History Main / SkaPunk

26th Jun '17 3:33:11 PM MarauderSky
Is there an issue? Send a Message
26th Jun '17 3:33:11 PM MarauderSky
Is there an issue? Send a Message
26th Jun '17 3:32:43 PM MarauderSky
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/SmashMouth (well, sometimes, anyways)

to:

* Music/SmashMouth (well, sometimes, anyways)sometimes anyways, mainly their first album, Music/FushYuMang)
12th Jan '17 10:08:54 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* OneHitWonder: ReelBigFish and TheMightyMightyBosstones have only really had one charting hit each: "Sell Out" and "The Impression That I Get," respectively. However, both bands have major cult followings.

to:

* OneHitWonder: ReelBigFish Music/ReelBigFish and TheMightyMightyBosstones Music/TheMightyMightyBosstones have only really had one charting hit each: "Sell Out" and "The Impression That I Get," respectively. However, both bands have major cult followings.
12th Jan '17 10:07:45 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


That's the musical style in a nutshell. To elaborate on the history of the genre, we'd have to go back to New York City in the early 1980s, where the first American ska scene began to develop. Much of the credit for the early development of American ska can be attributed to Robert "Bucket" Hingley, a British expatriate who enjoyed 2 Tone ska, founded his own band (The Toasters) and created the Moon Ska Records label, which recorded almost every noteworthy East Coast group at some point. Around the same time, a group of school friends from Massachusetts started TheMightyMightyBosstones, whose fusion of ska and HardcorePunk was influential in the development of the ska-core style.

to:

That's the musical style in a nutshell. To elaborate on the history of the genre, we'd have to go back to New York City in the early 1980s, where the first American ska scene began to develop. Much of the credit for the early development of American ska can be attributed to Robert "Bucket" Hingley, a British expatriate who enjoyed 2 Tone ska, founded his own band (The Toasters) and created the Moon Ska Records label, which recorded almost every noteworthy East Coast group at some point. Around the same time, a group of school friends from Massachusetts started TheMightyMightyBosstones, Music/TheMightyMightyBosstones, whose fusion of ska and HardcorePunk was influential in the development of the ska-core style.



* NeoClassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: It's not uncommon for bands to have other musical influences besides the obvious {{Ska}} and PunkRock ones- for example, HeavyMetal in the case of TheMightyMightyBosstones and ReelBigFish, or {{Reggae}} and {{HipHop}} in the case of Sublime. Music/{{Rancid}} experimented with PopPunk, HardcorePunk, Rockabilly, Reggae, Latin Music and Blues at various times, as well...

to:

* NeoClassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: It's not uncommon for bands to have other musical influences besides the obvious {{Ska}} and PunkRock ones- for example, HeavyMetal in the case of TheMightyMightyBosstones Music/TheMightyMightyBosstones and ReelBigFish, Music/ReelBigFish, or {{Reggae}} and {{HipHop}} in the case of Sublime. Music/{{Rancid}} experimented with PopPunk, HardcorePunk, Rockabilly, Reggae, Latin Music and Blues at various times, as well...
2nd Nov '16 7:57:27 PM RampinUp46
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 1995, ska punk was finally brought to mainstream attention with the release of NoDoubt's multi-platinum ''Tragic Kingdom'' album, which created a big demand for similar-sounding groups. 1996 and 1997 would be the peak years for the Third Wave revival. ReelBigFish, Sublime and The Mighty Mighty Bosstones all had hit singles on the Modern Rock charts, while groups like Less Than Jake and Mustard Plug skanked it up in Florida and the mid-west respectively and music by Save Ferris or the Toasters featured in films or TV. And while the mainstream focused on the aforementioned bands, the underground scene of the late 90's and early 2000ís saw a minor subgenre of ska punk form, dubbed "Crack Rock Steady". The subgenre was pioneered by bands like Choking Victim (the TropeNamer), Morning Glory, No Ca$h, and Music/LeftoverCrack, which fused ska, crust punk and DeathMetal into one package. For a while, ska punk was pretty popular.

to:

In 1995, ska punk was finally brought to mainstream attention with the release of NoDoubt's multi-platinum ''Tragic Kingdom'' album, which created a big demand for similar-sounding groups. 1996 and 1997 would be the peak years for the Third Wave revival. ReelBigFish, Sublime and The Mighty Mighty Bosstones all had hit singles on the Modern Rock charts, while groups like Less Than Jake and Mustard Plug skanked it up in Florida and the mid-west respectively and music by Save Ferris or the Toasters featured in films or TV. And while the mainstream focused on the aforementioned bands, the underground scene of the late 90's and early 2000ís saw a minor subgenre of ska punk form, dubbed "Crack Rock Steady". The subgenre was pioneered by bands like Choking Victim ChokingVictim (the TropeNamer), Morning Glory, No Ca$h, and Music/LeftoverCrack, which fused ska, crust punk and DeathMetal into one package. For a while, ska punk was pretty popular.
15th Apr '16 8:15:21 PM sharkcrap11
Is there an issue? Send a Message


