History Main / RocketTagGameplay

18th Apr '18 9:07:35 AM hubakon1368
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[[folder: Web Animation ]]
* ''WebAnimation/DeathBattle'': [[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles The Shredder]] vs [[Franchise/{{Wolverine}} Silver Samurai]] ultimately goes down to who would be the first to land a lethal hit due to Oroku Saki's ninja precision and Kenuichio Harada's Tachyon Blade. [[spoiler:The Shredder is deemed the winner since the hosts shown that Saki [[SuperSpeed can strike faster]] than Harada [[SuperReflexes can react to protect himself]].]]
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10th Apr '18 5:29:57 PM SAMAS
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* The fast movement and fast Time-To-Kill speeds of the ''VideoGame/{{Titanfall}}'' games are this in spades. Pilots rarely live though more than one burst of fire, and movement can be blindingly fast, especially after ''VideoGame/Titanfall2'' added the Stim and Grapple abilities. This goes all the way to the other side when the [[HumongousMecha Titans]] drop, however.
18th Mar '18 1:39:34 PM Eagal
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** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' 3.5 edition is often accused of Rocket Tag gameplay. Not only because damage outstrips hit points (and [[http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/19872838/Little_Red_Raiding_Hood:_A_Tale_of_38;_Guide_to_the_3.5_Dragoon Hood]] is merely one example), but because of an excess of spells which instantly kill or cripple their targets (and spellcasters knowing so many spells that they can always choose the one that's most effective, like MindRape against a dumb enemy). In fact, it was possible for every one of a caster's spells of 4th level or higher to be very direct "instant win" spells. For example, ''solid fog'' (a 20' radius) meant standard movement was limited to 5', or 20' if the target ran as fast as he could in a straight line and remembered he could do that. ''Evard's black tentacles'' tried grappling all creatures in the area (in a 30' radius, natch) and usually succeeded. Add ''stinking cloud'' (another 20' radius) to taste, which prevents those who fail their Fortitude save from acting and you have yourself a killer combo. At level 7. In ''core''. (In general, spells of level 3 and below can't plain win fights like this, but a failed save against a ''grease'', ''color spray'', ''glitterdust'', or ''web'' means you're pretty much screwed while the caster's friends & minions quickly beat you to death.)

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** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' 3.5 edition is often accused of Rocket Tag gameplay. Not only because damage outstrips hit points (and [[http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/19872838/Little_Red_Raiding_Hood:_A_Tale_of_38;_Guide_to_the_3.5_Dragoon Hood]] is merely one example), points, but because of an excess of spells which instantly kill or cripple their targets (and spellcasters knowing so many spells that they can always choose the one that's most effective, like MindRape against a dumb enemy). In fact, it was possible for every one of a caster's spells of 4th level or higher to be very direct "instant win" spells. For example, ''solid fog'' (a 20' radius) meant standard movement was limited to 5', or 20' if the target ran as fast as he could in a straight line and remembered he could do that. ''Evard's black tentacles'' tried grappling all creatures in the area (in a 30' radius, natch) and usually succeeded. Add ''stinking cloud'' (another 20' radius) to taste, which prevents those who fail their Fortitude save from acting and you have yourself a killer combo. At level 7. In ''core''. (In general, spells of level 3 and below can't plain win fights like this, but a failed save against a ''grease'', ''color spray'', ''glitterdust'', or ''web'' means you're pretty much screwed while the caster's friends & minions quickly beat you to death.)
17th Feb '18 6:08:49 PM thatother1dude
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* Some ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'' games after the third game allow for this with the "Heaven or Hell" difficulty mode unlocked after beating the game on [[HarderThanHard "Dante Must Die!"]] mode. All sources of damage - yours, the enemy's, traps and the like - are boosted to ridiculous levels on this difficulty, so much that anything that can die in the game will do so from a single hit. This is in contrast to "Hell or Hell" difficulty, where this only applies to ''[[OneHitPointWonder you]]''.

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* Some ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'' games after the third game allow for this with the have a "Heaven or Hell" difficulty mode unlocked after beating the game on [[HarderThanHard "Dante Must Die!"]] mode. All sources of damage - -- yours, the enemy's, traps and the like - -- are boosted to ridiculous levels on this difficulty, so much that anything that can die in the game will do so from a single hit. This is in contrast to "Hell or Hell" difficulty, where this only applies to ''[[OneHitPointWonder you]]''.
14th Feb '18 8:13:17 PM thatother1dude
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* ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', the classic. Most weapons will kill in a single shot to the head, there are no respawns and no way to recover health. The trope's in effect if the players are packing the HandCannon Desert Eagle, and when the BFG AWP comes into play ''any'' shots to the head or torso put you out of commission, even through your body armor. Using smoke grenades, flashbangs, suppressing fire and squad tactics is ''crucial'' to ensuring that your team members aren't taken out by a stray shot.

