History Main / SpaceOpera

25th May '16 7:07:47 PM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''SpaceBattleshipYamato'', the first space opera anime and among the first space operas to use large scale battles between fleets of spacecraft. Among the first space operas to involve the legend Creator/{{Leiji Matsumoto}}.

to:

* ''SpaceBattleshipYamato'', ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato'', the first space opera anime and among the first space operas to use large scale battles between fleets of spacecraft. Among the first space operas to involve the legend Creator/{{Leiji Matsumoto}}.



* ''Anime/TenchiMuyoRyoOhki'' has many Space Opera elements despite taking place mostly on Earth, while spinoff ''TenchiMuyoGXP'' and the second half of ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'' are clear-cut examples.

to:

* ''Anime/TenchiMuyoRyoOhki'' has many Space Opera elements despite taking place mostly on Earth, while spinoff ''TenchiMuyoGXP'' ''Anime/TenchiMuyoGXP'' and the second half of ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'' are clear-cut examples.



* ''{{Trigun}}'' (more so in the manga).
* ''LightNovel/{{Tytania}}'', the closest thing to an anime ''{{Dune}}'' and written by the same author as ''Anime/LegendOfGalacticHeroes'' though it is an independent story.

to:

* ''{{Trigun}}'' ''Manga/{{Trigun}}'' (more so in the manga).
* ''LightNovel/{{Tytania}}'', the closest thing to an anime ''{{Dune}}'' ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' and written by the same author as ''Anime/LegendOfGalacticHeroes'' though it is an independent story.
24th May '16 6:45:00 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Voltron}}'' (the vehicle one) / ''DairuggerXV''

to:

* ''{{Voltron}}'' ''Anime/{{Voltron}}'' (the vehicle one) / ''DairuggerXV''
23rd May '16 3:42:25 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/{{Shakara}}'' is an incredibly {{Troperrific}} take on this genre, covering the RoaringRampageOfRevenge of a KillerRobot who was made to avenge the deaths of its species at the hands of the evil alien alliance. [[EarthShatteringKaboom Planets blowing up]], [[SpaceBattle spaceship battles]], and {{time travel}} ensue.
10th May '16 8:23:28 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/SoukouNoStrain''

to:

* ''Anime/SoukouNoStrain''''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry''
30th Apr '16 7:43:17 PM MacronNotes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/CaptainEO'', a Ride/DisneyThemeParks ThreeDMovie, is less than 20 minutes long but clearly takes place in this genre: A dashing hero with a [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits crew of misfit alien creatures]] is sent on a mission to transform a grim, H.R. Giger-esque planet. There's a skirmish with the evil Supreme Commander's fleet of starships, and later the heroes are taken captive by her forces -- but they use ThePowerOfRock to turn into it a land of CrystalSpiresAndTogas and its people (including the ruler) into happy, Day-Glo dancers.

to:

* ''Film/CaptainEO'', a Ride/DisneyThemeParks ThreeDMovie, 3-D movie, is less than 20 minutes long but clearly takes place in this genre: A dashing hero with a [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits crew of misfit alien creatures]] is sent on a mission to transform a grim, H.R. Giger-esque planet. There's a skirmish with the evil Supreme Commander's fleet of starships, and later the heroes are taken captive by her forces -- but they use ThePowerOfRock to turn into it a land of CrystalSpiresAndTogas and its people (including the ruler) into happy, Day-Glo dancers.
20th Apr '16 3:07:58 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Tenchi Muyo Ryo-Ohki}}'' has many Space Opera elements despite taking place mostly on Earth, while spinoff ''TenchiMuyoGXP'' and the second half of ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'' are clear-cut examples.

to:

* ''{{Tenchi Muyo Ryo-Ohki}}'' ''Anime/TenchiMuyoRyoOhki'' has many Space Opera elements despite taking place mostly on Earth, while spinoff ''TenchiMuyoGXP'' and the second half of ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'' are clear-cut examples.
17th Apr '16 11:21:51 AM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness Hard Science Fiction]] defines itself, in part in opposition to space opera (and vica versa), in recent years, however, there has been a trend towards incorporating hard science fiction elements ''into'' space opera, as in ''Anime/StarshipOperators'', the 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' and especially AlistairReynolds' ''Literature/RevelationSpace''. In fact, "New Space Opera" has gained some currency as a term referring to works that combine fast-paced adventure plots with some degree of hard SF rigor.

to:

