History Main / ShootTheBuilder

19th Sep '17 11:27:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Film/XXx'', the BigBad kills all the scientists with his bioweapon, after they finished building his submarine.

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* In ''Film/XXx'', the BigBad kills all the scientists with his bioweapon, after they finished building his submarine. While it serves as a pretty good KickTheDog moment, it also raises FridgeLogic questions since he's planning to bomb ''every'' major city but they've only built one for him.
17th Sep '17 6:05:51 PM nombretomado
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* A variation appears in ArthurCClarke's ''The Fountains of Paradise'': The architect of the Fountains of Kalidasa commits suicide because someone had warned him that he would be blinded when his work was done. Kalidasa is quite outraged at being accused of such a thing:

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* A variation appears in ArthurCClarke's Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''The Fountains of Paradise'': The architect of the Fountains of Kalidasa commits suicide because someone had warned him that he would be blinded when his work was done. Kalidasa is quite outraged at being accused of such a thing:
17th Sep '17 4:46:27 PM Psyclone
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** Averted by Martellus, who decided to build his secret fortress ''entirely by himself''. When Agatha asks why he didn't resort to this trope, Martellus points out that [[GenreSavvy in their world]], [[DeathIsCheap death keeps very few secrets]].

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** Averted by Martellus, who decided to build his secret fortress lair ''entirely by himself''. When Agatha asks why he didn't resort to this trope, Martellus points out that [[GenreSavvy in their world]], [[DeathIsCheap death keeps very few secrets]].
12th Aug '17 1:57:47 AM foxley
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* ''Series/FatherBrown'': "The Alchemist's Secret" opens with the alchemist murdering the architect and leaving his body sealed in the secret room in the university (along with the box containing the eponymous secret), after having been assured that the builder have been 'dealt with'.
2nd Apr '17 2:39:34 PM Psyclone
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* Downplayed by, of all people, H. H. Holmes, one of America's earliest and most infamous SerialKillers. During construction of his personally designed HellHotel (filled with hidden passageways, death traps, makeshift gas chambers and places to dispose bodies), he would fire workers after two weeks at maximum citing shoddy workmanship, so he would be the only person who knew exactly what it was that was being built.

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* Downplayed by, of all people, H. H. Holmes, one of America's earliest and most infamous SerialKillers.serial killers. During construction of his personally designed HellHotel (filled with hidden passageways, death traps, makeshift gas chambers and places to dispose bodies), he would fire workers after two weeks at maximum citing shoddy workmanship, so he would be the only person who knew exactly what it was that was being built.
2nd Apr '17 2:39:16 PM Psyclone
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Added DiffLines:

* Downplayed by, of all people, H. H. Holmes, one of America's earliest and most infamous SerialKillers. During construction of his personally designed HellHotel (filled with hidden passageways, death traps, makeshift gas chambers and places to dispose bodies), he would fire workers after two weeks at maximum citing shoddy workmanship, so he would be the only person who knew exactly what it was that was being built.
24th Mar '17 9:50:03 AM erforce
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* In ''[[Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX The Punisher: The End]]'', the [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] who caused WorldWarThree had the engineer who built their survival bunker falsely incarcerated [[BondVillainStupidity instead of just killing him.]] Evidently, they never expected him to tell his cellmate, and never anticipated that his cellmate would be [[spoiler:The Punisher]].

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* ''Comicbook/ThePunisher''
**
In ''[[Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX The Punisher: The End]]'', ''ComicBook/ThePunisherTheEnd'', the [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] who caused WorldWarThree had the engineer who built their survival bunker falsely incarcerated [[BondVillainStupidity instead of just killing him.]] Evidently, they never expected him to tell his cellmate, and never anticipated that his cellmate would be [[spoiler:The Punisher]].
7th Jan '17 9:39:32 PM nombretomado
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* In ''EternalDarkness: Sanity's Requiem'', [[spoiler:Roberto Bianchi's chapter ends this way]].

