History Main / StupidSacrifice

7th Nov '17 1:46:34 PM Zaptech
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* In ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'', Pyrrha goes to fight [[spoiler: Cinder Falls]] after the latter attacks the school and [[spoiler: steals the power of the Fall Maiden]]. The school's been evacuated (so there's no one left who needs rescue) and Pyrrha knows she's not a match for the powered-up villain, but she still fights her and gets killed, accomplishing nothing besides causing extra emotional harm to her friends.
7th Nov '17 6:14:35 AM wingedcatgirl
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* The ''Machinima/LeeroyJenkinsVideo'' isn't really going ''that'' badly when Leeroy charges into the Rookery -- a sensible party would have [[ShootTheDog just let him die]], leaving them able to resurrect him at their leisure. Instead, though, they insist on charging in and trying to save him. ThePlan itself also involved several of these, as the Paladins were to cast Divine Intervention (which kills the caster to make the target invulnerable, [[EquivalentExchange but also incapable of acting]]) in an attempt to protect the mages while they AOE down the whelps. [[KarmaHoudiniWarranty This ends up including Leeroy himself]].
3rd Nov '17 1:54:36 PM ShorinBJ
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** Played with in the ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' episode "Learning Curves". While Tuvok tries to get the Ex-Maquis to start working like actual Starfleet officers, and not glory hungry terrorists, they fail a training simulation. When they accuse it of being an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation, he reveals there was a way to win: Retreating. Had they retreated, they would've lived. Instead, they "killed" themselves for nothing.

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** Played with in the ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' episode "Learning Curves". While Tuvok tries to get the Ex-Maquis ex-Maquis to start working like actual Starfleet officers, crewmen, and not glory hungry terrorists, they fail a training simulation. When they accuse it of being an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation, he reveals there was a way to win: Retreating. Had they retreated, they would've lived. Instead, they "killed" themselves for nothing.



** There's also an instance in the episode "Flesh and Blood", where Bra'tac attempts to ram their ha'tak into an Ori cruiser despite them witnessing first-hand that their weapons were ineffective (which is also pointed out by Sam). Mitchell (O'Neill's successor), being the guy he is, slaps a teleporter beacon onto Bra'tac when he isn't looking and has the ''Odyssey'' beam them all out before impact. Just as Sam predicted, the ha'tak's explosion doesn't even get past the Ori shields.
* The death of the Senator in the ''Series/StargateUniverse'' pilot is rather senseless. Air is slowly leaking out a damaged porthole on a shuttle attached to the main ship and the control panel to close the door is in the shuttle. The Senator sacrifices himself to save the rest of the crew, but given an hour or two (which they had) any decent engineer could have built something to press the button remotely. A lever on a string for instance. Or a flying remote-controlled camera drone, available from a vending machine aboard the ''Destiny''. Interestingly, while his sacrifice was justified (he was almost certainly going to die from his injuries anyway, and they needed the air badly), Rush's mentality or taking the time to look for someone to sacrifice instead of engineering a solution isn't.

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** There's also an instance in the episode "Flesh and Blood", where Bra'tac attempts to ram their ha'tak into an Ori cruiser despite them witnessing first-hand firsthand that their weapons were ineffective (which is also pointed out by Sam). Mitchell (O'Neill's successor), being the guy he is, slaps a teleporter beacon onto Bra'tac when he isn't looking and has the ''Odyssey'' beam them all out before impact. Just as Sam predicted, the ha'tak's explosion doesn't even get past the Ori shields.
* The death of the Senator senator in the ''Series/StargateUniverse'' pilot is rather senseless. Air is slowly leaking out a damaged porthole on a shuttle attached to the main ship and the control panel to close the door is in the shuttle. The Senator senator sacrifices himself to save the rest of the crew, but given an hour or two (which they had) any decent engineer could have built something to press the button remotely. A lever on a string for instance. Or a flying remote-controlled camera drone, available from a vending machine aboard the ''Destiny''. Interestingly, while his sacrifice was justified (he was almost certainly going to die from his injuries anyway, and they needed the air badly), Rush's mentality or taking the time to look for someone to sacrifice instead of engineering a solution isn't.



* A rare example where the ''villain'' pulls one of these is in the penultimate episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. Greer and Finch are locked in a room together, and Greer is able to trick Finch into admitting only he has the power to deploy the virus that can destroy Samaritan. In response to this Greer has all the oxygen from the room sucked out, knowing it will kill him but will also kill Finch thus eliminating the threat to Samaritan. Seeing as how he planned this there's no reason why he couldn't have immobilized Finch in some way prior and gave himself an escape route, or simply brought an oxygen mask. Furthermore it turns out to be a SenselessSacrifice as the rest of Team Machine show up in time to rescue Finch ''anyway''.

