History Main / ShootTheBuilder

24th Mar '17 9:50:03 AM erforce
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* In ''[[Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX The Punisher: The End]]'', the [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] who caused WorldWarThree had the engineer who built their survival bunker falsely incarcerated [[BondVillainStupidity instead of just killing him.]] Evidently, they never expected him to tell his cellmate, and never anticipated that his cellmate would be [[spoiler:The Punisher]].

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* ''Comicbook/ThePunisher''
**
In ''[[Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX The Punisher: The End]]'', ''ComicBook/ThePunisherTheEnd'', the [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] who caused WorldWarThree had the engineer who built their survival bunker falsely incarcerated [[BondVillainStupidity instead of just killing him.]] Evidently, they never expected him to tell his cellmate, and never anticipated that his cellmate would be [[spoiler:The Punisher]].
7th Jan '17 9:39:32 PM nombretomado
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* In ''EternalDarkness: Sanity's Requiem'', [[spoiler:Roberto Bianchi's chapter ends this way]].

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* In ''EternalDarkness: ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness: Sanity's Requiem'', [[spoiler:Roberto Bianchi's chapter ends this way]].
28th Nov '16 1:59:59 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted in ''TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': due to its highly advanced nature, every piece of the Nautilus was built separately in shipyards around the world, and then assembled by him and his crew (like him, they'd survived a British crushing a revolt, so they never wanted to leave or reveal its secrets) on their IslandBase.

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* Averted in ''TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': due to its highly advanced nature, every piece of the Nautilus was built separately in shipyards around the world, and then assembled by him and his crew (like him, they'd survived a British crushing a revolt, so they never wanted to leave or reveal its secrets) on their IslandBase.
20th Sep '16 8:43:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* Not as literal as these other examples but right at the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese destroyed everything they could about their Yamato-class "super" battleships, apparently so they couldn't be copied ([[AwesomeButImpractical not that anyone wanted to]]). Most of the information about them comes from a report a visiting German officer compiled. This gets particularly funny in context: there was not a single technology or design Imperial Japan had by that time in the war that was better than what the United States already had in the field. The Yamato, and her sister ship Musashi, were less effective in ''any'' role than the contemporary US battleships of ''Iowa'' class entering service about the same time, let alone the monster ''Montana'' class that were projected but never built; in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, old WorldWarI era US battleships at the Pearl Harbor and a series a torpedo boats completely decimated the Japanese Southern Force.) Even as a battleship, the Yamato class wasn't very awesome (aside from being the biggest battleship ever), because the only real advantage it had over the Iowa-class was its huge 18.1-inch guns (giving it a marginally greater range than other battleships--but their penetrative power comparison to the modernized US 16-inch guns of Iowa and Montana classes was not greater.), but Imperial Japan's fire control systems weren't advanced/accurate enough to make that extra range worth anything. The Musashi was wrecked unceremoniously by a series of carrier strikes, and the Yamato was rendered ''irrelevant'' shortly after, when Japan had no carrier forces whatsoever or enough of a surface fleet to be a threat, and the Yamato was obliterated with minimal casualties by a single carrier strike later in the war. In other words, Imperial Japan tried to invoke this trope for its Yamato-class battleships that were not as good as the average American battleship (not to mention carriers...), performed extremely poorly during the entire war, and the Japanese Empire ''knew this full well, but did it anyway.'' [[SanityHasAdvantages Sanity has its advantages, apparently.]]

