History Main / SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic

23rd Feb '18 3:13:05 PM margdean56
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* Creator/LyndonHardy's "Master of the Five Magics" series starts out with five kinds of magic whose rules have been studied and formalised to such a degree that each kind of magic uses different terms to indicate its ultimate law(s) - the Principles of thaumaturgy, the Doctrine of alchemy, the Maxim of magic, the Rule of sorcery, and the Laws of wizardry. The antagonist in the second book is attempting to conquer the world by mastering the meta-laws that govern which rules are dominant at any given time, then disconnecting them and bringing in new ways to perform these various arts that his troops have figured out but the established orders are unable to use - essentially trying to win by having analysed magic more than the other guys. The third book takes this to the ''next'' level of meta, exploring the feedback effects of specific types of analysis on metamagic - and by extension, local physics - and introduces an antagonist who has meta-meta-analyzed magic sufficiently to have learned how to effectively LogicBomb parts of the multiverse out of coherence.

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* Creator/LyndonHardy's "Master of the Five Magics" series starts out with five kinds of magic whose rules have been studied and formalised to such a degree that each kind of magic uses different terms to indicate its ultimate law(s) - the law(s)--the Principles of thaumaturgy, the Doctrine of alchemy, the Maxim of magic, the Rule of sorcery, and the Laws of wizardry. The antagonist in the second book is attempting to conquer the world by mastering the meta-laws that govern which rules are dominant at any given time, then disconnecting them and bringing in new ways to perform these various arts that his troops have figured out but the established orders are unable to use - essentially use--essentially trying to win by having analysed magic more than the other guys. The third book takes this to the ''next'' level of meta, exploring the feedback effects of specific types of analysis on metamagic - and metamagic--and by extension, local physics - and physics--and introduces an antagonist who has meta-meta-analyzed magic sufficiently to have learned how to effectively LogicBomb parts of the multiverse out of coherence.



* In ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'', the Spiral Labyrinth is a hidden library and research facility where warlocks with a scholarly bent study and experiment with both existing spells as well as developing new ones. They also accept commissions (such as from the Clave) to develop specific magic as needed. The Silent Brothers do similar work in the City of Bones, but are more narrowly-focused since they must work within the bounds of the runic knowledge granted to the Nephilim by the Angel Raziel.

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* In ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'', the Spiral Labyrinth is a hidden library and research facility where warlocks with a scholarly bent study and experiment with both existing spells as well as developing new ones. They also accept commissions (such as from the Clave) to develop specific magic as needed. The Silent Brothers do similar work in the City of Bones, but are more narrowly-focused narrowly focused since they must work within the bounds of the runic knowledge granted to the Nephilim by the Angel Raziel.



* In ''Literature/TheIronTeeth'' web serial the mage guild's treat magic like a science. They use chemistry and the scientific method to create spell crystals and other devices.

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* In ''Literature/TheIronTeeth'' web serial the mage guild's guilds treat magic like a science. They use chemistry and the scientific method to create spell crystals and other devices.



* In ''Literature/TheYoungAncients'' magic consists of creating fields where the laws of physics behave differently,in highly predictable ways as ordered by the field's creator. A solid knowledge of physics and chemistry can only aid a Builder. Later descriptions make this sound even more like computer programming, the Builder enters a trance wherein they can control their own brain's electricity so precisely so as to program reality on a quantum level.

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* In ''Literature/TheYoungAncients'' magic consists of creating fields where the laws of physics behave differently,in differently, in highly predictable ways as ordered by the field's creator. A solid knowledge of physics and chemistry can only aid a Builder. Later descriptions make this sound even more like computer programming, programming; the Builder enters a trance wherein they can control their own brain's electricity so precisely so as to program reality on a quantum level.