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* ''Series/PersonOfInterest'': A rare example where the ''villain'' pulls one of these is in the penultimate episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest''.episode. Greer and Finch are locked in a room together, and Greer is able to trick Finch into admitting only he has the power to deploy the virus that can destroy Samaritan. In response to this Greer has all the oxygen from the room sucked out, knowing it will kill him but will also kill Finch thus eliminating the threat to Samaritan. Seeing as how he planned this there's no reason why he couldn't have immobilized Finch in some way prior and gave himself an escape route, or simply brought an oxygen mask. Furthermore it turns out to be a SenselessSacrifice as the rest of Team Machine show up in time to rescue Finch ''anyway''.
3rd Nov '17 1:44:57 PM ShorinBJ
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* ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'':
** Ron sacrifices himself as a chess piece so that they can win the magical game of chess and reach the stone. [[AdaptationInducedPlothole Noted by Hermione and Harry in the book]], where he himself is the knight, so he has to stand still and let the queen "take" him. In the film he's sitting atop a massive stone horse, and many people have asked themselves why he just sat on that horse and watched as the queen approached, rather than jumping off... Granted, he doesn't die, but he could have. It's likely that Ron didn't jump off of the horse because it would have counted as a forfeit (that is, he only counts as the knight as long as he remains on the horse, or that jumping off the horse and onto an adjacent square would have counted as "cheating").
** Also Harry himself. Although he realises that he has little to no chances against the thief, be it Voldemort or Snape, he doesn't consider simply sending an owl to the absent Dumbledore until well into the "obstacle course". Neither does he heed [=McGonagall=]'s assurances that the Stone was perfectly safe, which, big shock, it actually was. This can be ''narratively'' justified by the fact that he was an 11-year old boy, even if it was stupid for the character.

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* ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'':
** Ron sacrifices himself as a chess piece so that they can win the magical game of chess and reach the stone. [[AdaptationInducedPlothole Noted by Hermione and Harry in the book]], where he himself is the knight, so he has to stand still and let the queen "take" him. In the film he's sitting atop a massive stone horse, and many people have asked themselves why he just sat on that horse and watched as the queen approached, rather than jumping off... Granted, he doesn't die, but he could have. It's likely that Ron didn't jump off of the horse because it would have counted as a forfeit (that is, he only counts as the knight as long as he remains on the horse, or that jumping off the horse and onto an adjacent square would have counted as "cheating").
** Also Harry himself.
''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'': Although he Harry realises that he has little to no chances against the thief, be it Voldemort or Snape, he doesn't consider simply sending an owl to the absent Dumbledore until well into the "obstacle course". Neither does he heed [=McGonagall=]'s assurances that the Stone was perfectly safe, which, big shock, it actually was. This can be ''narratively'' justified by the fact that he was an 11-year old boy, even if it was stupid for the character.
2nd Nov '17 2:08:35 PM MarqFJA
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** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', when Cell self-destructs, Goku teleports him away to King Kai's planet and dies when Cell blows up, despite the fact that he could have just teleported back to Earth before that happened, preferably with King Kai and his two companions. It is implied that Goku probably allowed this to happen as he states he wants to stay dead so people that come after him won't target the Earth. But out of all the villains that attacked Earth at this point (Piccolo, his son, Saiyans, Frieza and his father, Gero's androids, Cell) only Frieza and Gero were seeking revenge on him, and both were dead; both of them also wanted to conquer Earth anyway, and everyone else was stopped because of him, so if anything Earth was ''less'' safe without him. He did also want to make Earth and the Z-Fighters stop relying on him to save the day and bring up someone new to take the mantle.[[note]]It was Toriama's intention to retire Goku at this point and have Gohan take over as lead. However, that didn't play well with his editors or fans so he was forced to bring Goku back (again).[[/note]]

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** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', when Cell self-destructs, Goku teleports him away to King Kai's planet and dies when Cell blows up, despite the fact that he could have just teleported back to Earth before that happened, preferably with King Kai and his two companions. It is implied that Goku probably allowed this to happen as he states he wants to stay dead so people that come after him won't target the Earth. But out of all the villains that attacked Earth at this point (Piccolo, his son, Saiyans, Frieza and his father, Gero's androids, Cell) only Frieza and Gero were seeking revenge on him, and both were dead; both of them also wanted to conquer Earth anyway, and everyone else was stopped because of him, so if anything Earth was ''less'' safe without him. He did also want to make Earth and the Z-Fighters stop relying on him to save the day and bring up someone new to take the mantle.[[note]]It was Toriama's Toriyama's intention to retire Goku at this point and have Gohan take over as lead. However, that didn't play well with [[ExecutiveMeddling his editors editors]] or fans so he was forced to bring Goku back (again).[[/note]]
31st Oct '17 2:46:28 PM GhostLad
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* ''Series/Smallville'' Alicia Baker pulls this at the climax of an episode. She teleports in front of Clark to take a bullet when her crazed therapist tries to pull a MurderTheHypotenuse, despite knowing full well that Clark is completely bulletproof. She survives, and Clark quickly incapacitates the foe. When Clark asks her why, she says it's because she promised him she would never reveal his secret, and allowing the therapist to shoot him would have done just that. She's a recovering [[Yandere]] by the way.

