History Main / SelfRestraint

16th Sep '17 11:41:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Beast in the 90s ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' cartoon was once wrongly sent to prison. Magneto, thinking this would make him bitter, broke him out in an attempt to recruit him as an ally - at which point Beast politely asked him to leave, as he wished to stand trial and prove his innocence. Also displayed in a later scene where Gambit is visiting him and Beast casually bends the bars to his cell (and then straitens them again) to let him in.

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* Beast in the 90s ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' cartoon was once wrongly sent to prison. Magneto, thinking this would make him bitter, broke him out in an attempt to recruit him as an ally - at which point Beast politely asked him to leave, as he wished to stand trial and prove his innocence. Also displayed in a later scene where Gambit is visiting him and Beast casually bends the bars to his cell (and then straitens them again) to let him in.
11th Sep '17 3:30:19 PM Doug86
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* One of the first superhuman villains ComicBook/SpiderMan fought (established via RetCon in ''ComicBook/UntoldTalesOfSpiderMan'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantasticFour, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)

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* One of the first superhuman villains ComicBook/SpiderMan fought (established via RetCon in ''ComicBook/UntoldTalesOfSpiderMan'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantasticFour, the Comic/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/FantasticFour, the ComicBook/XMen and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)
8th Sep '17 6:48:18 AM CosmicFerret
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' episode "Bloodlines", When [[TheFlash Impulse]] appears in [[HomeBase the Cave]] and runs amok, he is knocked out by Nightwing and has his hands and feet cuffed. While Nightwing, Robin, and Beast Boy interrogate him, he stays put. But once [[MissionControl Mal Duncan]] arrives and opens an exit, Impulse simply vibrates his body through the cuffs and [[SuperSpeed runs off]].

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' episode "Bloodlines", When [[TheFlash [[Franchise/TheFlash Impulse]] appears in [[HomeBase the Cave]] and runs amok, he is knocked out by Nightwing and has his hands and feet cuffed. While Nightwing, Robin, and Beast Boy interrogate him, he stays put. But once [[MissionControl Mal Duncan]] arrives and opens an exit, Impulse simply vibrates his body through the cuffs and [[SuperSpeed runs off]].
28th Jul '17 4:14:17 PM jormis29
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* One of the first superhuman villains ComicBook/SpiderMan fought (established via RetCon in ''Untold Tales of Spider-Man'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantasticFour, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)

to:

* One of the first superhuman villains ComicBook/SpiderMan fought (established via RetCon in ''Untold Tales of Spider-Man'') ''ComicBook/UntoldTalesOfSpiderMan'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantasticFour, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)
22nd Jun '17 7:16:15 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* One of the first superhuman villains Spider Man fought (established via RetCon in ''Untold Tales of Spider-Man'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantastic Four, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)

to:

* One of the first superhuman villains Spider Man ComicBook/SpiderMan fought (established via RetCon in ''Untold Tales of Spider-Man'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantastic Four, ComicBook/TheFantasticFour, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)
22nd Jun '17 7:15:30 AM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* One of the first superhuman villains Spider Man fought (established via RetCon in ''Untold Tales of Spider-Man'') was David Lowell, called Sundown by the superhuman community. A FreakLabAccident granted him powers on the cosmic scale, including super-strength (potentially rivalling the Hulk's), flight, durability, energy projection, instant healing abilities, the ability to grow to giant size (better than Hank Pym) and teleportation. But gaining these powers also sent him into a pain-induced rage that threatened to level New York. When Spidey showed up, nothing the hero could do could so much as scratch him. Then ComicBook/TheAvengers, ComicBook/TheFantastic Four, the Comic/{{X-Men}} and various other New York heroes showed up to help. Nothing ''they'' could muster could [[NoSell so much as scratch him!]] ("He even stood up to Thor!" Peter relates to Mary Jane in a present-day story. "''To Thor!'' Can you imagine?") Eventually, a young girl who had admired him pleaded with him to stop, and in his rage, he turned an energy blast on her, only stopping when he saw who it was. [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone Who he had just injured.]] A later story details that he pled guilty, and while breaking out of jail for him would have been easier than most other villains who had, he would not, staying out of guilt until he was paroled, ten years later, [[TheAtoner still hating himself.]] (Ironically, Spidey seemed far more willing to forgive than he was to forgive himself; while he redeemed himself, he scoffed at the idea of using his powers heroically, [[RefusalOfTheCall feeling New York wouldn't accept an ex-con hero]].)
21st May '17 4:48:19 PM nombretomado
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* In the last episode of ''WeissKreuz Gluhen,'' Ken is shown to be in prison - which, we discover, is apparently by his own choice, and it's implied that he can get back out whenever he wants but is simply using it as a form of self-imposed penance and a chance to think.