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* Not as literal as these other examples but right at the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese destroyed everything they could about their Yamato-class "super" battleships, apparently so they couldn't be copied ([[AwesomeButImpractical not that anyone wanted to]]). Most of the information about them comes from a report a visiting German officer compiled. This gets particularly funny in context: there was not a single technology or design Imperial Japan had by that time in the war that was better than what the United States already had in the field. The Yamato, and her sister ship Musashi, were less effective in ''any'' role than the contemporary US battleships of ''Iowa'' class entering service about the same time, let alone the monster ''Montana'' class that were projected but never built; in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, old WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI era US battleships at the Pearl Harbor and a series a torpedo boats completely decimated the Japanese Southern Force.) Even as a battleship, the Yamato class wasn't very awesome (aside from being the biggest battleship ever), because the only real advantage it had over the Iowa-class was its huge 18.1-inch guns (giving it a marginally greater range than other battleships--but their penetrative power comparison to the modernized US 16-inch guns of Iowa and Montana classes was not greater.), but Imperial Japan's fire control systems weren't advanced/accurate enough to make that extra range worth anything. The Musashi was wrecked unceremoniously by a series of carrier strikes, and the Yamato was rendered ''irrelevant'' shortly after, when Japan had no carrier forces whatsoever or enough of a surface fleet to be a threat, and the Yamato was obliterated with minimal casualties by a single carrier strike later in the war. In other words, Imperial Japan tried to invoke this trope for its Yamato-class battleships that were not as good as the average American battleship (not to mention carriers...), performed extremely poorly during the entire war, and the Japanese Empire ''knew this full well, but did it anyway.'' [[SanityHasAdvantages Sanity has its advantages, apparently.]]
7th Aug '16 8:54:21 PM MrNickelodeon
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* In ''Ride/DoctorDoomsFearfall'' at [[Ride/UniversalStudios Universal's Islands of Adventure]], the title character uses Heind Redken, the scientist primarily responsible for building his "Tower of Doom", as the invention's first test subject. The Tower is successful in its function, but it kills the Heind in the process.

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* In ''Ride/DoctorDoomsFearfall'' at [[Ride/UniversalStudios Universal's Islands of Adventure]], the title character uses Heind Redken, the scientist primarily responsible for building his "Tower of Doom", as the invention's first test subject. The Tower is successful in its function, but it kills the Heind in the process.
7th Aug '16 8:54:00 PM MrNickelodeon
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Theme Parks]]
* In ''Ride/DoctorDoomsFearfall'' at [[Ride/UniversalStudios Universal's Islands of Adventure]], the title character uses Heind Redken, the scientist primarily responsible for building his "Tower of Doom", as the invention's first test subject. The Tower is successful in its function, but it kills the Heind in the process.
[[/folder]]
23rd Jul '16 4:00:34 PM Eddy1215
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Subtrope of YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness.

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Subtrope of YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness.
YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness. Similar to MookDepletion for the aforementioned 'no backup' problem.
10th Jul '16 10:30:48 PM JulianLapostat
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* According to some legends, Shah Jahan, the Mughal Emperor who had the Taj Mahal built, executed all the builders so they couldn't build anything to rival its beauty.

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* According to some legends, Shah Jahan, the Mughal Emperor who had the Taj Mahal built, executed all the builders so they couldn't build anything to rival its beauty. Recorded fact proves that he did no such thing, he hired a team of architects that included several skilled labourers invited from Turkey, and Shah Jahan had no intention upsetting relationships with the Ottoman Empire.
11th Jun '16 7:44:47 PM MacedonianKing
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* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', King Maegor [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Cruel]], who organized the completion of the royal palace and King's Landing, had the architects, masons, etc. murdered so that he would be the only one who knew the location of all of the secret passages.
* ''Literature/{{Cryptonomicon}}:'' The final step in the WW-II Japanese plan to build a super-secret underground vault for their plundered wealth was to flood it with water, with all of their slave labour sealed up inside along with all the gold. Fortunately for some of the workers, one of their leaders knew what was coming, and designed in a back-door escape route.

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* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', King Maegor [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Cruel]], who organized the completion of the royal palace and King's Landing, had the architects, masons, etc. murdered so that he would be the only one who knew the location of all of the secret passages.
passages. [[spoiler: Despite this, Varys the Spider has access to most of the passageways.]]
* ''Literature/{{Cryptonomicon}}:'' The final step in the WW-II Japanese plan to build a super-secret underground vault for their plundered wealth was to flood it with water, with all of their slave labour labor sealed up inside along with all the gold. Fortunately for some of the workers, one of their leaders knew what was coming, and designed in a back-door escape route.
11th Jun '16 7:40:11 PM MacedonianKing
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* In ''Film/OnceUponATimeInMexico'', Agent Sands kills a cook who made a dish Sands likes particularly well. As Sands sees it, he has restored balance, and can look back with enjoyment on that meal as a one time moment of perfection.

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* In ''Film/OnceUponATimeInMexico'', Agent Sands kills a cook who made a dish Sands likes particularly well. As Sands sees it, he has restored balance, and can look back with enjoyment on that meal as a one time moment of perfection. Sands is crazy.
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