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* ''Series/Smallville'' Alicia Baker pulls this at the climax of an episode. She teleports in front of Clark to take a bullet when her crazed therapist tries to pull a MurderTheHypotenuse, despite knowing full well that Clark is completely bulletproof. She survives, and Clark quickly incapacitates the foe. When Clark asks her why, she says it's because she promised him she would never reveal his secret, and allowing the therapist to shoot him would have done just that. She's a recovering [[Yandere]] {{Yandere}} by the way.
28th Oct '17 12:12:20 PM MurrayTheBlue
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* ''Series/Smallville''" Alicia Baker pulls this at the climax of an episode. She teleports in front of Clark to take a bullet when her crazed therapist tries to pull a MuderTheHypotenuse, despite knowing full well that Clark is completely bulletproof. She survives, and Clark quickly incapacitates the foe. When Clark asks her why, she says it's because she promised him she would never reveal his secret, and allowing the therapist to shoot him would have done just that. She's a recovering [[Yandere]]] by the way.

to:

* ''Series/Smallville''" ''Series/Smallville'' Alicia Baker pulls this at the climax of an episode. She teleports in front of Clark to take a bullet when her crazed therapist tries to pull a MuderTheHypotenuse, MurderTheHypotenuse, despite knowing full well that Clark is completely bulletproof. She survives, and Clark quickly incapacitates the foe. When Clark asks her why, she says it's because she promised him she would never reveal his secret, and allowing the therapist to shoot him would have done just that. She's a recovering [[Yandere]]] [[Yandere]] by the way.
28th Oct '17 12:11:33 PM MurrayTheBlue
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* ''Series/Smallville''" Alicia Baker pulls this at the climax of an episode. She teleports in front of Clark to take a bullet when her crazed therapist tries to pull a MuderTheHypotenuse, despite knowing full well that Clark is completely bulletproof. She survives, and Clark quickly incapacitates the foe. When Clark asks her why, she says it's because she promised him she would never reveal his secret, and allowing the therapist to shoot him would have done just that. She's a recovering [[Yandere]]] by the way.
4th Oct '17 5:58:10 PM Amahn
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** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', when Cell self-destructs, Goku teleports him away to King Kai's planet and dies when Cell blows up, despite the fact that he could have just teleported back to Earth before that happened, preferably with King Kai and his two companions. It is implied that Goku probably allowed this to happen as he states he wants to stay dead so people that come after him won't target the Earth. But out of all the villains that attacked Earth at this point (Piccolo, his son, Saiyans, Frieza and his father, Gero's androids, Cell) only Frieza and Gero were seeking revenge on him, and both were dead; both of them also wanted to conquer Earth anyway, and everyone else was stopped because of him, so if anything Earth was ''less'' safe without him.

to:

** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', when Cell self-destructs, Goku teleports him away to King Kai's planet and dies when Cell blows up, despite the fact that he could have just teleported back to Earth before that happened, preferably with King Kai and his two companions. It is implied that Goku probably allowed this to happen as he states he wants to stay dead so people that come after him won't target the Earth. But out of all the villains that attacked Earth at this point (Piccolo, his son, Saiyans, Frieza and his father, Gero's androids, Cell) only Frieza and Gero were seeking revenge on him, and both were dead; both of them also wanted to conquer Earth anyway, and everyone else was stopped because of him, so if anything Earth was ''less'' safe without him. He did also want to make Earth and the Z-Fighters stop relying on him to save the day and bring up someone new to take the mantle.[[note]]It was Toriama's intention to retire Goku at this point and have Gohan take over as lead. However, that didn't play well with his editors or fans so he was forced to bring Goku back (again).[[/note]]
21st Sep '17 8:46:29 PM ImpudentInfidel
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Even with the ''Broken Steel'' expansion, however, the end narration doesn't distinguish between your sending someone to die in your stead or just sending in someone who can't be killed by radiation, and the narrator chews you out for "cowardice" either way. Maybe they just didn't feel like creating a whole new cutscene and bringing Creator/RonPerlman back to record a new voice-over. Or maybe [[{{Watsonian}} the narrator]] was upset that you didn't end the story with a sacrifice appropriate for the Wasteland's messiah. Or maybe [[{{Doylist}} the dev team]] were just in a sulk because the fans were spoiling the drama with common sense.

to:

Even with the ''Broken Steel'' expansion, however, the end narration doesn't distinguish between your sending someone to die in your stead or just sending in someone who can't be killed by radiation, and the narrator chews you out for "cowardice" either way. Maybe they just didn't feel like creating a whole new cutscene and bringing Creator/RonPerlman back to record a new voice-over. Or maybe [[{{Watsonian}} the narrator]] was upset that you didn't end the story with a sacrifice appropriate for the Wasteland's messiah. Or maybe [[{{Doylist}} the dev team]] were just in a sulk because the fans were spoiling the drama with common sense. The rad-immune companions do get new dialog lines when you order them in that are varients of "oh yeah, that would make sense wouldn't it?"
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