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* In the last episode of ''WeissKreuz ''Anime/WeissKreuz Gluhen,'' Ken is shown to be in prison - which, we discover, is apparently by his own choice, and it's implied that he can get back out whenever he wants but is simply using it as a form of self-imposed penance and a chance to think.
7th May '17 6:40:08 PM thatother1dude
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* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Homer and Bart get arrested in Japan and are put in a jail cell... with paper walls. Only after his bail is paid and the door is opened does Homer walk through the wall.
** In another episode, we see that one of the prisons in Springfield operates on the honor system. And most of the prisoners actually comply.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''
**
In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo", Homer and Bart get arrested in Japan and are put in a jail cell... with paper walls. Only after his bail is paid and the door is opened does Homer walk through the wall.
** In another episode, "Realty Bites", we see that one of the prisons in Springfield operates on the honor system. And most Most of the prisoners actually comply.comply!
7th May '17 6:38:00 PM thatother1dude
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "Avatar Day", Aang refuses to break out when one of his previous incarnations is accused of murder. He even gets slapped into stocks. The problem is they're designed for adults, so Aang, who is pretty skinny anyway, has no trouble at all taking them off when he wants to.
** Later, in "The Earth King", rock restraints are put on Aang's wrists. Since Aang has been training as an Earthbender, this is pointless, but Aang lets them stay on so he can make a good impression. He even briefly takes them off to wave, then puts them back on.
** This happens to Bumi when he is imprisoned by the Fire Nation, who place him in a metal box with only his face exposed so that he can be fed. The Fire Nation soldiers thought that by completely immobilizing his arms and legs, they prevented him from Earthbending, but it turns out ''twitching his nose'' is all the body movement he needs for that. Bumi willingly restrains himself until the Firebenders temporarily lose their powers so it is easier for him to not just escape, but take back his whole city by himself.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "Avatar Day", Aang refuses to break out when one of his previous incarnations is accused of murder. He even gets slapped into stocks. The problem is they're designed for adults, so Aang, who is pretty skinny anyway, has no trouble at all taking them off when he wants to.
''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender''
** Later, in "The Earth King", rock restraints are put on Aang's wrists. Since Aang has been training as an Earthbender, this is pointless, but Aang lets them stay on so he can make a good impression. He even briefly takes them off to wave, then puts them back on.
** This happens to
When Bumi when he is imprisoned by the Fire Nation, who they place him in a metal box with only his face exposed so that he can be fed. The Fire Nation soldiers thought that by completely immobilizing his arms and legs, they prevented him from Earthbending, but it turns out ''twitching his nose'' is all the body movement he needs for that. [[WeWait Bumi willingly restrains himself until the Firebenders temporarily lose their powers powers]], so it is easier for him to not just escape, [[OneManArmy but take back his whole city by himself.himself]].
** In the episode "Avatar Day", Aang refuses to break out when one of his previous incarnations is accused of murder. He even gets slapped into stocks. The problem is they're designed for adults, so Aang, who is pretty skinny anyway, has no trouble at all taking them off when he wants to.
** In "The Earth King", rock restraints are put on Aang's wrists after his team surrender themselves to the Earth King. Since Aang has been training as an Earthbender, this is pointless, but Aang lets them stay on so he can make a good impression. He even briefly takes them off to wave, then puts them back on.
26th Mar '17 9:34:04 PM AthenaBlue
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* In ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', ''Heat'', Clark is arrested for arson. Chloe talks him out of breaking out. [[spoiler:Which he did anyway.]]
** Later, Clark stops Kara from breaking out when she was arrested for murder.
** [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking No jaywalking involved.]]
* In ''Series/LoisAndClark'', Superman promises to not use his superpowers since the people of Metropolis thinks that he is the cause of a localized heat wave [[spoiler:(it was actually Lex Luthor)]]. When he saves someone, he is arrested and put in holding, where one of the other detainees starts to mess with him, ("I just tugged on Superman's cape!"). When the jerk tries to punch him, Supes dodges and the bum lands his punch on another guy. The other guy is not happy and Superman just kinda shrugs at the first one, "Kinda sucks to be you right now."
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': The Winchesters purposely trip a motion detector to get themselves arrested so they can investigate a haunted prison.
** In another episode they allow themselves to be committed to a mental institute to investigate the deaths of patients. When they are done, they just walk out of the place with minimum of effort.