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* In ''EternalDarkness: ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness: Sanity's Requiem'', [[spoiler:Roberto Bianchi's chapter ends this way]].
28th Nov '16 1:59:59 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted in ''TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': due to its highly advanced nature, every piece of the Nautilus was built separately in shipyards around the world, and then assembled by him and his crew (like him, they'd survived a British crushing a revolt, so they never wanted to leave or reveal its secrets) on their IslandBase.

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* Averted in ''TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': due to its highly advanced nature, every piece of the Nautilus was built separately in shipyards around the world, and then assembled by him and his crew (like him, they'd survived a British crushing a revolt, so they never wanted to leave or reveal its secrets) on their IslandBase.
20th Sep '16 8:43:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* Not as literal as these other examples but right at the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese destroyed everything they could about their Yamato-class "super" battleships, apparently so they couldn't be copied ([[AwesomeButImpractical not that anyone wanted to]]). Most of the information about them comes from a report a visiting German officer compiled. This gets particularly funny in context: there was not a single technology or design Imperial Japan had by that time in the war that was better than what the United States already had in the field. The Yamato, and her sister ship Musashi, were less effective in ''any'' role than the contemporary US battleships of ''Iowa'' class entering service about the same time, let alone the monster ''Montana'' class that were projected but never built; in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, old WorldWarI era US battleships at the Pearl Harbor and a series a torpedo boats completely decimated the Japanese Southern Force.) Even as a battleship, the Yamato class wasn't very awesome (aside from being the biggest battleship ever), because the only real advantage it had over the Iowa-class was its huge 18.1-inch guns (giving it a marginally greater range than other battleships--but their penetrative power comparison to the modernized US 16-inch guns of Iowa and Montana classes was not greater.), but Imperial Japan's fire control systems weren't advanced/accurate enough to make that extra range worth anything. The Musashi was wrecked unceremoniously by a series of carrier strikes, and the Yamato was rendered ''irrelevant'' shortly after, when Japan had no carrier forces whatsoever or enough of a surface fleet to be a threat, and the Yamato was obliterated with minimal casualties by a single carrier strike later in the war. In other words, Imperial Japan tried to invoke this trope for its Yamato-class battleships that were not as good as the average American battleship (not to mention carriers...), performed extremely poorly during the entire war, and the Japanese Empire ''knew this full well, but did it anyway.'' [[SanityHasAdvantages Sanity has its advantages, apparently.]]

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* Not as literal as these other examples but right at the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese destroyed everything they could about their Yamato-class "super" battleships, apparently so they couldn't be copied ([[AwesomeButImpractical not that anyone wanted to]]). Most of the information about them comes from a report a visiting German officer compiled. This gets particularly funny in context: there was not a single technology or design Imperial Japan had by that time in the war that was better than what the United States already had in the field. The Yamato, and her sister ship Musashi, were less effective in ''any'' role than the contemporary US battleships of ''Iowa'' class entering service about the same time, let alone the monster ''Montana'' class that were projected but never built; in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, old WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI era US battleships at the Pearl Harbor and a series a torpedo boats completely decimated the Japanese Southern Force.) Even as a battleship, the Yamato class wasn't very awesome (aside from being the biggest battleship ever), because the only real advantage it had over the Iowa-class was its huge 18.1-inch guns (giving it a marginally greater range than other battleships--but their penetrative power comparison to the modernized US 16-inch guns of Iowa and Montana classes was not greater.), but Imperial Japan's fire control systems weren't advanced/accurate enough to make that extra range worth anything. The Musashi was wrecked unceremoniously by a series of carrier strikes, and the Yamato was rendered ''irrelevant'' shortly after, when Japan had no carrier forces whatsoever or enough of a surface fleet to be a threat, and the Yamato was obliterated with minimal casualties by a single carrier strike later in the war. In other words, Imperial Japan tried to invoke this trope for its Yamato-class battleships that were not as good as the average American battleship (not to mention carriers...), performed extremely poorly during the entire war, and the Japanese Empire ''knew this full well, but did it anyway.'' [[SanityHasAdvantages Sanity has its advantages, apparently.]]
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