* While [[{{Creator/StrugatskyBrothers}} the Strugatsky Brothers]] primarily wrote science fiction (hard at first, then progressively soft social SF) and are known for their ''Literature/NoonUniverse'' cycle, they also wrote two seminal Soviet fantasy novels purely running on this trope, ''Literature/MondayBeginsOnSaturday'' and ''Literature/TaleOfTheTroika''. Both are set in the same universe (which is a setting separate from the Noon Universe, unlike nearly all their other output except the last few novels), with the former being something like an comedic, fairly light-hearted ScienceFantasy / UrbanFantasy [[{{JustForFun/XMeetsY}} hybrid]], which parodies, and at the same time pays homage to, the academic spirit in general and the Soviet research institute system in particular; and the latter being a much more cynical, satirical tale with acerbic swipes at Soviet bureaucracy (it was heavily censored and only released in the [[{{DirectorsCut}} original form]] in the late 80s). Interestingly enough, while this trope is prominent, MagicAIsMagicA is averted very much on purpose: the magic in this setting is not particularly consistent or rigorously scientific (what with quite a few things from the FantasyKitchenSink thrown in), but the ''research'' into it is - which obviously doesn't fit together all that well in-universe, and thus causes some hilarious situations.

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* While [[{{Creator/StrugatskyBrothers}} the Strugatsky Brothers]] primarily wrote science fiction (hard at first, then progressively soft social SF) and are known for their ''Literature/NoonUniverse'' cycle, they also wrote two seminal Soviet fantasy novels purely running on this trope, ''Literature/MondayBeginsOnSaturday'' and ''Literature/TaleOfTheTroika''. Both are set in the same universe (which is a setting separate from the Noon Universe, unlike nearly all their other output except the last few novels), with the former being something like an comedic, fairly light-hearted ScienceFantasy / UrbanFantasy [[{{JustForFun/XMeetsY}} hybrid]], which parodies, and at the same time pays homage to, the academic spirit in general and the Soviet research institute system in particular; and the latter being a much more cynical, satirical tale with acerbic swipes at Soviet bureaucracy (it was heavily censored and only released in the [[{{DirectorsCut}} original form]] in the late 80s). Interestingly enough, while this trope is prominent, MagicAIsMagicA is averted very much on purpose: the magic in this setting is not particularly consistent or rigorously scientific (what with quite a few things from the FantasyKitchenSink thrown in), but the ''research'' into it is - which is--which obviously doesn't fit together all that well in-universe, and thus causes some hilarious situations.
23rd Feb '18 3:01:20 PM margdean56
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotter'', there are research departments in the Ministry of Magic; the Half-Blood Prince's potions textbook is a prime example of a student improving and perfecting potions-making through trial and error, study and observation; and Lord Voldemort delved further into the depths of dark magic than any wizard who came before him. Dumbledore's development of the uses of dragons' blood might also fall under this trope. The Potterverse in general has an interesting perspective on this trope. Whilst magic is never described as being anything explicable by ordinary means, it is a force that seems to obey numerous immutable rules (although most of these, such as 'magic cannot revive the dead' appear to be moral rather than empirical.) Heck, the fact that so many magical disciplines can be taught in a school at all is proof that they have been studied and recorded diligently over the centuries, and nearly all of what witches and wizards learn is simply how to duplicate the spells and potions that their forbears discovered.

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* In ''Literature/HarryPotter'', there are research departments in the Ministry of Magic; the Half-Blood Prince's potions textbook is a prime example of a student improving and perfecting potions-making through trial and error, study and observation; and Lord Voldemort delved further into the depths of dark magic than any wizard who came before him. Dumbledore's development of the uses of dragons' blood might also fall under this trope. The Potterverse in general has an interesting perspective on this trope. Whilst magic is never described as being anything explicable by ordinary means, it is a force that seems to obey numerous immutable rules (although most of these, such as 'magic cannot revive the dead' appear to be moral rather than empirical.) Heck, the fact that so many magical disciplines can be taught in a school at all is proof that they have been studied and recorded diligently over the centuries, and nearly all of what witches and wizards learn is simply how to duplicate the spells and potions that their forbears forebears discovered.