While [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness Hard Science Fiction]] defines itself, in part in opposition to space opera (and vica versa), in recent years, however, there has been a trend towards incorporating hard science fiction elements ''into'' space opera, as in ''Anime/StarshipOperators'', the 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' and especially AlistairReynolds' [[AlastairReynolds Alistair Reynolds']] ''Literature/RevelationSpace''. In fact, "New Space Opera" has gained some currency as a term referring to works that combine fast-paced adventure plots with some degree of hard SF rigor.
17th Apr '16 11:20:36 AM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Traveller}}'' was the first RPG set in the Space Opera genre, and set the standard for those that followed. It's in the "semi-hardened" category of SpaceOpera and an incredible amount of work went into the {{Backstory}} including fairly realistic science and social science. Traveller is flexible enough that a wide variety of flavors of SpaceOpera can be played, since the setting is a FramingDevice of sorts.
* The forgotten board game ''Imperium'' was used as a source for some of the {{Traveller}} universe. It depicts a young and expansionist [[TheRepublic republic]] on earth, conquering a VestigialEmpire in space. There are a number of other SpaceOpera board wargames, but this one is notable for historical reasons.

to:

* ''{{Traveller}}'' was the first RPG set in the Space Opera genre, and set the standard for those that followed. It's in the "semi-hardened" category harder end of SpaceOpera and an incredible amount a lot of work went into the {{Backstory}} including fairly realistic science and social science. Traveller ''Traveller'' is flexible enough that a wide variety of flavors of SpaceOpera can be played, since the setting is a FramingDevice one designed for the telling of sorts.
stories.
* The forgotten board game ''Imperium'' was used as a source for some of the {{Traveller}} ''{{Traveller}}'' universe. It depicts In it, a young and expansionist [[TheRepublic republic]] on earth, conquering conquers a VestigialEmpire in space. There are a number of other SpaceOpera board wargames, but this one is notable for historical reasons.



%%* Pacesetter's 1980s ''TabletopGame/StarAce'' RPG -- definitely at least somewhat in the spirit of ''Franchise/StarWars'', but set in its own original universe with fewer mystical undertones.

to:

%%* Pacesetter's 1980s ''TabletopGame/StarAce'' RPG -- definitely at least somewhat RPG, in the spirit of ''Franchise/StarWars'', ''Franchise/StarWars', but set in its own an original universe with fewer mystical undertones.



* Despite ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'' only covering our solar system, the epic themes and intrigues of space opera are definitely there. Just replace TheEmpire with actual Nazis.

to:

* Despite ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'' only covering covers our solar system, system but the epic themes and intrigues of space opera are definitely there. Just replace TheEmpire with actual Nazis.
17th Apr '16 11:17:10 AM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Space Opera''' are works set in a spacefaring civilization, usually, though not always, set in the future, specifically the far future. Technology is ubiquitous and secondary to the story. Space opera has an epic character to it: the universe is big, there are usually many sprawling civilizations and empires, there are political conflicts and intrigue. The action will range part of a solar system, at least, and possibly a whole galaxy or more than one. It frequently takes place in a StandardSciFiSetting. It has a romantic element which distinguishes it from most HardScienceFiction: big love stories, epic space battles, oversized heroes and villains, awe-inspiring scenery, and insanely gorgeous men and women.

to:

'''Space Opera''' are refers to works set in a spacefaring civilization, usually, though not always, set in the future, specifically the far future. Technology is ubiquitous and secondary to the story. Space opera has an epic character to it: the universe is big, there are usually many sprawling civilizations and empires, there are political conflicts and intrigue. The action will range part of a solar system, at least, and possibly a whole galaxy or more than one. It frequently takes place in a StandardSciFiSetting. It has a romantic element which distinguishes it from most HardScienceFiction: big love stories, epic space battles, oversized heroes and villains, awe-inspiring scenery, and insanely gorgeous men and women.



%%* Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy is one of the clearest examples in the franchise, but Series/PowerRangersInSpace started to drift this way before the season ended.

to:

%%* Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy is one of the clearest examples in the franchise, but Series/PowerRangersInSpace started franchise. ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace'' had begun to to drift this way before the season ended.



%%* ''Series/BabylonFive''

to:

%%* ''Series/BabylonFive''''Series/BabylonFive''.