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* ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', the classic. Most weapons will kill in a single shot to the head, there are and the primary game modes have no mid-round respawns and no way or ways to recover health. The trope's in effect if recovery help. When the players are packing the HandCannon Desert Eagle, and when the BFG AWP comes into play play, ''any'' shots to the head or torso put you out of commission, even through your body armor. Using smoke grenades, flashbangs, suppressing fire and squad tactics is ''crucial'' to ensuring that your team members aren't taken out by a stray shot.
14th Feb '18 7:58:15 PM thatother1dude
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'': Compared to Normal difficulty, players in [[HarderThanHard Survival]] difficulty take four times as much damage but only do one-quarter less--and can make up the difference with the [[HardModePerks Survival-exclusive]] Adrenaline mechanic that increases damage for every kill made without resting and increased drop rates for Legendary weapons.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'': Compared to Normal difficulty, players in [[HarderThanHard Survival]] difficulty take four times as much damage but only do one-quarter less--and can make up the difference with the [[HardModePerks Survival-exclusive]] Adrenaline mechanic mechanic, that increases damage for every kill made without resting resting, and increased drop rates for Legendary weapons.
15th Jan '18 9:05:49 AM Malady
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* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon Trading Card Game]]'' became like this during the later parts of [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Generation IV]] and the earlier parts of [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Generation V]]. Everywhere in tournament play was the "Donk" deck, which makes use of one Pokémon with one very high-damage, low-Energy attack. These attacks invariably have drawbacks, such as Rampardos [[CastFromHitPoints taking damage]] or Machamp only able to use it on certain Pokémon, and the rest of the deck was designed to minimize those negative effects. In addition, there were plenty of cards to boost damage, like [=PlusPower=], Buck's Training, and Expert Belt. Together, playing the ''Pokémon TCG'' competitively during then largely came down to a race to the first knockout which, more often than not, created momentum that would grow into an insurmountable lead.

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* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon Trading Card Game]]'' became like this during the later parts of [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Generation IV]] and the earlier parts of [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Generation V]]. Everywhere in tournament play was the "Donk" deck, which makes use of one Pokémon with one very high-damage, low-Energy attack. These attacks invariably have drawbacks, such as Rampardos [[CastFromHitPoints taking damage]] or Machamp only able to use it on certain Pokémon, and the rest of the deck was designed to minimize those negative effects. In addition, there were plenty of cards to boost damage, like [=PlusPower=], Buck's Training, and Expert Belt. Together, playing the ''Pokémon TCG'' competitively during then largely came down to a race to the first knockout which, more often than not, created momentum that would grow into an insurmountable lead.

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[[folder: Video Games ]]



* ''VideoGame/{{InvisibleInc}}'' implements this for ''turn-based tactical stealth'': One hit from a weapon, and any character is down, whether agent or enemy. (While an agent can be revived with some futuristic AppliedPhlebotinum, and an enemy may be KO'd or killed depending on your weapon, if they're hit, they're still out of the game.) Notably, during early development the devs ''did'' try a more conventional approach with hit points and hit percentages, but came to the conclusion that it felt too much like a combat game rather than like a stealth game, and specifically a spy game. They arrived at RocketTagGameplay after some brainstorms about what a spy game ''should'' feel like: like the stakes are high, and the enemy is always better-equipped than you are, but you gain the advantage through improvisation and quick thinking.

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* ''VideoGame/{{InvisibleInc}}'' ''VideoGame/InvisibleInc'' implements this for ''turn-based tactical stealth'': One hit from a weapon, and any character is down, whether agent or enemy. (While an agent can be revived with some futuristic AppliedPhlebotinum, and an enemy may be KO'd or killed depending on your weapon, if they're hit, they're still out of the game.) Notably, during early development the devs ''did'' try a more conventional approach with hit points and hit percentages, but came to the conclusion that it felt too much like a combat game rather than like a stealth game, and specifically a spy game. They arrived at RocketTagGameplay after some brainstorms about what a spy game ''should'' feel like: like the stakes are high, and the enemy is always better-equipped than you are, but you gain the advantage through improvisation and quick thinking.



