History Main / RuleAbidingRebel

12th Jan '17 8:19:50 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* This is a major component of the {{satire}} in Creator/ChuckPalahniuk's novel (and later [[Film/FightClub film]]) ''Literature/FightClub''. Project Mayhem, Tyler Durden's hyper-macho, anti-consumerist revolutionary group, is ultimately founded on the very same philosophical base as the culture that they think they overthrowing, buying into the same [[TestosteronePoisoning idealized vision of masculinity]] that they got from pop culture and society. They're not rebelling so much as they are lashing out mindlessly, still trying to get a perfect life as "real men", only through fighting and terrorism instead of consumerism.
4th Jan '17 8:21:26 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''WebVideo/FoldingIdeas'': The Foldable Human's analysis of Jack from ''Film/FightClub'' makes him sound like this. More specifically, he rebels against society not because he thinks conformity is bad. But because he feels entitled to live life as their idea of a [[IJustWantToBeBadass "real"]] [[IWantToBeARealMan man]] and acceptance that society promised. So as a result, he enforces similar ideals of masculinity, but in a different way, mainly by starting a fight club.

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* ''WebVideo/FoldingIdeas'': The Foldable Human's analysis of Jack from ''Film/FightClub'' makes him sound like this. More specifically, he rebels against society not because he thinks conformity is bad. But bad, but because he feels entitled to live life as their idea of a [[IJustWantToBeBadass "real"]] [[IWantToBeARealMan man]] and win the acceptance that society promised. So as a result, he enforces similar ideals of masculinity, but in a different way, mainly by starting a fight club.club.
* [[WebVideo/TheNostalgiaChick Lindsay Ellis']] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0qfFbtIj5w video]] on ''Theatre/{{Rent}}'' sees her discussing the phenomenon of "bourgeois theatre", specifically the youth-oriented "we have been left behind by the system" musicals that have proliferated on Broadway since TheSixties. In her argument, while they purport to be countercultural, their values tend towards the middle-class status quo upon further examination, serving mainly to validate the views of their mostly BourgeoisBohemian audiences rather than challenge them. She segues from there into Augusto Boal's Marxist concept of the "theater of the oppressed", which argues that, barring a genuine revolution to break the dominance of the ruling class over access to media, the Rule-Abiding Rebels are the only members of the counterculture who can possibly get their works disseminated to a mainstream audience. In addition to the subject of the episode, she also cited ''Theatre/LesMiserables'' and ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' as examples of bourgeois theatre, though she comes down substantially harder on ''RENT'' for doing this because, while ''Les Mis'' and ''Hamilton'' were honest about being such, ''RENT'' explicitly positions itself in opposition to the values of the culture around it and yet [[{{Hypocrite}} fails to walk the walk]].
20th Nov '16 4:56:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'': While all secret societies are officially treasonous (doubly so for the Communists), their actual threat to Alpha Complex varies a lot (FCCCP and the Trekkies in particular are identified as mostly harmless). The XP edition introduces a secret three-tier classification system, and reveals that some societies were deliberately created to draw in potential traitors and turn them into {{Rule Abiding Rebel}}s (for every Commie and [=PURGEr=] blowing stuff up, there's ten Death Leopards who think they're BadAss for putting up some graffiti).

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'': While all secret societies are officially treasonous (doubly so for the Communists), their actual threat to Alpha Complex varies a lot (FCCCP and the Trekkies in particular are identified as mostly harmless). The XP edition introduces a secret three-tier classification system, and reveals that some societies were deliberately created to draw in potential traitors and turn them into {{Rule Abiding Rebel}}s (for every Commie and [=PURGEr=] blowing stuff up, there's ten Death Leopards who think they're BadAss badass for putting up some graffiti).
24th Oct '16 9:48:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheOnion: [[http://www.theonion.com/articles/teen-rebel-refusing-to-purchase-yearbook,19901/ Teen rebel refusing to purchase yearbook]].

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* TheOnion: Website/TheOnion: [[http://www.theonion.com/articles/teen-rebel-refusing-to-purchase-yearbook,19901/ Teen rebel refusing to purchase yearbook]].