* Played for laughs in ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' when GOB ends up in a coalition-run prison in Iraq. [[spoiler:The whole thing is actually a government trick to get him to lead them to some evidence against his father, and they keep intentionally giving him opportunities to escape, but he just points out their "mistakes" each time rather than taking advantage of them.]]



* An early episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' has Teal'c captured and put on "trial" for killing a man years ago (when he served Apophis). It's an absurd KangarooCourt, the team is fully armed, the locals have only medieval weapons, and the Stargate can't be more than thirty feet away. The only complication: Teal'c is guilty as charged, and refuses escape. Even after the Goa'uld attack and Teal'c is freed and armed to join the fighting, he shows up for his scheduled execution.
** Needless to say, the locals have changed their mind about sentencing by this point.
* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "I, Robot", a self-aware robot called Adam has just killed its creator [[spoiler: after said creator, on the behest of the government, tried to erase Adam's personality and reprogram him as a mindless weapon]]. Most of the episode consists of a trial determining whether or not Adam should be considered a person fit to stand trial or a piece of haywire machinery that should be immediately scrapped. The entire time he is cuffed with rather hefty restraints. In the end Adam wins the right to stand trial as a person. However, as everyone is leaving the courthouse, the prosecuting attorney who argued against Adam's humanity accidentally walks into the path of a truck. Adam effortlessly breaks his restraints and pushes her out of the way, sacrificing himself in the process.
* Neal Caffrey on ''Series/WhiteCollar'' broke out of prison 3 months before the end of his sentence to find his girlfriend. This suggests that he could have left at any time. It is also ridiculous that the 'tracking anklet' he has in the first season can literally be cut off by a pair of scissors. If he wanted to leave, 5 minutes would be more than enough time to disappear. The real problem for Neal is what to do after he escapes. He does not have the funds to live comfortably in another country and does not fancy a quiet life as a nobody in some backwoods town. Baring those options, he knows that sooner or later Peter and the FBI would track him down and put him into a maximum security prison for a long time. It is easier to just finish his two year probation while [[GildedCage living in a penthouse apartment in the middle of Manhattan]].
* Played for laughs in ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' when GOB ends up in a coalition-run prison in Iraq. [[spoiler:The whole thing is actually a government trick to get him to lead them to some evidence against his father, and they keep intentionally giving him opportunities to escape, but he just points out their "mistakes" each time rather than taking advantage of them.]]



* At least until "The Time of Angels/Flesh and Stone" River Song of ''Series/DoctorWho'' is imprisoned in the Stormcage Prison for some not-yet-specified crime (implied to be murder, possibly of the Doctor himself). When she needs to (normally to go off on some adventure with the Doctor), she will happily escape and even let the guards see her packing her bags and inform them of her plans, and then return to her cell willingly when the adventure is done. Why she does this instead of just leaving for good is not clear, although it is possible that, in her ridiculously convoluted time-travel relationship with the Doctor, she needs somewhere where she can reliably be expected to be.
** As of "The Wedding Of River Song" we know that [[spoiler: she is indeed imprisoned for killing the Doctor, but didn't really]], and that part of the reason she remains in prison is [[spoiler: to provide clear historical evidence to the Silents that the Doctor was, in fact, killed]].

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* At least until ''Series/DoctorWho'': It's revealed in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E4TheTimeOfAngels "The Time of Angels/Flesh Angels"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E5FleshAndStone "Flesh and Stone" Stone"]] that River Song of ''Series/DoctorWho'' is imprisoned in the Stormcage Prison Containment Facility for some not-yet-specified crime (implied to be murder, the murder of an unidentified individual, possibly of the Doctor himself).himself. When she needs to (normally to go off on some adventure with the Doctor), she will happily escape and even let the guards see her packing her bags and inform them of her plans, and then return to her cell willingly when the adventure is done. Why she does this instead of just leaving for good is not clear, although it is possible that, in her ridiculously convoluted time-travel relationship with the Doctor, she needs somewhere where she can reliably be expected to be.
** As of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E13TheWeddingOfRiverSong "The Wedding Of of River Song" Song"]] we know that [[spoiler: she is indeed imprisoned for killing the Doctor, but didn't really]], and that part of the reason she remains in prison is [[spoiler: to provide clear historical evidence to the Silents Silence that the Doctor was, in fact, killed]].



* In ''Series/LoisAndClark'', Superman promises to not use his superpowers since the people of Metropolis thinks that he is the cause of a localized heat wave [[spoiler:(it was actually Lex Luthor)]]. When he saves someone, he is arrested and put in holding, where one of the other detainees starts to mess with him, ("I just tugged on Superman's cape!"). When the jerk tries to punch him, Supes dodges and the bum lands his punch on another guy. The other guy is not happy and Superman just kinda shrugs at the first one, "Kinda sucks to be you right now."




to:

* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "I, Robot", a self-aware robot called Adam has just killed its creator [[spoiler: after said creator, on the behest of the government, tried to erase Adam's personality and reprogram him as a mindless weapon]]. Most of the episode consists of a trial determining whether or not Adam should be considered a person fit to stand trial or a piece of haywire machinery that should be immediately scrapped. The entire time he is cuffed with rather hefty restraints. In the end Adam wins the right to stand trial as a person. However, as everyone is leaving the courthouse, the prosecuting attorney who argued against Adam's humanity accidentally walks into the path of a truck. Adam effortlessly breaks his restraints and pushes her out of the way, sacrificing himself in the process.
* In ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', ''Heat'', Clark is arrested for arson. Chloe talks him out of breaking out. [[spoiler:Which he did anyway.]]
** Later, Clark stops Kara from breaking out when she was arrested for murder.
** [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking No jaywalking involved.]]
* An early episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' has Teal'c captured and put on "trial" for killing a man years ago (when he served Apophis). It's an absurd KangarooCourt, the team is fully armed, the locals have only medieval weapons, and the Stargate can't be more than thirty feet away. The only complication: Teal'c is guilty as charged, and refuses escape. Even after the Goa'uld attack and Teal'c is freed and armed to join the fighting, he shows up for his scheduled execution.
** Needless to say, the locals have changed their mind about sentencing by this point.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': The Winchesters purposely trip a motion detector to get themselves arrested so they can investigate a haunted prison.
** In another episode they allow themselves to be committed to a mental institute to investigate the deaths of patients. When they are done, they just walk out of the place with minimum of effort.
* Neal Caffrey on ''Series/WhiteCollar'' broke out of prison 3 months before the end of his sentence to find his girlfriend. This suggests that he could have left at any time. It is also ridiculous that the 'tracking anklet' he has in the first season can literally be cut off by a pair of scissors. If he wanted to leave, 5 minutes would be more than enough time to disappear. The real problem for Neal is what to do after he escapes. He does not have the funds to live comfortably in another country and does not fancy a quiet life as a nobody in some backwoods town. Baring those options, he knows that sooner or later Peter and the FBI would track him down and put him into a maximum security prison for a long time. It is easier to just finish his two year probation while [[GildedCage living in a penthouse apartment in the middle of Manhattan]].





















* In the ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "Jailhouse Flock", the good guys get arrested. The Planeteers get bailed out, but not Captain Planet. He chooses to stay, even using his superpowers for the hard labor. It is only when his name is cleared that he leaves.



* ''RicochetRabbit'', "Jailbreak-In" has a bad guy refuse to leave the jail, as he enjoys the free room and board there. After several unsuccessful eviction attempts, the sheriff finally does toss the bad guy out, leading to him blowing up the jail in frustration: "If I can't stay there, no one can! Goodbye, jail!" BLAMMY! AT the very end Sheriff Ricochet puts him to work building the new jail, which will end up holding the stubborn bad guy once again.



* In one series of ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' cartoons, the hero is framed for various crimes by a criminal gemcutter named Tap-Tap, who is working for the gangster Riff-Raff. Eventually he turns himself in, ''not'' to exonerate himself, but because Tap-Tap's disguise is so convincing, he even fools Underdog himself, who assumes he was sleepwalking. Although the hero could escape from jail any time, he does not, and the ruse is discovered when Riff-Raff does it for him, breaking him out because they needed him to cut a large diamond that Tap-Tap couldn't dent. Naturally, [[StupidCrooks this exposes the ruse]], and the ''real'' criminals end up in jail.

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* In one series of ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' cartoons, the ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'':
** A Fleischer cartoon has our sailor
hero is framed for various crimes by helping Olive with household chores but getting on the wrong side of a criminal gemcutter named Tap-Tap, policeman who is working citing Popeye for numerous vehicle violations. When Popeye accidentally knocks a flower vase off a window sill and it hits the gangster Riff-Raff. Eventually policeman, he turns suddenly says "I hit an offisker! I broke the law!" He totes the unconscious cop in his car to the nearest jail, sits the cop down and locks himself in, ''not'' in a cell.
-->'''Popeye:''' I always obeys the law! (''singing'') 'Cause I'm Popeye the Sailor Man! (''toot! toot!'')
** In another cartoon, Olive becomes a cop herself, and Popeye thinks it's too dangerous; he tries
to exonerate himself, protect her, but because Tap-Tap's disguise only messes up and hurts himself each time, eventually being arrested (by Olive, ironically) when he gets involved in a brawl. Then, however, [[ProperlyParanoid his hunch is so convincing, proven right]] when a masher tries to assault Olive; he even fools Underdog himself, who assumes he was sleepwalking. Although hears her screams and, proving the hero jail could escape from never hold him, breaks out, then rescues her.
* ''WesternAnimation/RicochetRabbit'', "Jailbreak-In" has a bad guy refuse to leave the jail, as he enjoys the free room and board there. After several unsuccessful eviction attempts, the sheriff finally does toss the bad guy out, leading to him blowing up the
jail any time, he does not, and in frustration: "If I can't stay there, no one can! Goodbye, jail!" BLAMMY! AT the ruse is discovered when Riff-Raff does it for him, breaking him out because they needed very end Sheriff Ricochet puts him to cut a large diamond that Tap-Tap couldn't dent. Naturally, [[StupidCrooks this exposes work building the ruse]], and the ''real'' criminals new jail, which will end up in jail. holding the stubborn bad guy once again.