** Generation V in particular seems to encourage this, as nearly any Pokémon in OU play that isn't a StoneWall is more than likely going to get taken out by one super-effective attack. Ditto's [[TookALevelInBadass new level in badass]] shines in this sort of gameplay, as its new ability to transform as it enters the battlefield instead of spending a move, combined with a Choice Scarf, means that it doesn't matter what the Sweeper is or how powerful and fast it's gotten, at the very best it has a 50% chance of going first.
** Generation V's double battles were also like this, due to the prevalence of TakingYouWithMe moves like Explosion, Destiny Bond, and Final Gambit: Official tournament battles, which were all double battles, frequently ended in fewer turns than there were Pokémon. By contrast, Generation V's ''single battles'' often turned into PaddedSumoGameplay, with the ubiquitous presence of walls like Reuniclus, Slowbro, Dusknoir, and Scrafty with battles consisting largely of both players switching from Pokémon to Pokémon to take hits (until one of the aforementioned Sweepers shows up). Self-Destruct and Explosion got {{Nerf}}ed in Generation VI, though double battles continue to progress much faster than their single-battle cousins to this day.

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** Generation V in particular seems to encourage this, as nearly any Pokémon in OU play that isn't a StoneWall is more than likely going to get taken out by one super-effective attack. Ditto's [[TookALevelInBadass new level in badass]] shines in this sort of gameplay, as its new ability to transform as it enters the battlefield instead of spending a move, combined with a Choice Scarf, means that it doesn't matter what the Sweeper is or how powerful and fast it's gotten, at the very best it has a 50% chance of going first.
** Generation V's double battles were also like this, due to the prevalence of TakingYouWithMe moves like Explosion, Destiny Bond, and Final Gambit: Official tournament battles, which were all double battles, frequently ended in fewer turns than there were Pokémon. By contrast, Generation V's ''single battles'' often turned into PaddedSumoGameplay, with the ubiquitous presence of walls like Reuniclus, Slowbro, Dusknoir, and Scrafty with battles consisting largely of both players switching from Pokémon to Pokémon to take hits (until one of the aforementioned Sweepers shows up). Self-Destruct and Explosion got {{Nerf}}ed in Generation VI, though double battles continue to progress much faster than their single-battle cousins to this day.


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25th Dec '17 12:15:07 AM Kadorhal
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* Some ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'' games after the third game allow for this with the "Heaven or Hell" difficulty mode unlocked after beating the game on [[HarderThanHard "Dante Must Die!"]] mode. All sources of damage - yours, the enemy's, traps and the like - are boosted to ridiculous levels on this difficulty, so much that anything that can die in the game will do so from a single hit. This is in contrast to "Hell or Hell" difficulty, where this only applies to ''[[OneHitPointWonder you]]''.
24th Dec '17 12:33:49 PM Hekateras
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* ''VideoGame/{{InvisibleInc}}'' implements this for ''turn-based tactical stealth'': One hit from a weapon, and any character is down, whether agent or enemy. (While an agent can be revived with some futuristic AppliedPhlebotinum, and an enemy may be KO'd or killed depending on your weapon, if they're hit, they're still out of the game.) Notably, during early development the devs ''did'' try a more conventional approach with hit points and hit percentages, but came to the conclusion that it felt too much like a combat game rather than like a stealth game, and specifically a spy game. They arrived at RocketTagGameplay after some brainstorms about what a spy game ''should'' feel like: like the stakes are high, and the enemy is always better-equipped than you are, but you gain the advantage through improvisation and quick thinking.
11th Dec '17 5:55:51 AM Cryoclaste
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* ''{{Pokemon}}'', especially in earlier generations, has a metagame role called the "Sweeper". The purpose of this monster is to one-shot the entire opposing team due to a high speed stat, insane damage, and good coverage on the ElementalRockPaperScissors table. The best counter for a Sweeper? A faster sweeper that can one-shot it. Barring that, a character tough enough that it can survive a Sweeper's attack, so it can retaliate. Many Sweepers focus purely on Attack/Sp. Attack and Speed, so they're likely to be a GlassCannon or a FragileSpeedster.

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* ''{{Pokemon}}'', ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', especially in earlier generations, has a metagame role called the "Sweeper". The purpose of this monster is to one-shot the entire opposing team due to a high speed stat, insane damage, and good coverage on the ElementalRockPaperScissors table. The best counter for a Sweeper? A faster sweeper that can one-shot it. Barring that, a character tough enough that it can survive a Sweeper's attack, so it can retaliate. Many Sweepers focus purely on Attack/Sp. Attack and Speed, so they're likely to be a GlassCannon or a FragileSpeedster.
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