** The ritual that summons Death traditionally required a human sacrifice and lots of eldritch fires, but by the time the books start this has been refined to three bits of wood and four cubic centimetres of mouse blood. A later book introduced an even more refined version that just needed two bits of wood and an egg. [[RunningGag "It has to be a fresh egg, though"]]. It's even suggested that most magic can be pared down like this in a pinch, but is deliberately wrapped up in hard work, ceremony and mumbo-jumbo to keep people from trying it, for the same reason that we don't want hobbyists building nuclear bombs in their basements.

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** The ritual that summons Death traditionally required a human sacrifice and lots of eldritch fires, but by the time the books start this has been refined to three bits of wood and four cubic centimetres of mouse blood. A later book introduced an even more refined version that just needed two bits of wood and an egg. [[RunningGag "It has to be a fresh egg, though"]].though."]]. It's even suggested that most magic can be pared down like this in a pinch, but is deliberately wrapped up in hard work, ceremony and mumbo-jumbo to keep people from trying it, for the same reason that we don't want hobbyists building nuclear bombs in their basements.



* The ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series has a newly created school of magical theoreticians, who use geometry to work out what the effects of various bits of magic will be. Oddly enough, they mix this trope with AchievementsInIgnorance-- the theoreticians get started because, after hundreds of years where their nation had no mages, one of the things they don't know is that there are supposedly things they ''can never'' know. There's thus an understandable degree of conflict between them and the actual mages, who take a much more intuitive approach. As the ''Mage Storms'' series reaches its climax, it's conceded by even the most diehard "intuitionists" that the theoreticians have a point, and that their research works.

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* The ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series has a newly created school of magical theoreticians, who use geometry to work out what the effects of various bits of magic will be. Oddly enough, they mix this trope with AchievementsInIgnorance-- the AchievementsInIgnorance--the theoreticians get started because, after hundreds of years where their nation had no mages, one of the things they don't know is that there are supposedly things they ''can never'' know. There's thus an understandable degree of conflict between them and the actual mages, who take a much more intuitive approach. As the ''Mage Storms'' series reaches its climax, it's conceded by even the most diehard "intuitionists" that the theoreticians have a point, and that their research works.



* The same "make spells using assembly language" idea is used in Creator/GordonRDickson's novel ''Literature/TheDragonKnight'', although in the opposite direction. Here this is initially presented as a mnemonic approach to looking up and casting spells from an initially provided (and extremely comprehensive) reference book: rather than building up from simple effects, complex and polished spells are ''broken down'' into what's needed. And the series also develops this in the opposite direction from ''Literature/WizBiz'': rather than introducing successively more complex applications of programming, the main character's development in magic lies in slowly ''abandoning'' most of this, replacing symbolic formalue with colloquial description, that with visualization, and ultimately that for a wordless and intuitive form of "make whatever is most appropriate for this moment so" kind of thinking. While he never gives up formulating and testing hypotheses, what is being tested, how and what the results mean become progressively less clear over the series' course.
* In ''Literature/RetributionFalls'' demonologists are basically scientists who build {{Magitek}} (more magic than tech) powered by demons, they're not particularly evil either.

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* The same "make spells using assembly language" idea is used in Creator/GordonRDickson's novel ''Literature/TheDragonKnight'', although in the opposite direction. Here this is initially presented as a mnemonic approach to looking up and casting spells from an initially provided (and extremely comprehensive) reference book: rather than building up from simple effects, complex and polished spells are ''broken down'' into what's needed. And the series also develops this in the opposite direction from ''Literature/WizBiz'': rather than introducing successively more complex applications of programming, the main character's development in magic lies in slowly ''abandoning'' most of this, replacing symbolic formalue formulae with colloquial description, that with visualization, and ultimately that for a wordless and intuitive form of "make whatever is most appropriate for this moment so" kind of thinking. While he never gives up formulating and testing hypotheses, what is being tested, how and what the results mean become progressively less clear over the series' course.
* In ''Literature/RetributionFalls'' demonologists are basically scientists who build {{Magitek}} (more magic than tech) powered by demons, they're demons. They're not particularly evil either.