%%* Although ''Series/{{Doctor Who}}'' is not itself a Space Opera, a couple of individual stories are:
%%** ''The Daleks' Master Plan''

to:

%%* Although ''Series/{{Doctor Who}}'' is not itself a Space Opera, a couple of Opera in itself, some individual stories are:
make use of the subgenere.
%%** ''Mission to the Unknown'' and the epic twelve part ''The Daleks' Master Plan''Plan''. Oddly, "Mission to the Unknown", the prelude episode feels like an Unbuilt Trope version of the sort of stories ''Star Trek'' popularised. "Mission to the Unknown" has the Space agent Marc Cory discovering the Dalek plot to invade Earth's solar system [[RedShirt but dies before]] he can even send a message of warning. Earth's central government, which encompasses the whole system also has a subtly [[{{Dystopia}} dystopian]] feel to it.



%%** ''Frontier In Space''
%%** Oddly enough "The Daleks Master Plan" and its teaser episode "Mission to the Unknown" feels like an Unbuilt Trope version of the sort of stories "Star Trek" popularised. "Mission to the Unknown" has the Space agent Marc Cory discovering the Dalek plot to invade the Solar System but gets killed before he can even send a message of warning.

to:

%%** ''Frontier In Space''
%%** Oddly enough "The Daleks
Space'' and ''Planet of the Daleks'', which taken together form a twelve part story like the earlier ''The Daleks' Master Plan" and its teaser episode "Mission to the Unknown" feels like an Unbuilt Trope version Plan'', though of the sort of stories "Star Trek" popularised. "Mission to the Unknown" has the Space agent Marc Cory discovering the Dalek plot to invade the Solar System but gets killed before he can even send a message of warning.very different kind.
&&** ''Earthshock''.
%%**



* ''{{Ayreon}}'' is one of the most prolific examples of this and NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly ProgressiveRock in one package. The most prominent examples include... pretty much everything. The notable exception is ''The Human Equation'' album, [[spoiler: up until the very end]].

to:

* ''{{Ayreon}}'' {{Ayreon}} is one of the most prolific examples of this and NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly ProgressiveRock in one package. The most prominent examples include... pretty much everything. The notable exception is ''The Human Equation'' album, [[spoiler: up until the very end]].
17th Apr '16 11:06:58 AM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A [[InSpace space]] {{opera}} is a work set in a far future space faring civilization, where the technology is a ubiquitous and entirely secondary to the story. It has an epic character to it: The universe is big, there are lots of sprawling civilizations and empires, there are political conflicts and intrigues galore. Frequently it takes place in the StandardSciFiSetting. In perspective, it is a development of the PlanetaryRomance that looks beyond the exotic locations that were imagined for the local solar system in early science fiction ([[ScienceMarchesOn which the hard light of science revealed to be barren and lifeless]]) out into an infinite universe of imagined exotic locations.

Space opera has a lot of romantic elements: big love stories, epic space battles, oversized heroes and villains, awe-inspiring places, and insanely gorgeous women.

Expect to see a dashing hero cavorting around in sleek, cigar-shaped {{Retro Rocket}}s, {{Green Skinned Space Babe}}s, CrystalSpiresAndTogas civilizations full of SpaceElves, {{Wave Motion Gun}}s capable of dealing an EarthShatteringKaboom on a daily basis, and an evil [[TheEmpire Galactic Empire]] with a StandardSciFiFleet, including an entire universe full of [[UsedFuture beat-up mechanical objects]] capable of being resurrected with PercussiveMaintenance.

Note that this is quite different from the original definition of space opera, which was derogatory. It arose from a long line of similar terms for substandard genre fiction: 'horse opera' was bad [[TheWildWest Western]] fiction and 'soap opera' (so named because soap operas began as hour-long ads for soap) was hackneyed drama. The phrase was coined in 1941 by Wilson Tucker to describe what he called "the hacky, grinding, stinking, outworn space-ship yarn". (It's said that before 1975 or so, the only author who ever intentionally set out to write a space opera was Creator/JackVance, who wrote a novel about an opera company in space.) Weirdly, this means that many works which were originally touted as examples of 'serious' science fiction, such as the ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' series, are today held up as prime examples of SpaceOpera. As more authors and writers came to embrace the space opera style, the term came to lose many of its negative connotations. Assisting that process were writers who regarded all tales of action and adventure in space as bad, and so tried to pejoratively label it all "space opera"; [[AppropriatedAppellation they succeeded with the label, but not with keeping it pejorative.]]