* This is played with in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', where members of S.H.I.E.L.D. grab Jonah so Nick Fury can have a word with him, accidentally grabbing Peter along with him. This means they have to detain Peter while Jonah and Fury have their talk; while Peter realizes it wouldn't be a good idea to simply break out of the cell and give his identity away, he's rather curious, so he undoes a vent entrance in order to find Jonah and listen in. He manages to do so and get back before anyone notices.



* In one series of ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' cartoons, the hero is framed for various crimes by a criminal gemcutter named Tap-Tap, who is working for the gangster Riff-Raff. Eventually he turns himself in, ''not'' to exonerate himself, but because Tap-Tap's disguise is so convincing, he even fools Underdog himself, who assumes he was sleepwalking. Although the hero could escape from jail any time, he does not, and the ruse is discovered when Riff-Raff does it for him, breaking him out because they needed him to cut a large diamond that Tap-Tap couldn't dent. Naturally, [[StupidCrooks this exposes the ruse]], and the ''real'' criminals end up in jail.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "Jailhouse Flock", the good guys get arrested. The Planeteers get bailed out, but not Captain Planet. He chooses to stay, even using his superpowers for the hard labor. It is only when his name is cleared that he leaves.
* ''{{Popeye}}'':
** A Fleischer cartoon has our sailor hero helping Olive with household chores but getting on the wrong side of a policeman who is citing Popeye for numerous vehicle violations. When Popeye accidentally knocks a flower vase off a window sill and it hits the policeman, he suddenly says "I hit an offisker! I broke the law!" He totes the unconscious cop in his car to the nearest jail, sits the cop down and locks himself in a cell.
-->'''Popeye:''' I always obeys the law! (''singing'') 'Cause I'm Popeye the Sailor Man! (''toot! toot!'')
** In another cartoon, Olive becomes a cop herself, and Popeye thinks it's too dangerous; he tries to protect her, but only messes up and hurts himself each time, eventually being arrested (by Olive, ironically) when he gets involved in a brawl. Then, however, [[ProperlyParanoid his hunch is proven right]] when a masher tries to assault Olive; he hears her screams and, proving the jail could never hold him, breaks out, then rescues her.
* This is played with in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', where members of S.H.I.E.L.D. grab Jonah so Nick Fury can have a word with him, accidentally grabbing Peter along with him. This means they have to detail Peter while Jonah and Fury have their talk; while Peter realizes it wouldn't be a good idea to simply break out of the cell and give his identity away, he's rather curious, so he undoes a vent entrance in order to find Jonah and listen in. He manages to do so and get back before anyone notices.






* In more chivalrous times, officers captured in war would be given the opportunity to give their parole, which was usually a sworn promise that they would not fight against the capturers' troops. Mediaeval nobles often ended up as guests of their capturing lord, and many made great inroads in impregnating the local womenfolk. Later on, the fortress-town of Verdun was the go-to destination for British [=POWs=] in the Peninsular War. If they were enlisted, they sat it out in freezing, wet cells. If they were officers, they lived in the town and formed the Officers Philosophy Club, which did precious little philosophy and quite a lot of drinking and whoring.

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* In more chivalrous times, officers captured in war would be given the opportunity to give their parole, which was usually a sworn promise that they would not fight against the capturers' troops. Mediaeval nobles often ended up as guests of their capturing lord, and many made great inroads in impregnating the local womenfolk. Later on, the fortress-town of Verdun was the go-to destination for British [=POWs=] in the Peninsular War. If they were enlisted, they sat it out in freezing, wet cells. If they were officers, they lived in the town and formed the Officers Officers' Philosophy Club, which did precious little philosophy and quite a lot of drinking and whoring.
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