* The protagonist of L. E. Modesitt Jr's ''[[Literature/SagaOfRecluce The Magic Engineer]]'' takes this approach to magic - he takes notes on the logic and mathematical principles by which magic works, and eventually understands the basis of the entire magical system and how the two forms of magic interact with the material world. He then uses this scientific understanding of magic to build MagiTek steam-powered warships.

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* The protagonist of L. E. Modesitt Jr's ''[[Literature/SagaOfRecluce The Magic Engineer]]'' takes this approach to magic - he magic--he takes notes on the logic and mathematical principles by which magic works, and eventually understands the basis of the entire magical system and how the two forms of magic interact with the material world. He then uses this scientific understanding of magic to build MagiTek steam-powered warships.



** Waldo Butters is a medical examiner with absolutely zero magical talent. However, his analytical mindset and ability to remember random half-heard bits of information make him one of the best magical theorists on the planet, outstripping many wizards who have been researchign the topic for centuries in mere months. In a world where magic makes any technology go kablooie, he figures out a way to connect a spirit of intellect to the internet.
** In ''Summer Knight'', a Fairie Queen cites the Law of Conservation of Energy as proof of why the Summer knight's mantle of power couldn't be destroyed.

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** Waldo Butters is a medical examiner with absolutely zero magical talent. However, his analytical mindset and ability to remember random half-heard bits of information make him one of the best magical theorists on the planet, outstripping many wizards who have been researchign researching the topic for centuries in mere months. In a world where magic makes any technology go kablooie, he figures out a way to connect a spirit of intellect to the internet.
** In ''Summer Knight'', a Fairie Faerie Queen cites the Law of Conservation of Energy as proof of why the Summer knight's mantle of power couldn't be destroyed.



** In The fifth book, ''Foxglove Summer'', it is revealed that part of Nightingale's dismay comes from it being that line of thinking taken up by ThoseWackyNazis and the {{Ghostapo}} during [=WW2=], which led all sorts of atrocities and the virtual extinguishment of magic in the world at Ettersberg.

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** In The fifth book, ''Foxglove Summer'', it is revealed that part of Nightingale's dismay comes from it being that line of thinking taken up by ThoseWackyNazis and the {{Ghostapo}} during [=WW2=], which led to all sorts of atrocities and the virtual extinguishment of magic in the world at Ettersberg.



* Taken to MagiTek levels in ''Literature/TheCaseOfTheToxicSpellDump'', in which the narrator's fiancee is a proofreader for a grimoire publishing house, and sorcerous breakthroughs such as ectopasmic cloning and jinnetic engineering are rapidly modernizing an AlternateUniverse Earth.

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* Taken to MagiTek levels in ''Literature/TheCaseOfTheToxicSpellDump'', in which the narrator's fiancee fiancée is a proofreader for a grimoire publishing house, and sorcerous breakthroughs such as ectopasmic cloning and jinnetic engineering are rapidly modernizing an AlternateUniverse Earth.



* In ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'', allomancy- a magic system triggered by ingesting and "burning" various metals- was thoroughly explored by [[GodEmperor the Lord Ruler]], who only allowed knowledge of ten basic metals to reach the general populace. As the series progresses, [[ActionGirl Vin]] uses her knowledge of allomancy's logical setup of powers to discover a handful of new metals with additional abilities. From the same series, it's revealed in the final book that the torture chambers of the Steel Inquisitors were actually laboratories for researching [[BloodMagic hemalurgy]].
* Lev Grossman's ''Literature/TheMagicians'' and subsequent sequel play into this a lot. Magic is only doable by the most intelligent and obsessed people, as it requires memorizing enormous charts of data (moon position, weather), dozens of language (ancient and current), and the most elaborate hand gestures. Analysis is the main method of learning magic; only rare examples do magic spontaneously.

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* In ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'', allomancy- a allomancy--a magic system triggered by ingesting and "burning" various metals- was metals--was thoroughly explored by [[GodEmperor the Lord Ruler]], who only allowed knowledge of ten basic metals to reach the general populace. As the series progresses, [[ActionGirl Vin]] uses her knowledge of allomancy's logical setup of powers to discover a handful of new metals with additional abilities. From the same series, it's revealed in the final book that the torture chambers of the Steel Inquisitors were actually laboratories for researching [[BloodMagic hemalurgy]].
* Lev Grossman's ''Literature/TheMagicians'' and subsequent sequel play into this a lot. Magic is only doable by the most intelligent and obsessed people, as it requires memorizing enormous charts of data (moon position, weather), dozens of language languages (ancient and current), and the most elaborate hand gestures. Analysis is the main method of learning magic; only rare examples do magic spontaneously.
22nd Feb '18 5:54:40 AM Spindriver
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* Doctor Doom is a pro at this trope. Unlike his contemporary and rival, [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed Richards]], Doom has a thorough understanding of not just earthly sciences, but magic as well. He's actually used this advantage on a number of occasions to one-up Reed (and most of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse at various points), although the inherent weaknesses of magic (usually, bartering/stealing the energy from a higher power) typically come to bite Doom in the backside. Doom also blends magic and technology. For example, he use the sensors of his armor to copy the exact hand movements of spells when he sees them cast for the first time, and his gloves can automatically guide his hands through them. Thus allowing him to [[PowerCopying copy other wizards' spells]] far more quickly than it would normally take to master them. Though there are limits to this. Copying the movement may not be enough without an understanding behind the magic or sufficient level of skill to handle the spell as Doom found out with a later attempt. In one story the infar-red vision provided by his mask allowed him to see some advance warning of when magic was about to be cast, the other wizards and sorcerers present seemed to be unaware that their moves were being telegraphed as such.

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* Doctor Doom is a pro at this trope. Unlike his contemporary and rival, [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed Richards]], Doom has a thorough understanding of not just earthly sciences, but magic as well. He's actually used this advantage on a number of occasions to one-up Reed (and most of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse at various points), although the inherent weaknesses of magic (usually, bartering/stealing the energy from a higher power) typically come to bite Doom in the backside. Doom also blends magic and technology. For example, he use uses the sensors of in his armor to copy the exact hand movements of spells when he sees them cast for the first time, and his gloves can automatically guide his hands through them. Thus allowing him to [[PowerCopying copy other wizards' spells]] far more quickly than it would normally take to master them. Though there are limits to this. Copying the movement may not be enough without an understanding behind the magic or sufficient level of skill to handle the spell as Doom found out with a later attempt. In one story the infar-red infra-red vision provided by his mask allowed him to see some advance warning of when magic was about to be cast, the other wizards and sorcerers present seemed to be unaware that their moves were being telegraphed as such.



** Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, co-inventor of calculus, describer of universal gravitation and the three laws of motion, among other accomplishments, for one tried to make gold with alchemy and count the exact date of the Judgement Day. It's often said he's the last alchemist rather than the first scientist.

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** John Dee, a highly competent Elizabethan mathematician, geographer, and astrologer, was clearly as dedicated to discovering the nature of reality by systematic, methodical means as any modern physicist. Itís just that, by what he understood of reality, this meant trying to learn the names of angels and hiring a medium (and con artist) to gaze into a scrying crystal.
** Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, co-inventor of calculus, describer of universal gravitation and the three laws of motion, among other accomplishments, for one tried to make gold with alchemy and count determine the exact date of the Judgement Day. It's often said he's he was the last alchemist rather than the first scientist.
7th Feb '18 1:03:20 AM Cryoclaste
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* In the {{Castlevania}} series:
** Charlotte, one of the two player characters in VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin, is a powerful sorceress that owes her skill to constant study. She describes magic, either Dracula's, her own, or otherwise, with the kind of detail and technical lingo you'd expect from a scientist explaining her craft (early in the game, she explains the villain is controlling the castle's magic with "multilayer quantum-space barriers", based on the "Theory of Curse Amplification"). However, she doesn't elaborate too much on the terms she uses, so her explanations sometimes come across as a bit [[MagiBabble vague and hollow]]. This is somewhat justified because most of the time, she's explaining this to [[BookDumb Jonathan]], a warrior by trade who's not nearly as well versed in magic as she is. However, this trope is also zig-zagged, as there's magic in the story ([[OurGhostsAreDifferent specially]] [[SpiritAdvisor Wind]]'s) that even she can't justify or comprehend, because, well, [[AWizardDidIt it's magic, after all]], but also because she's still young and, despite being a prodigy, is still lacking experience.
** The eponymous [[CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] is the last of several groups of dedicated scholars founded in the 19th century to find new ways of defeating Dracula in the absence of the Belmont family line through diligent study. They finally succeeded in creating such a way, [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique Dominus]], right before one of the members, named Albus, goes rogue and steals it, kicking off the plot. [[spoiler: The "analyzed" part kicks into full gear when its revealed that [[EvilIsNotAToy all that research with Dracula's magic drove Barlowe, the Order's founder, mad]], resulting in him designing Dominus to consume the user and free Dracula instead of destroying him for good. As it turns out, Albus found out ''part'' of his lie and stole Dominus so he could do his own research. His search leads him to track down the descendants of the Belmont family and draw samples of their blood in an attempt to reconfigure Dominus. He is even found in a laboratory at one point.]]

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* In the {{Castlevania}} ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' series:
** Charlotte, one of the two player characters in VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin, ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin,'' is a powerful sorceress that owes her skill to constant study. She describes magic, either Dracula's, her own, or otherwise, with the kind of detail and technical lingo you'd expect from a scientist explaining her craft (early in the game, she explains the villain is controlling the castle's magic with "multilayer quantum-space barriers", based on the "Theory of Curse Amplification"). However, she doesn't elaborate too much on the terms she uses, so her explanations sometimes come across as a bit [[MagiBabble vague and hollow]]. This is somewhat justified because most of the time, she's explaining this to [[BookDumb Jonathan]], a warrior by trade who's not nearly as well versed in magic as she is. However, this trope is also zig-zagged, as there's magic in the story ([[OurGhostsAreDifferent specially]] [[SpiritAdvisor Wind]]'s) that even she can't justify or comprehend, because, well, [[AWizardDidIt it's magic, after all]], but also because she's still young and, despite being a prodigy, is still lacking experience.
** The eponymous [[CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] is the last of several groups of dedicated scholars founded in the 19th century to find new ways of defeating Dracula in the absence of the Belmont family line through diligent study. They finally succeeded in creating such a way, [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique Dominus]], right before one of the members, named Albus, goes rogue and steals it, kicking off the plot. [[spoiler: The "analyzed" part kicks into full gear when its revealed that [[EvilIsNotAToy all that research with Dracula's magic drove Barlowe, the Order's founder, mad]], resulting in him designing Dominus to consume the user and free Dracula instead of destroying him for good. As it turns out, Albus found out ''part'' of his lie and stole Dominus so he could do his own research. His search leads him to track down the descendants of the Belmont family and draw samples of their blood in an attempt to reconfigure Dominus. He is even found in a laboratory at one point.]]
15th Dec '17 5:46:32 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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* While [[{{Creator/StrugatskyBrothers}} the Strugatsky Brothers]] primarily wrote science fiction (hard at first, then progressively soft social SF) and are known for their ''Literature/NoonUniverse'' cycle, they also wrote two seminal Soviet fantasy novels purely running on this trope, ''Literature/MondayBeginsOnSaturday'' and ''Literature/TaleOfTheTroika''. Both are set in the same universe (which is a setting separate from the Noon Universe, unlike nearly all their other output except the last few novels), with the former being something like an comedic, fairly light-hearted ScienceFantasy / UrbanFantasy [[{{JustForFun/XMeetsY}} hybrid]], which parodies, and at the same time pays homage to, the academic spirit in general and the Soviet research institute system in particular; and the latter being a much more cynical, satirical tale with acerbic swipes at Soviet bureaucracy (it was heavily censored and only released in the [[{{DirectorsCut}} original form]] in the late 80s). Interestingly enough, while this trope is prominent, MagicAIsMagicA is averted very much on purpose: the magic in this setting is not particularly consistent or rigorously scientific (what with quite a few things from the FantasyKitchenSink thrown in), but the ''research'' into it is - which obviously doesn't fit together all that well in-universe, and thus causes some hilarious situations.
9th Dec '17 2:41:51 PM dracogeorge
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* In ''VideoGame/OpenSorcery'', you play BEL/S, an elemental firewall, which is a fire spirit bound to C++, with a HTML[[note]][[FunWithAcronyms Hypertext Magical Language]][[/note]] GUI, that acts like a firewall. Except instead of viruses, it deals with malicious spirits. And you might become an AI. It actually opens by quoting both ClarkesThirdLaw, and Clarke's Third Law Reversed, i.e. the quote at the top of this page.
9th Dec '17 9:44:04 AM TheGreatConversation
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* ''Literature/EnchantedForestChronicles''' Telemain did this, the implication being that this was the distinction between "magicians" and other magic-users (or, to put it another way, watch your ass, there's probably a few more like him lurking around Linderwall and the surrounding kingdoms).

