History Main / Robot

27th Jun '16 12:52:49 PM DrNoPuma
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* RobotClown
13th Mar '16 9:55:45 PM rmctagg09
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* MechanicalAbomination
28th Feb '16 7:55:01 PM LadyJuse
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* HostileAnimatronics
4th May '15 11:03:53 AM nombretomado
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The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots were ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[note]]''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.[[/note]] before the word "robot" came into use.

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The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots were ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology Myth/ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[note]]''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.[[/note]] before the word "robot" came into use.
18th Mar '14 1:41:00 AM Keybreak
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The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[note]]''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.[[/note]] before the word "robot" came into use.

to:

The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where were ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[note]]''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.[[/note]] before the word "robot" came into use.
14th Aug '13 7:49:30 AM Korodzik
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The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[hottip:*:''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.]] before the word "robot" came into use.

to:

The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[hottip:*:''automata'' ''automatons''[[note]]''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.]] [[/note]] before the word "robot" came into use.
17th Jul '13 8:39:08 PM JIKTV
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As a very common supertrope, {{Robot}} lists its subtropes below in index format. For an even more comprehensive list noting related tropes, see also RobotRollCall. Compare ArtificialHuman, SpaceshipGirl and the various {{Cyborg}}s. And of course, beware the RobotUprising.

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As a very common supertrope, {{Robot}} [=Robot=] lists its subtropes below in index format. For an even more comprehensive list noting related tropes, see also RobotRollCall. Compare ArtificialHuman, SpaceshipGirl and the various {{Cyborg}}s. And of course, beware the RobotUprising.
17th Mar '13 5:19:57 PM EarlOfSandvich
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--> '''TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'''

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--> '''TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'''
'''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy1'''
1st Mar '13 2:31:22 AM Aquila89
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The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[hottip:*:''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.]] before the word "robot" came into use.

to:

The word's origin lies with Karel Čapek, a Czech writer and playwright who coined the term in 1921 with his play ''Theatre/RossumsUniversalRobots'' -- although ironically, Čapek's robots where ArtificialHumans, not mechanical beings. The name is derived from the Czech word ''robota'', meaning serf labor. (According to Čapek, it was his brother, Josef who suggested him the word). The concept of the "mechanical human" itself is much older; in memory of the tale from ClassicalMythology that Hephaestus, the God of smithcraft, had built machines that moved of their own accord and worked for him, such beings were referred to as ''automatons''[[hottip:*:''automata'' if you insist on the Greek plural.]] before the word "robot" came into use.
4th Feb '13 9:10:14 AM SeptimusHeap
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* BadassAutomaton
This list shows the last 10 events of 19. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Robot