PlanetaryRomance is an older variant, which is basically HeroicFantasy [[AC:In Space]] -- or on a [[EarthAllAlong Dying Earth]] of some sort. While works such as ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' and various fantasy novels set on a planet are PlanetaryRomance, characters like ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' and ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' essentially codified the SpaceOpera concept in the popular imagination by the late 1930s.

''Franchise/StarWars'' is probably the most famous modern example of space opera. (Indeed, ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' was an important moment in changing "space opera" from an insult to a more neutral genre descriptor, due to the involvement of writer Creator/LeighBrackett.) In ''Star Wars'', technology is either [[MagicFromTechnology magic]] (the Force) or slightly faster versions of today's gadgets ([[FrickinLaserBeams blaster rifles]], hovercars, space ships) and the characters would be right at home in a fantasy novel ([[TheEmperor evil emperor]], {{farmboy}}, [[SaveThePrincess princess]]).

The genre is useful for long story- and character-[[StoryArc arcs]] but also expensive to film. Unless you do it in animated form, like dozens of {{anime}} series.

The opposite of Space Opera would probably be [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness Hard Science Fiction]]. In recent years, however, there has been a trend towards incorporating hard sci-fi elements ''into'' space opera, as in ''Anime/StarshipOperators'', the 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' or especially ''Literature/RevelationSpace'' -- in fact, "New Space Opera" has gained some currency as a term referring to works that combine fast-paced adventure plots with some degree of hard SF rigor.

See also TwoFistedTales, PulpMagazine, and WagonTrainToTheStars. In many ways, this is the [[SciFiCounterpart science fiction equivalent]] of HighFantasy.

to:

A [[InSpace space]] {{opera}} is a work '''Space Opera''' are works set in a far future space faring spacefaring civilization, where usually, though not always, set in the technology future, specifically the far future. Technology is a ubiquitous and entirely secondary to the story. It Space opera has an epic character to it: The the universe is big, there are lots of usually many sprawling civilizations and empires, there are political conflicts and intrigues galore. Frequently it intrigue. The action will range part of a solar system, at least, and possibly a whole galaxy or more than one. It frequently takes place in the a StandardSciFiSetting. In perspective, It has a romantic element which distinguishes it from most HardScienceFiction: big love stories, epic space battles, oversized heroes and villains, awe-inspiring scenery, and insanely gorgeous men and women.

Historically,
it is a development of the PlanetaryRomance that looks beyond the exotic locations that were imagined for the local solar system in early science fiction ([[ScienceMarchesOn which the hard light of science revealed to be barren and lifeless]]) out into an infinite universe of imagined exotic locations.

Space opera has a lot of romantic elements: big love stories, epic space battles, oversized heroes
locations. PlanetaryRomance was more or less HeroicFantasy [[AC:In Space]]. While works such as ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' by EdgarRiceBurroughs were pure PlanetaryRomance, ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' and villains, awe-inspiring places, and insanely gorgeous women.

its imitators had essentially codified the SpaceOpera concept in the popular imagination by the late 1930s, though the earliest strips took place on an AfterTheEnd future Earth. (''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', at least in the classic Alex Raymond era remained resolutely PlanetaryRomance, tied to the planet Mongo.)

Expect to see a dashing hero cavorting around in sleek, cigar-shaped {{Retro Rocket}}s, a CoolStarship, {{Green Skinned Space Babe}}s, CrystalSpiresAndTogas civilizations full of SpaceElves, {{Wave Motion Gun}}s capable of dealing an EarthShatteringKaboom on a daily basis, and an evil [[TheEmpire Galactic Empire]] with a StandardSciFiFleet, including an entire universe full of [[UsedFuture beat-up mechanical objects]] capable of being resurrected with PercussiveMaintenance.

Note that this is quite different from the original definition of space opera, which was derogatory. It arose from a long line of similar terms for substandard genre fiction: 'horse opera' was bad [[TheWildWest originally derogatory term, following "horse opera" ([[TheWildWest Western]] fiction cheap westerns) and 'soap opera' "SoapOpera" (so named because soap operas began as hour-long ads for soap) was hackneyed drama.soap), which requires no explatnion. The phrase was coined in 1941 by Wilson Tucker to describe what he called "the hacky, grinding, stinking, outworn space-ship yarn". (It's said that before 1975 or so, the only author who ever intentionally set out to write a space opera was Creator/JackVance, who wrote a novel novel, ''Space Opera'', literally about an opera company in space.) Weirdly, this means that many )

Via semantic drift, well-regarded
works which were originally touted as examples of 'serious' science fiction, such as the ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' series, are today held up as prime examples of SpaceOpera. As more authors and writers came to embrace the space opera style, the term came to lose many of its negative connotations. Assisting that process were writers who regarded all tales of action and adventure in space as bad, and so tried to pejoratively label it all "space opera"; [[AppropriatedAppellation they succeeded with the label, but not with keeping it pejorative.]]

PlanetaryRomance is an older variant, which is basically HeroicFantasy [[AC:In Space]] -- or on a [[EarthAllAlong Dying Earth]] of some sort. While works such as ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' and various fantasy novels set on a planet are PlanetaryRomance, characters like ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' and ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' essentially codified the SpaceOpera concept in the popular imagination by the late 1930s.

''Franchise/StarWars'' is probably inarguably the most famous modern example of space opera. (Indeed, ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' was an important moment in changing may have shifted "space opera" from an insult to a more neutral genre descriptor, due to the involvement of veteran sf writer Creator/LeighBrackett.) In ''Star Wars'', technology is either [[MagicFromTechnology magic]] (the Force) or slightly faster jazzier versions of today's gadgets ([[FrickinLaserBeams blaster rifles]], hovercars, space ships) and the characters would be right at home in a fantasy novel ships). Any ''Star Wars'' character ([[TheEmperor evil emperor]], {{farmboy}}, [[SaveThePrincess princess]]).

princess]]) would feel at home in a thick fantasy love, in part because editor-publisher Lester del Rey derived the "epic fantasy" template partly from ''Star Wars'' and partly from ''The Lord of the Rings'', though also because these works borrow from the same source of Jungian imagery.

The genre is useful for long story- [[StoryArc story]] and character-[[StoryArc [[CharacterArc character arcs]] but also expensive to film. Unless film, unless rendered you do it in animated form, like dozens of countless {{anime}} series.

The opposite of Space Opera would probably be While [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness Hard Science Fiction]]. In Fiction]] defines itself, in part in opposition to space opera (and vica versa), in recent years, however, there has been a trend towards incorporating hard sci-fi science fiction elements ''into'' space opera, as in ''Anime/StarshipOperators'', the 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' or and especially ''Literature/RevelationSpace'' -- in AlistairReynolds' ''Literature/RevelationSpace''. In fact, "New Space Opera" has gained some currency as a term referring to works that combine fast-paced adventure plots with some degree of hard SF rigor.

See also SpaceWestern, TwoFistedTales, PulpMagazine, and WagonTrainToTheStars. In many ways, this is the [[SciFiCounterpart science fiction equivalent]] of HighFantasy.



* The classic works of Creator/LeijiMatsumoto.



* ''LightNovel/CrusherJoe'' First novel written by HarukaTakachio right after he saw StarWars.

to:

* ''LightNovel/CrusherJoe'' First novel The first written by HarukaTakachio right immediately after he saw StarWars.seeing ''StarWars''.



* ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'': ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' IN SPACE!

to:

* ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'': ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' IN SPACE!SPACE! (Quite different from the AlfredBester novel ''The Stars My Destination'', which does the same way, though not in a SpaceOpera way.)



* The ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' franchise, notable for its ([[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 usual]]) [[AbsentAliens lack of aliens]] and realistic space colonies.

to:

* The ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' franchise, notable for its ([[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 usual]]) [[AbsentAliens lack of aliens]] and realistic plausible space colonies.



* ''Anime/IrresponsibleCaptainTylor''...[[PlayedForLaughs albeit slightly off]]

to:

* ''Anime/IrresponsibleCaptainTylor''...[[PlayedForLaughs ''Anime/IrresponsibleCaptainTylor'', albeit slightly off]]PlayedForLaughs.



* {{Trigun}} (more so in the manga).

to:

* {{Trigun}} ''{{Trigun}}'' (more so in the manga).



* The works of Creator/LeijiMatsumoto.



* ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' and ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' are the {{Trope Codifier}}s, and both feature lots of {{Retro Rocket}}s and a [[TheEmpire Galactic Empire]] of some sort. ''Star Wars'' started after Lucas couldn't get the rights to ''Flash''. King Features, realizing their mistake, made the ''Film/FlashGordon'' film after ''Star Wars'' came out.
** ''Flash Gordon'' is also a CaptainErsatz of ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' -- see Literature below.

to:

* ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' and its imitator ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' and ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' are the {{Trope Codifier}}s, though the former began as an AfterTheEnd story and both feature lots of {{Retro Rocket}}s only moved into space and a [[TheEmpire Galactic Empire]] the latter originally stayed on the planet Mongo, where Flash, Dale Arden and Dr. Zarkoff have gotten stranded. (The story takes place in the present day.). However, the popular image and later iterations of some sort. the strip have Flash Gordon adventuring in space. ''Star Wars'' started began after Lucas couldn't get failed to obtain the rights to ''Flash''. King Features, realizing their mistake, made the ''Film/FlashGordon'' film after the wild success of ''Star Wars'' came out.
** ''Flash Gordon'' is also a CaptainErsatz of ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'' -- see Literature below.
Wars''.



* Creator/MarvelComics turned cosmic part of their SharedUniverse into one giant SpaceOpera, since 2006. Starting with ''[[ComicBook/XMen X-Men: Rise and Fall of the Shi'Ar Empire]]'' and ''ComicBook/{{Annihilation}}'', we got one epic story after another -- ''ComicBook/AnnihilationConquest'', ''ComicBook/WarOfKings'', ''ComicBook/TheThanosImperative'' and adventures of many cosmic-themed heroes, like Comicbook/{{Nova}} and ComicBook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy between them.
* The whole ComicBook/MetabaronsUniverse -- but particularly ''ComicBook/TheMetabarons''.
* ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' has a foot firmly placed in SpaceOpera, especially for CrisisCrossover comics like ''ComicBook/SinestroCorpsWar'' where Sinestro himself [[spoiler: set the war up so [[XanatosGambit he wins either way.]]]]
* ''ComicBook/XMen'' ventures here occasionally, such as for ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga.''

to:

* Creator/MarvelComics turned the cosmic part of their SharedUniverse into one giant SpaceOpera, since 2006. Starting with ''[[ComicBook/XMen X-Men: Rise and Fall of the Shi'Ar Empire]]'' and ''ComicBook/{{Annihilation}}'', we got one epic story after another -- ''ComicBook/AnnihilationConquest'', ''ComicBook/WarOfKings'', ''ComicBook/TheThanosImperative'' and adventures of many cosmic-themed heroes, like Comicbook/{{Nova}} and ComicBook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy between them.
* The whole ComicBook/MetabaronsUniverse -- but AlexandroJodorowsky's ComicBook/MetabaronsUniverse, particularly ''ComicBook/TheMetabarons''.
* ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' has a foot firmly placed in SpaceOpera, especially for in CrisisCrossover comics like ''ComicBook/SinestroCorpsWar'' where Sinestro himself [[spoiler: set the war up so [[XanatosGambit he wins either way.]]]]
* ''ComicBook/XMen'' ventures here occasionally, such as in the ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga'', for ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga.''instance.



%%* ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''

to:

%%* ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones'', a borderline example in that it overlaps with MundaneScienceFiction.



%%* ''Film/FlashGordon''. The film came out after ''Star Wars''.

to:

%%* ''Film/FlashGordon''. The film came ''Film/FlashGordon'', though it does not technically count. It set out after to emulate the success of ''Star Wars''.Wars''.



%%* ''Film/BattleBeyondTheStars''

to:

%%* ''Film/BattleBeyondTheStars''''Film/BattleBeyondTheStars'', a fun B-Movie ''Star Wars'' clone.



%%* ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'' (although technically, it's a ''parody'' of space operas...)

to:

%%* ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'' (although technically, it's a ''parody'' of space operas...SpaceOpera.)



%%* ''QueenOfOuterSpace''

to:

%%* ''QueenOfOuterSpace''''QueenOfOuterSpace'', intended by script writer CharlesBeaumont as a StealthParody.



%%* ''TransformersTheMovie''. some edits even have the OpeningCrawl.

to:

%%* ''TransformersTheMovie''. some Some edits even have the OpeningCrawl.



* ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers'', an early and influential example, is probably the TropeCodifier in [[PulpMagazine pulp fiction]].



%%* Creator/AlastairReynolds' Literature/RevelationSpaceSeries actually ''does'' consider seriously how changes in technology would affect culture, even language.

to:

%%* Creator/AlastairReynolds' Literature/RevelationSpaceSeries actually ''does'' consider seriously how changes in technology would affect culture, culture and even language.
This list shows the last 10 events of 149. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SpaceOpera