worse, the race against [[Main/ThatOneBoss Bouldergeist]] with only [[Main/OneHitPointWonder one bit of health]].
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' has
her in the Grand Master Galaxy Daredevil Run. The star last major level is aptly called "The Perfect Run" because if you make a single mistake anywhere (and there are dozens of places to make mistakes) it kills you and forces you to start over from the beginning.
* In ''VideoGame/KirbyMassAttack'', completing all of the list objectives with "Gold Star Champion" standing out as the toughest one due to the fact
excruciatingly long for that control method, ''and'' she has RubberBandAI. And to get HundredPercentCompletion, you have to beat do each level race twice.
** ''Tooie'' also has the Dynamite Ordinance
and the bosses [[NoDamageRun without getting hurt]] Clinker's Cavern challenges. Both consist of Banjo wandering around a maze-like area in first-person view while, under a strict time limit, trying to get all locate and destroy a decent number of the gold stars.
* In ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamland'', after you beat the main game, there's EX-mode
creatures which is basically the game's hard mode. [[spoiler: There's also [[BossRush The True Arena]] after you finish that, which borders on SelfImposedChallenge if you take it on with only one player, so hopefully you have some skilled friends to help you, as some of the bosses are nearly impossible for one person alone, even if they are very skilled.]]
** From the same game, one
small enough to be hidden just out of the final gear pieces requires you to brave the game's [[MarathonLevel very long]] final level, use a Trumpet to retrieve a key from a rodent, then bring sight, in rooms that key all begin to look the next screen, through an incredibly difficult series of obstacles to the door holding the gear. The next screen is full of lava, incidentally- lava that instantly destroys the key. same. And as you got the key on the previous screen, that means playing through the very long level all over again just to get another shot. Is it any wonder cross-screen puzzles were removed by the time Triple Deluxe came along?
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Tomba}} Tomba 2]]'':
** "Go Fast on the Trolley!" If you brake for even a ''millisecond'' longer than you should, you'll miss the time limit. And you do it ''twice'', with an even ''worse'' time limit the second time. That assumes the ridiculous speed the trolley moves doesn't throw you off the rails beforehand. And to add salt to your wounds, the game gives you a condescending "Awww, you failed!" every time you lose. ''Tips and Tricks'' magazine, asked why the quest was so hard, answered that Whoopie Camp were sadists.
** The [[BonusLevelOfHell Secret Towers]]. Each of which requires a pair of GuideDangIt sidequests to even get the key to open. ''Then'' you have to find the door to each (also a GuideDangIt, as the game gives ''no'' hint as to where the doors are, and they're ''invisible''). And there are ''[[UpToEleven three]]'' of them. Most players give up long before discovering the PlatformHell within. And one of the Tower Song Parts are {{permanently missable|Content}}
if you don't get rid of all of the Clinkers in time, you have to escape from the area before you suffocate and lose all health.
* The Challenge Rooms in ''BionicCommando Rearmed''. Many of the later ones require insane coordination and timing, and can be {{Guide Dang It}}s. And you need to
complete another sidequest before defeating a certain Evil Pig.
** The Go Kart track
all of them for [[ThatOneAchievement the achievement]].
* ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped'' allows the player to reach [[UpToEleven 105% completion]] by earning at least golden relics
from every stage of the first game. The Bronze and Silver medals are easy enough to attain, but This is made very difficult by the amount of precision and timing needed to get the Gold is insane. Completionists looking to get the ultimate buff item (which you need the gold medal for) and thereby beat fact that the game 100%, will require likely require dozens features several different types of attempts. It's even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by the mermaid at the end levels and simply rushing through won't work in all of the racetrack when you do finally get it, as she says that [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall the developers are going to be disappointed with themselves.]]them.



** The mechanical fish, which requires you to shoot out all the valves of its heart in a time limit. You literally haven't a second to spare--you'll need all 100 seconds in order to complete it and destroy the robot fish. There's also a glitch that makes the propeller go for longer after a certain point in the game-- having the Sniper Scope active causes the rate at which the propellers spin to tank while the timer stays the same. It's easy enough to fix by leaving first person mode or disabling the sniper scope in between shots, but since it's a counter-intuitive fix to a problem that doesn't show up anywhere else in the game, many people resort to workaround glitches or declare it lost forever.

to:

** The mechanical fish, which requires you to shoot out all the valves of its heart in a time limit. You literally haven't a second to spare--you'll spare -- you'll need all 100 seconds in order to complete it and destroy the robot fish. There's also a glitch that makes the propeller go for longer after a certain point in the game-- game -- having the Sniper Scope active causes the rate at which the propellers spin to tank while the timer stays the same. It's easy enough to fix by leaving first person mode or disabling the sniper scope in between shots, but since it's a counter-intuitive fix to a problem that doesn't show up anywhere else in the game, many people resort to workaround glitches or declare it lost forever.



* ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'':
** The game features an infamous jigsaw piece in Rusty Bucket Bay that is widely regarded as the most difficult jigsaw in the game. It requires you to head down deep into the engine room of the level's ship, press a switch, navigate through a series of very narrow platforms with rotating fans, climb a ladder to exit the ship, jump into the water, and grab the jigsaw in the ship's propellers. All within a [[TimedMission strict time limit]]. Exacerbated by the fact that one misstep means failure, the difficulty of seeing the exact location of the jigsaw in the level's murky waters (which drain your OxygenMeter at double the rate, no less), touching the blades of the propellers mean instant death, and the game's relatively imprecise swimming controls. Nuts & Bolts even pokes fun at the difficulty of said Jiggy.
** Mr. Vile's minigame in Bubblegloop Swamp is another irritating one. It seems pretty simple, at first glance: fruit pop out of the holes, and the task given is to eat more fruit than Mr. Vile does. Mr. Vile, however, is pretty darn fast, and the player must transform into an incredibly slow crocodile to access the minigame. A powerup can be unlocked later in the game that gives you super speed, making it relatively easier in that respect. But once you beat him, you have to beat him again, only this time, worms will pop up alongside the fruit, and eating a worm causes you to become temporarily stunned. Finally, you have to play the game a third time. ''This'' time, both fruit and worms pop up again, but you can only eat whatever is displayed at the top of the screen. (ex: If it shows a worm, you must eat worms, and eating fruit will stun you.) The display changes randomly from fruit to worms. The fruit and worms themselves spawn randomly as well. And it all has to be done in succession to get the Jiggy.
** The sequel, ''Banjo-Tooie'', has Canary Mary. This probably wouldn't be so bad if you didn't have to race her on a vehicle powered by [[ButtonMashing repeatedly mashing the A button]]. To make things worse, the race against her in the last major level is excruciatingly long for that control method, ''and'' she has RubberBandAI. And to get HundredPercentCompletion, you have to do each race twice.
** ''Tooie'' also has the Dynamite Ordinance and Clinker's Cavern challenges. Both consist of Banjo wandering around a maze-like area in first-person view while, under a strict time limit, trying to locate and destroy a decent number of creatures which are small enough to be hidden just out of sight, in rooms that all begin to look the same. And if you don't get rid of all of the Clinkers in time, you have to escape from the area before you suffocate and lose all health.

to:

* ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'':
** The game features an infamous jigsaw piece in Rusty Bucket Bay that is widely regarded
In ''VideoGame/KirbyMassAttack'', completing all of the list objectives with "Gold Star Champion" standing out as the most difficult jigsaw in the game. It requires you toughest one due to head down deep into the engine room of the level's ship, press a switch, navigate through a series of very narrow platforms with rotating fans, climb a ladder to exit the ship, jump into the water, and grab the jigsaw in the ship's propellers. All within a [[TimedMission strict time limit]]. Exacerbated by the fact that one misstep means failure, the difficulty of seeing the exact location of the jigsaw in the level's murky waters (which drain your OxygenMeter at double the rate, no less), touching the blades of the propellers mean instant death, and the game's relatively imprecise swimming controls. Nuts & Bolts even pokes fun at the difficulty of said Jiggy.
** Mr. Vile's minigame in Bubblegloop Swamp is another irritating one. It seems pretty simple, at first glance: fruit pop out of the holes, and the task given is to eat more fruit than Mr. Vile does. Mr. Vile, however, is pretty darn fast, and the player must transform into an incredibly slow crocodile to access the minigame. A powerup can be unlocked later in the game that gives you super speed, making it relatively easier in that respect. But once you beat him,
you have to beat him again, each level and the bosses [[NoDamageRun without getting hurt]] to get all of the gold stars.
* In ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamland'', after you beat the main game, there's EX-mode which is basically the game's hard mode. [[spoiler: There's also [[BossRush The True Arena]] after you finish that, which borders on SelfImposedChallenge if you take it on with
only this time, worms will pop up alongside one player, so hopefully you have some skilled friends to help you, as some of the fruit, and eating a worm causes bosses are nearly impossible for one person alone, even if they are very skilled.]]
** From the same game, one of the final gear pieces requires
you to become temporarily stunned. Finally, brave the game's [[MarathonLevel very long]] final level, use a Trumpet to retrieve a key from a rodent, then bring that key to the next screen, through an incredibly difficult series of obstacles to the door holding the gear. The next screen is full of lava, incidentally -- lava that instantly destroys the key. And as you got the key on the previous screen, that means playing through the very long level all over again just to get another shot. Is it any wonder cross-screen puzzles were removed by the time Triple Deluxe came along?
* ''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' has you looking for over one hundred hostages to receive powerups,, and if you fail to save them before they're contaminated with a Nightmare Virus, they're [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] and
you have to play the restart your game to try again. to make it harder, one reploid has a third time. ''This'' time, both fruit and worms pop up again, but you can only eat whatever is displayed at the Nightmare spawn almost right on top of the screen. (ex: If it shows a worm, you must eat worms, and eating fruit will stun you.) The display changes randomly from fruit to worms. The fruit and worms themselves spawn randomly as well. And it all has to be done in succession to get the Jiggy.
** The sequel, ''Banjo-Tooie'', has Canary Mary. This probably wouldn't be so bad if you didn't have to race her on a vehicle powered by [[ButtonMashing repeatedly mashing the A button]]. To make things worse, the race against her in the last major level is excruciatingly long for that control method, ''and'' she has RubberBandAI. And to get HundredPercentCompletion,
him, meaning you have to do each race twice.
** ''Tooie'' also has
immediately shoot it down or lose him.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZX'' takes full advantage of its {{Metroidvania}} format in
the Dynamite Ordinance first game. How does it do this? [[LethalLavaLand Area K]] and Clinker's Cavern challenges. Both consist of Banjo wandering around a maze-like area in first-person view while, under a strict time limit, trying to locate and destroy a decent number of creatures which are small enough to be hidden just out of sight, in rooms that all begin to look the same. And if you don't get rid of all of the Clinkers in time, its thousand-times-cursed [[HeartContainer Sub Tank]]. First, you have to escape from go through an area with [[AdvancingWallOfDoom a wave of lava]] following you quite closely until you get to an area that instead has a [[RiseToTheChallenge rising pool of lava]]. You then go up to an alternate area of the first section of the level, where you go to a computer and reset the speed of the lava to slow (somehow). After this point, you must then take the cable car back to the start of the area before and go through the sub-boss battle and the ''entire'' lava wave section again, this time speeding through to a section near the middle of the area (and if you suffocate miss you have to start again or die?), avoiding or quickly destroying enemies, and lose then you must break through a set of five pairs of blocks, the first of which forms a wall on a hanging ledge. In order to break these blocks, you must use a charged attack from a form that is not particularly mobile. And if you get too close, you will grab the wall and attack in the opposite direction and have to try again. While the lava is still approaching, mind you, which makes this require insanely careful timing. Then you go through a relatively short segment to hit a button, go back through the stage, and climb up the rising lava area again to the first section. You just went through all health.of this hell to unlock a gate to a door. And then, just in case you spent too many lives on the aforementioned, you have to go through a short tunnel. Lined with [[SpikesOfDoom spikes.]] Underwater. And the water is boiling, so you'll periodically take damage, which snaps you out of your swimming mode, which you then have the length of your MercyInvincibility to turn back on (by jumping and hitting the jump button again, thus risking hitting the spiked ceiling). And then you have to get back out of this (i.e. play through the entire level ''again'') and make your way to a save point. [[CheckPointStarvation And you can't save during]] this whole hellish nightmare and keep your progress, not even the state of the lava speed.



** Collecting every single Figment is a task best left to the masochistic--especially in the Milla's Raceway sub-level. Due to the slope of the level, and the fact that it more or less forces you to be on your unwieldy Levitation Ball most of the way, it's very easy to fly too far or move too fast--and if you accidentally take the wrong pathway, too bad! To make matters worse, unlike most video game {{Plot Coupon}}s, Figments are transparent and can phase in and out of visibility--and some of them ''move,'' meaning you have to chase them down. It's possible to manually go up and down the race to collect the figments, but it's a painstaking process.

to:

** Collecting every single Figment is a task best left to the masochistic--especially masochistic -- especially in the Milla's Raceway sub-level. Due to the slope of the level, and the fact that it more or less forces you to be on your unwieldy Levitation Ball most of the way, it's very easy to fly too far or move too fast--and fast -- and if you accidentally take the wrong pathway, too bad! To make matters worse, unlike most video game {{Plot Coupon}}s, Figments are transparent and can phase in and out of visibility--and visibility -- and some of them ''move,'' meaning you have to chase them down. It's possible to manually go up and down the race to collect the figments, but it's a painstaking process.



* ''VideoGame/{{Vexx}}'':
** The last few Hearts in platformer are pure That One Sidequest. In the final world, you need to collect six {{Plot Coupon}}s to get a Heart, and they're scattered all over an ''extremely'' twisty and precarious level with BottomlessPits at every turn, with plenty of scrawny, moving, and electrified platforms here and there that are all just ''begging'' to send you plummeting into the abyss. And if you lose a life? Too bad! You have to start collecting them all over again! The entire level is pretty [[ScrappyLevel scrappy]], but both of its "collect X of object Y" missions can drive players to rage.
** The Sand Castle adds in some GuideDangIt. One of the hearts in the second world is supposed to be hidden in a "sand castle," according to its hint. There's a small castle made of sand in the desert, but it's too small to do anything with. Is it something else in the level you have to trigger? No. You have to go back to the ''first'' area and enter the castle behind the waterfall, which is an extremely trecherous platforming segment. At the bottom of ''one'' seemingly inconsequential platform, there's a thinner platform beneath, which you must LeapOfFaith to, to hit a switch. This lets you into the Sand Castle... which is a PaletteSwap version of the castle you just came through, and you have to ''do it again.''
** There's also a Heart in Frostblight Mill that requires the player to fly underneath the island and grab it out of the air (with flight controls that don't allow for a whole lot of precision.) Naturally, screwing this up is probably going to get you killed.
* The first ''VideoGame/SpyroTheDragon'' game has the level Tree Tops, the level itself is considered ThatOneLevel but there is a dragon stuck on a platform that you can only get to by chaining supercharge jumps and it's known for being hard to get to. The game actually [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this, the dragon compliments you on your jumping when you free him but Spyro grumbles, "You could have picked a better spot to get stuck in!"
* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'':
** There's a number of little side quests for orbs, one of which involves riding an infamous trolley around a track to get 50 gears for some pelican. This seemingly simple task will leave you traumatized with [[MostAnnoyingSound the phrase]] that horrible bird says to you every single one of the hundreds of times you are destined to fail, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti_vGdM1EBo&t=45s "Trouble with the trolley, eh?"]]
** The sidequest on the caveman level where you have to protect eggs from the raptors by running around and roasting them. The first time isn't that bad, because the all the raptors appear all in a row. The second time, however, they attack in a more or less random order, forcing you to run back and forth across the area to kill them all. If you miss a single jump or take a wrong turn, you're screwed.
** The Alchemist side-quest. To start it's an escort mission with the mandatory stupid A.I that will walk into the enemy's range without even trying to avoid them. To make matters worse if the guy went out of his cave and to the right he can completely avoid the enemies and reach his destination in half the time. The sidequest is especially notable in that, if you kill all the enemies first with [[BraggingRightsReward Infinite Superflame]], you can easily notice the Alchemist always follows the same, pre-determined path, that is ''programmed to run into every single enemy''. That's right, you're supposed to escort him and keep him safe from ''all of them!''
** The Crystal Popcorn is another difficult challenge, where the player had to collect more crystal pieces than Hunter, 10 during the first challenge, not that bad, 15 during the second, and Hunter's AI gets better too, also, leave the level without getting the second one, you'll have to do the first again.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZX'' takes full advantage of its {{Metroidvania}} format in the first game. How does it do this? [[LethalLavaLand Area K]] and its thousand-times-cursed [[HeartContainer Sub Tank]]. First, you have to go through an area with [[AdvancingWallOfDoom a wave of lava]] following you quite closely until you get to an area that instead has a [[RiseToTheChallenge rising pool of lava]]. You then go up to an alternate area of the first section of the level, where you go to a computer and reset the speed of the lava to slow (somehow). After this point, you must then take the cable car back to the start of the area and go through the sub-boss battle and the ''entire'' lava wave section again, this time speeding through to a section near the middle of the area (and if you miss you have to start again or die?), avoiding or quickly destroying enemies, and then you must break through a set of five pairs of blocks, the first of which forms a wall on a hanging ledge. In order to break these blocks, you must use a charged attack from a form that is not particularly mobile. And if you get too close, you will grab the wall and attack in the opposite direction and have to try again. While the lava is still approaching, mind you, which makes this require insanely careful timing. Then you go through a relatively short segment to hit a button, go back through the stage, and climb up the rising lava area again to the first section. You just went through all of this hell to unlock a gate to a door. And then, just in case you spent too many lives on the aforementioned, you have to go through a short tunnel. Lined with [[SpikesOfDoom spikes.]] Underwater. And the water is boiling, so you'll periodically take damage, which snaps you out of your swimming mode, which you then have the length of your MercyInvincibility to turn back on (by jumping and hitting the jump button again, thus risking hitting the spiked ceiling). And then you have to get back out of this (i.e. play through the entire level ''again'') and make your way to a save point. [[CheckPointStarvation And you can't save during]] this whole hellish nightmare and keep your progress, not even the state of the lava speed.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Vexx}}'':
** The last few Hearts in platformer are pure That One Sidequest. In
Many people who have played ''VideoGame/{{Rayman 2}}'' don't even know that the final world, you 1000th lum even exists. You need to collect six {{Plot Coupon}}s look at one section of a wall in a cutscene to get a Heart, and they're scattered all over an ''extremely'' twisty and precarious level with BottomlessPits at every turn, with plenty of scrawny, moving, and electrified platforms here and there realize that are all just ''begging'' to send you plummeting into the abyss. And if you lose a life? Too bad! You have to start collecting them all over again! The entire level is pretty [[ScrappyLevel scrappy]], but both of its "collect X of object Y" missions can drive players to rage.
** The Sand Castle adds in some GuideDangIt. One of the hearts in the second world is supposed to be hidden in a "sand castle," according to its hint. There's a small castle made of sand in the desert, but
it's too small a camouflaged secret tunnel to do anything with. Is it something else in the level 1000th lum. Despite your completion rate reaching 100%, the game still says that you have to trigger? No. You have to go back to the ''first'' area and enter the castle behind the waterfall, which is an extremely trecherous platforming segment. At the bottom of ''one'' seemingly inconsequential platform, 999/999 lums.
* In ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins,''
there's a thinner platform beneath, which the time trial for Mecha No Mistake. The level is ''already'' ThatOneLevel and notorious for its habit of killing players repeatedly; the time trial requires you must LeapOfFaith to, to hit a switch. This lets you into the Sand Castle... which is a PaletteSwap version of the castle you just came through, and you have not only complete it flawlessly, but to ''do complete it again.''
** There's also
flawlessly on a Heart in Frostblight Mill ''very strict time limit'' that requires the player to fly underneath the island and grab it out of the air (with flight controls that don't allow for a whole lot of precision.) Naturally, screwing this up is probably going to get you killed.
* The first ''VideoGame/SpyroTheDragon'' game has the level Tree Tops, the level itself is considered ThatOneLevel but there is a dragon stuck on a platform that you can only get to by chaining supercharge jumps and it's known for being hard to get to. The game actually [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this, the dragon compliments you on your jumping when you free him but Spyro grumbles, "You could have picked a better spot to get stuck in!"
* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'':
** There's a number of little side quests for orbs, one of which involves riding an infamous trolley around a track to get 50 gears for some pelican. This seemingly simple task will leave you traumatized with [[MostAnnoyingSound the phrase]] that horrible bird says to you every single one of the hundreds of times you are destined to fail, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti_vGdM1EBo&t=45s "Trouble with the trolley, eh?"]]
** The sidequest on the caveman level where you have to protect eggs from the raptors by running around and roasting them. The first time isn't that bad, because the all the raptors appear all in a row. The second time, however, they attack in a more or less random order, forcing
you to run back and forth across the area to kill them all. If you miss a single jump or take a wrong turn, you're screwed.
** The Alchemist side-quest. To start it's an escort mission with the mandatory stupid A.I that will walk into the enemy's range without even trying to avoid them. To make matters worse if the guy went out of his cave and to the right he can completely avoid the enemies and reach his destination in half the time. The sidequest is especially notable in that, if you kill all the enemies first with [[BraggingRightsReward Infinite Superflame]], you can easily notice the Alchemist always follows the same, pre-determined path, that is ''programmed to run into every single enemy''. That's right, you're supposed to escort him and keep him safe from ''all of them!''
** The Crystal Popcorn is another difficult challenge, where the player had to collect more crystal pieces than Hunter, 10 during the first challenge, not that bad, 15 during the second, and Hunter's AI gets better too, also, leave the level without getting the second one, you'll have to do the first again.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZX'' takes full advantage of its {{Metroidvania}} format in the first game. How does it do this? [[LethalLavaLand Area K]] and its thousand-times-cursed [[HeartContainer Sub Tank]]. First, you have to go through an area with [[AdvancingWallOfDoom a wave of lava]] following you quite closely until you get to an area that instead has a [[RiseToTheChallenge rising pool of lava]]. You then go up to an alternate area of the first section of the level, where you go to a computer and reset the speed of the lava to slow (somehow). After this point, you must then take the cable car back to the start of the area and go through the sub-boss battle and the ''entire'' lava wave section again, this time speeding through to a section near the middle of the area (and if you miss you have to start again or die?), avoiding or quickly destroying enemies, and then you must break through a set of five pairs of blocks, the first of which forms a wall on a hanging ledge. In order to break these blocks, you must use a charged attack from a form that is not particularly mobile. And if you get too close, you will grab the wall and attack in the opposite direction and have to try again. While the lava is still approaching, mind you, which makes this require insanely careful timing. Then you go through a relatively short segment to hit a button, go back through the stage, and climb up the rising lava area again to the first section. You just went through all of this hell to unlock a gate to a door. And then, just in case you spent too many lives on the aforementioned, you have to go through a short tunnel. Lined with [[SpikesOfDoom spikes.]] Underwater. And the water is boiling, so you'll periodically take damage, which snaps you out of your swimming mode, which you then have the length of your MercyInvincibility to turn back on (by jumping and hitting the jump button again, thus risking hitting the spiked ceiling). And then you have to get back out of this (i.e. play through
almost the entire level ''again'') and make your way to a save point. [[CheckPointStarvation And you can't save during]] this whole hellish nightmare and keep your progress, not even the state way. Some parts of the lava speed.level actually get easier if you run the whole thing (such as the part with vanishing platforms), others do not. And the gear room, while rarely dangerous, is a ''huge'' time suck that makes it all the more difficult to grab the Electoon. Let alone the trophy...
* ''VideoGame/SlyCooperAndTheThieviusRaccoonus'' has the Master Thief Sprints, [[TimedMission speedruns of every platforming level]]. They're noticeably more difficult than anything else in the game. Tellingly, no other Sly game used them, and the version on the [=PS3=] doesn't offer any trophies for completing them.



* Many people who have played ''VideoGame/{{Rayman 2}}'' don't even know that the 1000th lum even exists. You need to look at one section of a wall in a cutscene to realize that it's a camouflaged secret tunnel to the 1000th lum. Despite your completion rate reaching 100%, the game still says that you have 999/999 lums.
* In ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins,'' there's the time trial for Mecha No Mistake. The level is ''already'' ThatOneLevel and notorious for its habit of killing players repeatedly; the time trial requires you to not only complete it flawlessly, but to complete it flawlessly on a ''very strict time limit'' that requires you to run almost the entire way. Some parts of the level actually get easier if you run the whole thing (such as the part with vanishing platforms), others do not. And the gear room, while rarely dangerous, is a ''huge'' time suck that makes it all the more difficult to grab the Electoon. Let alone the trophy...
* ''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' has you looking for over one hundred hostages to receive powerups,, and if you fail to save them before they're contaminated with a Nightmare Virus, they're [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] and you have to restart your game to try again. to make it harder, one reploid has a Nightmare spawn almost right on top of him, meaning you have to immediately shoot it down or lose him.
* ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld Super Mario Advance]]'':
** ''Super Mario Advance'' gave us the Yoshi eggs. Did we mention that you don't get any extra hit points now? And there's no way to know where the Yoshi eggs are? In subspace! Plus, if you lose a life, you also lose any eggs you picked up. Hope you remember where the eggs where the first time and don't mind starting over!
** ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3 Super Mario Advance 4]]'' gave us optional levels that [[BribingYourWayToVictory require an eReader, and eReader cards to get to]]. And many of them were extremely difficult homages to previous games. The cards are lost now, due to being out of print for several years. On top of that, [[NoExportForYou only Japan had all the cards while other places got a fraction of what Japan had.]]
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', getting all 96 levels. That means all the exits. Including Valley Ghost House's alternate exit. And [[spoiler:Tubular]] in the Special World.
* In ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland''
** Getting 100% in each world is PlatformHell, but "Kamek's Revenge" takes the cake. Just getting to the skiing section is a nightmare, only to require the player to time each jump exactly right or start the entire level over again.
** Find 5 flowers in each level. Even once you find their actual location (and the designed had no compunction against putting them in invisible '?' clouds) you have to figure out how to touch it or nail it with an egg. An AutoScrollingLevel presents obvious problems along with this.
** Collect 20 red coins in each level. Most of these are hidden among regular coins, with just the slightest difference in color to differentiate them, and usually in spots that complicate already-tricky jumps. Others are hidden in side areas, frequently the kind that require replaying the entire level if missed once, or in flashing eggs, which have to be broken on something solid. Only a couple of levels have 21 red coins, most of which appear to be miscounts during level design, exactly one is a pressure-relief valve for a missable coin on mutually exclusive paths earlier in the level.
** Finish with 30 stars in each level. Stars are functionally Yoshi's HitPoints, copious in supply but lost just as easily. It's far to common to meet the other two requirements, then got poked on the home stretch and lose [[LastLousyPoint one measly star]] getting Baby Mario back. There is an item that instantly restores 20 stars (giving you an instant perfect on top of your regenerating base 10), but these are rare and hard to find. That is, until you unlock the minigame to farm them... by getting all 100% in a certain world. And all these apply in full force to boss levels (and you can't use items during boss battles).



* ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped'' allows the player to reach [[UpToEleven 105% completion]] by earning at least golden relics from every stage of the game. This is made very difficult by the fact that the game features several different types of levels and simply rushing through won't work in all of them.
* ''VideoGame/SlyCooperAndTheThieviusRaccoonus'' has the Master Thief Sprints, [[TimedMission speedruns of every platforming level]]. They're noticeably more difficult than anything else in the game. Tellingly, no other Sly game used them, and the version on the [=PS3=] doesn't offer any trophies for completing them.
* The Challenge Rooms in ''BionicCommando Rearmed''. Many of the later ones require insane coordination and timing, and can be {{Guide Dang It}}s. And you need to complete all of them for [[ThatOneAchievement the achievement]].

to:

* ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped'' allows The first ''VideoGame/SpyroTheDragon'' game has the level Tree Tops, the level itself is considered ThatOneLevel but there is a dragon stuck on a platform that you can only get to by chaining supercharge jumps and it's known for being hard to get to. The game actually [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this, the dragon compliments you on your jumping when you free him but Spyro grumbles, "You could have picked a better spot to get stuck in!"
* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'':
** There's a number of little side quests for orbs, one of which involves riding an infamous trolley around a track to get 50 gears for some pelican. This seemingly simple task will leave you traumatized with [[MostAnnoyingSound the phrase]] that horrible bird says to you every single one of the hundreds of times you are destined to fail, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti_vGdM1EBo&t=45s "Trouble with the trolley, eh?"]]
** The sidequest on the caveman level where you have to protect eggs from the raptors by running around and roasting them. The first time isn't that bad, because the all the raptors appear all in a row. The second time, however, they attack in a more or less random order, forcing you to run back and forth across the area to kill them all. If you miss a single jump or take a wrong turn, you're screwed.
** The Alchemist side-quest. To start it's an escort mission with the mandatory stupid A.I that will walk into the enemy's range without even trying to avoid them. To make matters worse if the guy went out of his cave and to the right he can completely avoid the enemies and reach his destination in half the time. The sidequest is especially notable in that, if you kill all the enemies first with [[BraggingRightsReward Infinite Superflame]], you can easily notice the Alchemist always follows the same, pre-determined path, that is ''programmed to run into every single enemy''. That's right, you're supposed to escort him and keep him safe from ''all of them!''
** The Crystal Popcorn is another difficult challenge, where the player had to collect more crystal pieces than Hunter, 10 during the first challenge, not that bad, 15 during the second, and Hunter's AI gets better too, also, leave the level without getting the second one, you'll have to do the first again.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'':
** There's the warp pipe on the desert island -- simply unlocking it requires maneuvering the [[SuperDrowningSkills water-soluble]] Yoshi through a time-consuming and tricky series of platform jumps over water. Once you're in, you have to collect 8 red coins over lethally toxic water, which is flowing irrevocably one way and contains strong currents that carry you away from the coins, by performing precisely timed jumps from a ''moving leaf-raft that is rapidly dissolving beneath your feet''; and you have to steer it with FLUDD. And if you run out of lives, you have to get Yoshi back on to that island all over again. There's a Warp Pipe at the end, which any sane person would think sends you back to the beginning to get any coins they missed, that ''sends you back to Delfino Plaza'', meaning you have to do the tedious section with Yoshi ''again'' just to try the level again.
** Watermelon Festival, requiring
the player to reach [[UpToEleven 105% completion]] by earning at least golden relics from every stage of the game. This is made maneuver a very fragile, difficult by the fact that the game features several different types of levels and simply rushing to control fruit through won't work a huge group of enemies which can for the most part only be stunned temporarily. Those that can be killed don't usually get in all your way anyways.
** The Pachinko course. You're in a giant pachinko machine, and you jump on a bouncy part
of them.
* ''VideoGame/SlyCooperAndTheThieviusRaccoonus''
the floor to get launched way up to the top. Then you have to navigate along thin nails in the wall to get to the red coins. Missing the outcroppings in the wall is quite easy when you can't easily maneuver yourself and rotate the camera at the same time. Miss even one and you'll fall to the inescapable bottom which has a hole you jump down to your death. Then you have to start over. To make matters worse, the Master Thief Sprints, [[TimedMission speedruns of level has [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard wonky physics]]: sometimes Mario will bump what amounts to an invisible wall, and other times an invisible force will thrust him in a direction you don't want to go.
** The 240 Blue Coins. There are hidden coins scattered throughout
every platforming level]]. They're noticeably more difficult than anything else level in the game. Tellingly, no other Sly game used them, Including [[NintendoHard most of the "secrets"]]. The blue coins vary in where they're found from obvious spots that require an unlockable power-up to [[GuideDangIt doing out of the way things like spraying the moon in a specific spot]] to [[NintendoHard controlling a boat toward one]] to just spraying anything you can find. And you need 10 to get a Shine Sprite and the version on the [=PS3=] game doesn't offer any trophies for completing them.
tell you where to find them or even provide you with a checklist.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'':
**
The Challenge Rooms three Trial galaxies, all extremely difficult {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s:
** The Toy Time Galaxy has ''Luigi's Purple Coins''. The time limit imposed may as well not exist, as the [[OneHitKO Green Slime of Death]] will see to it that you die ''long'' before your time runs out.
** Dreadnought Galaxy's Purple Coin challenge is a giant pain
in ''BionicCommando Rearmed''. Many the ass, simply because the MinecartMadness style of the later ones level means you can't miss a single one.
** The Daredevil challenge in Melty Molten Galaxy. In it, you have to play the first mission unharmed at all times. The vast array of hazards and potential ways to die, as well as the lack of checkpoints, will make you wish you had just fought Fiery Dino Piranha (which is already [[ThatOneBoss very difficult]] to do in normal gameplay).
** The Cosmic Mario races can be tricky, but not overly difficult. The Cosmic Luigi races, on the other hand, are infuriatingly difficult. Cosmic Luigi employs many tricks that players themselves use to go quickly, such as the long jump, and makes stunts that a standard player could achieve maybe one in every ten times.
** Not even Mario and bombs can make cleaning up garbage fun. There are two stars in Mario Galaxy that
require insane coordination you to clean up piles of garbage within thirty seconds, by using bombs that take ten seconds to explode.
** The Daredevil challenge in Ghostly Galaxy. It makes the player go up against [[Main/ThatOneBoss Bouldergeist]] with only [[Main/OneHitPointWonder one bit of health]].
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' has the Grand Master Galaxy Daredevil Run. The star is aptly called "The Perfect Run" because if you make a single mistake anywhere (and there are dozens of places to make mistakes) it kills you
and timing, forces you to start over from the beginning.
* ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld Super Mario Advance]]'':
** ''Super Mario Advance'' gave us the Yoshi eggs. Did we mention that you don't get any extra hit points now? And there's no way to know where the Yoshi eggs are? In subspace! Plus, if you lose a life, you also lose any eggs you picked up. Hope you remember where the eggs where the first time
and can be {{Guide Dang It}}s. don't mind starting over!
** ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3 Super Mario Advance 4]]'' gave us optional levels that [[BribingYourWayToVictory require an eReader, and eReader cards to get to]].
And many of them were extremely difficult homages to previous games. The cards are lost now, due to being out of print for several years. On top of that, [[NoExportForYou only Japan had all the cards while other places got a fraction of what Japan had.]]
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', getting all 96 levels. That means all the exits. Including Valley Ghost House's alternate exit. And [[spoiler:Tubular]] in the Special World.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Tomba}} Tomba 2]]'':
** "Go Fast on the Trolley!" If you brake for even a ''millisecond'' longer than you should, you'll miss the time limit. And you do it ''twice'', with an even ''worse'' time limit the second time. That assumes the ridiculous speed the trolley moves doesn't throw you off the rails beforehand. And to add salt to your wounds, the game gives you a condescending "Awww, you failed!" every time you lose. ''Tips and Tricks'' magazine, asked why the quest was so hard, answered that Whoopie Camp were sadists.
** The [[BonusLevelOfHell Secret Towers]]. Each of which requires a pair of GuideDangIt sidequests to even get the key to open. ''Then'' you have to find the door to each (also a GuideDangIt, as the game gives ''no'' hint as to where the doors are, and they're ''invisible''). And there are ''[[UpToEleven three]]'' of them. Most players give up long before discovering the PlatformHell within. And one of the Tower Song Parts are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you don't complete another sidequest before defeating a certain Evil Pig.
** The Go Kart track from the first game. The Bronze and Silver medals are easy enough to attain, but the amount of precision and timing needed to get the Gold is insane. Completionists looking to get the ultimate buff item (which you need the gold medal for) and thereby beat the game 100%, will require likely require dozens of attempts. It's even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by the mermaid at the end of the racetrack when you do finally get it, as she says that [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall the developers are going to be disappointed with themselves.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Vexx}}'':
** The last few Hearts in platformer are pure That One Sidequest. In the final world,
you need to complete collect six {{Plot Coupon}}s to get a Heart, and they're scattered all over an ''extremely'' twisty and precarious level with BottomlessPits at every turn, with plenty of scrawny, moving, and electrified platforms here and there that are all just ''begging'' to send you plummeting into the abyss. And if you lose a life? Too bad! You have to start collecting them all over again! The entire level is pretty [[ScrappyLevel scrappy]], but both of its "collect X of object Y" missions can drive players to rage.
** The Sand Castle adds in some GuideDangIt. One of the hearts in the second world is supposed to be hidden in a "sand castle," according to its hint. There's a small castle made of sand in the desert, but it's too small to do anything with. Is it something else in the level you have to trigger? No. You have to go back to the ''first'' area and enter the castle behind the waterfall, which is an extremely trecherous platforming segment. At the bottom of ''one'' seemingly inconsequential platform, there's a thinner platform beneath, which you must LeapOfFaith to, to hit a switch. This lets you into the Sand Castle... which is a PaletteSwap version of the castle you just came through, and you have to ''do it again.''
** There's also a Heart in Frostblight Mill that requires the player to fly underneath the island and grab it out of the air (with flight controls that don't allow
for [[ThatOneAchievement a whole lot of precision.) Naturally, screwing this up is probably going to get you killed.
* In ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'':
** Getting 100% in each world is PlatformHell, but "Kamek's Revenge" takes
the achievement]].cake. Just getting to the skiing section is a nightmare, only to require the player to time each jump exactly right or start the entire level over again.
** Find 5 flowers in each level. Even once you find their actual location (and the designed had no compunction against putting them in invisible '?' clouds) you have to figure out how to touch it or nail it with an egg. An AutoScrollingLevel presents obvious problems along with this.
** Collect 20 red coins in each level. Most of these are hidden among regular coins, with just the slightest difference in color to differentiate them, and usually in spots that complicate already-tricky jumps. Others are hidden in side areas, frequently the kind that require replaying the entire level if missed once, or in flashing eggs, which have to be broken on something solid. Only a couple of levels have 21 red coins, most of which appear to be miscounts during level design, exactly one is a pressure-relief valve for a missable coin on mutually exclusive paths earlier in the level.
** Finish with 30 stars in each level. Stars are functionally Yoshi's HitPoints, copious in supply but lost just as easily. It's far to common to meet the other two requirements, then got poked on the home stretch and lose [[LastLousyPoint one measly star]] getting Baby Mario back. There is an item that instantly restores 20 stars (giving you an instant perfect on top of your regenerating base 10), but these are rare and hard to find. That is, until you unlock the minigame to farm them... by getting all 100% in a certain world. And all these apply in full force to boss levels (and you can't use items during boss battles).



** On guitar, "Green Grass and High Tides", on drums "Run to the Hills"--both not really because they're absurdly difficult, but because they're long, long songs that require the player to keep a very fast rhythm throughout. You ''will'' get painful cramps halfway through. Then you'll mess up and have to start over from the top to get those precious, precious golden stars. For sheer difficulty there's the DLC "Snow ((Hey Oh))" which calls for lightning fast hammer-ons all the way through.

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** On guitar, "Green Grass and High Tides", on drums "Run to the Hills"--both Hills" -- both not really because they're absurdly difficult, but because they're long, long songs that require the player to keep a very fast rhythm throughout. You ''will'' get painful cramps halfway through. Then you'll mess up and have to start over from the top to get those precious, precious golden stars. For sheer difficulty there's the DLC "Snow ((Hey Oh))" which calls for lightning fast hammer-ons all the way through.



** "Short and Sweet" on ''Lego Rock Band''. The song is not particularly difficult or challenging - in fact, it's relatively easy-but it's long, long, long. Seven minutes!

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** "Short and Sweet" on ''Lego Rock Band''. The song is not particularly difficult or challenging - -- in fact, it's relatively easy-but easy -- but it's long, long, long. Seven minutes!



* ''VideoGame/{{DJ MAX}} Portable 2'' has missions that require you to complete a set of songs while fulfilling one or two goals at the same time (such as getting a high enough combo, keeping your accuracy high enough as you go from one song to the next, etc.). The earlier missions aren't too bad...with the exception of the "Rave 2 Wave" mission, which forces you to use the annoying CHAOS-W modifier, which causes notes to move in a wave-like fashion. And then you have the entirety of the later missions--one mission tasks you with getting a high score, but at the same time increasing your scroll speed every time you use Fever. Another picks 4 random songs for you, turns on the Random Max modifier, and must be completed with less than 20 Breaks. Perhaps the most infamous missions is "Just 1%", which requires you to, on top of using Fever a certain amount of times in a row per song, automatically fails you if you get the MAX 1% judgment on a single note, all while having you play some of the [[ThatOneBoss hardest songs in the game]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{DJ MAX}} Portable 2'' has missions that require you to complete a set of songs while fulfilling one or two goals at the same time (such as getting a high enough combo, keeping your accuracy high enough as you go from one song to the next, etc.). The earlier missions aren't too bad...with the exception of the "Rave 2 Wave" mission, which forces you to use the annoying CHAOS-W modifier, which causes notes to move in a wave-like fashion. And then you have the entirety of the later missions--one missions -- one mission tasks you with getting a high score, but at the same time increasing your scroll speed every time you use Fever. Another picks 4 random songs for you, turns on the Random Max modifier, and must be completed with less than 20 Breaks. Perhaps the most infamous missions is "Just 1%", which requires you to, on top of using Fever a certain amount of times in a row per song, automatically fails you if you get the MAX 1% judgment on a single note, all while having you play some of the [[ThatOneBoss hardest songs in the game]].



* ''VideoGame/BitTrip COMPLETE'' comes with 120 Challenges; 20 in each of the six games. To complete a challenge, you have to make a perfect run through it - hit all the Beats, dodge any Avoid Beats, etc. In ''RUNNER'', this also extends to hitting everything that gives points - but not all of them, or else you jump into a pit or another enemy. Challenges like Labyrinth (''VOID'': get through a maze of Avoid Beats and collect the Beats in a strict time limit); Fool You Once (''RUNNER'': a large portion of stuff that give you points actually forces you into enemies, also needs to time the jump pads for specific spots); Back Attack (''FATE'': a large portion of enemies come from the back, and so must stay alive to fire off at least a few shots to collect their Cores); and Harder, Faster (''FLUX'': starts slow, increases in speed and difficulty, and essentially limits your view to nothing in the middle of it all) require near mastery of the system being used.

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* ''VideoGame/BitTrip COMPLETE'' comes with 120 Challenges; 20 in each of the six games. To complete a challenge, you have to make a perfect run through it - -- hit all the Beats, dodge any Avoid Beats, etc. In ''RUNNER'', this also extends to hitting everything that gives points - -- but not all of them, or else you jump into a pit or another enemy. Challenges like Labyrinth (''VOID'': get through a maze of Avoid Beats and collect the Beats in a strict time limit); Fool You Once (''RUNNER'': a large portion of stuff that give you points actually forces you into enemies, also needs to time the jump pads for specific spots); Back Attack (''FATE'': a large portion of enemies come from the back, and so must stay alive to fire off at least a few shots to collect their Cores); and Harder, Faster (''FLUX'': starts slow, increases in speed and difficulty, and essentially limits your view to nothing in the middle of it all) require near mastery of the system being used.



* Recruiting Kecleon in the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' games. In the ''Rescue Team'' games, you need to raise a Pokemon to level 100, equip a Friend Bow, and defeat Kecleon until one joins you. It's a 1/1000 chance and they're insanely strong and at double Speed, but persistence is key. The ''Explorers'' games complicate this a bit. In order to make it even ''possible'' for a Kecleon to join you, you need to raise a Pokemon that can learn the Fast Friend IQ skill to level 100 and feed it enough gummis that it can learn said IQ skill. But wait--there's more. You either need the Golden Mask or Amber tear, one is in a 99-floor dungeon that reduces your level to 1, while the other is in a 40-level dungeon with similar restrictions. If you get that, you still only have a 1/200 chance and those Kecleon can still kill you effortlessly. You'd better have a plan and a ton of Reviver Seeds.

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* Recruiting Kecleon in the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' games. In the ''Rescue Team'' games, you need to raise a Pokemon to level 100, equip a Friend Bow, and defeat Kecleon until one joins you. It's a 1/1000 chance and they're insanely strong and at double Speed, but persistence is key. The ''Explorers'' games complicate this a bit. In order to make it even ''possible'' for a Kecleon to join you, you need to raise a Pokemon that can learn the Fast Friend IQ skill to level 100 and feed it enough gummis that it can learn said IQ skill. But wait--there's wait -- there's more. You either need the Golden Mask or Amber tear, one is in a 99-floor dungeon that reduces your level to 1, while the other is in a 40-level dungeon with similar restrictions. If you get that, you still only have a 1/200 chance and those Kecleon can still kill you effortlessly. You'd better have a plan and a ton of Reviver Seeds.



** For those who dealt with the Pac-Man sidequest by [[FanonDiscontinuity pretending it doesn't exist]], there's still "Gather the rock-people!" To do this quest, you have to move large stone statues throughout the Nekkar Quietlands by pushing them to the summit. Yes, pushing them, in a game where {{Hammerspace}} is a heavily JustifiedTrope. The EdgeGravity on said statues is beyond abysmal; you need to approach them with nearly pixel perfect accuracy just so the game registers the push, and even then it might not go the way you want it to - which is a major issue, because it's nigh-impossible to get the statues away from the walls except by leaving the area and coming back, which would be merely very bad instead of unforgivable if only Nekkar wasn't filled with narrow passages. The monsters can also block your statues, forcing you to fight them - and nearly every battle here features [[DemonicSpiders Queen Alraunes]]. And as though out of sheer spite, Nekkar is also filled with freaking '''invisible pit traps'''.

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** For those who dealt with the Pac-Man sidequest by [[FanonDiscontinuity pretending it doesn't exist]], there's still "Gather the rock-people!" To do this quest, you have to move large stone statues throughout the Nekkar Quietlands by pushing them to the summit. Yes, pushing them, in a game where {{Hammerspace}} is a heavily JustifiedTrope. The EdgeGravity on said statues is beyond abysmal; you need to approach them with nearly pixel perfect accuracy just so the game registers the push, and even then it might not go the way you want it to - -- which is a major issue, because it's nigh-impossible to get the statues away from the walls except by leaving the area and coming back, which would be merely very bad instead of unforgivable if only Nekkar wasn't filled with narrow passages. The monsters can also block your statues, forcing you to fight them - -- and nearly every battle here features [[DemonicSpiders Queen Alraunes]]. And as though out of sheer spite, Nekkar is also filled with freaking '''invisible pit traps'''.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' the Pink Tail, needed to get the best armor in the game. It is randomly dropped by the Pink Puffs/Flan Princesses, which only appear in a single room in the final dungeon and have a 1 in 64 chance of appearing in a given battle. Even if you did find the Pink Puffs, each one has only a 1 in 64 chance of actually dropping said ore (and that's when it dropped an item at all, which only has a 1 in 20 chance of happening). Some players have literally fought hundreds of battles against the Pink Puffs and not received a single Pink Tail - very annoying to say the least. In the original Japanese version (and the subsequent re-makes in all regions), the 1 in 64 drop rate (on top of 1 in 20 chance of dropping anything) applied not only to the Pink Tail, but also to FOUR optional summons for Rydia and nearly every character's best weapon; the fact that the enemies which can drop these items appear more often than the Pink Puffs offsets this only slightly. Subsequent versions of the game added even more subquest items with this property. If you try to get them during the regular course of the game, expect to be obscenely overlevelled by the time you get to the end!

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' the Pink Tail, needed to get the best armor in the game. It is randomly dropped by the Pink Puffs/Flan Princesses, which only appear in a single room in the final dungeon and have a 1 in 64 chance of appearing in a given battle. Even if you did find the Pink Puffs, each one has only a 1 in 64 chance of actually dropping said ore (and that's when it dropped an item at all, which only has a 1 in 20 chance of happening). Some players have literally fought hundreds of battles against the Pink Puffs and not received a single Pink Tail - -- very annoying to say the least. In the original Japanese version (and the subsequent re-makes in all regions), the 1 in 64 drop rate (on top of 1 in 20 chance of dropping anything) applied not only to the Pink Tail, but also to FOUR optional summons for Rydia and nearly every character's best weapon; the fact that the enemies which can drop these items appear more often than the Pink Puffs offsets this only slightly. Subsequent versions of the game added even more subquest items with this property. If you try to get them during the regular course of the game, expect to be obscenely overlevelled by the time you get to the end!



** Famed Mimic Gogo at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower is basically the entire reason no one will begrudge a perfect runner for resorting to [[SaveScumming savestates]]. He has a rare steal: Gold Hairpin. Gold Hairpins epitomize BoringButPractical and you ''will'' want as many as you can get, even if you aren't a perfect runner, and there are only three of them (counting this one) in the game. The problem? Gogo is fought at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower - a place where you're under a TimedMission towards a NonStandardGameOver if you run out of time. Gogo takes over two full minutes (of the seven you're given) to beat, which you will have to do after rare stealing the Hairpin. If you get his common steal instead (and said common steal is absolutely worthless), you will have to cast Return (which resets the battle state to what it was at the start) for another chance at the rare steal. In the GBA UpdatedRerelease, Return is bugged in that it will '''not reset the countdown timer'''. And as if to mock the player's attempts, Gogo starts the battle off with an obnoxiously lengthy speech, before you can take any action. You effectively have only three or four chances at the rare steal, when you have less than a 5% chance of actually pulling it off.
** Shell Bears, an uncommon encounter in the basement of Castle Exdeath, have a rare Spear item for stealing. What makes this particular rare steal so infamous is that the Spear item is absolutely worthless at this point in the game, weaker than even the weakest spears you could buy in shops hours ago, and it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]] if you don't get it before the castle's illusion is dispelled - it seems specifically designed to irritate perfect runners.

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** Famed Mimic Gogo at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower is basically the entire reason no one will begrudge a perfect runner for resorting to [[SaveScumming savestates]]. He has a rare steal: Gold Hairpin. Gold Hairpins epitomize BoringButPractical and you ''will'' want as many as you can get, even if you aren't a perfect runner, and there are only three of them (counting this one) in the game. The problem? Gogo is fought at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower - -- a place where you're under a TimedMission towards a NonStandardGameOver if you run out of time. Gogo takes over two full minutes (of the seven you're given) to beat, which you will have to do after rare stealing the Hairpin. If you get his common steal instead (and said common steal is absolutely worthless), you will have to cast Return (which resets the battle state to what it was at the start) for another chance at the rare steal. In the GBA UpdatedRerelease, Return is bugged in that it will '''not reset the countdown timer'''. And as if to mock the player's attempts, Gogo starts the battle off with an obnoxiously lengthy speech, before you can take any action. You effectively have only three or four chances at the rare steal, when you have less than a 5% chance of actually pulling it off.
** Shell Bears, an uncommon encounter in the basement of Castle Exdeath, have a rare Spear item for stealing. What makes this particular rare steal so infamous is that the Spear item is absolutely worthless at this point in the game, weaker than even the weakest spears you could buy in shops hours ago, and it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]] if you don't get it before the castle's illusion is dispelled - -- it seems specifically designed to irritate perfect runners.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' has the Queen of Cards sidequest, which sounds straightforward at first: trade unique Triple Triad cards to the Queen of Cards so that her artist father can create new unique cards. The problem is that you can't just ''give'' her the cards she asks for - you have to lose them to her in a card game, during which she's likely to use the Random draw rule and one of any number of bizarre trade rules designed to make sure you lose half your ''other'' unique cards to her in the process, all of which you'll have to win back the hard way. Every time she wins or loses a unique card, she moves to a new randomly-selected location somewhere around the world map, with only a vague hint as to her destination. The cards that she requested, and the new uniques her father creates, are distributed to random [=NPCs=] around the world with no hints to their locations ''at all''. Failure to complete this quest before Disc 4 results in all these cards becoming [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]], although you can still encounter the Queen of Cards. Oh, and hey, [[spoiler: the Random rule has spread throughout this region]].

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' has the Queen of Cards sidequest, which sounds straightforward at first: trade unique Triple Triad cards to the Queen of Cards so that her artist father can create new unique cards. The problem is that you can't just ''give'' her the cards she asks for - -- you have to lose them to her in a card game, during which she's likely to use the Random draw rule and one of any number of bizarre trade rules designed to make sure you lose half your ''other'' unique cards to her in the process, all of which you'll have to win back the hard way. Every time she wins or loses a unique card, she moves to a new randomly-selected location somewhere around the world map, with only a vague hint as to her destination. The cards that she requested, and the new uniques her father creates, are distributed to random [=NPCs=] around the world with no hints to their locations ''at all''. Failure to complete this quest before Disc 4 results in all these cards becoming [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]], although you can still encounter the Queen of Cards. Oh, and hey, [[spoiler: the Random rule has spread throughout this region]].



** The Deep Sea Research Facility deserves a mention too. The first challenge, defeating two Ruby Dragons and then Bahamut in a sequence, is not particularly challenging to a player who knows what they're doing and is GenreSavvy enough to solve the puzzle quickly. The second challenge, reaching the BonusBoss at the bottom of the dungeon, is significantly harder and can be a nightmare for the unprepared, as it involves a resource-management puzzle to even reach the lowest level and be able to access the boss; screw it up and you'd better have saved at the beginning or your efforts were all for nothing. The puzzle has two possible solutions, the easier of which results in the player wading through unavoidable monster encounter after encounter. And just to add insult to injury, the save point at the bottom? It's hidden. Hope you remembered to learn and junction Move-Find.

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** The Deep Sea Research Facility deserves a mention mention, too. The first challenge, defeating two Ruby Dragons and then Bahamut in a sequence, is not particularly challenging to a player who knows what they're doing and is GenreSavvy enough to solve the puzzle quickly. The second challenge, reaching the BonusBoss at the bottom of the dungeon, is significantly harder and can be a nightmare for the unprepared, as it involves a resource-management puzzle to even reach the lowest level and be able to access the boss; screw it up and you'd better have saved at the beginning or your efforts were all for nothing. The puzzle has two possible solutions, the easier of which results in the player wading through unavoidable monster encounter after encounter. And just to add insult to injury, the save point at the bottom? It's hidden. Hope you remembered to learn and junction Move-Find.



** Rikku's sigil isn't annoying for its difficulty, but for its duration - you have to do a ''lot'' of walking, often to areas of Bikanel that are spelled out in unnecessarily cryptic fashion by a stone about twenty miles from the nearest save point. Even with a "No Encounters" item strapped to one of your characters, you'll still be walking around a very boring desert for something like three hours.

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** Rikku's sigil isn't annoying for its difficulty, but for its duration - -- you have to do a ''lot'' of walking, often to areas of Bikanel that are spelled out in unnecessarily cryptic fashion by a stone about twenty miles from the nearest save point. Even with a "No Encounters" item strapped to one of your characters, you'll still be walking around a very boring desert for something like three hours.



** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.

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** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling Filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.



** The Lucky Coin fragment. To get it, you have to win 7,777 coins at the slots. Besides likely requiring a high starting investment, this can take ''hours'' of mind-numbing slots until the game takes pity on you. Even the official strategy guide recommends putting a rubber band over the Autoplay button and leaving the game running for a few hours - except using Autoplay cuts your chances of winning by 33%. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

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** The Lucky Coin fragment. To get it, you have to win 7,777 coins at the slots. Besides likely requiring a high starting investment, this can take ''hours'' of mind-numbing slots until the game takes pity on you. Even the official strategy guide recommends putting a rubber band over the Autoplay button and leaving the game running for a few hours - -- except using Autoplay cuts your chances of winning by 33%. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.



* In the first ''VideoGame/FossilFighters'' game, actually obtaining the series' MascotMook, [[TyrannosaurusRex T-Rex,]] is one of the most difficult tasks in the game. The area where its fossils can be found only appears post-game. And you can't even ''dig'' there to start with, because it's [[InterfaceScrew so hot, it interferes with your radar.]] You'll need to pay tons of money to build oases there to cool the area enough to even find fossils. Even ten, T-rex is easily the rarest fossil in the area--and you'll need to find every one of its parts if you want it to have all of its skills. (Thankfully, in the second game, it became the default starter for male trainers and was still pretty easy to find for female ones.)

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* In the first ''VideoGame/FossilFighters'' game, actually obtaining the series' MascotMook, [[TyrannosaurusRex T-Rex,]] is one of the most difficult tasks in the game. The area where its fossils can be found only appears post-game. And you can't even ''dig'' there to start with, because it's [[InterfaceScrew so hot, it interferes with your radar.]] You'll need to pay tons of money to build oases there to cool the area enough to even find fossils. Even ten, T-rex is easily the rarest fossil in the area--and area -- and you'll need to find every one of its parts if you want it to have all of its skills. (Thankfully, in the second game, it became the default starter for male trainers and was still pretty easy to find for female ones.)



** Then there's the event-only Pokemon: Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meoletta, Gensect, Diancie, Hoopa and Volcanion, which can't be obtained through normal gameplay - only through giveaways done by Nintendo. Luckily these are more common than they used to be -- in the early days there was usually only one chance to get the event Pokemon in a given generation, which usually involved traveling to select events such as conventions that were inevitably nowhere near you, but now there are several giveaways in each generation, and they're done through a wireless download, often at a relatively easy-to-get-to toy or game shop.

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** Then there's the event-only Pokemon: Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meoletta, Gensect, Diancie, Hoopa and Volcanion, which can't be obtained through normal gameplay - -- only through giveaways done by Nintendo. Luckily these are more common than they used to be -- in the early days there was usually only one chance to get the event Pokemon in a given generation, which usually involved traveling to select events such as conventions that were inevitably nowhere near you, but now there are several giveaways in each generation, and they're done through a wireless download, often at a relatively easy-to-get-to toy or game shop.



* Collecting all of the snowflake tokens in ''VideoGame/{{SSX}} 3''. White tokens on a white surface are not easy to spot.



* Collecting all of the snowflake tokens in ''VideoGame/{{SSX}} 3''. White tokens on a white surface are not easy to spot.



* In VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII, you have to collect 100 feathers which are also as hard to find as the flags in the first game. However, they emit a sound when you are near, are much easier to find in the night time, and actually give you a reward this time around.
* In VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}, the Sokolov Paintings are this. This is an incredibly difficult sidequest, considering that most of the time, these paintings are hidden in places where nobody would even look for them, such as ''on the third level of a ruined apartment with three identical levels and nothing else on the other two.'' Not only that, but the game ''[[GuideDangIt never tells you you need to look for paintings]]'', unless you notice the giant squares in upgraded Darkvision.

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* In VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII, ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'', you have to collect 100 feathers which are also as hard to find as the flags in the first game. However, they emit a sound when you are near, are much easier to find in the night time, and actually give you a reward this time around.
* In VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}, the Sokolov Paintings are this. This is an incredibly difficult sidequest, considering that most of the time, these paintings are hidden in places where nobody would even look for them, such as ''on the third level of a ruined apartment with three identical levels and nothing else on the other two.'' Not only that, but the game ''[[GuideDangIt never tells you you need to look for paintings]]'', unless you notice the giant squares in upgraded Darkvision.
around.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'', the Sokolov Paintings are this. This is an incredibly difficult sidequest, considering that most of the time, these paintings are hidden in places where nobody would even look for them, such as ''on the third level of a ruined apartment with three identical levels and nothing else on the other two.'' Not only that, but the game ''[[GuideDangIt never tells you you need to look for paintings]]'', unless you notice the giant squares in upgraded Darkvision.



** The "Body Count" weapon challenge in its fourth mission - kill eight people with assault rifles within 30 seconds to unlock a new assault rifle. The problem is that in none of the combat sections in the level can a player be realistically expected to accomplish this without [[ViolationOfCommonSense making some questionably suicidal tactical decisions]] - the first area requires stealth[[note]]trying to pick the enemies off one at a time is a no-go, since they will notice their buddies dropping and fail the mission, and teammates' kills by way of sync shots won't count for the challenge[[/note]], the second is filled with both panicking civilians and [[EveryCarIsAPinto easily-destroyed cars]][[note]]blowing enemies up by destroying the car they're taking cover behind doesn't count either, being near one when it explodes is instant death, and with the strict time limit for the challenge you can't afford to make careful shots and avoid killing the civilians, which is also a game over[[/note]], and the third has most of the enemies take cover behind a jeep with an automated turret[[note]]giving you a SadisticChoice: either ignore the auto-gun and get torn to shreds whenever you try to shoot someone, or blow it up with a grenade and promptly screw yourself out of the challenge when most of the enemies in this final section die in the explosion[[/note]]. The eighth level has the "Rifle Master" challenge with the same requirements, but this one is much easier since the level actually does throw enough enemies at you to accomplish it without having to worry about cars or civilians getting in the way.
** "Master Sniper" in the penultimate level is another "fun" one. You're supposed to make fifteen kills with a sniper rifle without missing a shot, which is hard enough to do on its own, but a glitch apparently introduced in one of the patches causes the counter to reset after every kill - you have to uninstall all patches and play the mission without them to get the challenge to work properly.

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** The "Body Count" weapon challenge in its fourth mission - -- kill eight people with assault rifles within 30 seconds to unlock a new assault rifle. The problem is that in none of the combat sections in the level can a player be realistically expected to accomplish this without [[ViolationOfCommonSense making some questionably suicidal tactical decisions]] - -- the first area requires stealth[[note]]trying to pick the enemies off one at a time is a no-go, since they will notice their buddies dropping and fail the mission, and teammates' kills by way of sync shots won't count for the challenge[[/note]], the second is filled with both panicking civilians and [[EveryCarIsAPinto easily-destroyed cars]][[note]]blowing enemies up by destroying the car they're taking cover behind doesn't count either, being near one when it explodes is instant death, and with the strict time limit for the challenge you can't afford to make careful shots and avoid killing the civilians, which is also a game over[[/note]], and the third has most of the enemies take cover behind a jeep with an automated turret[[note]]giving you a SadisticChoice: either ignore the auto-gun and get torn to shreds whenever you try to shoot someone, or blow it up with a grenade and promptly screw yourself out of the challenge when most of the enemies in this final section die in the explosion[[/note]]. The eighth level has the "Rifle Master" challenge with the same requirements, but this one is much easier since the level actually does throw enough enemies at you to accomplish it without having to worry about cars or civilians getting in the way.
** "Master Sniper" in the penultimate level is another "fun" one. You're supposed to make fifteen kills with a sniper rifle without missing a shot, which is hard enough to do on its own, but a glitch apparently introduced in one of the patches causes the counter to reset after every kill - -- you have to uninstall all patches and play the mission without them to get the challenge to work properly.



* The first ''VideoGame/ArcTheLad'' game contains one of the most ridiculous sidequest goals ever: win 1,000 Arena battles. The battles are easy, and by the time you've gotten even halfway to 1,000 wins, you'll have earned enough experience points to bring your entire team to the [[{{Cap}} level cap]] several times over. The primary challenge involved in getting to 1,000 wins is simply being obsessed enough to keep fighting the same enemies, over and over again, for hour after hour, in spite of the sheer tedium involved in doing so. If you're actually insane enough to reach 1,000 wins, the Arena manager will reward you with a huge supply of the game's best accessories [[OldSaveBonus for you to take with you into the sequel]], then [[BreakingTheFourthWall tell you to turn off the console, go outside, and get a life!]]
* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'': From ''VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories'' onwards there is the Land Of Carnage. For all purposes it's a different HUB area that allows you to fight the stages against enemies with insane stat boosts, but also the strongest weapons, emblems and armor pieces are only found while fighting in this area. However, actually getting there is always the hardest and most time-consuming task in the games. ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'' takes the cake by a long shot, though, with requirements that aren't explained anywhere and are absolutely impossible to figure out without a guide. Averted in ''VideoGame/DisgaeaDimension2'', where earning Carnage mode is straightforwardly unlocked through normal play.



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', the quest "The Whole Truth" pits you against six Cassies (Malboro mobs), each with a breath ability that instantly charms anyone in its area of effect with 100% accuracy, another breath ability that casts both "Sleep" and "Slow," and an ability that cures surrounding allies, raises their defense, and casts "Regen" on them.
** If you want a real annoyance, just wait until you encouter An Earnest Delight. It's a late-game dispatch mission, which can only be cleared if you have at least two Gria or Viera with complete MVP trophies or power level to around level 80 (when a well-built team can beat the final boss at level 50 on Hard).
** The Nu Mou vs. Bangaa mission is a serious GuideDangIt; you have to complete the mission as ''both sides'' three times before you learn it's a BatmanGambit by a third party which the two then team up to fight.
** Brightmoon Tor. First you fight about a dozen battles against reasonably difficult but still pretty easily beatable characters... and then you get to the top and some Level 99 monsters kick your ass almost before your first turn.
** "Time To Act", the conclusion of the Goug Watch quest line. It normally wouldn't be too bad, but you only get ''one'' character of your own and the rest of your allies are AI controlled Moogles. One of said allies is a Tinker who loves to either poison his teammates or Haste all the enemies, making it possible to get overrun by enemies before your one character even gets a turn. One of the enemies is a Parivir who can kill any of the Moogles in two hits with [[ThatOneAttack HoarfrostBlade]], never mind the five other enemies that want a piece of the Goug Watch. Oh, and you lose if ''any'' of the Moogles die.
** Even harder than all of the above, once you finish all 300 quests, you gain access to one final tournament. The first few battles are extremely tough even with a max-level party, but the absolute worst is the third or fourth battle. It pits you against a bunch of [[MightyGlacier Master Tonberries]] and a bunch of enemies who are only too eager to cast Haste on them. Oh, and they get to take about six free rounds before you're even allowed to move. And the Tonberries are guaranteed to hit for 999 damage in a game where it's nigh impossible to have more than about 600 HP. If you're really lucky, you might still have one character left by your first turn. And if, by some miracle, you manage to win? You don't even get a BraggingRightsReward, you get to watch the credits again.



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', the quest "The Whole Truth" pits you against six Cassies (Malboro mobs), each with a breath ability that instantly charms anyone in its area of effect with 100% accuracy, another breath ability that casts both "Sleep" and "Slow," and an ability that cures surrounding allies, raises their defense, and casts "Regen" on them.
** If you want a real annoyance, just wait until you encouter An Earnest Delight. It's a late-game dispatch mission, which can only be cleared if you have at least two Gria or Viera with complete MVP trophies or power level to around level 80 (when a well-built team can beat the final boss at level 50 on Hard).
** The Nu Mou vs. Bangaa mission is a serious GuideDangIt; you have to complete the mission as ''both sides'' three times before you learn it's a BatmanGambit by a third party which the two then team up to fight.
** Brightmoon Tor. First you fight about a dozen battles against reasonably difficult but still pretty easily beatable characters... and then you get to the top and some Level 99 monsters kick your ass almost before your first turn.
** "Time To Act", the conclusion of the Goug Watch quest line. It normally wouldn't be too bad, but you only get ''one'' character of your own and the rest of your allies are AI controlled Moogles. One of said allies is a Tinker who loves to either poison his teammates or Haste all the enemies, making it possible to get overrun by enemies before your one character even gets a turn. One of the enemies is a Parivir who can kill any of the Moogles in two hits with [[ThatOneAttack HoarfrostBlade]], never mind the five other enemies that want a piece of the Goug Watch. Oh, and you lose if ''any'' of the Moogles die.
** Even harder than all of the above, once you finish all 300 quests, you gain access to one final tournament. The first few battles are extremely tough even with a max-level party, but the absolute worst is the third or fourth battle. It pits you against a bunch of [[MightyGlacier Master Tonberries]] and a bunch of enemies who are only too eager to cast Haste on them. Oh, and they get to take about six free rounds before you're even allowed to move. And the Tonberries are guaranteed to hit for 999 damage in a game where it's nigh impossible to have more than about 600 HP. If you're really lucky, you might still have one character left by your first turn. And if, by some miracle, you manage to win? You don't even get a BraggingRightsReward, you get to watch the credits again.
* The first ''VideoGame/ArcTheLad'' game contains one of the most ridiculous sidequest goals ever: win 1,000 Arena battles. The battles are easy, and by the time you've gotten even halfway to 1,000 wins, you'll have earned enough experience points to bring your entire team to the [[{{Cap}} level cap]] several times over. The primary challenge involved in getting to 1,000 wins is simply being obsessed enough to keep fighting the same enemies, over and over again, for hour after hour, in spite of the sheer tedium involved in doing so. If you're actually insane enough to reach 1,000 wins, the Arena manager will reward you with a huge supply of the game's best accessories [[OldSaveBonus for you to take with you into the sequel]], then [[BreakingTheFourthWall tell you to turn off the console, go outside, and get a life!]]



* ''VideoGame/StellaDeusTheGateOfEternity'' allows you to recruit the AntiVillain half of the BigBadDuumvirate, Viser. This is a game-long sidequest (he is only recruitable whilst StormingTheCastle of the FinalBoss) and is so convoluted that it's ''beyond GuideDangIt'': of the game's two guides on Website/GameFAQs, one is only half-sure how to recruit him and the other offers no suggestions whatsoever.



* ''VideoGame/StellaDeusTheGateOfEternity'' allows you to recruit the AntiVillain half of the BigBadDuumvirate, Viser. This is a game-long sidequest (he is only recruitable whilst StormingTheCastle of the FinalBoss) and is so convoluted that it's ''beyond GuideDangIt'': of the game's two guides on Website/GameFAQs, one is only half-sure how to recruit him and the other offers no suggestions whatsoever.
* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'': From ''VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories'' onwards there is the Land Of Carnage. For all purposes it's a different HUB area that allows you to fight the stages against enemies with insane stat boosts, but also the strongest weapons, emblems and armor pieces are only found while fighting in this area. However, actually getting there is always the hardest and most time-consuming task in the games. ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'' takes the cake by a long shot, though, with requirements that aren't explained anywhere and are absolutely impossible to figure out without a guide. Averted in ''VideoGame/DisgaeaDimension2'', where earning Carnage mode is straightforwardly unlocked through normal play.
8th Apr '17 11:40:36 PM karategal
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* Recruiting Kecleon in the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' games. In the ''Rescue Team'' games, you need to raise a Pokemon to level 100, equip a Friend Bow, and defeat Kecleon until one joins you. It's a 1/1000 chance and they're insanely strong and at double Speed, but persistence is key. The ''Explorers'' games complicate this a bit. In order to make it even ''possible'' for a Kecleon to join you, you need to raise a Pokemon that can learn the Fast Friend IQ skill to level 100 and feed it enough gummis that it can learn said IQ skill. But wait--there's more. You either need the Golden Mask or Amber tear, one is in a 99-floor dungeon that reduces your level to 1, while the other is in a 40-level dungeon with similar restrictions. If you get that, you still only have a 1/200 chance and those Kecleon can still kill you effortlessly. You'd better have a plan and a ton of Reviver Seeds.
** Any escort mission in a higher level dungeon, ''especially'' when you don't know what the target floor is. [[ArtificialStupidity You can't control them at all like you can your partners, and they're prone to wandering off in the wrong direction]].
* In ''VideoGame/AzureDreams'':
** Finding the Healing Herb for Cherrl is a nightmare because ''it looks just like every other herb in the game'' and it can only be found on the 28th floor, which has plenty of powerful monsters on it, and if you find it, and don't escape the tower, there's a possibility that the healing herb might be [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] and prevents you from curing Cherrl's illness.
** Finding out how to activate the construction of certain buildings, considering that some of them can only be created ''after'' you reach the top of the monster tower.



* In ''VideoGame/AzureDreams'':
** Finding the Healing Herb for Cherrl is a nightmare because ''it looks just like every other herb in the game'' and it can only be found on the 28th floor, which has plenty of powerful monsters on it, and if you find it, and don't escape the tower, there's a possibility that the healing herb might be [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] and prevents you from curing Cherrl's illness.
** Finding out how to activate the construction of certain buildings, considering that some of them can only be created ''after'' you reach the top of the monster tower.
* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac:Rebirth'' has the Challenges. Some are easy and fun, like "Computer Savvy", which starts you with Technologies 1 and 2, letting you laser your way through the game. Some are annoying, but not too difficult, like "Cursed!", which starts you with lots of extra health and a complete map of every floor...at the cost of being forced to take damage every single time you enter/exit any room. And some are just flat-out ridiculous, like "Solar System", which blindfolds you so you can't fire any tears at all, forcing you to rely on your orbiting attack flies' CollisionDamage to kill anything.
** The Suicide King challenge. Ipecac + Mr. Mega + My Reflection gives you ''huge, exploding boomerang tears''. This is as difficult as it sounds.



* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac:Rebirth'' has the Challenges. Some are easy and fun, like "Computer Savvy", which starts you with Technologies 1 and 2, letting you laser your way through the game. Some are annoying, but not too difficult, like "Cursed!", which starts you with lots of extra health and a complete map of every floor...at the cost of being forced to take damage every single time you enter/exit any room. And some are just flat-out ridiculous, like "Solar System", which blindfolds you so you can't fire any tears at all, forcing you to rely on your orbiting attack flies' CollisionDamage to kill anything.
** The Suicide King challenge. Ipecac + Mr. Mega + My Reflection gives you ''huge, exploding boomerang tears''. This is as difficult as it sounds.

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* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac:Rebirth'' has Recruiting Kecleon in the Challenges. Some are easy ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' games. In the ''Rescue Team'' games, you need to raise a Pokemon to level 100, equip a Friend Bow, and fun, like "Computer Savvy", which starts defeat Kecleon until one joins you. It's a 1/1000 chance and they're insanely strong and at double Speed, but persistence is key. The ''Explorers'' games complicate this a bit. In order to make it even ''possible'' for a Kecleon to join you, you need to raise a Pokemon that can learn the Fast Friend IQ skill to level 100 and feed it enough gummis that it can learn said IQ skill. But wait--there's more. You either need the Golden Mask or Amber tear, one is in a 99-floor dungeon that reduces your level to 1, while the other is in a 40-level dungeon with Technologies 1 similar restrictions. If you get that, you still only have a 1/200 chance and 2, letting those Kecleon can still kill you laser your way through the game. Some are annoying, but not too difficult, like "Cursed!", which starts you with lots of extra health effortlessly. You'd better have a plan and a complete map ton of every floor...at Reviver Seeds.
** Any escort mission in a higher level dungeon, ''especially'' when you don't know what
the cost of being forced to take damage every single time you enter/exit any room. And some are just flat-out ridiculous, like "Solar System", which blindfolds you so you target floor is. [[ArtificialStupidity You can't fire any tears control them at all, forcing all like you to rely on can your orbiting attack flies' CollisionDamage partners, and they're prone to kill anything.
** The Suicide King challenge. Ipecac + Mr. Mega + My Reflection gives you ''huge, exploding boomerang tears''. This is as difficult as it sounds.
wandering off in the wrong direction]].




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* The Weather Lady recruitment quest in ''VideoGame/CitizensOfEarth''. You just need to let her find you during a rainstorm. Except normal rain won't do, and even though you can ask her to change the weather even before recruiting her, you can't select a rainstorm until you level up her talent, which requires having her in your party. It's all a LuckBasedMission, and you could very well go through the entire story without recruiting her.
* ''VideoGame/DigimonWorld4'' has a sidequest that is already brutal in that you can't use heal techs/items once you get into the area where the quest is, and plenty of traps that do damage based on your MAX HP. As if that wasn't brutal enough, to unlock a specific digivolution for the Digimon you started as, you have to beat it on the hardest game difficulty setting (think ''Diablo II'' difficulty settings here), with a hinted at [[SelfImposedChallenge special condition]] that you finish off the boss with [[OneHitPointWonder one HP remaining]]. You don't have to do this to complete the quest, you DO have to do it in order to unlock the best reward, so it's kind of a twist where the self-imposed challenge is optional. To get yourself down to 1 HP without killing yourself (and automatically failing the quest, which means you have to start it over from the beginning), you have to use a quick-sand pit and let yourself get sucked in repeatedly until you have 1 HP left. Then you have to navigate your way past a lot of traps (hopefully you took out the walls first before you went down to 1 HP, if not, you're in deep trouble), and kill the boss without letting it hit you once.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' has this in the form of the shard-collecting side quest. Scattered across every area you can visit are a collection of shards that help to unlock doors in a desert oasis. The problem is, some of these shards are hard to get to, requiring jumping and taking very unorthodox paths that you might have to look up a guide in order to find. Not to mention that there are ''more'' in the actual oasis itself, where most of those "jumping puzzles" come into play because there are rock arches, cliffs, and little nooks and crannies that you have to run around and find in an already very poorly laid-out area. All of this just for gear and permanent buffs that up your elemental resistance, which by end game you will most likely be able to ''make yourself.''
* ''VideoGame/DragonFable'' has ''Embrace Your Destiny'', the final sidequest in Nythera's ''Rise of the [=DragonMage=]'' chain. Almost universally disliked by players who don't have a mage build or high alchemy levels because the player character's stats are always used when playing as a different character in a sidequest.



* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'':
** The companion quests are hard enough to ''start'', which, often have to be triggered by being in certain places with those companions, but sometimes you may unknowingly make it so that you lose the opportunity to gain the "points" needed to start the quests. The worst case is Raul, who you can only find by going to a place filled with xenophobic Super Mutants that you aren't going to even want to try to get into until you're a decent level. However, once you finally get Raul, in order to start his quest, you need to talk with a few specific [=NPCs=] who you cannot have talked with before. If you have talked with them, then sucks to be you. Fortunately, this was fixed in a patch.
** Getting to Bitter Springs, the site of Boone's companion quest, requires traversing an area swarming with [[DemonicSpiders Cazadors]] (and the occasional Deathclaw), where he can easily get killed.
** The Legend of the Star. You need fifty Sunset Sarsaparilla blue star bottlecaps. There are only one hundred of these scattered throughout the game, and the physics mean you could easily bump into them and not notice them being knocked to the floor, or heaven forbid clipping through it. You can also get them through drinking SS, but there's only a 5% of their showing, meaning you need 1000 bottles. Your only rewards are a crapton of worthless trinkets, a unique energy pistol, [[ThatOneAchievement and a bronze trophy]].
** Another quest, "I Put a Spell on You," isn't difficult and might not even be that bad for some people. You need to find a mole in Camp [=McCarran=], and it culminates in finding out that [[spoiler: A bomb has been planted on the monorail. You rush to deactivate the bomb, if you do so the game will actually give you the message that the bomb has been successfully defused. But then it might go off anyway. This is either due to you stopping to talk with Col. Hsu right before going to defuse the bomb which wastes too much time despite the fact that the game tells you to report to him after stopping the mole, or you happened to earlier on unknowingly tell the mole information that makes the bomb's detonation inevitable. Like stated before, this may just be a minor nuisance, unless the only save file you have that is from before you made any crucial mistakes is several hours behind your playtime]]. Both objectives count towards Boone's history points.
** The quest "Come Fly With Me" is essentially a huge, layered fetch quest that requires a lot running back and forth in one general location, albeit it a large facility. The requirements to get the best possible ending and the most EXP require tricky tasks like attacking the huge invisible enemies in narrow corridors in order to save a prisoner or navigating a large, heavily booby trapped room to get to a computer. At a certain, attacking hostile enemies in the presence of certain characters in this quest will cause them to attack in return. To top it off, the quest is riddled with a number of frustrating bugs and is prone to crashing.
* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'':
** Most of the "Silver Shroud" quest is simply hunting down and killing various baddies. Except for the ending where you have to save Kent from the drug dealer [[ThatOneBoss Sinjin]], who has a rifle to Kent's head. Have fun reloading and running through the same [[LargeHam cheesy]] dialog a dozen times to take down Sinjin before he pulls the trigger. Especially if you are underpowered and have to [[{{Hypocrite}} use chems]] to get enough of a boost to pull it off.
** "Hole in the Wall" is required to get the Medicine Bobblehead and Curie as a companion, as well as [[PlayerHeadquarters personal quarters in Vault 81]]. After [[GuideDangIt a somewhat obtuse procedure for starting the quest]], to find a cure for Austin's illness, you have to trek through a sealed-off [[AbandonedLaboratory secret laboratory]] full of plague-carrying Mole Rats, including a [[KingMook Brood Mother]], and if you get bit, [[StatusAilment the disease subtracts 10 from your maximum HP]]. There's only one dose of the cure, so if you [[SadisticChoice use it on yourself]], Austin dies and [[WhatTheHellHero everyone in Vault 81 hates you]], so no PlayerHeadquarters there for you.



* In the first ''VideoGame/FossilFighters'' game, actually obtaining the series' MascotMook, [[TyrannosaurusRex T-Rex,]] is one of the most difficult tasks in the game. The area where its fossils can be found only appears post-game. And you can't even ''dig'' there to start with, because it's [[InterfaceScrew so hot, it interferes with your radar.]] You'll need to pay tons of money to build oases there to cool the area enough to even find fossils. Even ten, T-rex is easily the rarest fossil in the area--and you'll need to find every one of its parts if you want it to have all of its skills. (Thankfully, in the second game, it became the default starter for male trainers and was still pretty easy to find for female ones.)










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\n\n* ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicII'' had the infamous sequence in the Telos military base. Already the hardest part of the entire game, it's got this annoying side quest where you have to escort the dumbest person in the universe out of the base. It's not even quest per se, You can just tell him to follow you out, and lead him back to the exit. The character's AI is so bad, he will only follow you if certain conditions are met (distance, direct line of sight, etc), leaving the player to go back for him every 10 meters. And god help you if he gets stuck behind something. The sequence can last at least 10 minutes, and besides a few light side points it's completely pointless. Of course it might be useful for lowering the cost of your healing spell, which is vital at this part.



* The optional Bros Attack mini games and BossRush in the MarioAndLuigi series. In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory'' you've got the Cholesteroad, which gives you prizes for literally perfecting your attacks to the point you get hundreds of points on each, and the massage challenges for Bowser which do the same. In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'', there's the Mad Skillathon and Battle Broque Madame, which act the same for that game's Bros Attacks and Luiginary Attacks, and have you get over 800 points on each for prizes. These are all extremely difficult. There's also the turn limited Gauntlet and Battle Ring in game respectively, which is incredibly unforgiving as well. Oh, and the Giant Battle Ring in Dream Team as well, which is harder than anything else on normal mode and damn near impossible on hard mode (thanks to the strictest turn limits in RPG history). As you can tell, only the extremely dedicated complete them all.






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\n\n* The Racer's Labyrinth in ''VideoGame/MonsterRacers''. A huge, 100-person long MultiMookMelee, across every terrain type in the game (both in the races, and in navigating the labyrinth itself), against opponents up to level ''80'' (when you're likely to access said labyrinth around level 60 or so). It all culminates in three of the hardest races in the game against three ridiculously tough and high-leveled bosses. [[spoiler: On the plus side, you get rewarded with a random Exotic monster if you win, and you can repeat the process as many times as you like for all the Exotics you want.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{NieR}}'' has Life in the Sands. You have to get 10 Pink Moonflower Seeds. Sounds deceptively simple, right? It is. You can get Red, Gold, and Blue Moonflower Seeds at the shops, but there's no pink seeds anywhere to be found. You have to ''hybridize'' them, in a complex, multi-step process that is explained ''nowhere'' in the game, can be easily messed up if you don't know what you're doing, and either takes ''several days real-time'' or a lot of fiddling with the system clock. Your reward? 10,000 gold. At this point of the game, that's a drop in the bucket. [[TheDarkId Trolled by Cavia!]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Okage}}: Shadow King'' has the hellish [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Escapeless Abyss]]. [[IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace The name says it all, really]]. If you go in without any [[EscapeRope Guidance Jewels]], you won't be getting out without blind, dumb luck.
* ''VideoGame/{{Opoona}}:''
** Fully befriending Ine. In order to befriend her, you ''first'' have to befriend Masao, which means you need to have a high enough appreciation for art, which means running around the world and being sure to check every single plaque for every artwork you come across. Then you have to make sure you're [[ItMakesSenseInContext famous enough to play the ukulele,]] and impress her with your skills. ''Then'' you have to bother Masao into giving you his sculpture of himself, and [[VendorTrash not immediately sell it for a giant chunk of cash as the game suggests you do]], but rather give it to Ine on the grounds that they're both exchange students from the same planet. And then, once you're done with all that, you have to play the ukulele for '''''fifty in-game days''''' to get her friendship to its highest point. And since [[LevelUpAtIntimacy5 the stat increases via her friendship]] is by far the most common out of all the possible friends, it's really more a BraggingRightsReward than anything.
** Jingle's [[FetchQuest Rogue research requests]] can be this as well. In order to complete his research, Jingle will sometimes ask you for various {{Rare Random Drop}}s from the enemies in the world. A first-time player of the game is likely to simply spend time trying to earn the drops legitimately, which is an exercise in frustration all its own. A veteran or one using a guide knows that they can be obtained from Secret Codes as well... except that Secret Codes also happen to be ''extremely'' tiny pink stickers stuck randomly behind various pieces of furniture and landscape, and that spotting them is almost as much of a challenge. To make things worse, the Secret Codes that give the necessary drop appear far later than the quests that require them.
* The original ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' has Chuck Quizmo. It's not hard, just ''incredibly annoying''. You have to find a spot where he [[RandomlyDrops (might)]] spawn, then just keep running back and forth until he does. Over. And. Over. Again. He has fully one third of the game's Star Pieces, and will give you only '''one''' every time he shows up. And there's ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' with the Pit of 100 Trials. Have fun.






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\n\n* ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'' has the Labyrinth of Amala, which is only mostly optional, but whose mandatory parts are ''significantly'' easier than its optional parts. Bear in mind that "significantly easier" in the case of a Megaten game is like saying "we're going to blow your head off, then burn and desecrate your corpse" instead of "we're going to burn you alive and mutilate your daughter while forcing you to watch." and so you can imagine the [[UnusualEuphemism treats]] you're in for in the rest of the dungeon. To top it all off, the last area has a door that can only be opened by the first ally to ever join you[[note]]If that ally evolved and/or was used as non-sacrificial fusion for another demon, that's still fair game[[/note]]. Hope you didn't dismiss said ally as being too underpowered at some point along the way, 'cause you ain't getting them back.
** The Amala Grave Run involves using the Black Visor at every Burial Chamber to relive past boss battles with your current lineup. The Run's objective is to finish every single battle under a certain turn limit. While the first battles become laughably easy with endgame stats and demons, the Demonic Sponsor battles are hellishly difficult to break. Noah in particular has a nigh-flawless defense that can only be breached under highly specific conditions. Even should you complete the Run, it will do ''squat'' for you at the time -- in NewGamePlus, you have to advance once again until reaching the Labyrinth's first Burial Chamber, where you'll be granted ''an extra Press Turn''.
** Getting the Amala Ring in ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is quite the task. To be able to obtain it, you have to beat the [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne Hitoshura]], who is called the hardest boss [[UpToEleven in RPG history]]. It's that hard to do. The kicker? The ring can't be obtained in Digital Devil Saga 1. You get it by buying Digital Devil Saga 2 [[OldSaveBonus and transferring data from your save file of Digital Devil Saga 1]]. Yes, it's a sidequest that costs actual money.
** ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' has the Fiend sidequest, which is a repeat from the Fiend encounters from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' and ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiII''. ''Seven'' Fiends are hidden across Tokyo. Each has a 1/256 chance of appearing when you enter their spawning grounds. By the by, if they don't appear when entering their area, ''you have to leave the area entirely'' to try again. It's easy to see why this is considered extremely tedious and frustrating to many.



* ''VideoGame/{{Sudeki}}'':
** The Omnium Collector sidequest, required for one character's InfinityPlusOneSword. As the title suggests, it involves finding a total of 21 chunks of Omnium, [[TwentyBearAsses which are dropped by enemies in the dungeon you just cleared]]. The catch is these things are expensive and drop only 5% of the time (at a generous guess) from an enemy that has only a 50-50 chance of appearing at each encounter, and said encounters can only be created by running repetitively back and forth between two rooms of the dungeon.
** Heart's Heart requires going back into a dungeon after defeating the boss and being given every indication to leave. It's not [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] if you don't, but the way to get it afterward is so arbitrary some believe the event flags are badly programmed.
** A collection request the player probably has the stuff for in their pocket when it becomes available, but just ''starting'' the quest requires heading somewhere out of the way that you have absolutely no reason to go, and claiming the reward involves tediously sneaking through an area patrolled by guards that will kick you out on sight.






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\n\n* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'':
** The most expensive Frog Coin requires 500 coins to initiate a series of trades and you can only hold a maximum of 999 coins at a time. And you only get a Frog Coin every other time; most of the time it is...significantly less than 500 coins.
** Seed and Fertilizer. You might not even catch the Fertilizer. But the InfinityPlusOneSword and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Infinity Plus One Armor]] are there.
** The Frog Coin in Mushroom Castle. There is a hidden chest in the main room of the Mushroom Castle, which requires you to hop on the head of Toad to give you enough of a boost to actually get the damn thing. You have one shot at it, and no sign that it's even there. You do get an item that chimes when you enter the room that still has a hidden chest... but long, long after this event. And if you don't get it your first time there, it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]].
** Helping Toadofsky finish his orchestra without help is incredibly hard unless you have a really good ear for music.
* ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' has the defend the graveyard sidequest. Basically, you can decide to sub in for a ghoul who stays in the graveyard to make sure the dead stay dead (apparently LA has a zombie problem) while he goes out for a night on the town. Unfortunately, while the zombies don't take many hits to take down, there's a ''lot'' of them, so much so that by the time you make it to one gate to start clearing zombies, they'll already be mobbing the other gate all the way across the graveyard, and if either of them get knocked open, you fail. This is considered the hardest sidequest in the game, so much so that most players will opt for the other option (bringing him a hooker or, if female, pleasuring him yourself) which gives the same amount of xp.













* ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor''. The Pit of 100 Trials. Have fun.
* ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'': Having fun yet? How about doing the same thing ''twice''? But of course the BonusBoss won't fight you unless you beat it for a ''third time''.
* The original ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' has Chuck Quizmo. It's not hard, just ''incredibly annoying''. You have to find a spot where he [[RandomlyDrops (might)]] spawn, then just keep running back and forth until he does. Over. And. Over. Again. He has fully one third of the game's Star Pieces, and will give you only '''one''' every time he shows up.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'':
** The most expensive Frog Coin requires 500 coins to initiate a series of trades and you can only hold a maximum of 999 coins at a time. And you only get a Frog Coin every other time; most of the time it is...significantly less than 500 coins.
** Seed and Fertilizer. You might not even catch the Fertilizer. But the InfinityPlusOneSword and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Infinity Plus One Armor]] are there.
** The Frog Coin in Mushroom Castle. There is a hidden chest in the main room of the Mushroom Castle, which requires you to hop on the head of Toad to give you enough of a boost to actually get the damn thing. You have one shot at it, and no sign that it's even there. You do get an item that chimes when you enter the room that still has a hidden chest... but long, long after this event. And if you don't get it your first time there, it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]].
** Helping Toadofsky finish his orchestra without help is incredibly hard unless you have a really good ear for music.
* The optional Bros Attack mini games and BossRush in the MarioAndLuigi series. In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory'' you've got the Cholesteroad, which gives you prizes for literally perfecting your attacks to the point you get hundreds of points on each, and the massage challenges for Bowser which do the same. In VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam, there's the Mad Skillathon and Battle Broque Madame, which act the same for that game's Bros Attacks and Luiginary Attacks, and have you get over 800 points on each for prizes. These are all extremely difficult. There's also the turn limited Gauntlet and Battle Ring in game respectively, which is incredibly unforgiving as well. Oh, and the Giant Battle Ring in Dream Team as well, which is harder than anything else on normal mode and damn near impossible on hard mode (thanks to the strictest turn limits in RPG history). As you can tell, only the extremely dedicated complete them all.

* ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'' has the Labyrinth of Amala, which is only mostly optional, but whose mandatory parts are ''significantly'' easier than its optional parts. Bear in mind that "significantly easier" in the case of a Megaten game is like saying "we're going to blow your head off, then burn and desecrate your corpse" instead of "we're going to burn you alive and mutilate your daughter while forcing you to watch." and so you can imagine the [[UnusualEuphemism treats]] you're in for in the rest of the dungeon. To top it all off, the last area has a door that can only be opened by the first ally to ever join you[[note]]If that ally evolved and/or was used as non-sacrificial fusion for another demon, that's still fair game[[/note]]. Hope you didn't dismiss said ally as being too underpowered at some point along the way, 'cause you ain't getting them back.
** The Amala Grave Run involves using the Black Visor at every Burial Chamber to relive past boss battles with your current lineup. The Run's objective is to finish every single battle under a certain turn limit. While the first battles become laughably easy with endgame stats and demons, the Demonic Sponsor battles are hellishly difficult to break. Noah in particular has a nigh-flawless defense that can only be breached under highly specific conditions. Even should you complete the Run, it will do ''squat'' for you at the time - in NewGamePlus, you have to advance once again until reaching the Labyrinth's first Burial Chamber, where you'll be granted ''an extra Press Turn''.
** Getting the Amala Ring in ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is quite the task. To be able to obtain it, you have to beat the [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne Hitoshura]], who is called the hardest boss [[UpToEleven in RPG history]]. It's that hard to do. The kicker? The ring can't be obtained in Digital Devil Saga 1. You get it by buying Digital Devil Saga 2 [[OldSaveBonus and transferring data from your save file of Digital Devil Saga 1]]. Yes, it's a sidequest that costs actual money.
** ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' has the Fiend sidequest, which is a repeat from the Fiend encounters from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' and ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiII''. ''Seven'' Fiends are hidden across Tokyo. Each has a 1/256 chance of appearing when you enter their spawning grounds. By the by, if they don't appear when entering their area, ''you have to leave the area entirely'' to try again. It's easy to see why this is considered extremely tedious and frustrating to many.
* ''VideoGame/DigimonWorld4'' has a sidequest that is already brutal in that you can't use heal techs/items once you get into the area where the quest is, and plenty of traps that do damage based on your MAX HP. As if that wasn't brutal enough, to unlock a specific digivolution for the Digimon you started as, you have to beat it on the hardest game difficulty setting (think Diablo II difficulty settings here), with a hinted at [[SelfImposedChallenge special condition]] that you finish off the boss with [[OneHitPointWonder one HP remaining]]. You don't have to do this to complete the quest, you DO have to do it in order to unlock the best reward, so it's kind of a twist where the self-imposed challenge is optional. To get yourself down to 1 HP without killing yourself (and automatically failing the quest, which means you have to start it over from the beginning), you have to use a quick-sand pit and let yourself get sucked in repeatedly until you have 1 HP left. Then you have to navigate your way past a lot of traps (hopefully you took out the walls first before you went down to 1 HP, if not, you're in deep trouble), and kill the boss without letting it hit you once.
* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'':
** The companion quests are hard enough to ''start'', which, often have to be triggered by being in certain places with those companions, but sometimes you may unknowingly make it so that you lose the opprotunity to gain the "points" needed to start the quests. The worst case is Raul, who you can only find by going to a place filled with xenophobic Super Mutants that you aren't going to even want to try to get into until you're a decent level. However, once you finally get Raul, in order to start his quest, you need to talk with a few specific [=NPCs=] who you cannot have talked with before. If you have talked with them, then sucks to be you. Fortunately, this was fixed in a patch.
** Getting to Bitter Springs, the site of Boone's companion quest, requires traversing an area swarming with [[DemonicSpiders Cazadors]] (and the occasional Deathclaw), where he can easily get killed.
** The Legend of the Star. You need fifty Sunset Sarsaparilla blue star bottlecaps. There are only one hundred of these scattered throughout the game, and the physics mean you could easily bump into them and not notice them being knocked to the floor, or heaven forbid clipping through it. You can also get them through drinking SS, but there's only a 5% of their showing, meaning you need 1000 bottles. Your only rewards are a crapton of worthless trinkets, a unique energy pistol, [[ThatOneAchievement and a bronze trophy]].
** Another quest, "I Put a Spell on You," isn't difficult and might not even be that bad for some people. You need to find a mole in Camp [=McCarran=], and it culminates in finding out that [[spoiler: A bomb has been planted on the monorail. You rush to deactivate the bomb, if you do so the game will actually give you the message that the bomb has been successfully defused. But then it might go off anyway. This is either due to you stopping to talk with Col. Hsu right before going to defuse the bomb which wastes too much time despite the fact that the game tells you to report to him after stopping the mole, or you happened to earlier on unknowingly tell the mole information that makes the bomb's detonation inevitable. Like stated before, this may just be a minor nuisance, unless the only save file you have that is from before you made any crucial mistakes is several hours behind your playtime]]. Both objectives count towards Boone's history points.
** The quest "Come Fly With Me" is essentially a huge, layered fetch quest that requires a lot running back and forth in one general location, albeit it a large facility. The requirements to get the best possible ending and the most EXP require tricky tasks like attacking the huge invisible enemies in narrow corridors in order to save a prisoner or navigating a large, heavily booby trapped room to get to a computer. At a certain, attacking hostile enemies in the presence of certain characters in this quest will cause them to attack in return. To top it off, the quest is riddled with a number of frustrating bugs and is prone to crashing.
* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'':
** Most of the "Silver Shroud" quest is simply hunting down and killing various baddies. Except for the ending where you have to save Kent from the drug dealer [[ThatOneBoss Sinjin]], who has a rifle to Kent's head. Have fun reloading and running through the same [[LargeHam cheesy]] dialog a dozen times to take down Sinjin before he pulls the trigger. Especially if you are underpowered and have to [[{{Hypocrite}} use chems]] to get enough of a boost to pull it off.
** "Hole in the Wall" is required to get the Medicine Bobblehead and Curie as a companion, as well as [[PlayerHeadquarters personal quarters in Vault 81]]. After [[GuideDangIt a somewhat obtuse procedure for starting the quest]], to find a cure for Austin's illness, you have to trek through a sealed-off [[AbandonedLaboratory secret laboratory]] full of plague-carrying Mole Rats, including a [[KingMook Brood Mother]], and if you get bit, [[StatusAilment the disease subtracts 10 from your maximum HP]]. There's only one dose of the cure, so if you [[SadisticChoice use it on yourself]], Austin dies and [[WhatTheHellHero everyone in Vault 81 hates you]], so no PlayerHeadquarters there for you.
* ''VideoGame/{{Sudeki}}'':
** The Omnium Collector sidequest, required for one character's InfinityPlusOneSword. As the title suggests, it involves finding a total of 21 chunks of Omnium, [[TwentyBearAsses which are dropped by enemies in the dungeon you just cleared]]. The catch is these things are expensive and drop only 5% of the time (at a generous guess) from an enemy that has only a 50-50 chance of appearing at each encounter, and said encounters can only be created by running repetitively back and forth between two rooms of the dungeon.
** Heart's Heart requires going back into a dungeon after defeating the boss and being given every indication to leave. It's not [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]] if you don't, but the way to get it afterward is so arbitrary some believe the event flags are badly programmed.
** A collection request the player probably has the stuff for in their pocket when it becomes available, but just ''starting'' the quest requires heading somewhere out of the way that you have absolutely no reason to go, and claiming the reward involves tediously sneaking through an area patrolled by guards that will kick you out on sight.
* ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicII'' had the infamous sequence in the Telos military base. Already the hardest part of the entire game, it's got this annoying side quest where you have to escort the dumbest person in the universe out of the base. It's not even quest per se, You can just tell him to follow you out, and lead him back to the exit. The character's AI is so bad, he will only follow you if certain conditions are met (distance, direct line of sight, etc), leaving the player to go back for him every 10 meters. And god help you if he gets stuck behind something. The sequence can last at least 10 minutes, and besides a few light side points it's completely pointless. Of course it might be useful for lowering the cost of your healing spell, which is vital at this part.
* ''VideoGame/{{Okage}}: Shadow King'' has the hellish [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Escapeless Abyss]]. [[IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace The name says it all, really]]. If you go in without any [[EscapeRope Guidance Jewels]], you won't be getting out without blind, dumb luck.
* ''VideoGame/DragonFable'' has ''Embrace Your Destiny'', the final sidequest in Nythera's ''Rise of the [=DragonMage=]'' chain. Almost universally disliked by players who don't have a mage build or high alchemy levels because the player character's stats are always used when playing as a different character in a sidequest.
* ''VideoGame/{{NieR}}'' has Life in the Sands. You have to get 10 Pink Moonflower Seeds. Sounds deceptively simple, right? It is. You can get Red, Gold, and Blue Moonflower Seeds at the shops, but there's no pink seeds anywhere to be found. You have to ''hybridize'' them, in a complex, multi-step process that is explained ''nowhere'' in the game, can be easily messed up if you don't know what you're doing, and either takes ''several days real-time'' or a lot of fiddling with the system clock. Your reward? 10,000 gold. At this point of the game, that's a drop in the bucket. [[TheDarkId Trolled by Cavia!]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Opoona}}:''
** Fully befriending Ine. In order to befriend her, you ''first'' have to befriend Masao, which means you need to have a high enough appreciation for art, which means running around the world and being sure to check every single plaque for every artwork you come across. Then you have to make sure you're [[ItMakesSenseInContext famous enough to play the ukulele,]] and impress her with your skills. ''Then'' you have to bother Masao into giving you his sculpture of himself, and [[VendorTrash not immediately sell it for a giant chunk of cash as the game suggests you do]], but rather give it to Ine on the grounds that they're both exchange students from the same planet. And then, once you're done with all that, you have to play the ukulele for '''''fifty in-game days''''' to get her friendship to its highest point. And since [[LevelUpAtIntimacy5 the stat increases via her friendship]] is by far the most common out of all the possible friends, it's really more a BraggingRightsReward than anything.
** Jingle's [[FetchQuest Rogue research requests]] can be this as well. In order to complete his research, Jingle will sometimes ask you for various {{Rare Random Drop}}s from the enemies in the world. A first-time player of the game is likely to simply spend time trying to earn the drops legitimately, which is an exercise in frustration all its own. A veteran or one using a guide knows that they can be obtained from Secret Codes as well... except that Secret Codes also happen to be ''extremely'' tiny pink stickers stuck randomly behind various pieces of furniture and landscape, and that spotting them is almost as much of a challenge. To make things worse, the Secret Codes that give the necessary drop appear far later than the quests that require them.
* The Racer's Labyrinth in ''VideoGame/MonsterRacers''. A huge, 100-person long MultiMookMelee, across every terrain type in the game (both in the races, and in navigating the labyrinth itself), against opponents up to level ''80'' (when you're likely to access said labyrinth around level 60 or so). It all culminates in three of the hardest races in the game against three ridiculously tough and high-leveled bosses. [[spoiler: On the plus side, you get rewarded with a random Exotic monster if you win, and you can repeat the process as many times as you like for all the Exotics you want.]]
* In the first ''VideoGame/FossilFighters'' game, actually obtaining the series' MascotMook, [[TyrannosaurusRex T-Rex,]] is one of the most difficult tasks in the game. The area where its fossils can be found only appears post-game. And you can't even ''dig'' there to start with, because it's [[InterfaceScrew so hot, it interferes with your radar.]] You'll need to pay tons of money to build oases there to cool the area enough to even find fossils. Even ten, T-rex is easily the rarest fossil in the area--and you'll need to find every one of its parts if you want it to have all of its skills. (Thankfully, in the second game, it became the default starter for male trainers and was still pretty easy to find for female ones.)
* The Weather Lady recruitment quest in ''VideoGame/CitizensOfEarth''. You just need to let her find you during a rainstorm. Except normal rain won't do, and even though you can ask her to change the weather even before recruiting her, you can't select a rainstorm until you level up her talent, which requires having her in your party. It's all a LuckBasedMission, and you could very well go through the entire story without recruiting her.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' has this in the form of the shard-collecting side quest. Scattered across every area you can visit are a collection of shards that help to unlock doors in a desert oasis. The problem is, some of these shards are hard to get to, requiring jumping and taking very unorthodox paths that you might have to look up a guide in order to find. Not to mention that there are ''more'' in the actual oasis itself, where most of those "jumping puzzles" come into play because there are rock arches, cliffs, and little nooks and crannies that you have to run around and find in an already very poorly laid-out area. All of this just for gear and permanent buffs that up your elemental resistance, which by end game you will most likely be able to ''make yourself.''
* ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' has the defend the graveyard sidequest. Basically, you can decide to sub in for a ghoul who stays in the graveyard to make sure the dead stay dead (apparently LA has a zombie problem) while he goes out for a night on the town. Unfortunately, while the zombies don't take many hits to take down, there's a ''lot'' of them, so much so that by the time you make it to one gate to start clearing zombies, they'll already be mobbing the other gate all the way across the graveyard, and if either of them get knocked open, you fail. This is considered the hardest sidequest in the game, so much so that most players will opt for the other option (bringing him a hooker or, if female, pleasuring him yourself) which gives the same amount of xp.



* The original ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' had that infamous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDdqKVrh-dU "Saving the Ralari"]] mission, which classifies as both EscortMission and LuckBasedMission. You don't need to save the Ralari to win the game and there is no way to do a HundredPercentCompletion due to the mission branching, but if you want to complete the game without losing any mission, this one is the 13th mission.



** The fourth mine in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonDS'' is a 65,535 floor nightmare MarathonLevel. The only real reasons to even try are A) To get the [[strike:Dragon]]Goddess Ball, which will grant you one of several wishes, or can be kept in your inventory to slowly increase your farm's rating and B) a special event that can only be seen by reaching the final floor. It's damned expensive (You pretty much have to fill your rucksack with [=TurbojoltXLs=] and [=BodigizerXLs=] to stand a real chance) and frustrating (the monsters there are the toughest in the game, and the mine pits can drop an instant death-bringing 100 floors at a time) and other than the aforementioned Goddess Ball, all the good mine items are in the much smaller Mine #3 - which you had to finish to even unlock #4.

to:

** The fourth mine in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonDS'' is a 65,535 floor nightmare MarathonLevel. The only real reasons to even try are A) To get the [[strike:Dragon]]Goddess Ball, which will grant you one of several wishes, or can be kept in your inventory to slowly increase your farm's rating and B) a special event that can only be seen by reaching the final floor. It's damned expensive (You pretty much have to fill your rucksack with [=TurbojoltXLs=] and [=BodigizerXLs=] to stand a real chance) and frustrating (the monsters there are the toughest in the game, and the mine pits can drop an instant death-bringing 100 floors at a time) and other than the aforementioned Goddess Ball, all the good mine items are in the much smaller Mine #3 - -- which you had to finish to even unlock #4.



* Getting the wishing well in ''[[VideoGame/TheSims The Sims 2: Seasons]]''. To get it, you need to get a perfect score from the Garden Club. To do this, you spend hours and hours tending, spraying and watering your garden, praying that it doesn't snow or rain and destroy all your work, spend thousands of simoleons on flowers, hedges and decorations (Which also require a lot of upkeep) and eventually, [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext talking to the trees to increase their health.]] When (if) you finally get the wishing well, you can select three wishes. Two of them are quite useful, but wishing for money gives you a pathetically tiny sum of 1000 simoleons (Which is probably nowhere near how much you've spent working on the garden) and all three wishes are likely to fail, with disastrous results.



* Getting the wishing well in ''[[VideoGame/TheSims The Sims 2: Seasons]]''. To get it, you need to get a perfect score from the Garden Club. To do this, you spend hours and hours tending, spraying and watering your garden, praying that it doesn't snow or rain and destroy all your work, spend thousands of simoleons on flowers, hedges and decorations (Which also require a lot of upkeep) and eventually, [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext talking to the trees to increase their health.]] When (if) you finally get the wishing well, you can select three wishes. Two of them are quite useful, but wishing for money gives you a pathetically tiny sum of 1000 simoleons (Which is probably nowhere near how much you've spent working on the garden) and all three wishes are likely to fail, with disastrous results.

to:

* Getting The original ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' had that infamous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDdqKVrh-dU "Saving the wishing well in ''[[VideoGame/TheSims The Sims 2: Seasons]]''. To get it, you Ralari"]] mission, which classifies as both EscortMission and LuckBasedMission. You don't need to get a perfect score from save the Garden Club. To do this, you spend hours Ralari to win the game and hours tending, spraying and watering your garden, praying that it doesn't snow or rain and destroy all your work, spend thousands of simoleons on flowers, hedges and decorations (Which also require there is no way to do a lot of upkeep) and eventually, [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext talking HundredPercentCompletion due to the trees to increase their health.]] When (if) mission branching, but if you finally get want to complete the wishing well, you can select three wishes. Two of them are quite useful, but wishing for money gives you a pathetically tiny sum of 1000 simoleons (Which game without losing any mission, this one is probably nowhere near how much you've spent working on the garden) and all three wishes are likely to fail, with disastrous results.13th mission.
8th Apr '17 11:29:36 PM karategal
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Alundra}}'', there's the Gilded Falcons quest. You have to find all 50 of them throughout the game, and most of them are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you're not careful, especially since there's one in each dungeon and most dungeons are one time visits. One of them even has a ''time limit'' before it self-destructs -- if you don't beat all the enemies quickly, you'll be tossed from the dungeon before you can pick it up (FYI, it's the wounded miner dream).
* The Looter's Caverns in ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'' have caused more than one player to attack their TV screens in a fit of rage. They require you to maneuver the not-very-manueverable hovercraft through a maze of twisty passages lined with mines, [[LaserHallway lasers]], and obstacles, all the while "racing" against the doors, which close on a timer -- and some of which are almost impossible to get through in time without using [[NitroBoost speed boosts]]. If steering into a bomb-lined wall twenty times doesn't drive you to madness, hearing your sidekick [[AnnoyingVideoGameHelper shout the same things over and over again]] will.
* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'':
** "Mandrake Is The Best Medicine" wherein you have to get Mandrake Root. Doesn't sound so hard, but it's dropped by Mandragoras, which only appear in one level, and only in the areas of that level that take the longest time to reach from the starting points, and which explode without dropping anything if you don't kill them quickly enough? Not only that, but the enemies in this particular level are extremely annoying. So, yeah.
** A late-game mission that requires you to collect an Alexandrite. The only place it's found is as a 1/5 drop chance at the end of a fairly difficult bonus dungeon, and if you get one of the other 4 drops instead, you have to to the whole dungeon over again.
** Or the one sidequest Abram hands out that requires you to get some Merman Meat? There's just one little catch: Mermen don't drop Merman Meat -- Loreleis do. And they don't do it very often. This can be blamed on a translation error -- the original Japanese version had a gender-neutral name for the item instead, although who knows why they didn't simply translate it as "Mermaid Meat"...
* ''VideoGame/EpicMickey'' has a fair share of these, but the one that stands out the most is the quest to rescue ''all'' of the gremlins in the game, considering that some of them can be [[PermanentlyMissableContent easily missed and lost]] since you can only visit most places once, and there's an autosave feature and no SaveScumming in this game (as the developers didn't want you to go back on your choices) to help you out, if you make a mistake and don't realize it until it's too late.
* Anyone who's played ''VideoGame/IllusionOfGaia'' remembers gathering Red Gems. They range from easy to GuideDangIt, but that ''one''. The third red gem occurs only in your home town, so once you leave it's lost, but that's not the annoying part. To get it, you have to wait for the fisherman on the docks to have caught a bucket, which you examine to get the gem. You can only change how he is by running inside and then back outside to check on him. ''And, on top of all that'', [[RandomlyDrops there's a one-in-God only knows chance of him actually having got the bucket.]] Step One: Eject cartridge. Step Two: Ball-peen hammer.
* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has the [[HeartContainer life jewel]] in the Dimensional Corridor. If you don't know what you're doing, you'll easily [[PermanentlyMissableContent miss it for the rest of the game]]. If you know what you're doing but have trouble getting it right, you'll hate waiting to recharge a certain item that needs to be used at an exact moment to make a tricky jumping puzzle possible. Damage boosting can prevent it from being lost, but messing up still makes it even more frustrating to get than it already is.



* ''VideoGame/EpicMickey'' has a fair share of these, but the one that stands out the most is the quest to rescue ''all'' of the gremlins in the game, considering that some of them can be [[PermanentlyMissableContent easily missed and lost]] since you can only visit most places once, and there's an autosave feature and no SaveScumming in this game (as the developers didn't want you to go back on your choices) to help you out, if you make a mistake and don't realize it until it's too late.
* ''VideoGame/{{Onimusha}} 3'' has an optional training mode that you unlock along the way. The training sessions are in no way easy, but they are completely doable, at least until you reach Critical training. It requires either almost superhuman reflexes or huge amounts of dumb luck to get through, especially in the PC port. Passing it gets you a neat item and unlocks the good ending.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Alundra}}'', there's the Gilded Falcons quest. You have to find all 50 of them throughout the game, and most of them are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you're not careful, especially since there's one in each dungeon and most dungeons are one time visits. One of them even has a ''time limit'' before it self-destructs - if you don't beat all the enemies quickly, you'll be tossed from the dungeon before you can pick it up (FYI, it's the wounded miner dream).



* The Looter's Caverns in ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'' have caused more than one player to attack their TV screens in a fit of rage. They require you to maneuver the not-very-manueverable hovercraft through a maze of twisty passages lined with mines, [[LaserHallway lasers]], and obstacles, all the while "racing" against the doors, which close on a timer--and some of which are almost impossible to get through in time without using [[NitroBoost speed boosts]]. If steering into a bomb-lined wall twenty times doesn't drive you to madness, hearing your sidekick [[AnnoyingVideoGameHelper shout the same things over and over again]] will.
* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'':
** "Mandrake Is The Best Medicine" wherein you have to get Mandrake Root. Doesn't sound so hard, but it's dropped by Mandragoras, which only appear in one level, and only in the areas of that level that take the longest time to reach from the starting points, and which explode without dropping anything if you don't kill them quickly enough? Not only that, but the enemies in this particular level are extremely annoying. So, yeah.
** A late-game mission that requires you to collect an Alexandrite. The only place it's found is as a 1/5 drop chance at the end of a fairly difficult bonus dungeon, and if you get one of the other 4 drops instead, you have to to the whole dungeon over again.
** Or the one sidequest Abram hands out that requires you to get some Merman Meat? There's just one little catch: Mermen don't drop Merman Meat - Loreleis do. And they don't do it very often. This can be blamed on a translation error - the original Japanese version had a gender-neutral name for the item instead, although who knows why they didn't simply translate it as "Mermaid Meat"...
* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has the [[HeartContainer life jewel]] in the Dimensional Corridor. If you don't know what you're doing, you'll easily [[PermanentlyMissableContent miss it for the rest of the game]]. If you know what you're doing but have trouble getting it right, you'll hate waiting to recharge a certain item that needs to be used at an exact moment to make a tricky jumping puzzle possible. Damage boosting can prevent it from being lost, but messing up still makes it even more frustrating to get than it already is.
* Anyone who's played ''VideoGame/IllusionOfGaia'' remembers gathering Red Gems. They range from easy to GuideDangIt, but that ''one''. The third red gem occurs only in your home town, so once you leave it's lost, but that's not the annoying part. To get it, you have to wait for the fisherman on the docks to have caught a bucket, which you examine to get the gem. You can only change how he is by running inside and then back outside to check on him. ''And, on top of all that'', [[RandomlyDrops there's a one-in-God only knows chance of him actually having got the bucket.]] Step One: Eject cartridge. Step Two: Ball-peen hammer.
* Trying to get all the coins in ''WallaceAndGromit - Project Zoo''? If you have, then the mere mention of the Lava World bonus stage will make you curl up in the fetal position and whimper. [[VideoGame/DonkeyKong Gromit has to climb a series of platforms while avoiding rolling barrels thrown by a gorilla.]] What's the problem? Due to spectacularly bad testing the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube version of the game contains a glitch where 99% of the barrels are invisible to the player. Barrels that result in instant death if touched. Oh, and did we mentio me limit? Getting the coins from this level requires truly psychic guesswork and timing, and the reward? Short clips from "WesternAnimation/TheWrongTrousers" and one preview from the 'Cracking Contraptions' series.

to:

* The Looter's Caverns in ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'' have caused more than one player to attack their TV screens in a fit of rage. They require you to maneuver the not-very-manueverable hovercraft through a maze of twisty passages lined with mines, [[LaserHallway lasers]], and obstacles, all the while "racing" against the doors, which close on a timer--and some of which are almost impossible to get through in time without using [[NitroBoost speed boosts]]. If steering into a bomb-lined wall twenty times doesn't drive you to madness, hearing your sidekick [[AnnoyingVideoGameHelper shout the same things over and over again]] will.
* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'':
** "Mandrake Is The Best Medicine" wherein you have to get Mandrake Root. Doesn't sound so hard, but it's dropped by Mandragoras, which only appear in one level, and only in the areas of
''VideoGame/{{Onimusha}} 3'' has an optional training mode that level that take you unlock along the longest time to way. The training sessions are in no way easy, but they are completely doable, at least until you reach from the starting points, and which explode without dropping anything if you don't kill them quickly enough? Not only that, but the enemies in this particular level are extremely annoying. So, yeah.
** A late-game mission that
Critical training. It requires you to collect an Alexandrite. The only place it's found is as a 1/5 drop chance at the end either almost superhuman reflexes or huge amounts of a fairly difficult bonus dungeon, and if you get one of the other 4 drops instead, you have to to the whole dungeon over again.
** Or the one sidequest Abram hands out that requires you
dumb luck to get some Merman Meat? There's just one little catch: Mermen don't drop Merman Meat - Loreleis do. And they don't do it very often. This can be blamed on a translation error - the original Japanese version had a gender-neutral name for the item instead, although who knows why they didn't simply translate it as "Mermaid Meat"...
* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has the [[HeartContainer life jewel]]
through, especially in the Dimensional Corridor. If PC port. Passing it gets you don't know what you're doing, you'll easily [[PermanentlyMissableContent miss it for the rest of the game]]. If you know what you're doing but have trouble getting it right, you'll hate waiting to recharge a certain neat item that needs to be used at an exact moment to make a tricky jumping puzzle possible. Damage boosting can prevent it from being lost, but messing up still makes it even more frustrating to get than it already is.
* Anyone who's played ''VideoGame/IllusionOfGaia'' remembers gathering Red Gems. They range from easy to GuideDangIt, but that ''one''. The third red gem occurs only in your home town, so once you leave it's lost, but that's not
and unlocks the annoying part. To get it, you have to wait for the fisherman on the docks to have caught a bucket, which you examine to get the gem. You can only change how he is by running inside and then back outside to check on him. ''And, on top of all that'', [[RandomlyDrops there's a one-in-God only knows chance of him actually having got the bucket.]] Step One: Eject cartridge. Step Two: Ball-peen hammer.
good ending.
* Trying to get all the coins in ''WallaceAndGromit - -- Project Zoo''? If you have, then the mere mention of the Lava World bonus stage will make you curl up in the fetal position and whimper. [[VideoGame/DonkeyKong Gromit has to climb a series of platforms while avoiding rolling barrels thrown by a gorilla.]] What's the problem? Due to spectacularly bad testing the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube version of the game contains a glitch where 99% of the barrels are invisible to the player. Barrels that result in instant death if touched. Oh, and did we mentio me limit? Getting the coins from this level requires truly psychic guesswork and timing, and the reward? Short clips from "WesternAnimation/TheWrongTrousers" and one preview from the 'Cracking Contraptions' series.



** First, there's the Bomber's Ring. It requires you to score perfectly (8 rounds out of 8, flawlessly) in the Goron Dance Hall on Platinum, the highest difficulty level. It's a game where you have to enter the button sequence EXACTLY as it's given - in the right order and with the exactly same rhythm and timing. And on Platinum, some of those sequences are more than 10 buttons long. You have to do that perfectly 8 times in a row, and even at that level, it's still randomized.

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** First, there's the Bomber's Ring. It requires you to score perfectly (8 rounds out of 8, flawlessly) in the Goron Dance Hall on Platinum, the highest difficulty level. It's a game where you have to enter the button sequence EXACTLY as it's given - -- in the right order and with the exactly same rhythm and timing. And on Platinum, some of those sequences are more than 10 buttons long. You have to do that perfectly 8 times in a row, and even at that level, it's still randomized.



* ''VideoGame/LEGOStarWars'': The Complete Saga has a pretty crazy achievement. You have to go through the whole Cloud City / Darth Vader boss fight level, while having the stormtrooper helmet on your head. This means you have to go through the level without ever being hit or ever falling down one of the many pits, or when you have to change to R2-D2 to open doors, hope that the NPC that takes control over your helmeted character doesn't change to another figure. If you try this really on the normal way you are probably working on it for all eternity. Though the achievement is also unlocked if you take on the helmet and then just exit the level, saving the found amount of money, because you technically finished the level with the helmet.



* ''VideoGame/LEGOStarWars'': The Complete Saga has a pretty crazy achievement. You have to go through the whole Cloud City / Darth Vader boss fight level, while having the stormtrooper helmet on your head. This means you have to go through the level without ever being hit or ever falling down one of the many pits, or when you have to change to R2-D2 to open doors, hope that the NPC that takes control over your helmeted character doesn't change to another figure. If you try this really on the normal way you are probably working on it for all eternity. Though the achievement is also unlocked if you take on the helmet and then just exit the level, saving the found amount of money, because you technically finished the level with the helmet.



* Unlocking T.T. in ''VideoGame/DiddyKongRacing'' requires beating his best Time Trial time on every course in the game. The problem? T.T. is ''good.'' ''Really'' good. And being as it's Time Trial mode (and he's a ghost), you have no weapons at your disposal in order to beat him--just your mad driving skills and the game's famous "Zipper Trick," which requires you to let go of your accelerator right before hitting a speed-boosting Zipper. The good or bad thing (depending on [[NintendoHard how you like your games]]) is that, in the DS port, this sidequest is now ''much'' easier due to the addition of upgrades to your vehicles. Using Pipsy in combination with an upgrade that increases your vehicle's maximum speed makes beating all T.T.'s times, if not a piece of cake, at the very least a muffin top.
* ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 6'' has the Passing Challenge showcases, for which you need Zen-like precision to beat on any difficulty higher than Above Average. Especially the first one with the Ford GT at Sebring.



* Unlocking T.T. in ''VideoGame/DiddyKongRacing'' requires beating his best Time Trial time on every course in the game. The problem? T.T. is ''good.'' ''Really'' good. And being as it's Time Trial mode (and he's a ghost), you have no weapons at your disposal in order to beat him--just your mad driving skills and the game's famous "Zipper Trick," which requires you to let go of your accelerator right before hitting a speed-boosting Zipper. The good or bad thing (depending on [[NintendoHard how you like your games]]) is that, in the DS port, this sidequest is now ''much'' easier due to the addition of upgrades to your vehicles. Using Pipsy in combination with an upgrade that increases your vehicle's maximum speed makes beating all T.T.'s times, if not a piece of cake, at the very least a muffin top.
* ''VideoGame/WipeOut HD Fury'': YOU WILL NEVER REACH ZONE ZEUS. Also, Zico mocks you. Seriously, [=PS3=] trophies and X360 achievements can be That One Trophy/Achievement too...



* ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 6'' has the Passing Challenge showcases, for which you need Zen-like precision to beat on any difficulty higher than Above Average. Especially the first one with the Ford GT at Sebring.




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* ''VideoGame/WipeOut HD Fury'': YOU WILL NEVER REACH ZONE ZEUS. Also, Zico mocks you. Seriously, [=PS3=] trophies and X360 achievements can be That One Trophy/Achievement too...



** The original ''Perfect Dark'' has some difficult side items as well - specifically, the firing range. A skilled gamer could probably get most of the silver stars with a little practice. Getting all the gold stars, however, is nearly impossible. The major stumbling block is the [=AR34=]: You must get 500 points (a bulls-eye is 10 points) in 20 seconds with 100% accuracy, using an assault rifle. Oh, and the targets break when shot too much, so if you break a target and let even a single bullet through afterwards, you fail.

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** The original ''Perfect Dark'' has some difficult side items as well - -- specifically, the firing range. A skilled gamer could probably get most of the silver stars with a little practice. Getting all the gold stars, however, is nearly impossible. The major stumbling block is the [=AR34=]: You must get 500 points (a bulls-eye is 10 points) in 20 seconds with 100% accuracy, using an assault rifle. Oh, and the targets break when shot too much, so if you break a target and let even a single bullet through afterwards, you fail.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'':
** Obtaining each character's InfinityPlusOneSword is an extremely simple effort, but acquiring the sigils, key items that are required to power up each weapon to its full potential, is invariably a highly arduous task. Infamously, getting two sigils requires achieving a perfect score in a highly luck-based chocobo racing minigame, which is every bit as annoying as it sounds, and by dodging ''two hundred'' lightning bolts in a row in another minigame that demands, well, lightning-quick reflexes. Wakka's sigil and [[LimitBreak Overdrives]], while not difficult to acquire by any means, require at least ten hours of Blitzball, the game's love-it-or-hate-it unexpected gameplay change minigame. In the [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]], both the chocobo racing and lightning dodging minigames were turned into [[ThatOneAchievement Those Two Achievements]]. Even worse, there is also a trophy that can be earned only by acquiring all the Celestial Weapons, sigils, and crests; and powering them all up.
** The lightning bolts were comparatively easy compared to the chocobo racing task (had 0.7s) for a long, long time. The logical conclusion is that whoever programmed that one had a grudge against the guy who designed Caladbolg. You are racing the chocobo trainer, and you are seeking a time of 0.0 seconds (hitting a balloon is a 3 second bonus, and being hit by a bird is a 3 second penalty). That by itself is difficult enough, but the game goes out of its way to make it even harder. The trainer will jostle with you, interfering with your position, the chocobo is difficult to control and will always seek to progress toward the finish line even if you'd rather hit a balloon, birds will come at you in positions that are impossible to dodge (including when you're stunned from being hit by a bird), and [[InterfaceScrew the camera changes angles at inopportune times.]]
** The butterfly minigame. You have to run down paths, collecting all the blue butterflies, while avoiding all the red ones, all before time runs out. What's that? That sounds easy to you? Well then, perhaps we should mention the DepthDeception-inducing camera angles, the dark blue lighting that makes identifying the colors ridiculously difficult, and the fact that each time you fail, you have to fight a battle (the penalty for hitting a red butterfly) before backtracking all the way back to the start. The time between attempts is always longer than the attempts themselves.
** European gamers and those who laid their hands on the [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]] have it even worse: if you don't collect all crests as you go along, you'll have to backtrack later... usually through paths containing a [[ThatOneBoss Dark Aeon]]. And getting one of the spheres necessary to get Auron's best Overdrive also involves getting past one. Oh, and we mustn't forget Tidus' weapon, since if you don't get his item before leaving the room, Dark Bahamut (one of the harder Dark Aeons) sits in front of it. And the second part to power up his weapon is from ''the infernal chocobo race''. Meaning you might spend an eternity getting a less than 0.0 time there, only to find something that has 5 ''million'' health, and basically needs maxed stats to even dream of winning. (Unless you go the Zanmato route, which is about as cheap as buying North America, and you'll still probably want First Strike if you don't have high agility.)\\
If you forget either of two specific treasures the first time you visit the temples in the PAL/HD versions, you have to face some of the Dark Aeons just to regain access to those temples. This can really screw you over if you're trying to fully-power Yuna's Celestial Weapon, because you NEED all the Aeons to do that, which in turn requires all of the treasures.
** Rikku's sigil isn't annoying for its difficulty, but for its duration - you have to do a ''lot'' of walking, often to areas of Bikanel that are spelled out in unnecessarily cryptic fashion by a stone about twenty miles from the nearest save point. Even with a "No Encounters" item strapped to one of your characters, you'll still be walking around a very boring desert for something like three hours.
** Finding all 26 of the Al Bhed journals to translate the Al Bhed language one letter at a time can be a real pain considering that several of them are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you're not thorough with your searches. (There is a way to get the ones that were missed, but you have to start a new game or from a save file that ''didn't'' pass them, find the ones you missed, save, go back to your regular game, then have it read the memory card to look at all the ones you've ever found on every save file.)
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'':
** To get the game's most powerful InfinityPlusOneSword, you [[GuideDangIt need a strategy guide]], because it requires you to leave four treasure chests alone without giving you the slightest indication of where those chests are. There's another way to get the weapon, but it's a [[LuckBasedMission 1/1000 random treasure chest drop]]. And that chest happens to be in one of the hardest areas of the game, and also happens to have a requirement of getting 10 of the 12 summons (not including Zodiark, of the next example, who is inside the area) of the game. On the bright side, you get 5 just for completing most of the story, this chest isn't a chest you can only ever open once, and there are a couple of other interesting drops on the way to it.
** Another nasty sidequest involves a trek into Phase 2 of the Henne Mines, the game's most difficult BonusDungeon. It's an hour-long journey through a narrow and confusing dungeon infested with GoddamnedBats (borderline DemonicSpiders if you aren't expecting/ready for level 60+ enemies, some of which have [[OneHitKill instant-kills]]). There are no saves, and at the end of the Mines is Zodiark, one of the game's three most difficult [[BonusBoss optional bosses]]. The reward for beating Zodiark is the ability to use him as a [[SummonMagic summon]], but because he requires the character to be under a certain dangerous status to use his ultimate attack, Zodiark is AwesomeButImpractical.
** Danjuro, the ultimate dagger, is dropped by a single Rare Game, which has an extremely complicated set of rules to get it to spawn reliably, which took years to figure out, to the point where the Final Fantasy Wiki ''still'' says that the exact spawn conditions are not fully understood. It only spawns in rooms with a Waystone (teleporter) ''and'' requires 30+ kills since the last time a Waystone was used. In an area where every 3-6 platforms is probably a Waystone that you don't know you you can't use in order to get Larva Eater to spawn. Add onto that the obviously low drop rate for the Danjuro (3% base), and you've got a quest that is ''begging'' to be evaded via cheating or skillful moving around. (Then the Bestiary is rather taunting and pretty much ''lies'' by giving Larva Eater a 1/5 rating for how rare it is to find. Which, if you know the spawn mechanics, ''could'' be considered true. But considering it took two ''years'' to figure out how to get him to spawn ''once'' without taking all day....) Similar enemies have confirmed quirks to make dropping easier, i.e. Helvinek's Grand Helms by leaving the screen as the enemy dies. (Oh, and even if you ''don't'' want to get a Danjuro, if you want to complete the Bestiary for the later example of completing the Sky Pirate's Den, you're still going to need to spawn him at least once.)
** Any of the ultimate weapon sidequests with the exception of Fomalhaut (which can be obtained long before the end of the game).
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.
** Finding [[HumongousMecha Omega Mk. XII]] is an exercise in hair-pulling frustration. The most satisfying part isn't beating him, but actually tracking the mofo down. Even if you look up an ''actual'' map instead of the (completely, utterly useless) in-game one, the trek is still rather complicated.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'':
** Obtaining each
In ''VideoGame/{{Anachronox}}'', to get one character's InfinityPlusOneSword is an extremely simple effort, but acquiring you need to let PAL play in a children's area for a specific amount of time at a specific point in the sigils, key game. If he plays for less than 6 hours or more than 8 '''realtime''' hours he find other items instead. Even if he plays for the right amount of time but before reaching the specific point in the game he will get yet another item instead. This is a definite GuideDangIt moment as there is nothing in the game that hints at how long he needs to play or more importantly at what point the InfinityPlusOneSword appears rather than another item. And if you move more than a few feet from the window where you can see him, he comes out and the timer resets.
* ''VideoGame/BatenKaitosOrigins'':
** There's the nightmarish ''VideoGame/PacMan'' sidequest, which ''takes longer to finish than every other sidequest and the main quest combined.'' To accomplish it, you must feed one of your quest magnus one copy of ''every other quest magnus in the game''. 3 of them are {{permanently missable|Content}}, 3 of them take 30 hours in real time to create (seriously), and there's a ton more
that are required to power up each weapon to its full potential, is invariably a in highly arduous task. Infamously, getting two sigils requires achieving unintuitive places. Some of them can only be acquired by accepting a perfect score in sidequest ''that doesn't show up on your sidequest list'', some of them are semi-missable (you can recreate them, but it's a highly luck-based chocobo racing minigame, which is every bit as annoying as it sounds, major pain to do so), and MANY of them can only be acquired by dodging ''two hundred'' lightning bolts in a row in another minigame that demands, well, lightning-quick reflexes. Wakka's sigil and [[LimitBreak Overdrives]], while not difficult letting them age. One of the quest magnus you need to acquire by any means, require at least ten hours of Blitzball, use for this doubles as an ingredient for the game's love-it-or-hate-it unexpected gameplay change minigame. In the [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]], both the chocobo racing and lightning dodging minigames were turned into [[ThatOneAchievement Those Two Achievements]]. Even worse, there is also a trophy that can be earned only by acquiring all the Celestial Weapons, sigils, and crests; and powering them all up.
** The lightning bolts were comparatively easy compared to the chocobo racing task (had 0.7s) for a long, long time. The logical conclusion is that whoever programmed that one had a grudge against the guy who designed Caladbolg. You are racing the chocobo trainer, and you are seeking a time of 0.0 seconds (hitting a balloon is a 3 second bonus, and being hit by a bird is a 3 second penalty). That by itself is difficult enough, but the game goes out of its way
InfinityPlusOneSword. And to make it matters even harder. The trainer will jostle with you, interfering with your position, the chocobo is difficult to control and will always seek to progress toward the finish line even if you'd rather hit a balloon, birds will come at worse, you in positions that are impossible to dodge (including when have no in-game means of keeping track of which magnus you've used for this. Forgotten which ones you're stunned missing? Too bad! Your reward for doing this is permanent critical hits, which ''would'' be a GameBreaker, but by the time you're done with this nightmare, you should be good enough to stomp the final boss into dust without it.
** For those who dealt with the Pac-Man sidequest by [[FanonDiscontinuity pretending it doesn't exist]], there's still "Gather the rock-people!" To do this quest, you have to move large stone statues throughout the Nekkar Quietlands by pushing them to the summit. Yes, pushing them, in a game where {{Hammerspace}} is a heavily JustifiedTrope. The EdgeGravity on said statues is beyond abysmal; you need to approach them with nearly pixel perfect accuracy just so the game registers the push, and even then it might not go the way you want it to - which is a major issue, because it's nigh-impossible to get the statues away
from being hit the walls except by a bird), leaving the area and [[InterfaceScrew coming back, which would be merely very bad instead of unforgivable if only Nekkar wasn't filled with narrow passages. The monsters can also block your statues, forcing you to fight them - and nearly every battle here features [[DemonicSpiders Queen Alraunes]]. And as though out of sheer spite, Nekkar is also filled with freaking '''invisible pit traps'''.
* It doesn't compare with
the Pac-Man sidequest listed above, but Mizuti's sidequest in ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos Eternal Wings'' needs to be mentioned here. Remember [[ThatOneLevel Zosma Tower]]? All those damn timed 3D [[BlockPuzzle Block Puzzles]], done with a static camera changes angles that sometimes doesn't show you what you need to see? Well, you're going back there, down into the basement for five all new levels of fun. One particularly nasty puzzle requires you to use an elevator as a block stop. ''While it's in motion.'' Finally at inopportune times.the bottom? Remember that irritating boss fight, between [[LuckBasedMission Xelha and the Ice Goddess]]? They recreated it, this time between Mizuti and the Shadow Wizard. ''Eternal Wings'' also has the Family Tree and Star Map sidequests. The former requires a bit of maneuvering as some members of the family can only be convinced to return to Quzman's home after certain others have returned and at least one ''won't'' return if a certain other one is already there, some of the deceased members require you to talk to one of the members back at his house multiple times in order to get them signed for, and just when you think you've finished it, Quzman lays one more member on you, which can't be obtained until this point and requires going back into the aforementioned basement of Zosma Tower. The latter is even trickier, as many of the fragments appear as drops from random encounters and the final piece [[spoiler:was with the Keeper of the Star Map all along; you have to ''repeatedly'' ask him for "info on the fragments" after returning every other fragment, then tell him that you want to complete the map and that he "deserves it", and he'll finally give you the Fragment, which you must then hand right back to him to complete the quest.]]
** The butterfly minigame. You have * In ''VideoGame/BreathOfFireIV'', trying to run down paths, collecting find all the blue butterflies, while avoiding dragon summons all have a degree of GuideDangIt, but the red ones, worst of them all before time runs out. What's that? That sounds easy has to you? Well then, perhaps we should mention be the DepthDeception-inducing camera angles, Sea Dragon. Obviously, it will be found in the dark blue lighting sea, but where ''exactly''? An NPC gives you a vague hint about some rock formation, yes, and locating that makes identifying formation is actually easy, but ''pinpointing'' the colors ridiculously difficult, exact spot is going to drive you crazy. Oh, and there's also the fact that each time you fail, you have to fight a battle (the penalty for hitting a red butterfly) before backtracking all the way back to the start. boating minigame in of itself has a slew of {{Scrappy Mechanic}}s.
*
The time between attempts is always longer than the attempts themselves.
** European gamers and those who laid their hands on the
Lost Sanctum quest in ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]] have it even worse: if you don't collect DS]]'' is quickly rising in the ranks as That One Sidequest. To wit: inescapable, scripted battles, going up and down the same mountain at least seven times, and not being able to progress without speaking to the right NPC to set off an event flag, despite having all crests as you go along, you'll have to backtrack later... usually through paths containing a [[ThatOneBoss Dark Aeon]]. And getting one of the spheres items necessary to proceed. And the rewards are quickly outclassed by those found in the post-game dungeon, the Dimensional Vortex. Hell, most of the rewards are outclassed by the rewards from the sidequests ''that were in the original game.'' The only upside to this is that the repetitive battles do allow for significant TP grinding, allowing you to quickly gain everyone's techs.

* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'' is the game where you find God. And then find out he's really the devil. But after you beat him, you have a sidequest where you can find God again. But you have to
get Auron's all the shards, some of which are {{permanently missable|Content}}, to go to one dungeon, where you find shards for the other dungeon, and then you can fight God.
%%ZeroContextExample- add context before uncommenting.
%%** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' has the Dragovian sidequest. Works fine until you face the Darksteel Dragon.
* Any ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' player who doesn't still have "Seeking Your Roots" somewhere in the back of their list of active quests to this day either specifically avoided starting it (by never picking up a single Nirnroot, ever) or console hacked or otherwise cheated like a maniac to clear it.
** There's no time limit on the quest and Nirnroots can be picked up while doing everything else. To fully complete the quest 100 are required but there are over three times that many scattered throughout the game.
** Similarly "The Museum of Oddities" in ''Shivering Isles'' is one for players not all that interested in completionist-y dungeon diving. Unlike Nirnroots, some of the objects you must collect for this quest spawn randomly.
** While we're on the subject of Oblivion, most [[EscortMission sidequests that involve escorting or defending]] an NPC are usually difficult to get through, due mainly to everyone in the game having seemingly attended [[LeeroyJenkins the Leeroy Jenkins self defense class]].
** Another ''Oblivion'' quest would be the collector, finishing that one is a pain, unless you opt out midway through and finish the others in that questline instead. Ir doesn't help that the original printing of tbe strategy guide actually gave an additional location for a statues that doesn't exist.
* For ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', That One Sidequest is definitely Threads of the Webspinner, which is about finding all Sanguine items. All 26[[note]]There are 27, but the quest-giver already has one of them.[[/note]] of them, tucked into the most remote corners of Vvardenfell. 15 of them will be ''relatively'' easy (the quest-giver outright tells you where two of them are, and 13 of the others are found as part of other quests for the quest-giver). [[GuideDangIt The remaining 11]]...
** Another in ''Morrowind'' is acquiring [[InfinityPlusOneSword Eltonbrand]]. First, it requires you to acquire [[InfinityMinusOneSword Goldbrand]] as part of an obscure quest that you are extremely unlikely to find on your own. (The one person in the game who tells you about it isn't exactly trustworthy and even then, his directions are bad, leading you to swimming around in the ocean further south than you need to.) Then, you get directions from [[PhysicalGod Boethiah]] to find him/her ([[GenderBender it's complicated]]) a sculptor to rebuild his/her shrine. If you manage to do that, then wait the two in-game weeks required for the statue to be built, you can finally claim Goldbrand. To upgrade it into Eltonbrand, you need to become a vampire (something most players of the game may not even realize is in the game for many, many hours) and perform a specific quest with a specific amount of gold in your inventory. THEN you get Eltonbrand. Complicated and [[GuideDangIt near impossible to find on your own]], but very [[GameBreaker worth it]]. Though given the message you get when you receive Eltonbrand and the fact it technically isn't a quest (or even has any journal messages of its own), Eltonbrand was probably meant more as an EasterEgg than an actual complicated sidequest.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'':
** The Seeking Your Roots quest from ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' returns as the appropriately-named A Return To Your Roots. You're searching through a giant cavern full of high-level enemies for [[TwentyBearAsses glowing plants]] that tend to be tucked in out-of-the-way places. So far, not much worse than any other CollectionSidequest, until you've cleared the entire ''enormous'' area of enemies and wandered over the same area twenty times without finding that [[LastLousyPoint Last Lousy Root]].
** No. Stone. Unturned. Finding 24 gemstones without quest markers tucked away in the most unlikely places in all of Skyrim, which you can't remove from your inventory once found and ''do not stack''. After you find them all (''if'' you find them all) you get to clear a [[DemonicSpiders Falmer]] [[ThatOneLevel cave]], and then you get a reward that [[BraggingRightsReward would have been REALLY useful]] when you started the quest at level 5, less so when you finally finish it at around level 50.
*** The gemstones themselves, despite having a shown weight value of 0.5, do not actually effect the overall weight of the player's inventory, so at least they're weightless, despite the game telling you that they aren't.
** The Impatience of a Saint quest from the Dawnguard DLC. You need to collect ten lost pages of Saint Jiub's opus, which are scattered across the Soul Cairn. Not only are there no quest markers, but the Cairn is large, dark and hard to navigate, it's difficult to remember where you've already been, and the pages are small and very easy to miss. In addition, some of them are hidden behind portals and in hard to access buildings.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' the Pink Tail, needed to get the
best Overdrive armor in the game. It is randomly dropped by the Pink Puffs/Flan Princesses, which only appear in a single room in the final dungeon and have a 1 in 64 chance of appearing in a given battle. Even if you did find the Pink Puffs, each one has only a 1 in 64 chance of actually dropping said ore (and that's when it dropped an item at all, which only has a 1 in 20 chance of happening). Some players have literally fought hundreds of battles against the Pink Puffs and not received a single Pink Tail - very annoying to say the least. In the original Japanese version (and the subsequent re-makes in all regions), the 1 in 64 drop rate (on top of 1 in 20 chance of dropping anything) applied not only to the Pink Tail, but also involves getting past one. Oh, to FOUR optional summons for Rydia and we mustn't forget Tidus' weapon, since nearly every character's best weapon; the fact that the enemies which can drop these items appear more often than the Pink Puffs offsets this only slightly. Subsequent versions of the game added even more subquest items with this property. If you try to get them during the regular course of the game, expect to be obscenely overlevelled by the time you get to the end!
* Getting the elusive "perfect game" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is a recipe for infinite frustration -- even once you realize that [[GuideDangIt you will NOT succeed without a guide]] for countless reasons, there are still certain enemies that seem designed to mess with {{hundred percent completion}}ists. Some of the more notorious ones include:
** Famed Mimic Gogo at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower is basically the entire reason no one will begrudge a perfect runner for resorting to [[SaveScumming savestates]]. He has a rare steal: Gold Hairpin. Gold Hairpins epitomize BoringButPractical and you ''will'' want as many as you can get, even if you aren't a perfect runner, and there are only three of them (counting this one) in the game. The problem? Gogo is fought at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower - a place where you're under a TimedMission towards a NonStandardGameOver if you run out of time. Gogo takes over two full minutes (of the seven you're given) to beat, which you will have to do after rare stealing the Hairpin. If you get his common steal instead (and said common steal is absolutely worthless), you will have to cast Return (which resets the battle state to what it was at the start) for another chance at the rare steal. In the GBA UpdatedRerelease, Return is bugged in that it will '''not reset the countdown timer'''. And as if to mock the player's attempts, Gogo starts the battle off with an obnoxiously lengthy speech, before you can take any action. You effectively have only three or four chances at the rare steal, when you have less than a 5% chance of actually pulling it off.
** Shell Bears, an uncommon encounter in the basement of Castle Exdeath, have a rare Spear item for stealing. What makes this particular rare steal so infamous is that the Spear item is absolutely worthless at this point in the game, weaker than even the weakest spears you could buy in shops hours ago, and it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]]
if you don't get his item it before leaving the room, Dark Bahamut (one of castle's illusion is dispelled - it seems specifically designed to irritate perfect runners.
** The boss fight in
the harder Dark Aeons) sits Great Forest of Moore is a WolfpackBoss fight of four Crystals -- and each one of those four enemies has a chance of dropping an Ash item. Ash is, again, worthless outside of having a perfect item list -- and it exists in front of it. And the second part to power up his weapon is from ''the infernal chocobo race''. Meaning a finite quantity, so if you might spend an eternity getting want a less than 0.0 time there, only to find something that has 5 ''million'' health, and basically needs maxed stats to even dream of winning. (Unless you go the Zanmato route, which is about as cheap as buying North America, and "perfect" Ash number, you'll still probably want First Strike if you don't have high agility.)\\
If you forget either of two specific treasures the first time you visit the temples in the PAL/HD versions, you have to face some of the Dark Aeons just to regain access to those temples. This can
a really screw hard task at hand.
** And when
you over if you're trying to fully-power Yuna's Celestial Weapon, because thought you NEED all the Aeons to do that, which in turn requires were done with all of that, there's Twintania, the treasures.
** Rikku's sigil isn't annoying for its difficulty, but for its duration - you have to do a ''lot'' of walking, often to areas of Bikanel that are spelled out
third-last boss fight in unnecessarily cryptic fashion by a stone about twenty miles from the nearest save point. Even with a "No Encounters" item strapped to one of your characters, you'll still be walking around a very boring desert for something like three hours.
** Finding all 26 of the Al Bhed journals to translate the Al Bhed language one letter at a time can be a real pain considering that several of them are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you're not thorough with your searches. (There is a way to get the ones that were missed, but you have to start a new game or from a save file that ''didn't'' pass them, find the ones you missed, save, go back to your regular game, then have it read the memory card to look at all the ones you've ever found on every save file.)
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'':
** To get the game's most powerful InfinityPlusOneSword, you [[GuideDangIt need a strategy guide]], because it requires you to leave four treasure chests alone without giving you the slightest indication of where those chests are. There's another way to get the weapon, but it's a [[LuckBasedMission 1/1000 random treasure chest drop]]. And that chest happens to be in one of the hardest areas of the game, and also happens to have a requirement of getting 10 of the 12 summons (not including Zodiark, of the next example, who is inside the area) of
the game. On the bright side, you get 5 just He has two separate states -- one where he's charging for completing most of the story, this chest isn't a chest you can only ever open once, and there are a couple of other interesting drops on the way to it.
** Another nasty sidequest involves a trek into Phase 2 of the Henne Mines, the game's most difficult BonusDungeon. It's an hour-long journey through a narrow and confusing dungeon infested with GoddamnedBats (borderline DemonicSpiders if you aren't expecting/ready for level 60+ enemies, some of which have [[OneHitKill instant-kills]]). There are no saves, and at the end of the Mines is Zodiark, one of the game's three most difficult [[BonusBoss optional bosses]]. The reward for beating Zodiark is the ability to use him as a [[SummonMagic summon]], but because he requires the character to be under a certain dangerous status to use
his ultimate attack, Zodiark is AwesomeButImpractical.
** Danjuro, the ultimate dagger, is dropped by a single Rare Game, which has an extremely complicated set of rules to get it to spawn reliably, which took years to figure out, to the point
attack Gigaflare, and one where the Final Fantasy Wiki ''still'' says that the exact spawn conditions are not fully understood. It only spawns in rooms with he isn't. The former state has a Waystone (teleporter) ''and'' requires 30+ kills since the last time a Waystone was used. In an area where every 3-6 platforms is probably a Waystone that you don't know you you can't use in order to get Larva Eater to spawn. Add onto that the obviously low drop rate for the Danjuro (3% base), and you've got a quest that is ''begging'' to be evaded via cheating or skillful moving around. (Then the Bestiary is rather taunting and pretty much ''lies'' by giving Larva Eater a 1/5 rating for how one-shot rare it is to find. Which, if you know steal, and the spawn mechanics, ''could'' be considered true. But considering it took two ''years'' to figure out how to get him to spawn ''once'' without taking all day....) Similar enemies have confirmed quirks to make dropping easier, i.e. Helvinek's Grand Helms by leaving the screen as the enemy dies. (Oh, and latter state has a one-shot rare drop. So even if after you ''don't'' want to get a Danjuro, if pull off the rare steal, you want to complete the Bestiary for the later example of completing the Sky Pirate's Den, you're still going have to need to spawn him at least once.)
** Any of the ultimate weapon sidequests
survive Gigaflare, and THEN get lucky with the exception of Fomalhaut (which can be obtained long before the end of the game).
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.
** Finding [[HumongousMecha Omega Mk. XII]] is an exercise in hair-pulling frustration. The most satisfying part isn't beating him, but actually tracking the mofo down. Even if you look up an ''actual'' map instead of the (completely, utterly useless) in-game one, the trek is still rather complicated.
rare drop.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX''. Excalibur II. It requires a ''ridiculous'' SpeedRun, and is found in the final dungeon, after most other sidequests become unavailable- suffice to say that if you completed the game fast enough to find it, you didn't experience much of the game. The PAL version is an ''incredibly'' major offender. Because of the game playing slower but the timer still going at a normal pace, ''[[UpToEleven it's so extremely hard, for years it was thought to be impossible on the PAL version of the game.]]''
** In addition, locking it to those who ''don't'' do a speed run is. On that note, Quina's skills, like most games' Blue Magic, definitely qualifies. Instead of merely being hit by the attack, Quina has to 'Eat' enemies, meaning their HP must be dropped to 12.5% (or 25% if Quina is [[LimitBreak Tranced]]) and then using the command, with no indication whether the enemy will give a skill or not.
** Getting the highest score in Tetra Master. There are hundred different cards in the game and you can carry 100 at once. For max points you have to get 1 of each, some of which are only used by one player in the entire world. If youíve found the right player, you may still have to play several times against him before he uses the card you want. Even if he uses it, you have to win the round and have the card turned into your color by the end of the battle to get it. That battles between cards are often randomly decided, doesnít help either. Then you have to have a different arrow combination on each of your cards. If two cards have the same arrow combination, you get less points, even if the cards are unique otherwise. And then you have to get each card to rank A. Normally cards start with either rank P(hysical) or M(agical). Then, when you use them in the card game, they get randomly (and very rarely) upgraded to rank X, if you have them battle other cards. Then, when you use them after they turned X, you use them again and they may turn to rank A (what is even more rare than turning to X). And you have to do this with all 100 of your cards. Oh, and while youíre trying to get them to rank A, you may loose a game and the other payer takes your unique card, meaning, you have to win it back from him. And the best of all? You donít even get a reward for doing all this. Not even a BraggingRightsReward. Nothing, except the score shown in your card menu.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' the Pink Tail, needed to get the best armor in the game. It is randomly dropped by the Pink Puffs/Flan Princesses, which only appear in a single room in the final dungeon and have a 1 in 64 chance of appearing in a given battle. Even if you did find the Pink Puffs, each one has only a 1 in 64 chance of actually dropping said ore (and that's when it dropped an item at all, which only has a 1 in 20 chance of happening). Some players have literally fought hundreds of battles against the Pink Puffs and not received a single Pink Tail - very annoying to say the least. In the original Japanese version (and the subsequent re-makes in all regions), the 1 in 64 drop rate (on top of 1 in 20 chance of dropping anything) applied not only to the Pink Tail, but also to FOUR optional summons for Rydia and nearly every character's best weapon; the fact that the enemies which can drop these items appear more often than the Pink Puffs offsets this only slightly. Subsequent versions of the game added even more subquest items with this property. If you try to get them during the regular course of the game, expect to be obscenely overlevelled by the time you get to the end!
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'', the sidequest to get the Lady Luck Dressphere is difficult (read: virtually impossible) unless you're good at math. If you don't beat Shinra during the actual Spherebreak tournament, you have a 50% lowered chance of getting Lady Luck until the end of that chapter, and a 75% by Chapter Five. The Mascot dressphere is comparatively easier to get, but is an endeavor that lasts throughout the game (and thanks to a bug in the [=PS2=] version, even if you did everything right, if you saved the Zanarkand Episode Complete for last, you still wouldn't get it). Getting 100% story completion is nigh-impossible in itself, because unlike the Mascot, it requires a completely perfect playthrough, and most players will likely [[PermanentlyMissableContent forever miss their chance]] (barring New Game Plus) ''in the first five minutes''.



* Getting the elusive "perfect game" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is a recipe for infinite frustration -- even once you realize that [[GuideDangIt you will NOT succeed without a guide]] for countless reasons, there are still certain enemies that seem designed to mess with {{hundred percent completion}}ists. Some of the more notorious ones include:
** Famed Mimic Gogo at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower is basically the entire reason no one will begrudge a perfect runner for resorting to [[SaveScumming savestates]]. He has a rare steal: Gold Hairpin. Gold Hairpins epitomize BoringButPractical and you ''will'' want as many as you can get, even if you aren't a perfect runner, and there are only three of them (counting this one) in the game. The problem? Gogo is fought at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower - a place where you're under a TimedMission towards a NonStandardGameOver if you run out of time. Gogo takes over two full minutes (of the seven you're given) to beat, which you will have to do after rare stealing the Hairpin. If you get his common steal instead (and said common steal is absolutely worthless), you will have to cast Return (which resets the battle state to what it was at the start) for another chance at the rare steal. In the GBA UpdatedRerelease, Return is bugged in that it will '''not reset the countdown timer'''. And as if to mock the player's attempts, Gogo starts the battle off with an obnoxiously lengthy speech, before you can take any action. You effectively have only three or four chances at the rare steal, when you have less than a 5% chance of actually pulling it off.
** Shell Bears, an uncommon encounter in the basement of Castle Exdeath, have a rare Spear item for stealing. What makes this particular rare steal so infamous is that the Spear item is absolutely worthless at this point in the game, weaker than even the weakest spears you could buy in shops hours ago, and it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]] if you don't get it before the castle's illusion is dispelled - it seems specifically designed to irritate perfect runners.
** The boss fight in the Great Forest of Moore is a WolfpackBoss fight of four Crystals - and each one of those four enemies has a chance of dropping an Ash item. Ash is, again, worthless outside of having a perfect item list - and it exists in a finite quantity, so if you want a "perfect" Ash number, you'll have a really hard task at hand.
** And when you thought you were done with all of that, there's Twintania, the third-last boss fight in the game. He has two separate states - one where he's charging for his ultimate attack Gigaflare, and one where he isn't. The former state has a one-shot rare steal, and the latter state has a one-shot rare drop. So even after you pull off the rare steal, you still have to survive Gigaflare, and THEN get lucky with the rare drop.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'' is the game where you find God. And then find out he's really the devil. But after you beat him, you have a sidequest where you can find God again. But you have to get all the shards, some of which are {{permanently missable|Content}}, to go to one dungeon, where you find shards for the other dungeon, and then you can fight God.
%%ZeroContextExample- add context before uncommenting.
%%** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' has the Dragovian sidequest. Works fine until you face the Darksteel Dragon.
* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' has one in the form of a BettingMinigame, which you must win to get some of the characters and thus achieve the HundredPercentCompletion and [[MultipleEndings Secret Ending]]. The fact that such game relies so much on luck (or is blatantly rigged, depending who you ask) and ''also'' can suck your money dry has earned it a Troper FanNickname: 'The Game that Shall not Be Named'. That and the original name is kind of silly-sounding.
** [[VideoGame/SuikodenI The first game]]'s version can actually be a decent moneymaker (though it doesn't beat the "Coin in the cup" game), but the second game ups the difficulty to an insane degree.
** The dice game is the best bit maker once you can do maximum bets, but ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'''s game will make you want to destroy your television.
** Try leveling up ''every'' playable character's weapon to their maximum level. Have fun obtaining the money to do that, especially if you ''don't'' like playing Triple Storm or the Coin Game.
** Finding [[spoiler: Pesmerga]] in the first game is pretty annoying mainly because you have to go all the way ''back'' to the top of Neclord's castle pretty late in the game, and you can't use an escape talisman in that area to instantly warp you outside afterwards.
** There's also finding the ultimate magician Crowley in the first game, because he's hidden deep within a cave, and you have to feel around the walls for the secret passage to his chamber.
** Recruiting Clive is a pain because it's basically a LuckBasedMission late in the game. It's easy, but it might take a lot longer than it should.
** In the second game, getting all the Recipes for the cooking mini-game can be a chore, especially with the notoriously hard to get recipe #24 from the Do Re Mi Elves, and ''especially'' if you're trying for Clive's Quest at the same time, which is another "That One Sidequest" for it's time limit.
** The Aforementioned Clive's Quest is a time-limit game that, unless one is doing the [[GoodBadBugs Matilda Gate Trick]], is pretty hard to accomplish whilst still A) getting all 108 stars, B) Leveling up at a decent rate, and C) collecting anything, including some {{permanently missable|Content}} items like Recipe #24. It's a very fine Juggling act.
** Getting all the dogs in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII''.
* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the biggest goal for completionists is that you GottaCatchThemAll. But this requires so much work that only the most dedicated players will be able to do it... And you have only a limited time before the next gen comes out, making you do it all over again with an even bigger number of Pokemon.
** Way back in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', getting HundredPercentCompletion was extremely difficult, since the lack of breeding meant that you could only get one starter Pokemon per game, and almost nobody was willing to trade away their own starter to complete somebody else's Pokedex. This didn't last ''too'' long however, as ''Pokemon Yellow'' gave the player all three Kanto starter Pokemon for free.
** Special mention has to go out to Feebas. In both of the two generations that it's obtainable in, it's only available through fishing on one route. Sounds simple enough. Except that you can only catch it by fishing on a handful of specific water squares. In an area like ''[[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/8/83/Hoenn_Route_119_E.png this]]''. Also, the squares are set randomly every time a completely-unrelated saying in an entirely unrelated town changes, which can happen on a whim. And if you ever do eventually find one, make sure it's got a nature that prefers dry Pokeblocks/Poffins, since feeding it an obscene amount of these is the only way to evolve it into [[MagikarpPower something useful]].
*** In the Ruby and Sapphire remakes, Feebas can be found fishing under a bridge in Route 119 100% of the time, averting this in Generation VI
** Trying to find Mirage Island (not to be confused with the [[VideoGameRemake remake's]] Mirages Spots), which is the only place to get some of the rarest and most powerful berries in the game. To clarify, you have to go to Pacifidlog Town, which is pretty late in the game and talk to an old man in a house looking out a window who will say if he sees Mirage Island that day or not that day. More often than not, he will say that he can't which means that you have to wait until the next day to try again, and since the {{Pokemon}} games are set in ''real time'', you could literally spend ''weeks, months, or even longer'' just to find all of the berries in an extreme LuckBasedMission, and this is just one of many considering [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters all of the fleeing Pokemon there are in the series.]]
*** The remake's Mirage [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Islands Islands]] [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Forests Forests]],[[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Caves Caves]] and [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Mountains Mountains]], of which there are 8 each, all containing Pokemon you can't find in Hoenn or [[VideoGame/PokemonXandY Kalos]]. What makes them this is that they are randomly appearing once per day. Due to how it works, it is possible to receive the same spot three times in one week, or not receive the last one for many months. Worse, is that Gen VI Native Meowth, Porygon, Unown, Stantler, Kricketune, Cherrim, Glameow, Darmanitan, Cofagrigus and Tynamo lines cannot be obtained outside of this sidequest.
** Then there's the event-only Pokemon: Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meoletta, Gensect, Diancie, Hoopa and Volcanion, which can't be obtained through normal gameplay - only through giveaways done by Nintendo. Luckily these are more common than they used to be- in the early days there was usually only one chance to get the event Pokemon in a given generation, which usually involved traveling to select events such as conventions that were inevitably nowhere near you, but now there are several giveaways in each generation, and they're done through a wireless download, often at a relatively easy-to-get-to toy or game shop.
*** Luckily Deoxys can be caught without an event in [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Pokemon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]].
** The fleeing Pokemon. It seems like ever since Generation II, Japanese law requires there to be at least one of these in every main game. Raikou; Entei and Suicune in Johto, Latias and Latios in the original Hoenn, Mesprit and Cresselia in Sinnoh, Tornadus and Thundurus in old Unova, Articuno; Zapdos or Moltres in Kalos (depending on the starter you chose) and cold Sinnoh...you're lucky if you so much as encounter one of these, let alone catch it. To add insult to injury, an NPC says that Mesprit is merely playing with you.
** Getting Shedinja is a GuideDangIt all its own: You have to have no more than five mons and a Poke Ball.
** The Dropped Item sidequest in ''Black 2/White 2'', which is the only way to obtain rare mons that can't be obtained anywhere else. In Nimbasa City you can find an item (actually an Xtranceiver), and upon obtaining it Yancy (if you chose the male player character) or Curtis (if you chose female) will start calling. You have to travel all across Unova, getting in specific ''unmarked'' spots that will trigger a call from them. You have to hit 10 out of 15 spots to start the (thankfully much easier) second part of the quest, which consists of making at least 15 calls in one of the areas the unmarked spots were in before (such as Lentimas Town), as opposed to just those single spots (unfortunately, however, the area at least one call at a time may be made in is selected randomly). Still, having a bicycle and a Pokémon that knows Fly would be handy.
** Capturing Rayquaza in ''HG/SS'' is a real pain. First of all, to even ''get'' to the damn thing, you need a Pokémon that isn't available in the version you're playing. You can't get said Pokémon until you defeat [[BonusBoss Red]], which means even if you have both versions, you'll be doing a lot of playing to get to that point, or else hope you have a friend who's gotten that far and is willing to lend you it. If you do achieve that, the actual battle with Rayquaza is absolutely terrible for two reasons: one, it uses Rest, constantly undoing your progress in getting down its HP. Two, it has Outrage. That move is already widely considered ThatOneAttack, but in this case, the one disadvantage of the attack actually becomes a disadvantage for the ''player''. Rayquaza will confuse itself after using it, meaning if you actually got its HP low enough to try and catch it, it'll end up knocking itself out and you'll have to start all over.
** Getting Landorus in ''Black'' and ''White'' requires the player to go to the Abundant Shrine with both a Thundurus and Tornadus in their party. You can only get one of each in your copy of the game. So basically you're expected to get someone to trade you a one-of-a-kind legendary for the chance to catch the bastard. One of them also cannot be from your game.
** Catching Legendary Pokémon in general is a pain. Not only are they incredibly powerful and capable of knocking out your party of Pokémon, but they all have low catch rates so you are going to be spending a long time trying to catch them as they keep breaking out of the Poke Balls you throw. And that's not even getting into resetting for good natures and/or Individual Values.
** Getting the TM for Energy Ball in ORAS. It requires ''both'' bikes, which was not possible in previous games so you wouldn't think to try it unless you found this in the Safari Zone and realized you needed both bikes to get it. Trouble is, you first have to find three different people across Hoenn and speak to them, one of which is in the Battle Resort not accessible until after the Delta Episode. The other two are in hard to reach, out of the way spots in locations you're unlikely to return to, with each one requiring a specific bike. Only then will Rydel let you have both bikes. Nowhere in game tells you that you can do this or how to do it. Worse still, Energy Ball itself is a powerful Grass-type move that many Pokémon (most notably Psycic and Ghost-types) can learn, increasing the desire to get it.
** Putting ''all'' of the above to shame, however, is the quest to collect all Zygarde Cores and Cells in ''Sun and Moon''. There are ''100'' of these spread throughout the entire region, and the game gives you ''no'' hint whatsoever as to where they are located. What's more, some of them only appear in the day, and some of them only appear at night. Adding insult to injury, some of them only appear in areas that are unlocked ''after'' you've beaten the Elite Four.

to:

* Getting ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX''. Excalibur II. It requires a ''ridiculous'' SpeedRun, and is found in the elusive "perfect game" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is a recipe for infinite frustration final dungeon, after most other sidequests become unavailable -- even once you realize suffice to say that [[GuideDangIt you will NOT succeed without a guide]] for countless reasons, there are still certain enemies that seem designed to mess with {{hundred percent completion}}ists. Some of the more notorious ones include:
** Famed Mimic Gogo at the bottom of the Sunken Walse Tower is basically the entire reason no one will begrudge a perfect runner for resorting to [[SaveScumming savestates]]. He has a rare steal: Gold Hairpin. Gold Hairpins epitomize BoringButPractical and you ''will'' want as many as you can get, even
if you aren't a perfect runner, and there are only three completed the game fast enough to find it, you didn't experience much of them (counting this one) in the game. The problem? Gogo PAL version is fought at the bottom an ''incredibly'' major offender. Because of the Sunken Walse Tower - a place where you're under a TimedMission towards a NonStandardGameOver if you run out of time. Gogo takes over two full minutes (of game playing slower but the seven you're given) to beat, which you will have to do after rare stealing the Hairpin. If you get his common steal instead (and said common steal is absolutely worthless), you will have to cast Return (which resets the battle state to what it was timer still going at the start) for another chance at the rare steal. In the GBA UpdatedRerelease, Return is bugged in that it will '''not reset the countdown timer'''. And as if to mock the player's attempts, Gogo starts the battle off with an obnoxiously lengthy speech, before you can take any action. You effectively have only three or four chances at the rare steal, when you have less than a 5% chance of actually pulling it off.
** Shell Bears, an uncommon encounter in the basement of Castle Exdeath, have a rare Spear item for stealing. What makes this particular rare steal so infamous is that the Spear item is absolutely worthless at this point in the game, weaker than even the weakest spears you could buy in shops hours ago, and
normal pace, ''[[UpToEleven it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]] if you don't get so extremely hard, for years it before the castle's illusion is dispelled - it seems specifically designed to irritate perfect runners.
** The boss fight in the Great Forest of Moore is a WolfpackBoss fight of four Crystals - and each one of those four enemies has a chance of dropping an Ash item. Ash is, again, worthless outside of having a perfect item list - and it exists in a finite quantity, so if you want a "perfect" Ash number, you'll have a really hard task at hand.
** And when you
was thought you were done with all of that, there's Twintania, to be impossible on the third-last boss fight in the game. He has two separate states - one where he's charging for his ultimate attack Gigaflare, and one where he isn't. The former state has a one-shot rare steal, and the latter state has a one-shot rare drop. So even after you pull off the rare steal, you still have to survive Gigaflare, and THEN get lucky with the rare drop.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'' is the game where you find God. And then find out he's really the devil. But after you beat him, you have a sidequest where you can find God again. But you have to get all the shards, some of which are {{permanently missable|Content}}, to go to one dungeon, where you find shards for the other dungeon, and then you can fight God.
%%ZeroContextExample- add context before uncommenting.
%%** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' has the Dragovian sidequest. Works fine until you face the Darksteel Dragon.
* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' has one in the form of a BettingMinigame, which you must win to get some of the characters and thus achieve the HundredPercentCompletion and [[MultipleEndings Secret Ending]]. The fact that such game relies so much on luck (or is blatantly rigged, depending who you ask) and ''also'' can suck your money dry has earned it a Troper FanNickname: 'The Game that Shall not Be Named'. That and the original name is kind of silly-sounding.
** [[VideoGame/SuikodenI The first game]]'s
PAL version can actually be a decent moneymaker (though it doesn't beat of the "Coin in the cup" game), but the second game ups the difficulty game.]]''
** In addition, locking it
to an insane degree.
** The dice game is the best bit maker once you can do maximum bets, but ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'''s game will make you want to destroy your television.
** Try leveling up ''every'' playable character's weapon to their maximum level. Have fun obtaining the money to do that, especially if you
those who ''don't'' do a speed run is. On that note, Quina's skills, like playing Triple Storm or most games' Blue Magic, definitely qualifies. Instead of merely being hit by the Coin Game.
** Finding [[spoiler: Pesmerga]] in
attack, Quina has to 'Eat' enemies, meaning their HP must be dropped to 12.5% (or 25% if Quina is [[LimitBreak Tranced]]) and then using the first game is pretty annoying mainly because you have to go all the way ''back'' to the top of Neclord's castle pretty late in the game, and you can't use an escape talisman in that area to instantly warp you outside afterwards.
** There's also finding the ultimate magician Crowley in the first game, because he's hidden deep within a cave, and you have to feel around the walls for the secret passage to his chamber.
** Recruiting Clive is a pain because it's basically a LuckBasedMission late in the game. It's easy, but it might take a lot longer than it should.
** In the second game, getting all the Recipes for the cooking mini-game can be a chore, especially
command, with no indication whether the notoriously hard to get recipe #24 from the Do Re Mi Elves, and ''especially'' if you're trying for Clive's Quest at the same time, which is another "That One Sidequest" for it's time limit.
** The Aforementioned Clive's Quest is
enemy will give a time-limit game that, unless one is doing the [[GoodBadBugs Matilda Gate Trick]], is pretty hard to accomplish whilst still A) getting all 108 stars, B) Leveling up at a decent rate, and C) collecting anything, including some {{permanently missable|Content}} items like Recipe #24. It's a very fine Juggling act.
skill or not.
** Getting all the dogs highest score in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII''.
* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the biggest goal for completionists is that you GottaCatchThemAll. But this requires so much work that only the most dedicated players will be able to do it... And you have only a limited time before the next gen comes out, making you do it all over again with an even bigger number of Pokemon.
** Way back in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', getting HundredPercentCompletion was extremely difficult, since the lack of breeding meant that you could only get one starter Pokemon per game, and almost nobody was willing to trade away their own starter to complete somebody else's Pokedex. This didn't last ''too'' long however, as ''Pokemon Yellow'' gave the player all three Kanto starter Pokemon for free.
** Special mention has to go out to Feebas. In both of the two generations that it's obtainable in, it's only available through fishing on one route. Sounds simple enough. Except that you can only catch it by fishing on a handful of specific water squares. In an area like ''[[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/8/83/Hoenn_Route_119_E.png this]]''. Also, the squares
Tetra Master. There are set randomly every time a completely-unrelated saying in an entirely unrelated town changes, which can happen on a whim. And if you ever do eventually find one, make sure it's got a nature that prefers dry Pokeblocks/Poffins, since feeding it an obscene amount of these is the only way to evolve it into [[MagikarpPower something useful]].
*** In the Ruby and Sapphire remakes, Feebas can be found fishing under a bridge in Route 119 100% of the time, averting this in Generation VI
** Trying to find Mirage Island (not to be confused with the [[VideoGameRemake remake's]] Mirages Spots), which is the only place to get some of the rarest and most powerful berries in the game. To clarify, you have to go to Pacifidlog Town, which is pretty late
hundred different cards in the game and talk to an old man in a house looking out a window who will say if he sees Mirage Island that day or not that day. More often than not, he will say that he can't which means that you can carry 100 at once. For max points you have to wait until get 1 of each, some of which are only used by one player in the next day entire world. If youíve found the right player, you may still have to try again, play several times against him before he uses the card you want. Even if he uses it, you have to win the round and since have the {{Pokemon}} games are set in ''real time'', you could literally spend ''weeks, months, or even longer'' just to find all card turned into your color by the end of the berries in an extreme LuckBasedMission, and this is just one battle to get it. That battles between cards are often randomly decided, doesnít help either. Then you have to have a different arrow combination on each of many considering [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters all of your cards. If two cards have the fleeing Pokemon there same arrow combination, you get less points, even if the cards are unique otherwise. And then you have to get each card to rank A. Normally cards start with either rank P(hysical) or M(agical). Then, when you use them in the series.card game, they get randomly (and very rarely) upgraded to rank X, if you have them battle other cards. Then, when you use them after they turned X, you use them again and they may turn to rank A (what is even more rare than turning to X). And you have to do this with all 100 of your cards. Oh, and while youíre trying to get them to rank A, you may loose a game and the other payer takes your unique card, meaning, you have to win it back from him. And the best of all? You donít even get a reward for doing all this. Not even a BraggingRightsReward. Nothing, except the score shown in your card menu.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'':
** Obtaining each character's InfinityPlusOneSword is an extremely simple effort, but acquiring the sigils, key items that are required to power up each weapon to its full potential, is invariably a highly arduous task. Infamously, getting two sigils requires achieving a perfect score in a highly luck-based chocobo racing minigame, which is every bit as annoying as it sounds, and by dodging ''two hundred'' lightning bolts in a row in another minigame that demands, well, lightning-quick reflexes. Wakka's sigil and [[LimitBreak Overdrives]], while not difficult to acquire by any means, require at least ten hours of Blitzball, the game's love-it-or-hate-it unexpected gameplay change minigame. In the [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]], both the chocobo racing and lightning dodging minigames were turned into [[ThatOneAchievement Those Two Achievements]]. Even worse, there is also a trophy that can be earned only by acquiring all the Celestial Weapons, sigils, and crests; and powering them all up.
** The lightning bolts were comparatively easy compared to the chocobo racing task (had 0.7s) for a long, long time. The logical conclusion is that whoever programmed that one had a grudge against the guy who designed Caladbolg. You are racing the chocobo trainer, and you are seeking a time of 0.0 seconds (hitting a balloon is a 3 second bonus, and being hit by a bird is a 3 second penalty). That by itself is difficult enough, but the game goes out of its way to make it even harder. The trainer will jostle with you, interfering with your position, the chocobo is difficult to control and will always seek to progress toward the finish line even if you'd rather hit a balloon, birds will come at you in positions that are impossible to dodge (including when you're stunned from being hit by a bird), and [[InterfaceScrew the camera changes angles at inopportune times.
]]
*** The remake's Mirage [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Islands Islands]] [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Forests Forests]],[[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Caves Caves]] and [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Mountains Mountains]], of which there are 8 each, all containing Pokemon you can't find in Hoenn or [[VideoGame/PokemonXandY Kalos]]. What makes them this is that they are randomly appearing once per day. Due to how it works, it is possible to receive the same spot three times in one week, or not receive the last one for many months. Worse, is that Gen VI Native Meowth, Porygon, Unown, Stantler, Kricketune, Cherrim, Glameow, Darmanitan, Cofagrigus and Tynamo lines cannot be obtained outside of this sidequest.
** Then there's the event-only Pokemon: Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meoletta, Gensect, Diancie, Hoopa and Volcanion, which can't be obtained through normal gameplay - only through giveaways done by Nintendo. Luckily these are more common than they used to be- in the early days there was usually only one chance to get the event Pokemon in a given generation, which usually involved traveling to select events such as conventions that were inevitably nowhere near you, but now there are several giveaways in each generation, and they're done through a wireless download, often at a relatively easy-to-get-to toy or game shop.
*** Luckily Deoxys can be caught without an event in [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Pokemon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]].
** The fleeing Pokemon. It seems like ever since Generation II, Japanese law requires there to be at least one of these in every main game. Raikou; Entei and Suicune in Johto, Latias and Latios in the original Hoenn, Mesprit and Cresselia in Sinnoh, Tornadus and Thundurus in old Unova, Articuno; Zapdos or Moltres in Kalos (depending on the starter you chose) and cold Sinnoh...you're lucky if you so much as encounter one of these, let alone catch it. To add insult to injury, an NPC says that Mesprit is merely playing with you.
** Getting Shedinja is a GuideDangIt all its own:
butterfly minigame. You have to have no more than five mons and a Poke Ball.
** The Dropped Item sidequest in ''Black 2/White 2'', which is
run down paths, collecting all the only way to obtain rare mons that can't be obtained anywhere else. In Nimbasa City you can find an item (actually an Xtranceiver), and upon obtaining it Yancy (if you chose blue butterflies, while avoiding all the male player character) or Curtis (if you chose female) will start calling. You have to travel red ones, all across Unova, getting in specific ''unmarked'' spots that will trigger a call from them. You have to hit 10 out of 15 spots to start the (thankfully much easier) second part of the quest, which consists of making at least 15 calls in one of the areas the unmarked spots were in before (such as Lentimas Town), as opposed to just those single spots (unfortunately, however, the area at least one call at a time may be made in is selected randomly). Still, having a bicycle and a Pokémon runs out. What's that? That sounds easy to you? Well then, perhaps we should mention the DepthDeception-inducing camera angles, the dark blue lighting that knows Fly would be handy.
** Capturing Rayquaza in ''HG/SS'' is a real pain. First of all, to even ''get'' to
makes identifying the damn thing, you need a Pokémon colors ridiculously difficult, and the fact that isn't available in the version you're playing. You can't get said Pokémon until each time you defeat [[BonusBoss Red]], which means even if fail, you have both versions, you'll be doing a lot of playing to get to that point, or else hope you have fight a friend who's gotten that far and is willing to lend you it. If you do achieve that, the actual battle with Rayquaza is absolutely terrible (the penalty for two reasons: one, it uses Rest, constantly undoing your progress in getting down its HP. Two, it has Outrage. That move is already widely considered ThatOneAttack, but in this case, hitting a red butterfly) before backtracking all the one disadvantage of way back to the attack actually becomes a disadvantage for start. The time between attempts is always longer than the ''player''. Rayquaza will confuse itself after using it, meaning attempts themselves.
** European gamers and those who laid their hands on the [[UpdatedRerelease HD remaster]] have it even worse:
if you actually got its HP low enough to try and catch it, it'll end up knocking itself out and don't collect all crests as you go along, you'll have to start all over.
** Getting Landorus in ''Black'' and ''White'' requires the player to go to the Abundant Shrine with both
backtrack later... usually through paths containing a Thundurus and Tornadus in their party. You can only get [[ThatOneBoss Dark Aeon]]. And getting one of each in your copy the spheres necessary to get Auron's best Overdrive also involves getting past one. Oh, and we mustn't forget Tidus' weapon, since if you don't get his item before leaving the room, Dark Bahamut (one of the game. So harder Dark Aeons) sits in front of it. And the second part to power up his weapon is from ''the infernal chocobo race''. Meaning you might spend an eternity getting a less than 0.0 time there, only to find something that has 5 ''million'' health, and basically needs maxed stats to even dream of winning. (Unless you go the Zanmato route, which is about as cheap as buying North America, and you'll still probably want First Strike if you don't have high agility.)\\
If you forget either of two specific treasures the first time you visit the temples in the PAL/HD versions, you have to face some of the Dark Aeons just to regain access to those temples. This can really screw you over if
you're expected to get someone to trade you a one-of-a-kind legendary for the chance to catch the bastard. One of them also cannot be from your game.
** Catching Legendary Pokémon in general is a pain. Not only are they incredibly powerful and capable of knocking out your party of Pokémon, but they all have low catch rates so you are going to be spending a long time
trying to catch them as they keep breaking out of fully-power Yuna's Celestial Weapon, because you NEED all the Poke Balls you throw. And that's not even getting into resetting for good natures and/or Individual Values.
** Getting the TM for Energy Ball
Aeons to do that, which in ORAS. It turn requires ''both'' bikes, which was all of the treasures.
** Rikku's sigil isn't annoying for its difficulty, but for its duration - you have to do a ''lot'' of walking, often to areas of Bikanel that are spelled out in unnecessarily cryptic fashion by a stone about twenty miles from the nearest save point. Even with a "No Encounters" item strapped to one of your characters, you'll still be walking around a very boring desert for something like three hours.
** Finding all 26 of the Al Bhed journals to translate the Al Bhed language one letter at a time can be a real pain considering that several of them are {{permanently missable|Content}} if you're
not possible in previous games so thorough with your searches. (There is a way to get the ones that were missed, but you have to start a new game or from a save file that ''didn't'' pass them, find the ones you missed, save, go back to your regular game, then have it read the memory card to look at all the ones you've ever found on every save file.)
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'', the sidequest to get the Lady Luck Dressphere is difficult (read: virtually impossible) unless you're good at math. If you don't beat Shinra during the actual Spherebreak tournament, you have a 50% lowered chance of getting Lady Luck until the end of that chapter, and a 75% by Chapter Five. The Mascot dressphere is comparatively easier to get, but is an endeavor that lasts throughout the game (and thanks to a bug in the [=PS2=] version, even if you did everything right, if you saved the Zanarkand Episode Complete for last, you still
wouldn't think to try get it). Getting 100% story completion is nigh-impossible in itself, because unlike the Mascot, it unless requires a completely perfect playthrough, and most players will likely [[PermanentlyMissableContent forever miss their chance]] (barring New Game Plus) ''in the first five minutes''.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'':
** To get the game's most powerful InfinityPlusOneSword,
you found this in [[GuideDangIt need a strategy guide]], because it requires you to leave four treasure chests alone without giving you the Safari Zone and realized you needed both bikes slightest indication of where those chests are. There's another way to get it. Trouble is, you first the weapon, but it's a [[LuckBasedMission 1/1000 random treasure chest drop]]. And that chest happens to be in one of the hardest areas of the game, and also happens to have a requirement of getting 10 of the 12 summons (not including Zodiark, of the next example, who is inside the area) of the game. On the bright side, you get 5 just for completing most of the story, this chest isn't a chest you can only ever open once, and there are a couple of other interesting drops on the way to find it.
** Another nasty sidequest involves a trek into Phase 2 of the Henne Mines, the game's most difficult BonusDungeon. It's an hour-long journey through a narrow and confusing dungeon infested with GoddamnedBats (borderline DemonicSpiders if you aren't expecting/ready for level 60+ enemies, some of which have [[OneHitKill instant-kills]]). There are no saves, and at the end of the Mines is Zodiark, one of the game's
three most difficult [[BonusBoss optional bosses]]. The reward for beating Zodiark is the ability to use him as a [[SummonMagic summon]], but because he requires the character to be under a certain dangerous status to use his ultimate attack, Zodiark is AwesomeButImpractical.
** Danjuro, the ultimate dagger, is dropped by a single Rare Game, which has an extremely complicated set of rules to get it to spawn reliably, which took years to figure out, to the point where the Final Fantasy Wiki ''still'' says that the exact spawn conditions are not fully understood. It only spawns in rooms with a Waystone (teleporter) ''and'' requires 30+ kills since the last time a Waystone was used. In an area where every 3-6 platforms is probably a Waystone that you don't know you you can't use in order to get Larva Eater to spawn. Add onto that the obviously low drop rate for the Danjuro (3% base), and you've got a quest that is ''begging'' to be evaded via cheating or skillful moving around. (Then the Bestiary is rather taunting and pretty much ''lies'' by giving Larva Eater a 1/5 rating for how rare it is to find. Which, if you know the spawn mechanics, ''could'' be considered true. But considering it took two ''years'' to figure out how to get him to spawn ''once'' without taking all day....) Similar enemies have confirmed quirks to make dropping easier, i.e. Helvinek's Grand Helms by leaving the screen as the enemy dies. (Oh, and even if you ''don't'' want to get a Danjuro, if you want to complete the Bestiary for the later example of completing the Sky Pirate's Den, you're still going to need to spawn him at least once.)
** Any of the ultimate weapon sidequests with the exception of Fomalhaut (which can be obtained long before the end of the game).
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is a prerequisite for a completely
different people across Hoenn challenge.
** Finding [[HumongousMecha Omega Mk. XII]] is an exercise in hair-pulling frustration. The most satisfying part isn't beating him, but actually tracking the mofo down. Even if you look up an ''actual'' map instead of the (completely, utterly useless) in-game one, the trek is still rather complicated.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'':
** 'The Bigger They Are...'. You have to fight a [[GiantMook Gigantuar]]. His only attack, 10,000 Needles, takes off 10,000 health, dispels buffs,
and speak has a very high chance of causing Pain and Fog. He also has over a million HP, a high Stagger threshold, and an insanely low target time. Even if you can beat it, it's one of the hardest missions to them, get a five-star on.
** 'Gaian Grudge'. Three Tonberries. Have fun.
** 'Indomitable Will' pits you against two [[StoneWall Raktavijas]], Cie'th with an 'inertial barrier' that reduces any damage they take to ScratchDamage. To get rid of the barrier, they have to be staggered, and their chain gauge fills excruciatingly slowly. They also have devastatingly powerful offense, so it comes down to finding the right balance of defense and offense.
** The battle against Neochu and five Picochu, especially if one does this prior to Chapter 12 to obtain the Growth Egg, an accessory that doubles the [=CP=] obtained from battle. Neochu hits pretty hard and [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou likes to target your leader]] as soon as the battle starts. It also uses Screech, which causes a huge amount of damage to the entire party, debuffs you ''and'' buffs the Picochu. And those little buggers are not pushovers, either. They're small and fast and hit hard that even [[StoneWall Snow]] will require some frequent healing to not die. The only good thing about this sidequest, is that Neochu is susceptible to Vanille's Death spell, though even with Neochu gone, the Picochu can still frustrate a player.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'':
** The Lucky Coin fragment. To get it, you have to win 7,777 coins at the slots. Besides likely requiring a high starting investment, this can take ''hours'' of mind-numbing slots until the game takes pity on you. Even the official strategy guide recommends putting a rubber band over the Autoplay button and leaving the game running for a few hours - except using Autoplay cuts your chances of winning by 33%. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
** There's also the Monster Professor fragment, which requires you to ''have fought every single enemy in the entire game at least once.'' There are literally dozens of {{Underground Monkey}}s in this game, many of which are incredibly unlikely to show up without the Battlemania fragment skill on. That's before you get into the BonusBoss fights,
one of which only appears as an incredibly rare random encounter in a small area of a single time period you probably have no reason to go back to, or the Paradox Scope fights, many of which are ridiculously hard, or the Archylte Steppe, which has four different weather patterns, each with their own unique set of enemies that don't spawn anywhere else, or that one boss fight whose third form is skippable if you pick the right Live Trigger answer...
** There's also the quizzes in Academia. Many of the questions don't actually have answers in-game, but instead require you to try to work out the probable answer from what is in-game (or what's in one of the ''other'' Franchise/FinalFantasy games). But this isn't too bad if you have a guide. So most of the quizzes have you hunting down an NPC that appears at one of eleven out-of-the-way locations
in the Battle Resort not accessible largest, most crowded, and generally convoluted map in the game and is almost invisible until after you use Mog to reveal him. Oh, and some of the Delta Episode. The other two questions have random answers that change every time you do the quiz; guess the wrong one, and you get to start all over again. Fun times!
** Another sidequest requires you to explore 100% of all the maps in the game. Most of them
are in hard to reach, pretty easy, but some of them are infuriating, especially the Academia maps. Academia 400 AF is ThatOneLevel ''swarming'' with Cie'th, Academia 4XX AF is a massive sprawling city with dozens of tiny alleys, nooks, and crannies, and Academia 500 AF is a platformer level with several out of the way spots platforms, at least one of which requires the Anti-Grav Jump Fragment Skill to reach. Augusta Tower, meanwhile, is hard to explore simply because the map only shows one floor at a time, meaning there's no efficient way to check your progress barring stopping at every floor.
* The Kick all the Lucky Animals sidequest
in locations you're unlikely ''[[VideoGame/DotHackGUGames .hack]]'' is one thanks to return to, with the need to hop all over the playing fields to find each one requiring variety, having to avoid getting BlessedWithSuck from the unlucky types, and getting them all is a specific bike. Only then will Rydel let GuideDangIt because the method for generating them isn't that obvious.
** But the Flyer quest is an even better example, once you hit all the towns
you have both bikes. Nowhere in game tells you to wander the fields and hope that the medical team would even show up, and then it's very likely you can do this or how to do it. Worse still, Energy Ball itself is a powerful Grass-type move that many Pokémon (most notably Psycic and Ghost-types) can learn, increasing got them on the desire to get it.
** Putting ''all'' of
list already. Unlike the above to shame, however, is lucky animals, there's no known method for making the quest Medical squad appear.
** In ''[[VideoGame/DotHackR1Games .hack//Quarantine]]'', there's the Item Completion Event, which gets unlocked once you finish the main story. To complete that, you need
to collect ''all the items and equipments in the game'', except for the rare ones. Seeing how most people spent the games collecting rare (often missable) items, and that it doesn't register the items until you take them to the quest NPC (which means all Zygarde Cores the equipments you sold, gave to allies or traded don't count), most players need to start from scratch. It doesn't help that there are dozens of weapons for each class, and Cells in ''Sun and Moon''. There are ''100'' of these spread throughout the entire region, and the game gives you ''no'' hint whatsoever as to where they are located. What's more, some 90% of them only appear in the day, can't be bought, so you have to start [[LimitBreak Data Draining]] monsters all around, trading with everyone and some abusing Springs of them only appear at night. Adding insult to injury, some of them only appear in areas Myst or [[GuideDangit check a guide]]. Your reward for all that are unlocked ''after'' you've beaten the Elite Four.hassle? [[BraggingRightsReward A wallpaper]]. No wonder almost no one cares to finish it...







* The Fallen in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''. Nigh impossible on a regular playthrough. Several of his attacks can randomly kill any party member in 1 hit, often killing more than 1 per turn. Any units that survive take roughly 50% damage. He also has a 10-turn limit after which your whole team is annihilated, regardless of how well you were doing. To top it off, improper (read: normal & suggested in-game) grinding makes the fight even tougher due to enemies scaling with your Battle Rank instead of your stats. To counteract this, people do the counter-intuitive "Low-BR" playthroughs in order to be maximize stat growth just for this fight. The Fallen's DLC reskin The Lost is ''even harder,'' with higher stats, better attacks, and he only gives you 5 turns before everyone dies. And there's even less of a reward.
* ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana:''
** One of the sidequests you can undertake is to rescue a despondant organ grinder from the Underworld. Which, for this subquest, are policed by {{Mook Bouncer}}s that will teleport you back to the very bottom level of should you so much as brush against one. And in the later levels, they disappear from view a few seconds after you enter the room. (At least the game does give you a little bit of mercy in that you encounter fewer of these bouncers each time you get sent back.)
** Slightly less annoying, but still a pain in the rear, is an early subquest to sell lamps to the Dudbears. You're taught a few phrases in the Dudbear language, and then it's off to negotiate a series of dialogue trees so that they'll buy your lamps. It's somewhat made up for by the fact that you get 1000 Lucre per lamp, and the guy you have to give the money to doesn't even care if you don't give him the full 3000.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect''
** The Moon mission from ''VideoGame/MassEffect1''. There's dozens of advanced Alliance drones carrying machine guns and rocket launchers which can shred through your health at an alarming rate. You get the mission at level 20, but most people can't complete it until level 30. Even worse, you'll want to do it as soon as possible to get your PrestigeClass.
** [[VideoGame/MassEffect2 The sequel]] has the Secure Smuggled Cargo mission. Aria gives you the coordinates for a stash of goods on a nearby planet. Doesn't sound so bad, until you get there and find out you have to fight ''three'' [[HumongousMecha YMIR heavy mechs]], and if you take too long, they destroy the cargo. It's practically a guarantee that one of them will attack you while the other two go after cargo containers, and if all the containers are destroyed, they'll all chase you. Worse, this is most likely a quest a new player will do at a lower level, since you can access it fairly easily in Omega, which is the location the game points you towards when you start.
** ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' thoughtfully provides the Citadel: Hanar Diplomat side-mission, which is notorious not because it's hard, but because it's glitchy as hell and is prone to spontaneously imploding with no provocation at all. ''Walking past people'' can cause it to break.
* The piano sidequest in ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce''. A ten-round battle with the highest-level enemies, your HP carries over between battles, a ton of attacks flying at you all at once, making them almost unavoidable, a lot of enemies having hair-tearing gimmicks (hit that giant eye enemy with its back turned? No damage, sorry!), an enemy that can heal itself and raise 200 HP shields (for reference, a lot of your cards don't even breach 150), and to top it all off, three 1000-HP enemies that fling attacks literally every half-second at you.
* An example in the prequel series, ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'': In 3, it's the Time Trials. To get the fifth star (which allows the unlocking of the Omega Navis), you have to clear every named Navi in the game (their beta versions, if available, excluding Bass) within a time limit. Not too bad, right, especially since a great folder can three-turn almost any boss? Nope. To clear them, you have to use the crappy pre-made folders found with random people in the game. You can't set a preset chip, so it's all up to randomness. The other one is the slab hiding the Hub.BAT Navicust piece. 20 battles in a row, with enemies that can cover the field with attacks, and the last few battles have the Aura nonsense going on.



* Good luck maxing all the social links in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' if you haven't played the game before. Magaret requires lots of sheer luck and money sunk into her link, Ai's has the most opportunities to reverse and is the only one that can be broken, the Fox's take a few days to accomplish each and if you aren't doing them concurrently with your main quest, you can never catch up, and Naoto's requires max courage and knowledge. And those are just the more obnoxious ones.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'':
** A player would be lucky to have two days left at the end, and adventures don't even take up a full day in that game. Granted, the reason you have so little time left is because there's a social link that can only be started in the last month, but even without taking this link into account, you'll only finish with about a week and a half left. And completing the Persona compendium requires maxing all the social links, grinding your character to level 90 fusing personas all the way up, and... you'll still have [[LastLousyPoint only 98% completion]] because three personas are only obtainable by special fusions ''[[GuideDangIt that the game never tells you about]]''. Norn can be guessed if you know a bit of mythology (Clotho + Lachesis + Atropos, the Greek equivilents of the Norns), but Messiah (Orpheus + Thanatos) makes sense only in retrospect. And without a walkthrough, you're not likely to know Shiva (Rangda + Barong) even ''exists''.
** Several of Elizabeth's requests fall into this too.
*** "Please Clean the Bathroom" is an annoying case of DoubleUnlock. You need the Scrub Brush to clean the bathroom, which is a ''weapon''. Ken's joke weapon to be exact, which is only found as a reward for ''another'' quest: "I'd like to try Inari Sushi". This one requires maxed Academics, the slowest stat to raise in the game, and is one that players trying to max all Social Links will probably avoid since normally getting Inari Sushi at the Shrine uses up the afternoon. [[GuideDangIt The one time it doesn't is during this quest.]]
*** "I'd like to try Oden Juice" is another annoying one, as the game is essentially lying to you when it says the quest has no deadline. A girl at school has it, but she'll only give it to you in exchange for all the Kyoto-exclusive drinks. The problem is you only visit Kyoto once in the game, during the class trip in mid-November. If you don't buy all the drinks in what little time you have there, this request is [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]].
*** All of the katana requests in Tartarus. Elizabeth will ask for one rare katana for each block of Tartarus, and they can only be found in rare chests. Which, as the name implies, have a low chance of spawning on any given floor... and the rare chest needs to spawn on a couple of specific floors in order to have a chance of containing the katana. Not difficult, just a really annoying LuckBasedMission, and there are ''five'' of these in the game, the fifth being in the unlockable BonusDungeon.



* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the biggest goal for completionists is that you GottaCatchThemAll. But this requires so much work that only the most dedicated players will be able to do it... And you have only a limited time before the next gen comes out, making you do it all over again with an even bigger number of Pokemon.
** Way back in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', getting HundredPercentCompletion was extremely difficult, since the lack of breeding meant that you could only get one starter Pokemon per game, and almost nobody was willing to trade away their own starter to complete somebody else's Pokedex. This didn't last ''too'' long however, as ''Pokemon Yellow'' gave the player all three Kanto starter Pokemon for free.
** Special mention has to go out to Feebas. In both of the two generations that it's obtainable in, it's only available through fishing on one route. Sounds simple enough. Except that you can only catch it by fishing on a handful of specific water squares. In an area like ''[[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/8/83/Hoenn_Route_119_E.png this]]''. Also, the squares are set randomly every time a completely-unrelated saying in an entirely unrelated town changes, which can happen on a whim. And if you ever do eventually find one, make sure it's got a nature that prefers dry Pokeblocks/Poffins, since feeding it an obscene amount of these is the only way to evolve it into [[MagikarpPower something useful]].
*** In the Ruby and Sapphire remakes, Feebas can be found fishing under a bridge in Route 119 100% of the time, averting this in Generation VI
** Trying to find Mirage Island (not to be confused with the [[VideoGameRemake remake's]] Mirages Spots), which is the only place to get some of the rarest and most powerful berries in the game. To clarify, you have to go to Pacifidlog Town, which is pretty late in the game and talk to an old man in a house looking out a window who will say if he sees Mirage Island that day or not that day. More often than not, he will say that he can't which means that you have to wait until the next day to try again, and since the {{Pokemon}} games are set in ''real time'', you could literally spend ''weeks, months, or even longer'' just to find all of the berries in an extreme LuckBasedMission, and this is just one of many considering [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters all of the fleeing Pokemon there are in the series.]]
*** The remake's Mirage [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Islands Islands]] [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Forests Forests]],[[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Caves Caves]] and [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Mirage_Mountains Mountains]], of which there are 8 each, all containing Pokemon you can't find in Hoenn or [[VideoGame/PokemonXandY Kalos]]. What makes them this is that they are randomly appearing once per day. Due to how it works, it is possible to receive the same spot three times in one week, or not receive the last one for many months. Worse, is that Gen VI Native Meowth, Porygon, Unown, Stantler, Kricketune, Cherrim, Glameow, Darmanitan, Cofagrigus and Tynamo lines cannot be obtained outside of this sidequest.
** Then there's the event-only Pokemon: Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meoletta, Gensect, Diancie, Hoopa and Volcanion, which can't be obtained through normal gameplay - only through giveaways done by Nintendo. Luckily these are more common than they used to be -- in the early days there was usually only one chance to get the event Pokemon in a given generation, which usually involved traveling to select events such as conventions that were inevitably nowhere near you, but now there are several giveaways in each generation, and they're done through a wireless download, often at a relatively easy-to-get-to toy or game shop.
*** Luckily Deoxys can be caught without an event in [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Pokemon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]].
** The fleeing Pokemon. It seems like ever since Generation II, Japanese law requires there to be at least one of these in every main game. Raikou; Entei and Suicune in Johto, Latias and Latios in the original Hoenn, Mesprit and Cresselia in Sinnoh, Tornadus and Thundurus in old Unova, Articuno; Zapdos or Moltres in Kalos (depending on the starter you chose) and cold Sinnoh...you're lucky if you so much as encounter one of these, let alone catch it. To add insult to injury, an NPC says that Mesprit is merely playing with you.
** Getting Shedinja is a GuideDangIt all its own: You have to have no more than five mons and a Poke Ball.
** The Dropped Item sidequest in ''Black 2/White 2'', which is the only way to obtain rare mons that can't be obtained anywhere else. In Nimbasa City you can find an item (actually an Xtranceiver), and upon obtaining it Yancy (if you chose the male player character) or Curtis (if you chose female) will start calling. You have to travel all across Unova, getting in specific ''unmarked'' spots that will trigger a call from them. You have to hit 10 out of 15 spots to start the (thankfully much easier) second part of the quest, which consists of making at least 15 calls in one of the areas the unmarked spots were in before (such as Lentimas Town), as opposed to just those single spots (unfortunately, however, the area at least one call at a time may be made in is selected randomly). Still, having a bicycle and a Pokémon that knows Fly would be handy.
** Capturing Rayquaza in ''HG/SS'' is a real pain. First of all, to even ''get'' to the damn thing, you need a Pokémon that isn't available in the version you're playing. You can't get said Pokémon until you defeat [[BonusBoss Red]], which means even if you have both versions, you'll be doing a lot of playing to get to that point, or else hope you have a friend who's gotten that far and is willing to lend you it. If you do achieve that, the actual battle with Rayquaza is absolutely terrible for two reasons: one, it uses Rest, constantly undoing your progress in getting down its HP. Two, it has Outrage. That move is already widely considered ThatOneAttack, but in this case, the one disadvantage of the attack actually becomes a disadvantage for the ''player''. Rayquaza will confuse itself after using it, meaning if you actually got its HP low enough to try and catch it, it'll end up knocking itself out and you'll have to start all over.
** Getting Landorus in ''Black'' and ''White'' requires the player to go to the Abundant Shrine with both a Thundurus and Tornadus in their party. You can only get one of each in your copy of the game. So basically you're expected to get someone to trade you a one-of-a-kind legendary for the chance to catch the bastard. One of them also cannot be from your game.
** Catching Legendary Pokémon in general is a pain. Not only are they incredibly powerful and capable of knocking out your party of Pokémon, but they all have low catch rates so you are going to be spending a long time trying to catch them as they keep breaking out of the Poke Balls you throw. And that's not even getting into resetting for good natures and/or Individual Values.
** Getting the TM for Energy Ball in ORAS. It requires ''both'' bikes, which was not possible in previous games so you wouldn't think to try it unless you found this in the Safari Zone and realized you needed both bikes to get it. Trouble is, you first have to find three different people across Hoenn and speak to them, one of which is in the Battle Resort not accessible until after the Delta Episode. The other two are in hard to reach, out of the way spots in locations you're unlikely to return to, with each one requiring a specific bike. Only then will Rydel let you have both bikes. Nowhere in game tells you that you can do this or how to do it. Worse still, Energy Ball itself is a powerful Grass-type move that many Pokémon (most notably Psycic and Ghost-types) can learn, increasing the desire to get it.
** Putting ''all'' of the above to shame, however, is the quest to collect all Zygarde Cores and Cells in ''Sun and Moon''. There are ''100'' of these spread throughout the entire region, and the game gives you ''no'' hint whatsoever as to where they are located. What's more, some of them only appear in the day, and some of them only appear at night. Adding insult to injury, some of them only appear in areas that are unlocked ''after'' you've beaten the Elite Four.



* ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' has a combination sidequest plus ''final boss'': If you get to just before the final boss, and then leave and visit a specific town, it'll remove the boss's limiter, turning the final boss, who is easily doable around level 50 to a ridiculously powerful monster, requiring levels in the ''200s'' just to avoid being instantly killed even while wearing items which reduce the damage he does with his elemental attacks. The resultant grind is ridiculously long. Beating The Cave Of Trials also qualifies for this, although it's a great place to level grind.
* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' has one in the form of a BettingMinigame, which you must win to get some of the characters and thus achieve the HundredPercentCompletion and [[MultipleEndings Secret Ending]]. The fact that such game relies so much on luck (or is blatantly rigged, depending who you ask) and ''also'' can suck your money dry has earned it a Troper FanNickname: 'The Game that Shall not Be Named'. That and the original name is kind of silly-sounding.
** [[VideoGame/SuikodenI The first game]]'s version can actually be a decent moneymaker (though it doesn't beat the "Coin in the cup" game), but the second game ups the difficulty to an insane degree.
** The dice game is the best bit maker once you can do maximum bets, but ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'''s game will make you want to destroy your television.
** Try leveling up ''every'' playable character's weapon to their maximum level. Have fun obtaining the money to do that, especially if you ''don't'' like playing Triple Storm or the Coin Game.
** Finding [[spoiler: Pesmerga]] in the first game is pretty annoying mainly because you have to go all the way ''back'' to the top of Neclord's castle pretty late in the game, and you can't use an escape talisman in that area to instantly warp you outside afterwards.
** There's also finding the ultimate magician Crowley in the first game, because he's hidden deep within a cave, and you have to feel around the walls for the secret passage to his chamber.
** Recruiting Clive is a pain because it's basically a LuckBasedMission late in the game. It's easy, but it might take a lot longer than it should.
** In the second game, getting all the Recipes for the cooking mini-game can be a chore, especially with the notoriously hard to get recipe #24 from the Do Re Mi Elves, and ''especially'' if you're trying for Clive's Quest at the same time, which is another "That One Sidequest" for it's time limit.
** The Aforementioned Clive's Quest is a time-limit game that, unless one is doing the [[GoodBadBugs Matilda Gate Trick]], is pretty hard to accomplish whilst still A) getting all 108 stars, B) Leveling up at a decent rate, and C) collecting anything, including some {{permanently missable|Content}} items like Recipe #24. It's a very fine Juggling act.
** Getting all the dogs in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII''.





* Any ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' player who doesn't still have "Seeking Your Roots" somewhere in the back of their list of active quests to this day either specifically avoided starting it (by never picking up a single Nirnroot, ever) or console hacked or otherwise cheated like a maniac to clear it.
** There's no time limit on the quest and Nirnroots can be picked up while doing everything else. To fully complete the quest 100 are required but there are over three times that many scattered throughout the game.
** Similarly "The Museum of Oddities" in ''Shivering Isles'' is one for players not all that interested in completionist-y dungeon diving. Unlike Nirnroots, some of the objects you must collect for this quest spawn randomly.
** While we're on the subject of Oblivion, most [[EscortMission sidequests that involve escorting or defending]] an NPC are usually difficult to get through, due mainly to everyone in the game having seemingly attended [[LeeroyJenkins the Leeroy Jenkins self defense class]].
** Another ''Oblivion'' quest would be the collector, finishing that one is a pain, unless you opt out midway through and finish the others in that questline instead. Ir doesn't help that the original printing of tbe strategy guide actually gave an additional location for a statues that doesn't exist.
* For ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', That One Sidequest is definitely Threads of the Webspinner, which is about finding all Sanguine items. All 26[[note]]There are 27, but the quest-giver already has one of them.[[/note]] of them, tucked into the most remote corners of Vvardenfell. 15 of them will be ''relatively'' easy (the quest-giver outright tells you where two of them are, and 13 of the others are found as part of other quests for the quest-giver). [[GuideDangIt The remaining 11]]...
** Another in ''Morrowind'' is acquiring [[InfinityPlusOneSword Eltonbrand]]. First, it requires you to acquire [[InfinityMinusOneSword Goldbrand]] as part of an obscure quest that you are extremely unlikely to find on your own. (The one person in the game who tells you about it isn't exactly trustworthy and even then, his directions are bad, leading you to swimming around in the ocean further south than you need to.) Then, you get directions from [[PhysicalGod Boethiah]] to find him/her ([[GenderBender it's complicated]]) a sculptor to rebuild his/her shrine. If you manage to do that, then wait the two in-game weeks required for the statue to be built, you can finally claim Goldbrand. To upgrade it into Eltonbrand, you need to become a vampire (something most players of the game may not even realize is in the game for many, many hours) and perform a specific quest with a specific amount of gold in your inventory. THEN you get Eltonbrand. Complicated and [[GuideDangIt near impossible to find on your own]], but very [[GameBreaker worth it]]. Though given the message you get when you receive Eltonbrand and the fact it technically isn't a quest (or even has any journal messages of its own), Eltonbrand was probably meant more as an EasterEgg than an actual complicated sidequest.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'':
** The Seeking Your Roots quest from ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' returns as the appropriately-named A Return To Your Roots. You're searching through a giant cavern full of high-level enemies for [[TwentyBearAsses glowing plants]] that tend to be tucked in out-of-the-way places. So far, not much worse than any other CollectionSidequest, until you've cleared the entire ''enormous'' area of enemies and wandered over the same area twenty times without finding that [[LastLousyPoint Last Lousy Root]].
** No. Stone. Unturned. Finding 24 gemstones without quest markers tucked away in the most unlikely places in all of Skyrim, which you can't remove from your inventory once found and ''do not stack''. After you find them all (''if'' you find them all) you get to clear a [[DemonicSpiders Falmer]] [[ThatOneLevel cave]], and then you get a reward that [[BraggingRightsReward would have been REALLY useful]] when you started the quest at level 5, less so when you finally finish it at around level 50.
*** The gemstones themselves, despite having a shown weight value of 0.5, do not actually effect the overall weight of the player's inventory, so at least they're weightless, despite the game telling you that they aren't.
** The Impatience of a Saint quest from the Dawnguard DLC. You need to collect ten lost pages of Saint Jiub's opus, which are scattered across the Soul Cairn. Not only are there no quest markers, but the Cairn is large, dark and hard to navigate, it's difficult to remember where you've already been, and the pages are small and very easy to miss. In addition, some of them are hidden behind portals and in hard to access buildings.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect''
** The Moon mission from ''VideoGame/MassEffect1''. There's dozens of advanced Alliance drones carrying machine guns and rocket launchers which can shred through your health at an alarming rate. You get the mission at level 20, but most people can't complete it until level 30. Even worse, you'll want to do it as soon as possible to get your PrestigeClass.
** [[VideoGame/MassEffect2 The sequel]] has the Secure Smuggled Cargo mission. Aria gives you the coordinates for a stash of goods on a nearby planet. Doesn't sound so bad, until you get there and find out you have to fight ''three'' [[HumongousMecha YMIR heavy mechs]], and if you take too long, they destroy the cargo. It's practically a guarantee that one of them will attack you while the other two go after cargo containers, and if all the containers are destroyed, they'll all chase you. Worse, this is most likely a quest a new player will do at a lower level, since you can access it fairly easily in Omega, which is the location the game points you towards when you start.
** ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' thoughtfully provides the Citadel: Hanar Diplomat side-mission, which is notorious not because it's hard, but because it's glitchy as hell and is prone to spontaneously imploding with no provocation at all. ''Walking past people'' can cause it to break.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Anachronox}}'', to get one character's InfinityPlusOneSword you need to let PAL play in a children's area for a specific amount of time at a specific point in the game. If he plays for less than 6 hours or more than 8 '''realtime''' hours he find other items instead. Even if he plays for the right amount of time but before reaching the specific point in the game he will get yet another item instead. This is a definite GuideDangIt moment as there is nothing in the game that hints at how long he needs to play or more importantly at what point the InfinityPlusOneSword appears rather than another item. And if you move more than a few feet from the window where you can see him, he comes out and the timer resets.
* The piano sidequest in ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce''. A ten-round battle with the highest-level enemies, your HP carries over between battles, a ton of attacks flying at you all at once, making them almost unavoidable, a lot of enemies having hair-tearing gimmicks (hit that giant eye enemy with its back turned? No damage, sorry!), an enemy that can heal itself and raise 200 HP shields (for reference, a lot of your cards don't even breach 150), and to top it all off, three 1000-HP enemies that fling attacks literally every half-second at you.
* An example in the prequel series, ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'': In 3, it's the Time Trials. To get the fifth star (which allows the unlocking of the Omega Navis), you have to clear every named Navi in the game (their beta versions, if available, excluding Bass) within a time limit. Not too bad, right, especially since a great folder can three-turn almost any boss? Nope. To clear them, you have to use the crappy pre-made folders found with random people in the game. You can't set a preset chip, so it's all up to randomness. The other one is the slab hiding the Hub.BAT Navicust piece. 20 battles in a row, with enemies that can cover the field with attacks, and the last few battles have the Aura nonsense going on.
* The Kick all the Lucky Animals sidequest in ''[[VideoGame/DotHackGUGames .hack]]'' is one thanks to the need to hop all over the playing fields to find each variety, having to avoid getting BlessedWithSuck from the unlucky types, and getting them all is a GuideDangIt because the method for generating them isn't that obvious.
** But the Flyer quest is an even better example, once you hit all the towns you have to wander the fields and hope that the medical team would even show up, and then it's very likely you got them on the list already. Unlike the lucky animals, there's no known method for making the Medical squad appear.
** In ''[[VideoGame/DotHackR1Games .hack//Quarantine]]'', there's the Item Completion Event, which gets unlocked once you finish the main story. To complete that, you need to collect ''all the items and equipments in the game'', except for the rare ones. Seeing how most people spent the games collecting rare (often missable) items, and that it doesn't register the items until you take them to the quest NPC (which means all the equipments you sold, gave to allies or traded don't count), most players need to start from scratch. It doesn't help that there are dozens of weapons for each class, and 90% of them can't be bought, so you have to start [[LimitBreak Data Draining]] monsters all around, trading with everyone and abusing Springs of Myst or [[GuideDangit check a guide]]. Your reward for all that hassle? [[BraggingRightsReward A wallpaper]]. No wonder almost no one cares to finish it...
* ''VideoGame/BatenKaitosOrigins'':
** There's the nightmarish ''VideoGame/PacMan'' sidequest, which ''takes longer to finish than every other sidequest and the main quest combined.'' To accomplish it, you must feed one of your quest magnus one copy of ''every other quest magnus in the game''. 3 of them are {{permanently missable|Content}}, 3 of them take 30 hours in real time to create (seriously), and there's a ton more that are in highly unintuitive places. Some of them can only be acquired by accepting a sidequest ''that doesn't show up on your sidequest list'', some of them are semi-missable (you can recreate them, but it's a major pain to do so), and MANY of them can only be acquired by letting them age. One of the quest magnus you need to use for this doubles as an ingredient for the game's InfinityPlusOneSword. And to make matters even worse, you have no in-game means of keeping track of which magnus you've used for this. Forgotten which ones you're missing? Too bad! Your reward for doing this is permanent critical hits, which ''would'' be a GameBreaker, but by the time you're done with this nightmare, you should be good enough to stomp the final boss into dust without it.
** For those who dealt with the Pac-Man sidequest by [[FanonDiscontinuity pretending it doesn't exist]], there's still "Gather the rock-people!" To do this quest, you have to move large stone statues throughout the Nekkar Quietlands by pushing them to the summit. Yes, pushing them, in a game where {{Hammerspace}} is a heavily JustifiedTrope. The EdgeGravity on said statues is beyond abysmal; you need to approach them with nearly pixel perfect accuracy just so the game registers the push, and even then it might not go the way you want it to - which is a major issue, because it's nigh-impossible to get the statues away from the walls except by leaving the area and coming back, which would be merely very bad instead of unforgivable if only Nekkar wasn't filled with narrow passages. The monsters can also block your statues, forcing you to fight them - and nearly every battle here features [[DemonicSpiders Queen Alraunes]]. And as though out of sheer spite, Nekkar is also filled with freaking '''invisible pit traps'''.
* It doesn't compare with the Pac-Man sidequest listed above, but Mizuti's sidequest in ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos Eternal Wings'' needs to be mentioned here. Remember [[ThatOneLevel Zosma Tower]]? All those damn timed 3D [[BlockPuzzle Block Puzzles]], done with a static camera that sometimes doesn't show you what you need to see? Well, you're going back there, down into the basement for five all new levels of fun. One particularly nasty puzzle requires you to use an elevator as a block stop. ''While it's in motion.'' Finally at the bottom? Remember that irritating boss fight, between [[LuckBasedMission Xelha and the Ice Goddess]]? They recreated it, this time between Mizuti and the Shadow Wizard. ''Eternal Wings'' also has the Family Tree and Star Map sidequests. The former requires a bit of maneuvering as some members of the family can only be convinced to return to Quzman's home after certain others have returned and at least one ''won't'' return if a certain other one is already there, some of the deceased members require you to talk to one of the members back at his house multiple times in order to get them signed for, and just when you think you've finished it, Quzman lays one more member on you, which can't be obtained until this point and requires going back into the aforementioned basement of Zosma Tower. The latter is even trickier, as many of the fragments appear as drops from random encounters and the final piece [[spoiler:was with the Keeper of the Star Map all along; you have to ''repeatedly'' ask him for "info on the fragments" after returning every other fragment, then tell him that you want to complete the map and that he "deserves it", and he'll finally give you the Fragment, which you must then hand right back to him to complete the quest.]]
* The Lost Sanctum quest in ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger [[UpdatedRerelease DS]]'' is quickly rising in the ranks as That One Sidequest. To wit: inescapable, scripted battles, going up and down the same mountain at least seven times, and not being able to progress without speaking to the right NPC to set off an event flag, despite having all the items necessary to proceed. And the rewards are quickly outclassed by those found in the post-game dungeon, the Dimensional Vortex. Hell, most of the rewards are outclassed by the rewards from the sidequests ''that were in the original game.'' The only upside to this is that the repetitive battles do allow for significant TP grinding, allowing you to quickly gain everyone's techs.
* Good luck maxing all the social links in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' if you haven't played the game before. Magaret requires lots of sheer luck and money sunk into her link, Ai's has the most opportunities to reverse and is the only one that can be broken, the Fox's take a few days to accomplish each and if you aren't doing them concurrently with your main quest, you can never catch up, and Naoto's requires max courage and knowledge. And those are just the more obnoxious ones.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'':
** A player would be lucky to have two days left at the end, and adventures don't even take up a full day in that game. Granted, the reason you have so little time left is because there's a social link that can only be started in the last month, but even without taking this link into account, you'll only finish with about a week and a half left. And completing the Persona compendium requires maxing all the social links, grinding your character to level 90 fusing personas all the way up, and... you'll still have [[LastLousyPoint only 98% completion]] because three personas are only obtainable by special fusions ''[[GuideDangIt that the game never tells you about]]''. Norn can be guessed if you know a bit of mythology (Clotho + Lachesis + Atropos, the Greek equivilents of the Norns), but Messiah (Orpheus + Thanatos) makes sense only in retrospect. And without a walkthrough, you're not likely to know Shiva (Rangda + Barong) even ''exists''.
** Several of Elizabeth's requests fall into this too.
*** "Please Clean the Bathroom" is an annoying case of DoubleUnlock. You need the Scrub Brush to clean the bathroom, which is a ''weapon''. Ken's joke weapon to be exact, which is only found as a reward for ''another'' quest: "I'd like to try Inari Sushi". This one requires maxed Academics, the slowest stat to raise in the game, and is one that players trying to max all Social Links will probably avoid since normally getting Inari Sushi at the Shrine uses up the afternoon. [[GuideDangIt The one time it doesn't is during this quest.]]
*** "I'd like to try Oden Juice" is another annoying one, as the game is essentially lying to you when it says the quest has no deadline. A girl at school has it, but she'll only give it to you in exchange for all the Kyoto-exclusive drinks. The problem is you only visit Kyoto once in the game, during the class trip in mid-November. If you don't buy all the drinks in what little time you have there, this request is [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]].
*** All of the katana requests in Tartarus. Elizabeth will ask for one rare katana for each block of Tartarus, and they can only be found in rare chests. Which, as the name implies, have a low chance of spawning on any given floor... and the rare chest needs to spawn on a couple of specific floors in order to have a chance of containing the katana. Not difficult, just a really annoying LuckBasedMission, and there are ''five'' of these in the game, the fifth being in the unlockable BonusDungeon.
* ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' has a combination sidequest plus ''final boss'': If you get to just before the final boss, and then leave and visit a specific town, it'll remove the boss's limiter, turning the final boss, who is easily doable around level 50 to a ridiculously powerful monster, requiring levels in the ''200s'' just to avoid being instantly killed even while wearing items which reduce the damage he does with his elemental attacks. The resultant grind is ridiculously long. Beating The Cave Of Trials also qualifies for this, although it's a great place to level grind.

to:

* Any ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' player who doesn't still have "Seeking Your Roots" somewhere in the back of their list of active quests to this day either specifically avoided starting it (by never picking up a single Nirnroot, ever) or console hacked or otherwise cheated like a maniac to clear it.
** There's no time limit on the quest and Nirnroots can be picked up while doing everything else. To fully complete the quest 100 are required but there are over three times that many scattered throughout the game.
** Similarly "The Museum of Oddities" in ''Shivering Isles'' is one for players not all that interested in completionist-y dungeon diving. Unlike Nirnroots, some of the objects you must collect for this quest spawn randomly.
** While we're on the subject of Oblivion, most [[EscortMission sidequests that involve escorting or defending]] an NPC are usually difficult to get through, due mainly to everyone in the game having seemingly attended [[LeeroyJenkins the Leeroy Jenkins self defense class]].
** Another ''Oblivion'' quest would be the collector, finishing that one is a pain, unless you opt out midway through and finish the others in that questline instead. Ir doesn't help that the original printing of tbe strategy guide actually gave an additional location for a statues that doesn't exist.
* For ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', That One Sidequest is definitely Threads of the Webspinner, which is about finding all Sanguine items. All 26[[note]]There are 27, but the quest-giver already has one of them.[[/note]] of them, tucked into the most remote corners of Vvardenfell. 15 of them will be ''relatively'' easy (the quest-giver outright tells you where two of them are, and 13 of the others are found as part of other quests for the quest-giver). [[GuideDangIt The remaining 11]]...
** Another in ''Morrowind'' is acquiring [[InfinityPlusOneSword Eltonbrand]]. First, it requires you to acquire [[InfinityMinusOneSword Goldbrand]] as part of an obscure quest that you are extremely unlikely to find on your own. (The one person in the game who tells you about it isn't exactly trustworthy and even then, his directions are bad, leading you to swimming around in the ocean further south than you need to.) Then, you get directions from [[PhysicalGod Boethiah]] to find him/her ([[GenderBender it's complicated]]) a sculptor to rebuild his/her shrine. If you manage to do that, then wait the two in-game weeks required for the statue to be built, you can finally claim Goldbrand. To upgrade it into Eltonbrand, you need to become a vampire (something most players of the game may not even realize is in the game for many, many hours) and perform a specific quest with a specific amount of gold in your inventory. THEN you get Eltonbrand. Complicated and [[GuideDangIt near impossible to find on your own]], but very [[GameBreaker worth it]]. Though given the message you get when you receive Eltonbrand and the fact it technically isn't a quest (or even has any journal messages of its own), Eltonbrand was probably meant more as an EasterEgg than an actual complicated sidequest.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'':
** The Seeking Your Roots quest from ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' returns as the appropriately-named A Return To Your Roots. You're searching through a giant cavern full of high-level enemies for [[TwentyBearAsses glowing plants]] that tend to be tucked in out-of-the-way places. So far, not much worse than any other CollectionSidequest, until you've cleared the entire ''enormous'' area of enemies and wandered over the same area twenty times without finding that [[LastLousyPoint Last Lousy Root]].
** No. Stone. Unturned. Finding 24 gemstones without quest markers tucked away in the most unlikely places in all of Skyrim, which you can't remove from your inventory once found and ''do not stack''. After you find them all (''if'' you find them all) you get to clear a [[DemonicSpiders Falmer]] [[ThatOneLevel cave]], and then you get a reward that [[BraggingRightsReward would have been REALLY useful]] when you started the quest at level 5, less so when you finally finish it at around level 50.
*** The gemstones themselves, despite having a shown weight value of 0.5, do not actually effect the overall weight of the player's inventory, so at least they're weightless, despite the game telling you that they aren't.
** The Impatience of a Saint quest from the Dawnguard DLC. You need to collect ten lost pages of Saint Jiub's opus, which are scattered across the Soul Cairn. Not only are there no quest markers, but the Cairn is large, dark and hard to navigate, it's difficult to remember where you've already been, and the pages are small and very easy to miss. In addition, some of them are hidden behind portals and in hard to access buildings.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect''
** The Moon mission from ''VideoGame/MassEffect1''. There's dozens of advanced Alliance drones carrying machine guns and rocket launchers which can shred through your health at an alarming rate. You get the mission at level 20, but most people can't complete it until level 30. Even worse, you'll want to do it as soon as possible to get your PrestigeClass.
** [[VideoGame/MassEffect2 The sequel]] has the Secure Smuggled Cargo mission. Aria gives you the coordinates for a stash of goods on a nearby planet. Doesn't sound so bad, until you get there and find out you have to fight ''three'' [[HumongousMecha YMIR heavy mechs]], and if you take too long, they destroy the cargo. It's practically a guarantee that one of them will attack you while the other two go after cargo containers, and if all the containers are destroyed, they'll all chase you. Worse, this is most likely a quest a new player will do at a lower level, since you can access it fairly easily in Omega, which is the location the game points you towards when you start.
** ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' thoughtfully provides the Citadel: Hanar Diplomat side-mission, which is notorious not because it's hard, but because it's glitchy as hell and is prone to spontaneously imploding with no provocation at all. ''Walking past people'' can cause it to break.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Anachronox}}'', to get one character's InfinityPlusOneSword you need to let PAL play in a children's area for a specific amount of time at a specific point in the game. If he plays for less than 6 hours or more than 8 '''realtime''' hours he find other items instead. Even if he plays for the right amount of time but before reaching the specific point in the game he will get yet another item instead. This is a definite GuideDangIt moment as there is nothing in the game that hints at how long he needs to play or more importantly at what point the InfinityPlusOneSword appears rather than another item. And if you move more than a few feet from the window where you can see him, he comes out and the timer resets.
* The piano sidequest in ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce''. A ten-round battle with the highest-level enemies, your HP carries over between battles, a ton of attacks flying at you all at once, making them almost unavoidable, a lot of enemies having hair-tearing gimmicks (hit that giant eye enemy with its back turned? No damage, sorry!), an enemy that can heal itself and raise 200 HP shields (for reference, a lot of your cards don't even breach 150), and to top it all off, three 1000-HP enemies that fling attacks literally every half-second at you.
* An example in the prequel series, ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'': In 3, it's the Time Trials. To get the fifth star (which allows the unlocking of the Omega Navis), you have to clear every named Navi in the game (their beta versions, if available, excluding Bass) within a time limit. Not too bad, right, especially since a great folder can three-turn almost any boss? Nope. To clear them, you have to use the crappy pre-made folders found with random people in the game. You can't set a preset chip, so it's all up to randomness. The other one is the slab hiding the Hub.BAT Navicust piece. 20 battles in a row, with enemies that can cover the field with attacks, and the last few battles have the Aura nonsense going on.
* The Kick all the Lucky Animals sidequest in ''[[VideoGame/DotHackGUGames .hack]]'' is one thanks to the need to hop all over the playing fields to find each variety, having to avoid getting BlessedWithSuck from the unlucky types, and getting them all is a GuideDangIt because the method for generating them isn't that obvious.
** But the Flyer quest is an even better example, once you hit all the towns you have to wander the fields and hope that the medical team would even show up, and then it's very likely you got them on the list already. Unlike the lucky animals, there's no known method for making the Medical squad appear.
** In ''[[VideoGame/DotHackR1Games .hack//Quarantine]]'', there's the Item Completion Event, which gets unlocked once you finish the main story. To complete that, you need to collect ''all the items and equipments in the game'', except for the rare ones. Seeing how most people spent the games collecting rare (often missable) items, and that it doesn't register the items until you take them to the quest NPC (which means all the equipments you sold, gave to allies or traded don't count), most players need to start from scratch. It doesn't help that there are dozens of weapons for each class, and 90% of them can't be bought, so you have to start [[LimitBreak Data Draining]] monsters all around, trading with everyone and abusing Springs of Myst or [[GuideDangit check a guide]]. Your reward for all that hassle? [[BraggingRightsReward A wallpaper]]. No wonder almost no one cares to finish it...
* ''VideoGame/BatenKaitosOrigins'':
** There's the nightmarish ''VideoGame/PacMan'' sidequest, which ''takes longer to finish than every other sidequest and the main quest combined.'' To accomplish it, you must feed one of your quest magnus one copy of ''every other quest magnus in the game''. 3 of them are {{permanently missable|Content}}, 3 of them take 30 hours in real time to create (seriously), and there's a ton more that are in highly unintuitive places. Some of them can only be acquired by accepting a sidequest ''that doesn't show up on your sidequest list'', some of them are semi-missable (you can recreate them, but it's a major pain to do so), and MANY of them can only be acquired by letting them age. One of the quest magnus you need to use for this doubles as an ingredient for the game's InfinityPlusOneSword. And to make matters even worse, you have no in-game means of keeping track of which magnus you've used for this. Forgotten which ones you're missing? Too bad! Your reward for doing this is permanent critical hits, which ''would'' be a GameBreaker, but by the time you're done with this nightmare, you should be good enough to stomp the final boss into dust without it.
** For those who dealt with the Pac-Man sidequest by [[FanonDiscontinuity pretending it doesn't exist]], there's still "Gather the rock-people!" To do this quest, you have to move large stone statues throughout the Nekkar Quietlands by pushing them to the summit. Yes, pushing them, in a game where {{Hammerspace}} is a heavily JustifiedTrope. The EdgeGravity on said statues is beyond abysmal; you need to approach them with nearly pixel perfect accuracy just so the game registers the push, and even then it might not go the way you want it to - which is a major issue, because it's nigh-impossible to get the statues away from the walls except by leaving the area and coming back, which would be merely very bad instead of unforgivable if only Nekkar wasn't filled with narrow passages. The monsters can also block your statues, forcing you to fight them - and nearly every battle here features [[DemonicSpiders Queen Alraunes]]. And as though out of sheer spite, Nekkar is also filled with freaking '''invisible pit traps'''.
* It doesn't compare with the Pac-Man sidequest listed above, but Mizuti's sidequest in ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos Eternal Wings'' needs to be mentioned here. Remember [[ThatOneLevel Zosma Tower]]? All those damn timed 3D [[BlockPuzzle Block Puzzles]], done with a static camera that sometimes doesn't show you what you need to see? Well, you're going back there, down into the basement for five all new levels of fun. One particularly nasty puzzle requires you to use an elevator as a block stop. ''While it's in motion.'' Finally at the bottom? Remember that irritating boss fight, between [[LuckBasedMission Xelha and the Ice Goddess]]? They recreated it, this time between Mizuti and the Shadow Wizard. ''Eternal Wings'' also has the Family Tree and Star Map sidequests. The former requires a bit of maneuvering as some members of the family can only be convinced to return to Quzman's home after certain others have returned and at least one ''won't'' return if a certain other one is already there, some of the deceased members require you to talk to one of the members back at his house multiple times in order to get them signed for, and just when you think you've finished it, Quzman lays one more member on you, which can't be obtained until this point and requires going back into the aforementioned basement of Zosma Tower. The latter is even trickier, as many of the fragments appear as drops from random encounters and the final piece [[spoiler:was with the Keeper of the Star Map all along; you have to ''repeatedly'' ask him for "info on the fragments" after returning every other fragment, then tell him that you want to complete the map and that he "deserves it", and he'll finally give you the Fragment, which you must then hand right back to him to complete the quest.]]
* The Lost Sanctum quest in ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger [[UpdatedRerelease DS]]'' is quickly rising in the ranks as That One Sidequest. To wit: inescapable, scripted battles, going up and down the same mountain at least seven times, and not being able to progress without speaking to the right NPC to set off an event flag, despite having all the items necessary to proceed. And the rewards are quickly outclassed by those found in the post-game dungeon, the Dimensional Vortex. Hell, most of the rewards are outclassed by the rewards from the sidequests ''that were in the original game.'' The only upside to this is that the repetitive battles do allow for significant TP grinding, allowing you to quickly gain everyone's techs.
* Good luck maxing all the social links in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' if you haven't played the game before. Magaret requires lots of sheer luck and money sunk into her link, Ai's has the most opportunities to reverse and is the only one that can be broken, the Fox's take a few days to accomplish each and if you aren't doing them concurrently with your main quest, you can never catch up, and Naoto's requires max courage and knowledge. And those are just the more obnoxious ones.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'':
** A player would be lucky to have two days left at the end, and adventures don't even take up a full day in that game. Granted, the reason you have so little time left is because there's a social link that can only be started in the last month, but even without taking this link into account, you'll only finish with about a week and a half left. And completing the Persona compendium requires maxing all the social links, grinding your character to level 90 fusing personas all the way up, and... you'll still have [[LastLousyPoint only 98% completion]] because three personas are only obtainable by special fusions ''[[GuideDangIt that the game never tells you about]]''. Norn can be guessed if you know a bit of mythology (Clotho + Lachesis + Atropos, the Greek equivilents of the Norns), but Messiah (Orpheus + Thanatos) makes sense only in retrospect. And without a walkthrough, you're not likely to know Shiva (Rangda + Barong) even ''exists''.
** Several of Elizabeth's requests fall into this too.
*** "Please Clean the Bathroom" is an annoying case of DoubleUnlock. You need the Scrub Brush to clean the bathroom, which is a ''weapon''. Ken's joke weapon to be exact, which is only found as a reward for ''another'' quest: "I'd like to try Inari Sushi". This one requires maxed Academics, the slowest stat to raise in the game, and is one that players trying to max all Social Links will probably avoid since normally getting Inari Sushi at the Shrine uses up the afternoon. [[GuideDangIt The one time it doesn't is during this quest.]]
*** "I'd like to try Oden Juice" is another annoying one, as the game is essentially lying to you when it says the quest has no deadline. A girl at school has it, but she'll only give it to you in exchange for all the Kyoto-exclusive drinks. The problem is you only visit Kyoto once in the game, during the class trip in mid-November. If you don't buy all the drinks in what little time you have there, this request is [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]].
*** All of the katana requests in Tartarus. Elizabeth will ask for one rare katana for each block of Tartarus, and they can only be found in rare chests. Which, as the name implies, have a low chance of spawning on any given floor... and the rare chest needs to spawn on a couple of specific floors in order to have a chance of containing the katana. Not difficult, just a really annoying LuckBasedMission, and there are ''five'' of these in the game, the fifth being in the unlockable BonusDungeon.
* ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' has a combination sidequest plus ''final boss'': If you get to just before the final boss, and then leave and visit a specific town, it'll remove the boss's limiter, turning the final boss, who is easily doable around level 50 to a ridiculously powerful monster, requiring levels in the ''200s'' just to avoid being instantly killed even while wearing items which reduce the damage he does with his elemental attacks. The resultant grind is ridiculously long. Beating The Cave Of Trials also qualifies for this, although it's a great place to level grind.












* The Fallen in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''. Nigh impossible on a regular playthrough. Several of his attacks can randomly kill any party member in 1 hit, often killing more than 1 per turn. Any units that survive take roughly 50% damage. He also has a 10-turn limit after which your whole team is annihilated, regardless of how well you were doing. To top it off, improper (read: normal & suggested in-game) grinding makes the fight even tougher due to enemies scaling with your Battle Rank instead of your stats. To counteract this, people do the counter-intuitive "Low-BR" playthroughs in order to be maximize stat growth just for this fight. The Fallen's DLC reskin The Lost is ''even harder,'' with higher stats, better attacks, and he only gives you 5 turns before everyone dies. And there's even less of a reward.

to:

* The Fallen in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''. Nigh impossible on a regular playthrough. Several of his attacks can randomly kill any party member in 1 hit, often killing more than 1 per turn. Any units that survive take roughly 50% damage. He also has a 10-turn limit after which your whole team is annihilated, regardless of how well you were doing. To top it off, improper (read: normal & suggested in-game) grinding makes the fight even tougher due to enemies scaling with your Battle Rank instead of your stats. To counteract this, people do the counter-intuitive "Low-BR" playthroughs in order to be maximize stat growth just for this fight. The Fallen's DLC reskin The Lost is ''even harder,'' with higher stats, better attacks, and he only gives you 5 turns before everyone dies. And there's even less of a reward.



* ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana:''
** One of the sidequests you can undertake is to rescue a despondant organ grinder from the Underworld. Which, for this subquest, are policed by {{Mook Bouncer}}s that will teleport you back to the very bottom level of should you so much as brush against one. And in the later levels, they disappear from view a few seconds after you enter the room. (At least the game does give you a little bit of mercy in that you encounter fewer of these bouncers each time you get sent back.)
** Slightly less annoying, but still a pain in the rear, is an early subquest to sell lamps to the Dudbears. You're taught a few phrases in the Dudbear language, and then it's off to negotiate a series of dialogue trees so that they'll buy your lamps. It's somewhat made up for by the fact that you get 1000 Lucre per lamp, and the guy you have to give the money to doesn't even care if you don't give him the full 3000.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'':
** 'The Bigger They Are...'. You have to fight a [[GiantMook Gigantuar]]. His only attack, 10,000 Needles, takes off 10,000 health, dispels buffs, and has a very high chance of causing Pain and Fog. He also has over a million HP, a high Stagger threshold, and an insanely low target time. Even if you can beat it, it's one of the hardest missions to get a five-star on.
** 'Gaian Grudge'. Three Tonberries. Have fun.
** 'Indomitable Will' pits you against two [[StoneWall Raktavijas]], Cie'th with an 'inertial barrier' that reduces any damage they take to ScratchDamage. To get rid of the barrier, they have to be staggered, and their chain gauge fills excruciatingly slowly. They also have devastatingly powerful offense, so it comes down to finding the right balance of defense and offense.
** The battle against Neochu and five Picochu, especially if one does this prior to Chapter 12 to obtain the Growth Egg, an accessory that doubles the [=CP=] obtained from battle. Neochu hits pretty hard and [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou likes to target your leader]] as soon as the battle starts. It also uses Screech, which causes a huge amount of damage to the entire party, debuffs you ''and'' buffs the Picochu. And those little buggers are not pushovers, either. They're small and fast and hit hard that even [[StoneWall Snow]] will require some frequent healing to not die. The only good thing about this sidequest, is that Neochu is susceptible to Vanille's Death spell, though even with Neochu gone, the Picochu can still frustrate a player.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'':
** The Lucky Coin fragment. To get it, you have to win 7,777 coins at the slots. Besides likely requiring a high starting investment, this can take ''hours'' of mind-numbing slots until the game takes pity on you. Even the official strategy guide recommends putting a rubber band over the Autoplay button and leaving the game running for a few hours - except using Autoplay cuts your chances of winning by 33%. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
** There's also the Monster Professor fragment, which requires you to ''have fought every single enemy in the entire game at least once.'' There are literally dozens of {{Underground Monkey}}s in this game, many of which are incredibly unlikely to show up without the Battlemania fragment skill on. That's before you get into the BonusBoss fights, one of which only appears as an incredibly rare random encounter in a small area of a single time period you probably have no reason to go back to, or the Paradox Scope fights, many of which are ridiculously hard, or the Archylte Steppe, which has four different weather patterns, each with their own unique set of enemies that don't spawn anywhere else, or that one boss fight whose third form is skippable if you pick the right Live Trigger answer...
** There's also the quizzes in Academia. Many of the questions don't actually have answers in-game, but instead require you to try to work out the probable answer from what is in-game (or what's in one of the ''other'' Franchise/FinalFantasy games). But this isn't too bad if you have a guide. So most of the quizzes have you hunting down an NPC that appears at one of eleven out-of-the-way locations in the largest, most crowded, and generally convoluted map in the game and is almost invisible until you use Mog to reveal him. Oh, and some of the questions have random answers that change every time you do the quiz; guess the wrong one, and you get to start all over again. Fun times!
** Another sidequest requires you to explore 100% of all the maps in the game. Most of them are pretty easy, but some of them are infuriating, especially the Academia maps. Academia 400 AF is ThatOneLevel ''swarming'' with Cie'th, Academia 4XX AF is a massive sprawling city with dozens of tiny alleys, nooks, and crannies, and Academia 500 AF is a platformer level with several out of the way platforms, at least one of which requires the Anti-Grav Jump Fragment Skill to reach. Augusta Tower, meanwhile, is hard to explore simply because the map only shows one floor at a time, meaning there's no efficient way to check your progress barring stopping at every floor.



* In ''VideoGame/BreathOfFireIV'', trying to find all the dragon summons all have a degree of GuideDangIt, but the worst of them all has to be the Sea Dragon. Obviously, it will be found in the sea, but where ''exactly''? An NPC gives you a vague hint about some rock formation, yes, and locating that formation is actually easy, but ''pinpointing'' the exact spot is going to drive you crazy. Oh, and there's also the fact that the boating minigame in of itself has a slew of {{Scrappy Mechanic}}s.
8th Apr '17 10:28:06 PM karategal
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** Danjuro, the ultimate dagger, is dropped by a single Rare Game, which has an extremely complicated set of rules to get it to spawn reliably, which took years to figure out, to the point where the Final Fantasy Wiki ''still'' says that the exact spawn conditions are not fully understood. It only spawns in rooms with a Waystone (teleporter) ''and'' requires 30+ kills since the last time a Waystone was used. In an area where every 3-6 platforms is probably a Waystone that you don't you you can't use in order to get Larva Eater to spawn. Add onto that the obviously low drop rate for the Danjuro (3% base), and you've got a quest that is ''begging'' to be evaded via cheating or skillful moving around. (Then the Bestiary is rather taunting and pretty much ''lies'' by giving Larva Eater a 1/5 rating for how rare it is to find. Which, if you know the spawn mechanics, ''could'' be considered true. But considering it took two ''years'' to figure out how to get him to spawn ''once'' without taking all day....) Similar enemies have confirmed quirks to make dropping easier, i.e. Helvinek's Grand Helms by leaving the screen as the enemy dies. (Oh, and even if you ''don't'' want to get a Danjuro, if you want to complete the Bestiary for the later example of completing the Sky Pirate's Den, you're still going to need to spawn him at least once.)

to:

** Danjuro, the ultimate dagger, is dropped by a single Rare Game, which has an extremely complicated set of rules to get it to spawn reliably, which took years to figure out, to the point where the Final Fantasy Wiki ''still'' says that the exact spawn conditions are not fully understood. It only spawns in rooms with a Waystone (teleporter) ''and'' requires 30+ kills since the last time a Waystone was used. In an area where every 3-6 platforms is probably a Waystone that you don't know you you can't use in order to get Larva Eater to spawn. Add onto that the obviously low drop rate for the Danjuro (3% base), and you've got a quest that is ''begging'' to be evaded via cheating or skillful moving around. (Then the Bestiary is rather taunting and pretty much ''lies'' by giving Larva Eater a 1/5 rating for how rare it is to find. Which, if you know the spawn mechanics, ''could'' be considered true. But considering it took two ''years'' to figure out how to get him to spawn ''once'' without taking all day....) Similar enemies have confirmed quirks to make dropping easier, i.e. Helvinek's Grand Helms by leaving the screen as the enemy dies. (Oh, and even if you ''don't'' want to get a Danjuro, if you want to complete the Bestiary for the later example of completing the Sky Pirate's Den, you're still going to need to spawn him at least once.)



** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the beastiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.

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** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'', filling the Sky Pirate's Den is an example of That One Sidequest made up of other That One Sidequests: finding all thirteen espers, completing all Hunts, completing the beastiary bestiary (of 500 monsters, several of which are 'rare spawns' and may only have a 1% chance to spawn, one particular set requires you to take an hour and a half to completely wipe out two adjacent zones to get the target monster to spawn, ''fourteen times''), defeating a dozen hidden optional bosses in nondescript mazes (one of which, Yiazmat, requires two hours for a ''speedrun'' of maxed-out level 99 characters), powerlevelling every character about 20 levels above the point you fight the final boss, perform all the end-of-combo Concurrences (when you have no in-game way of finding out how many there are let alone how to do them), and fully exploring every map (including unmarked hidden areas). And to top it all off, this isn't what gives you HundredPercentCompletion -- completing the Den is is a prerequisite for a completely different challenge.



* Getting the elusive "perfect game" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is a recipe for infinite frustration - even once you realize that [[GuideDangIt you will NOT succeed without a guide]] for countless reasons, there are still certain enemies that seem designed to mess with {{hundred percent completion}}ists. Some of the more notorious ones include:

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* Getting the elusive "perfect game" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is a recipe for infinite frustration - -- even once you realize that [[GuideDangIt you will NOT succeed without a guide]] for countless reasons, there are still certain enemies that seem designed to mess with {{hundred percent completion}}ists. Some of the more notorious ones include:
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