History Main / SeeminglyProfoundFool

17th Sep '17 7:52:28 AM jormis29
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* Creator/JohnCandy played exactly this character in ''Who's Harry Crumb?''. Harry (Candy) is almost in [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Ralph Wiggum's]] league. He was sent in by the CorruptCorporateExecutive because the executive wanted to send the worst possible detective in the world. Eventually, some characters do catch on to Crumb's stupidity, but by the end are wondering if it was ObfuscatingStupidity. It [[spoiler: probably was not.]]

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* Creator/JohnCandy played exactly this character in ''Who's Harry Crumb?''.''Film/WhosHarryCrumb''. Harry (Candy) is almost in [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Ralph Wiggum's]] league. He was sent in by the CorruptCorporateExecutive because the executive wanted to send the worst possible detective in the world. Eventually, some characters do catch on to Crumb's stupidity, but by the end are wondering if it was ObfuscatingStupidity. It [[spoiler: probably was not.]]
25th Aug '17 6:09:17 AM kicking_k
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* ''Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin'''s short story “The Silence of the Asonu” describes the titular people who, though they have a language, hardly ever speak aloud as adults (and then only to small children). As a result, some people from other cultures have built up a cult around their rare utterances, and read a great deal of mystic significance into them, even though they’re as banal as saying “Very good” to a child who has made something.
25th Aug '17 6:07:52 AM kicking_k
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* ''Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin'''s short story “The Silence of the Asonu” describes the titular people who, though they have a language, hardly ever speak aloud as adults (and then only to small children). As a result, some people from other cultures have built up a cult around their rare utterances, and read a great deal of mystic significance into them, even though they’re as banal as saying “Very good” to a child who has made something.
28th Jul '17 8:44:31 PM SMARTALIENQT
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* Two versions of the same Jewish joke:
** An antisemitic priest was in charge of a town, and challenged the Jews of the town to a sign language debate with him, with a catch: if the person they pick to debate loses, all the Jews must leave. No one volunteers for the debate except a poor fool. At the debate, the priest draws a big circle in the air. The fool stamps on the ground. The priest holds up three fingers. The fool shakes his head and holds up one. The priest takes out bread and wine. The fool begins to eat an apple. The priest then declares that the fool had won the debate. The priest's explanation: "The circle meant that God was everywhere in the world. The stamp on the ground meant God was not in Hell. The three fingers represented the Trinity. Holding up one finger meant that God was one and indivisible. The bread and wine represented the blood and flesh of Jesus, but when he reminded me of the original sin, I knew he had won." The ''fool's'' explanation, on the other hand: "The priest pointed far away, meaning that all the Jews must leave. I stamped on the ground, to say that we're staying right here. The three fingers meant that we had three days to get out. The one finger meant that not one of us was leaving. Then, I guess he gave up, since he took out his lunch, so I took out mine."
** A king says he will expel all the Jews in his kingdom, unless he is defeated in a sign language debate. Again, a poor fool volunteers. The king holds out his hand with the fingers spread, and the fool puts up a fist. The king puts out two fingers and the fool holds up one. Then the king takes out a piece of moldy cheese, and the fool takes out an egg. The king meant for the outstretched hand to mean that the Jews were scattered over the world, and the fist meant that they were united in God. The two fingers meant that there were two kings, on in Heaven and one on Earth, but the fool signified that there was only one king, God. The cheese meant that the religion was old and falling apart, but the egg meant that it was fresh and whole. Or... the king tried to grab the fool and he held up a fist to ward him off, the two fingers were to poke out his eyes and the finger was to stop him, and they both brought out their lunches.
** A slightly different version of this is told as a Zen parable where the fool assumes [[CallingMeALogarithm he is being insulted]]:
--->Provided he makes and wins an argument about Buddhism with those who live there, any wandering monk can remain in a Zen temple. If he is defeated, he has to move on.\\
In a temple in the northern part of Japan two brother monks were dwelling together. The elder one was learned, but the younger one was stupid and had but one eye.\\
A wandering monk came and asked for lodging, properly challenging them to a debate about the sublime teachings. The elder brother, tired that day from much studying, told the younger one to take his place. "Go and request the dialogue in silence," he cautioned.\\
So the young monk and the stranger went to the shrine and sat down.\\
Shortly afterwards the traveler rose and went in to the elder brother and said: "Your young brother is a wonderful fellow. He defeated me."\\
"Relate the dialogue to me," said the elder one.\\
"Well," explained the traveler, "first I held up one finger, representing Buddha, the enlightened one. So he held up two fingers, signifying Buddha and his teaching. I held up three fingers, representing Buddha, his teaching, and his followers, living the harmonious life. Then he shook his clenched fist in my face, indicating that all three come from one realization. Thus he won and so I have no right to remain here." With this, the traveler left.\\
"Where is that fellow?" asked the younger one, running in to his elder brother.\\
"I understand you won the debate."\\
"Won nothing. I'm going to beat him up."\\
"Tell me the subject of the debate," asked the elder one.\\
"Why, the minute he saw me he held up one finger, insulting me by insinuating that I have only one eye. Since he was a stranger I thought I would be polite to him, so I held up two fingers, congratulating him that he has two eyes. Then the impolite wretch held up three fingers, suggesting that between us we only have three eyes. So I got mad and started to punch him, but he ran out and that ended it!"