* [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]]:

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* [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]]: ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
21st Sep '16 10:00:08 PM Premonition45
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** The trope was also explored in a number of ways in the episode that had Creator/CheechAndChong come perform in Springfield. While they are acting out their popular "Dave's not here" skit, Chong becomes annoyed when he notices that their middle-aged fans know the routine by heart and are shouting out the lines before he and Cheech can say them. So begins ad-libbing - and when Cheech tells him to stick to the script, Chong replies with an angry shout of [[ThatManIsDead "CHONG'S not here!"]] and [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere storms off the stage]] (in what proves eventually to be a TenMinuteRetirement). Cheech now needs a new Chong, and settles on Homer. At first Homer is [[AscendedFanboy thrilled to be performing alongside one of his adolescent heroes]], and imagines Cheech and himself going on all kinds of "wacky adventures." Homer soon becomes disappointed when he finds that Cheech is actually quite serious off-stage, and that his idea of "sticking it to the man" is going to museums to view works created by marginalized Chicano artists, which Homer finds boring. (He won't even let them buy French fries, because they're "too high in trans-fats.")
** When Homer quits his job, he decides to finally stick it to his MeanBoss, Mr. Burns, by . . . putting a glass of water on Burns's desk without a coaster. Then grabbing Burns's wastepaper basket and dumping the one piece of paper in it on the floor. On the other hand, Mr Burns does actually show [[SeriousBusiness shock and outrage at this behaviour.]]
** Certain episodes, notably "Homerpalooza", have mocked Generation-X'ers for thinking they're cool when in fact they're just insecure and cynical ''en masse'' - and, in one case, so confused that [[LogicBomb they're not even sure if they're]] ''[[LogicBomb really]]'' [[LogicBomb being sarcastic]]. They're also shown to be hypocritical: at the rock festival, Lisa has just gotten finished (sincerely) saying that Gen-X'ers accept all people for who they are when Homer sees [[TheFreakShow a freak show]] set up among the exhibits. And the kids at the festival hate Homer and angrily tell him to leave because they can't stand [[StrawAffiliation "uncool"]] adults [[PretenderDiss copying their culture]].

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** The trope was also explored in a number of ways in the episode that had "A Midsummer's Nice Dream", when Creator/CheechAndChong come perform in Springfield. While they are acting out their popular "Dave's not here" skit, Chong becomes annoyed when he notices that their middle-aged fans know the routine by heart and are shouting out the lines before he and Cheech can say them. So begins ad-libbing - and when Cheech tells him to stick to the script, Chong replies with an angry shout of [[ThatManIsDead "CHONG'S not here!"]] and [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere storms off the stage]] (in what proves eventually to be a TenMinuteRetirement). Cheech now needs a new Chong, and settles on Homer. At first Homer is [[AscendedFanboy thrilled to be performing alongside one of his adolescent heroes]], and imagines Cheech and himself going on all kinds of "wacky adventures." Homer soon becomes disappointed when he finds that Cheech is actually quite serious off-stage, and that his idea of "sticking it to the man" is going to museums to view works created by marginalized Chicano artists, which Homer finds boring. (He won't even let them buy French fries, because they're "too high in trans-fats.")
** When In "And Maggie Makes Three", Homer quits his job, he decides to finally stick it to his MeanBoss, Mr. Burns, by . . . putting a glass of water on Burns's desk without a coaster. Then grabbing Burns's wastepaper basket and dumping the one piece of paper in it on the floor. On the other hand, Mr Burns does actually show [[SeriousBusiness shock and outrage at this behaviour.]]
** Certain episodes, notably "Homerpalooza", have mocked Generation-X'ers for thinking they're cool when in fact they're just insecure and cynical ''en masse'' - and, in one case, so confused that [[LogicBomb they're not even sure if they're]] ''[[LogicBomb really]]'' [[LogicBomb being sarcastic]]. They're also shown to be hypocritical: at the rock festival, Lisa has just gotten finished (sincerely) saying that Gen-X'ers accept all people for who they are when Homer sees [[TheFreakShow a freak show]] set up among the exhibits. And the kids at the festival hate Homer and angrily tell him to leave because they can't stand [[StrawAffiliation "uncool"]] adults [[PretenderDiss copying their culture]]. culture]].
** In "The Heartbroke Kid", Springfield Elementary School decides to install vending machines, giving half its profits to the school. Its hip-hop themed mascots, Scammer and Z-Dawg, are described by Lindsey Naegle as "spokesrebels".
-->'''Scammer:''' [[TheManIsStickingItToTheMan Yo, don't flava hate, participate]]!
29th Aug '16 4:39:39 PM nombretomado
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* The DisneyChannel original movie ''Film/RadioRebel''. The main character is a teen radio commentator who is supposed to be seen as this cool, rebellious girl, but she doesn't really do anything anti-authority. She mostly complains about cliques and school rules being unfair but doesn't say anything that would be considered controversial or new by most people, especially teens.