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* ''Literature/EnchantedForestChronicles''' ''Literature/EnchantedForestChronicles'': Telemain did this, the implication is a magician, which apparently amounts to "magical theoretician," magicians being that this was the distinction between "magicians" and ones who ''analyze'' magic, while other magic-users (or, magic users don't concern themselves with theory. He has a tendency to put it another way, watch your ass, there's probably explode into enthusiastic SesquipedalianLoquaciousness whenever he encounters a few more like him lurking around Linderwall and the surrounding kingdoms).new spell.


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* The main branch of magic in ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' works through invocation of "true names," and its mastery requires long years of intensive study and memorization.
8th Dec '17 7:28:17 PM Xtifr
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* In Creator/CharlesStross' ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'', magic is a science. Specifically, computer science. Alan Turing discovered how to use technology to contact other dimensions, most of which are full of not-very-nice creatures. It's very much a science, since why bother with all that drawing of sigils when you can just load up an app on your PDA that does the same thing?

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* In Creator/CharlesStross' ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'', ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'', magic is a science. Specifically, computer science. Alan Turing discovered how to use technology to contact other dimensions, most of which are full of not-very-nice creatures. It's very much a science, since why bother with all that drawing of sigils when you can just load up an app on your PDA that does the same thing?
3rd Dec '17 2:33:06 AM Touko_K
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* Mostly performed by the Inertia Society in the ''Videogame/{{Undertale}}'' fanfic [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fanfic/Visiontale Visiontale]], [[https://archiveofourown.org/works/8779618/chapters/20125687 posted on Archive of Our Own]], whose members study magic with scientific rigor. Inspired by human TechnoBabble, monsters even created MagiBabble to describe magic, and use magic to create magitronic devices, like their versions of smartphones, televisions, and computers.
29th Nov '17 5:57:14 AM ramblepedia
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* In ''WesternAnimation/TangledTheSeries'', Valerian is a scientist, inventor, and alchemist, and on multiple occasions he has attempted to apply science to try to understand to the magical mysteries of Corona.
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