* Two versions of the same Jewish joke:
** An antisemitic priest was in charge of a town, and challenged the Jews of the town to a sign language debate with him, with a catch: if the person they pick to debate loses, all the Jews must leave. No one volunteers for the debate except a poor fool. At the debate, the priest draws a big circle in the air. The fool stamps on the ground. The priest holds up three fingers. The fool shakes his head and holds up one. The priest takes out bread and wine. The fool begins to eat an apple. The priest then declares that the fool had won the debate. The priest's explanation: "The circle meant that God was everywhere in the world. The stamp on the ground meant God was not in Hell. The three fingers represented the Trinity. Holding up one finger meant that God was one and indivisible. The bread and wine represented the blood and flesh of Jesus, but when he reminded me of the original sin, I knew he had won." The ''fool's'' explanation, on the other hand: "The priest pointed far away, meaning that all the Jews must leave. I stamped on the ground, to say that we're staying right here. The three fingers meant that we had three days to get out. The one finger meant that not one of us was leaving. Then, I guess he gave up, since he took out his lunch, so I took out mine."
** Here is another version. The king holds out his hand with the fingers spread, and the fool puts up a fist. The king puts out two fingers and the fool holds up one. Then the king takes out a piece of moldy cheese, and the fool takes out an egg. The king meant for the outstretched hand to mean that the Jews were scattered over the world, and the fist meant that they were united in God. The two fingers meant that there were two kings, on in Heaven and one on Earth, but the fool signified that there was only one king, God. The cheese meant that the religion was old and falling apart, but the egg meant that it was fresh and whole. Or... the king tried to grab the fool and he held up a fist to ward him off, the two fingers were to poke out his eyes and the finger was to stop him, and they both brought out their lunches.
** A slightly different version of this is told as a Zen parable where the fool assumes [[CallingMeALogarithm he is being insulted]]:
--->Provided he makes and wins an argument about Buddhism with those who live there, any wandering monk can remain in a Zen temple. If he is defeated, he has to move on.\\
In a temple in the northern part of Japan two brother monks were dwelling together. The elder one was learned, but the younger one was stupid and had but one eye.\\
A wandering monk came and asked for lodging, properly challenging them to a debate about the sublime teachings. The elder brother, tired that day from much studying, told the younger one to take his place. "Go and request the dialogue in silence," he cautioned.\\
So the young monk and the stranger went to the shrine and sat down.\\
Shortly afterwards the traveler rose and went in to the elder brother and said: "Your young brother is a wonderful fellow. He defeated me."\\
"Relate the dialogue to me," said the elder one.\\
"Well," explained the traveler, "first I held up one finger, representing Buddha, the enlightened one. So he held up two fingers, signifying Buddha and his teaching. I held up three fingers, representing Buddha, his teaching, and his followers, living the harmonious life. Then he shook his clenched fist in my face, indicating that all three come from one realization. Thus he won and so I have no right to remain here." With this, the traveler left.\\
"Where is that fellow?" asked the younger one, running in to his elder brother.\\
"I understand you won the debate."\\
"Won nothing. I'm going to beat him up."\\
"Tell me the subject of the debate," asked the elder one.\\
"Why, the minute he saw me he held up one finger, insulting me by insinuating that I have only one eye. Since he was a stranger I thought I would be polite to him, so I held up two fingers, congratulating him that he has two eyes. Then the impolite wretch held up three fingers, suggesting that between us we only have three eyes. So I got mad and started to punch him, but he ran out and that ended it!"

to:

* Two versions of the same Jewish joke:
** An antisemitic priest was in charge of a town, and challenged the Jews of the town to a sign language debate with him, with a catch: if the person they pick to debate loses, all the Jews must leave. No one volunteers for the debate except a poor fool. At the debate, the priest draws a big circle in the air. The fool stamps on the ground. The priest holds up three fingers. The fool shakes his head and holds up one. The priest takes out bread and wine. The fool begins to eat an apple. The priest then declares that the fool had won the debate. The priest's explanation: "The circle meant that God was everywhere in the world. The stamp on the ground meant God was not in Hell. The three fingers represented the Trinity. Holding up one finger meant that God was one and indivisible. The bread and wine represented the blood and flesh of Jesus, but when he reminded me of the original sin, I knew he had won." The ''fool's'' explanation, on the other hand: "The priest pointed far away, meaning that all the Jews must leave. I stamped on the ground, to say that we're staying right here. The three fingers meant that we had three days to get out. The one finger meant that not one of us was leaving. Then, I guess he gave up, since he took out his lunch, so I took out mine."
** Here is another version. The king holds out his hand with the fingers spread, and the fool puts up a fist. The king puts out two fingers and the fool holds up one. Then the king takes out a piece of moldy cheese, and the fool takes out an egg. The king meant for the outstretched hand to mean that the Jews were scattered over the world, and the fist meant that they were united in God. The two fingers meant that there were two kings, on in Heaven and one on Earth, but the fool signified that there was only one king, God. The cheese meant that the religion was old and falling apart, but the egg meant that it was fresh and whole. Or... the king tried to grab the fool and he held up a fist to ward him off, the two fingers were to poke out his eyes and the finger was to stop him, and they both brought out their lunches.
** A slightly different version of this is told as a Zen parable where the fool assumes [[CallingMeALogarithm he is being insulted]]:
--->Provided he makes and wins an argument about Buddhism with those who live there, any wandering monk can remain in a Zen temple. If he is defeated, he has to move on.\\
In a temple in the northern part of Japan two brother monks were dwelling together. The elder one was learned, but the younger one was stupid and had but one eye.\\
A wandering monk came and asked for lodging, properly challenging them to a debate about the sublime teachings. The elder brother, tired that day from much studying, told the younger one to take his place. "Go and request the dialogue in silence," he cautioned.\\
So the young monk and the stranger went to the shrine and sat down.\\
Shortly afterwards the traveler rose and went in to the elder brother and said: "Your young brother is a wonderful fellow. He defeated me."\\
"Relate the dialogue to me," said the elder one.\\
"Well," explained the traveler, "first I held up one finger, representing Buddha, the enlightened one. So he held up two fingers, signifying Buddha and his teaching. I held up three fingers, representing Buddha, his teaching, and his followers, living the harmonious life. Then he shook his clenched fist in my face, indicating that all three come from one realization. Thus he won and so I have no right to remain here." With this, the traveler left.\\
"Where is that fellow?" asked the younger one, running in to his elder brother.\\
"I understand you won the debate."\\
"Won nothing. I'm going to beat him up."\\
"Tell me the subject of the debate," asked the elder one.\\
"Why, the minute he saw me he held up one finger, insulting me by insinuating that I have only one eye. Since he was a stranger I thought I would be polite to him, so I held up two fingers, congratulating him that he has two eyes. Then the impolite wretch held up three fingers, suggesting that between us we only have three eyes. So I got mad and started to punch him, but he ran out and that ended it!"
28th Jul '17 8:39:08 PM SMARTALIENQT
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* Creator/TheBrothersGrimm wrote of "[[http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/grimm098.html Doctor Know-It-All]]," who on the advice of a friend gave himself that name and pretended to be a very wise person. When a wealthy gentleman heard of this, he came to the 'good doctor' for advice about his servants. Doctor Know-It-All managed to completely bluff his way through a bizarre series of events in which he unwittingly revealed all of the plots being concocted by the servants. Because of this, he became very wealthy and continued to be celebrated as knowing everything... somehow.

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* Creator/TheBrothersGrimm wrote of "[[http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/grimm098.authorama.com/grimms-fairy-tales-54.html Doctor Know-It-All]]," who on the advice of a friend gave himself that name and pretended to be a very wise person. When a wealthy gentleman heard of this, he came to the 'good doctor' for advice about his servants. Doctor Know-It-All managed to completely bluff his way through a bizarre series of events in which he unwittingly revealed all of the plots being concocted by the servants. Because of this, he became very wealthy and continued to be celebrated as knowing everything... somehow.
27th Jul '17 9:45:18 AM fugyfruit101
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* In ''OnePunchMan'' while not really an idiot Saitama is still quite simple minded yet his Disciple Genos take almost everything he says as amazingly profound advice
26th May '17 10:50:49 AM Prfnoff
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* In ''The Inspector General'', a lazy, good-for-nothing officer, Khelastakov, travels to a small Russian town which is expecting the arrival of an Inspector General from St. Petersburg. He is mistaken for the Inspector General and treated like royalty, despite his boorish behavior.