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* The DisneyChannel Creator/DisneyChannel original movie ''Film/RadioRebel''. The main character is a teen radio commentator who is supposed to be seen as this cool, rebellious girl, but she doesn't really do anything anti-authority. She mostly complains about cliques and school rules being unfair but doesn't say anything that would be considered controversial or new by most people, especially teens.
21st Aug '16 1:12:58 PM nombretomado
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* When he teamed up with RandyOrton to battle D-Generation X in the fall of 2006, {{Edge}} accused ShawnMichaels and TripleH of being this. Certainly, compared with their overtly offensive incarnation during TheNineties, DX's second coming in 2006 looked pretty {{Badbutt}}.

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* When he teamed up with RandyOrton Wrestling/RandyOrton to battle D-Generation X in the fall of 2006, {{Edge}} Wrestling/{{Edge}} accused ShawnMichaels Wrestling/ShawnMichaels and TripleH Wrestling/TripleH of being this. Certainly, compared with their overtly offensive incarnation during TheNineties, DX's second coming in 2006 looked pretty {{Badbutt}}.
12th Aug '16 6:42:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* The {{Music/TISM}} song "[[Music/LedZeppelin Dazed And]] {{Confucius}}" is a lament that, while the singer does want to be a rebel, he just can't stay up late enough to do any rebellious things. In the end the police search his house and find his stash of H[[spoiler:omework]].

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* The {{Music/TISM}} song "[[Music/LedZeppelin Dazed And]] {{Confucius}}" Creator/{{Confucius}}" is a lament that, while the singer does want to be a rebel, he just can't stay up late enough to do any rebellious things. In the end the police search his house and find his stash of H[[spoiler:omework]].
20th Jun '16 2:40:17 PM gewunomox
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* ''Series/FullHouse'' really, really wants its audience to believe that Uncle Jesse is a badass because he drives a motorcycle and listens to/plays rock music (''Classic'' rock like [[ElvisPresley Elvis]] that is. A TakeThat at TwistedSister indicates that [[WriterOnBoard neither he nor the writers]] care for HeavyMetal). In reality, not so much. Eventually Jesse leaves his "wild ways" behind when he decides to get married and have [[CousinOliver twins.]]

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* ''Series/FullHouse'' really, really wants its audience to believe that Uncle Jesse is a badass because he drives a motorcycle and listens to/plays rock music (''Classic'' rock like [[ElvisPresley Elvis]] that is. A TakeThat at TwistedSister Music/TwistedSister indicates that [[WriterOnBoard neither he nor the writers]] care for HeavyMetal). In reality, not so much. Eventually Jesse leaves his "wild ways" behind when he decides to get married and have [[CousinOliver twins.]]
19th Jun '16 3:14:57 PM ironballs16
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** His original heel turn after cashing in the Money in the Bank briefcase on Jeff Hardy, was primarily based around his Straight Edge lifestyle vs. Hardy's drug use. Yes, the bad guy was the one who didn't smoke, drink, or do drugs.

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** His original heel turn after cashing in the Money in the Bank briefcase on Jeff Hardy, was primarily based around his Straight Edge lifestyle vs. Hardy's drug use. Yes, the bad guy was the one who didn't smoke, drink, or do drugs.drugs[[note]]Though he was heel because of his HolierThanThou attitude[[/note]].
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