History Main / TemporalParadox

19th Jan '16 4:57:19 AM SolidSonicTH
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*** This same paradox occurs in "The Why of Fry" and the Scootie Puff, Sr. but there it works out just fine (Fry tells Nibbler in the past to give him a better escape craft during the Infosphere mission, the Nibblonians give him one, and he escapes before the quantum interface bomb sends the Infosphere to the other dimension, which is not what happened the first time and invalidates the event that made it possible for him to go back in time in the first place).
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*** This same paradox occurs in "The Why of Fry" and with the Scootie Puff, Sr. but there it works out just fine (Fry tells Nibbler in the past to give him a better escape craft during the Infosphere mission, the Nibblonians give him one, and he escapes before the quantum interface bomb sends the Infosphere to the other dimension, which is not what happened the first time and invalidates the event that made it possible for him to go back in time in the first place).
19th Jan '16 4:56:14 AM SolidSonicTH
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*** This same paradox occurs in "The Why of Fry" and the Scootie Puff, Sr. but there it works out just fine (Fry tells Nibbler in the past to give him a better escape craft during the Infosphere mission, the Nibblonians give him one, and he escapes before the quantum interface bomb sends the Infosphere to the other dimension, which is not what happened the first time and invalidates the event that made it possible for him to go back in time in the first place).
29th Dec '15 4:51:50 AM Anddrix
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*** This is generally accepted; however, it has been shown that SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom has invented technology that allows this rule to be broken in PAD's Comicbook/XFactor run.
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*** This is generally accepted; however, it has been shown that SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom Doctor Doom has invented technology that allows this rule to be broken in PAD's Comicbook/XFactor run.
12th Oct '15 5:06:54 AM Xaven
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** In the two part adventure, "Under the Lake" and "Before the Flood", an ontological paradox, referred to in this as a bootstrap paradox, is the central theme of "Before the Flood". The Doctor's ghost is revealed to be a hologram created by the Doctor's Sonic Sunglasses, and everything the ghost said was programmed in by the Doctor. The thing is, the Doctor only knew to create the hologram because he saw the ghost and was told what it said. So, when exactly did the Doctor come up with the idea for the ghost and what it said? ** Also in "Before the Flood", the Doctor gives a hypothetical example of this paradox featuring Beethoven.
12th Oct '15 4:55:22 AM Xaven
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** In "Space" and "Time", the two part mini adventure where the TARDIS materializes inside itself, the Doctor knows he needs to create a controlled temporal implosion, but doesn't know which lever to use to trigger the implosion. Cue the arrival of a future Doctor with said knowledge. The Doctor then uses the lever and then quickly runs into the Police Box, becoming the future Doctor telling his past self which lever to use. Now, answer me this. Where exactly did the knowledge of which lever to use come from?
11th Oct '15 3:58:03 PM Xaven
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** This one is a Reverse Grandfather Paradox. In 2401, the first level of the game, when Cortez is trying to get back to the base with the time crystals, a mysterious figure can be spotted throughout the level, who helps out, especially in the final firefight by sniping enemies from a rock ledge overlooking the base, allowing Cortez to get inside and deliver the crystals, completing the time machine that Cortez then uses to travel though time. Towards the end of the game, when Cortez is in Crow's underwater base in 1924, he discovers that Crow has ordered some assassins to travel to 2401 to kill Cortez before he travels in time. He disguises himself as an assassin and travels with the others, carrying only two weapons, one of them being a sniper rifle. He takes out the other assassins and other enemies blocking his past self's path to the base. Reaching a rock ledge overlooking the base, he joins in the final firefight by sniping enemies, until his past self enters the base.
11th Oct '15 3:36:51 PM Xaven
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* ''TimeSplitters: Future Perfect'', has multiple examples. ** Throughout the game, once in every time zone, Cortez crosses paths with a future version of himself, then travels back in time and repeats those events as the future self. The first time this happens is when he is in 1924. He comes across a locked door and is unable to advance. But then, a future Cortez arrives in the hallway above him, and, through a grate, tosses him the key to the door, telling him to pass it on later. When he reaches the hallway above that room, he passes through a wormhole, taking him back in time, and passes on the key to his past self. This leaves one question. Where did the key come from? ** Another example is when Cortez is in 2052. He enters a large chamber with two terminals and a wormhole. He teams up with three other versions of himself to successfully get through the room. The first and third versions of Cortez hack the terminals, while the second and fourth versions fight off the room's security. However, the two terminals are locked by passwords, which are given to the first and third versions of Cortez by the other two. Just where did this knowledge of the passwords come from?
18th Sep '15 10:13:32 PM nombretomado
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** Except when it is that way. You don't think that any two comic writers actually agree on how this stuff works, do you? That said, the ''EarthX'' series (including Universe X and Paradise X) suggests a couple of different versions of this. In the end, it is fundamentally, philosophically important that the idea that [[spoiler:alternate universes branch off only as a result of time travel]] is true.
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** Except when it is that way. You don't think that any two comic writers actually agree on how this stuff works, do you? That said, the ''EarthX'' ''ComicBook/EarthX'' series (including Universe X and Paradise X) suggests a couple of different versions of this. In the end, it is fundamentally, philosophically important that the idea that [[spoiler:alternate universes branch off only as a result of time travel]] is true.
12th Sep '15 7:10:52 PM SamTheAwesome
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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fanfic/TheLastGreatTimeWar ''The Last Great Time War'']], a Doctor Who fanfiction, has a multiverse-wide war of paradoxes.

* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' special, "The Secret Origin of Denzel Crocker". Timmy goes back in time to find out why Crocker was so miserable and to try to fix it. He finds out that as a child, Crocker ''himself'' had fairy godparents--and that they were Cosmo and Wanda, something that they don't remember--and figures out that he must've done something to lose his fairies. He tries to warn the young Crocker, but inadvertently ends up being the one who reveals the secret (with some help from both '70s Cosmo ''and'' modern Cosmo's stupidity). Furthermore, as Jorgen shows up to erase everyone's memories of there being fairies, young Crocker manages to get his hands on the DNA tracker that AJ had built so that they'd know when Crocker was around, ''and'' managed to get Cosmo's DNA to use in it, ''and'' managed to covertly write a memo on the back of it that fairy godparents exist without Jorgen noticing, allowing him to keep that knowledge after his memory of fairies was erased...which means that if Timmy had never interfered, Crocker would be neither miserable nor fairy-obsessed. However, whereas when Timmy left for the past, Crocker was using a very primitive and likely useless "fairy finder", the Crocker in the present that Timmy returned to was using the tracker that AJ had built, implying that he ''had'' created an alternate timeline, and leaving one to wonder what happened in the original timeline. Of course, considering it's explicitly stated in TheMovie that few kids keep their fairies past their first year, much less until adulthood when they would leave ''anyway'', we can guess...
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' special, "The Secret Origin of Denzel Crocker". Timmy goes back in time to find out why Crocker was so miserable and to try to fix it. He finds out that as a child, Crocker ''himself'' had fairy godparents--and that they were Cosmo and Wanda, something that they don't remember--and figures out that he must've done something to lose his fairies. He tries to warn the young Crocker, but inadvertently ends up being the one who reveals the secret (with some help from both '70s Cosmo ''and'' modern Cosmo's stupidity). Furthermore, as Jorgen shows up to erase everyone's memories of there being fairies, young Crocker manages to get his hands on the DNA tracker that AJ had built so that they'd know when Crocker was around, ''and'' managed to get Cosmo's DNA to use in it, ''and'' managed to covertly write a memo on the back of it that fairy godparents exist without Jorgen noticing, allowing him to keep that knowledge after his memory of fairies was erased...which which means that if Timmy had never interfered, Crocker would be neither miserable nor fairy-obsessed. However, whereas when Timmy left for the past, Crocker was using a very primitive and likely useless "fairy finder", the Crocker in the present that Timmy returned to was using the tracker that AJ had built, implying that he ''had'' created an alternate timeline, and leaving one to wonder what happened in the original timeline. Of course, considering it's explicitly stated in TheMovie that few kids keep their fairies past their first year, much less until adulthood when they would leave ''anyway'', we can guess...
7th Sep '15 7:00:42 AM Hanz
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* The ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games are well known for situations occurring in which the player can create a paradox of sorts, by killing someone in a prequel who is known to be alive in chronologically later games. Of particular note is Revolver Ocelot, in the third game, whose death during certain scenes results in an instant NonStandardGameOver. It's especially surreal when your CO ''from the future'' starts chewing you out for causing a Time Paradox.
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* The ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games are well known for situations occurring in which the player can create a paradox of sorts, by killing someone in a prequel who is known to be alive in chronologically later games. Of particular note is Revolver Ocelot, in the third game, whose death during certain scenes results in an instant NonStandardGameOver. It's especially surreal when your CO ''from the future'' starts chewing you out for causing a Time Paradox.
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