+ Ska, PunkRock, PopPunk, HardcorePunk

to:

+ Ska, {{Ska}} (especially TwoTone), PunkRock, PopPunk, HardcorePunk
6th Apr '16 10:47:12 PM xanthocholy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/TheVincentBlackShadow



* TropeCodifier: The Toasters for American ska music in general, the Mighty Mighty Bosstones for ska-core and Choking Victim for Crack Rock Steady.

to:

* TropeCodifier: The Toasters for American ska music in general, the Mighty Mighty Bosstones for ska-core and Choking Victim for Crack Rock Steady.
26th Jan '16 5:00:16 PM RampinUp46
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Crack Rock Steady takes this up to eleven by writing songs about drug use, anarchism (more typically in the traditional sense, not the AnarchyIsChaos way - although there may be some overlap), and police brutality, among other "darker" subjects. The [[song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56flbcUqAB8]] that named the subgenre is about a 3 or so on the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness, but the lyrics blatantly describe the singer's hatred for police officers, to put it lightly.

to:

** Crack Rock Steady takes this up to eleven by writing songs about drug use, anarchism (more typically in the traditional sense, not the AnarchyIsChaos way - although there may be some overlap), and police brutality, among other "darker" subjects. The [[song https://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56flbcUqAB8]] com/watch?v=56flbcUqAB8 song]] that named the subgenre is about a 3 or so on the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness, but the lyrics blatantly describe the singer's hatred for police officers, to put it lightly.
24th Jan '16 2:08:04 PM RampinUp46
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 1995, ska punk was finally brought to mainstream attention with the release of NoDoubt's multi-platinum ''Tragic Kingdom'' album, which created a big demand for similar-sounding groups. 1996 and 1997 would be the peak years for the Third Wave revival. ReelBigFish, Sublime and The Mighty Mighty Bosstones all had hit singles on the Modern Rock charts, while groups like Less Than Jake and Mustard Plug skanked it up in Florida and the mid-west respectively and music by Save Ferris or the Toasters featured in films or TV. For a while, ska punk was pretty popular.

In the early 2000ís another wave of ska punk came about called Crack Rock Steady, fusing Ska, Crust Punk and DeathMetal.

to:

In 1995, ska punk was finally brought to mainstream attention with the release of NoDoubt's multi-platinum ''Tragic Kingdom'' album, which created a big demand for similar-sounding groups. 1996 and 1997 would be the peak years for the Third Wave revival. ReelBigFish, Sublime and The Mighty Mighty Bosstones all had hit singles on the Modern Rock charts, while groups like Less Than Jake and Mustard Plug skanked it up in Florida and the mid-west respectively and music by Save Ferris or the Toasters featured in films or TV. And while the mainstream focused on the aforementioned bands, the underground scene of the late 90's and early 2000ís saw a minor subgenre of ska punk form, dubbed "Crack Rock Steady". The subgenre was pioneered by bands like Choking Victim (the TropeNamer), Morning Glory, No Ca$h, and Music/LeftoverCrack, which fused ska, crust punk and DeathMetal into one package. For a while, ska punk was pretty popular.

In the early 2000ís another wave of ska punk came about called Crack Rock Steady, fusing Ska, Crust Punk and DeathMetal.
popular.



* Music/LeftoverCrack

to:

* Music/LeftoverCrackMusic/LeftoverCrack (also counts as HardcorePunk)



* LyricalDissonance: A complete set of examples would probably fill a page on their own. This trope was practically a trademark of the genre. In short: most Ska Punk songs have bouncy, upbeat music and superficially sound extremely happy, but if you actually pay attention to the lyrics they are some of the most cynical, sarcastic, snide and/or self-deprecating songs ever written.
* MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness: Anywhere from a 4 to a 7, depending on how much HardcorePunk / HeavyMetal vs. Music/{{Ska}} / {{Reggae}} influence a given band has. Many bands also go up and down the scale depending on the song, or even within a song.

to:

* LyricalDissonance: A complete set of examples would probably fill a page on their own. This own; this trope was practically a trademark of the genre. In short: most Ska Punk songs have bouncy, upbeat music and superficially sound extremely happy, but if you actually pay attention to the lyrics they are some of the most cynical, sarcastic, snide and/or self-deprecating songs ever written.
written.
** Crack Rock Steady takes this up to eleven by writing songs about drug use, anarchism (more typically in the traditional sense, not the AnarchyIsChaos way - although there may be some overlap), and police brutality, among other "darker" subjects. The [[song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56flbcUqAB8]] that named the subgenre is about a 3 or so on the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness, but the lyrics blatantly describe the singer's hatred for police officers, to put it lightly.
* MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness: Anywhere Typically anywhere from a 4 to a 7, 8, depending on how much HardcorePunk / HeavyMetal vs. Music/{{Ska}} / {{Reggae}} influence a given band has. Many bands also go up and down the scale depending on the song, or even within a song.



This list shows the last 10 events of 43. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SkaPunk