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* In ''The Inspector General'', ''Theatre/TheInspectorGeneral'', a lazy, good-for-nothing officer, Khelastakov, travels to a small Russian town which is expecting the arrival of an Inspector General from St. Petersburg. He is mistaken for the Inspector General and treated like royalty, despite his boorish behavior.
20th May '17 12:56:04 PM TheBigBopper
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->'''Pippin:''' The closer we are to danger, the further we are from harm. It's the last thing he'll expect.\\
'''Treebeard:''' That doesn't make sense to me, but you are very small. Perhaps you're right.
-->-- ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings The Two Towers]]''
17th Apr '17 12:36:40 PM Nazetrime
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* ''WebComic/StandStillStaySilent'': This happens when Onni meets Reynir. From the reader's point of view, Reynir is having his first dream/spirit walking experience while thinking he's simply having a normal dream, walks into Lalli's protectected area, gets kicked out by Lalli, and accidentally walks into Onni's safe area while trying to get back to his own. Lalli having decided to follow Reynir after kicking him out causes Onni to think Reynir was actively helping Lalli reach him. That causes Onni to interpret any signs of Reynir not actually knowing what is going on as him being quirky, causing him to tell Reynir he's happy to know that there is "another mage" on the crew right before he wakes up. In a later chapter, after Reynir ended up being the one calling Onni as magical reinforcements against strange ghosts due to Lalli being incapacited at the time, Onni has a radio conversation with Reynir and asks ''him'' if he has any theory about what the ghosts are. It's only then that Onni finds out that he's actually talking to a sheepherder who literally found he was a mage when he called him one.

to:

* ''WebComic/StandStillStaySilent'': This happens when Onni meets Reynir. From the reader's point of view, Reynir is having his first dream/spirit walking experience while thinking he's simply having a normal dream, walks into Lalli's protectected protected area, gets kicked out by Lalli, and accidentally walks into Onni's safe area while trying to get back to his own. Lalli having decided to follow Reynir after kicking him out causes Onni to think Reynir was actively helping Lalli reach him. That causes Onni to interpret any signs of Reynir not actually knowing what is going on as him being quirky, causing him to tell Reynir he's happy to know that there is "another mage" on the crew right before he wakes up. In a later chapter, after Reynir ended up being the one calling Onni as magical reinforcements against strange ghosts due to Lalli being incapacited at the time, Onni has a radio conversation with Reynir and asks ''him'' if he has any theory about what the ghosts are. It's only then that Onni finds out that he's actually talking to a sheepherder who literally found out he was a mage when he called him one.
24th Mar '17 4:26:37 AM Nazetrime
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* ''WebComic/StandStillStaySilent'': This happens when Onni meets Reynir. From a reader's point of view, Reynir is having his first dream/spirit walking experience while thinking he's simply having a normal dream, walks into Lalli's protectected area, gets kicked out by Lalli, and accidentally walks into Onni's safe area while trying to go back to his own. Lalli deciding to follow Reynir after kicking him out causes Onni to think Reynir was actively helping Lalli reach him, and the few signs Reynir shows of not knowing what is going on get interpreted by Onni as him being quirky.

to:

* ''WebComic/StandStillStaySilent'': This happens when Onni meets Reynir. From a the reader's point of view, Reynir is having his first dream/spirit walking experience while thinking he's simply having a normal dream, walks into Lalli's protectected area, gets kicked out by Lalli, and accidentally walks into Onni's safe area while trying to go get back to his own. Lalli deciding having decided to follow Reynir after kicking him out causes Onni to think Reynir was actively helping Lalli reach him, and the few him. That causes Onni to interpret any signs of Reynir shows of not actually knowing what is going on get interpreted by Onni as him being quirky. quirky, causing him to tell Reynir he's happy to know that there is "another mage" on the crew right before he wakes up. In a later chapter, after Reynir ended up being the one calling Onni as magical reinforcements against strange ghosts due to Lalli being incapacited at the time, Onni has a radio conversation with Reynir and asks ''him'' if he has any theory about what the ghosts are. It's only then that Onni finds out that he's actually talking to a sheepherder who literally found he was a mage when he called him one.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SeeminglyProfoundFool