History Main / ReplacementScrappy

25th Sep '16 11:41:15 AM SuperSonicHeroes
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** ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirlsLegendOfEverFree'': While a majority of the fandom disliked Flash Sentry in the Equestria Girls films due to being a SatelliteLoveInterest to Twilight, the fourth film introduces Timber Spruce who is an even worse example. The human Twilight falls for him as soon as she sees him and their interactions seems forced at best. This angered many fans for repeating the mistakes made with Flash in the previous films, and since Flash's popularity had been slowly rising over the years his supporters weren't happy that he was pushed to the background and a new guy stole his love interest.
22nd Sep '16 10:01:37 PM Twentington
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** The 1990 revival was critically panned (to the point of reaching MemeticMutation in the game show community), with one of the main points of contention being the hosting performance of Patrick Wayne (son of Creator/JohnWayne). Besides rule changes that cheapened the game (including a TotallyRadical rapping dragon in the BonusRound), Wayne was hated for his over-excitable hosting style, as he read the questions and RulesSpiel in a monotone, but would suddenly scream "YOU WIN!" or "YOU BLOCK!" if a contestant successfully placed an X or O on the board. His hosting style gained MemeticMutation in the game show community for being one of the worst known hosts.

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** The 1990 revival was critically panned (to the point Beyond a large number of reaching MemeticMutation in the game show community), with one of the main points of contention being the hosting performance of Patrick Wayne (son of Creator/JohnWayne). Besides rule unnecessary cosmetic changes and rules changes that cheapened the game (including a TotallyRadical rapping dragon in game, the BonusRound), Wayne main point of contention for the 1990-1991 revival was hated for his over-excitable the hosting style, style of Patrick Wayne (Creator/JohnWayne's son). Wayne often came across as he fake in the interviews and read the questions and RulesSpiel in a monotone, but would suddenly scream [[SuddenlyShouting scream]] "YOU WIN!" if a contestant won the game, or "YOU BLOCK!" if a contestant successfully placed an X or O on the board.blocked his/her opponent. His hosting style gained MemeticMutation in the game show community for being one of the worst known hosts.



** In the 1990-91 season, ''Joker'' also got a {{Re Tool}}ed revival, helmed by Pat Finn. While the rule changes were somewhat more accepted than those of ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', Finn was also seen as an example of this trope, as some felt that he was too dry and monotone (though this may be an example of being restrained by the format, general reception to Finn as a host has warmed up considerably, as evidenced by his work on ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' and ''Series/TheBigSpin'').

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** In the 1990-91 season, ''Joker'' also got a {{Re Tool}}ed revival, helmed by Pat Finn. While the rule changes were somewhat more accepted than those of ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', Finn was also seen as an example of this trope, as some felt that he was too dry and monotone (though monotone, particularly the way he droned "as you know, ''The Joker's Wild'' is a game of definitions" in the BonusRound. However, this may be an example of being restrained by the format, as general reception to Finn as a host has warmed up considerably, as evidenced by his work on ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' and ''Series/TheBigSpin'').''Series/TheBigSpin''.



** The first came when the producers of ''Series/MatchGame'' decided to partner with those of ''Squares'' to form ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' in 1983-84. The ''Squares'' portion was hosted not by original ''Squares'' host Peter Marshall (who helmed the show from 1966 to 1980), but rather to Jon Bauman, aka Bowser of Music/ShaNaNa. Bauman was obviously inexperienced and stiff in the role, which was only exacerbated by original ''Match Game'' host Gene Rayburn still hosting the ''Match'' portion.

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** The first came when the producers of ''Series/MatchGame'' decided to partner with those of ''Squares'' to form ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' in 1983-84. The ''Squares'' portion was hosted not by original ''Squares'' host Peter Marshall (who helmed the show from 1966 to 1980), but rather to Jon Bauman, aka best known for being Bowser of Music/ShaNaNa.in Music/ShaNaNa (although he did not host in-character). Bauman was obviously inexperienced and stiff in the role, which was only exacerbated by original ''Match Game'' host Gene Rayburn still hosting the ''Match'' portion. In addition, even ''Rayburn'' seemed to hate Bauman.



** After the original Richard Dawson-hosted version went off the air in 1985, creator Creator/MarkGoodson launched a revival for Creator/{{CBS}} hosted by a young comedian named Ray Combs, which ran from 1988 to 1994. [[BrokenBase Depending on who is asked]], Combs is either a straight example, an inversion or an aversion. Those who prefer Combs generally feel that Dawson's (usually) off-camera clashes with the higher-ups outweighed the warmth and wit he (usually) showed on-camera, while the pro-Dawson camp tends to see Combs as cold and smug. [[TakeAThirdOption Still others feel]] that both brought their own styles to the table.
** Ironically, Dawson himself seemed to become one in 1994, when Goodson's son Jonathan saw that the show was sinking and decided to bring Dawson back. The years had not been kind to him, as the now 62-year-old Dawson was past his prime: he spoke slower and softer, he had gained a lot of weight, and his once-sharp wit was greatly dulled. The revived Dawson version lasted only a year.
** The current version, begun in 1999, originally went to comedian Louie Anderson. He was heavily panned for his weight, gravelly voice, and supposedly bored demeanor. After he left in 2002, a pattern began where each successive host was considered an improvement at first glance, but then the cracks began to show:
** Richard Karn (2002-06) was initially given a pass because, while clearly inexperienced as a host, he seemed to show as much enthusiasm for the job as Anderson seemed to lack. Although he did show a brief period of competence, he eventually moved into an extremely stiff, robotic manner of hosting which was highly dependent on him shouting {{Catch Phrase}}s ("[[MemeticMutation I'M DOUBLING THE POINTS!]]").
** John O'Hurley (2006-10) had hosted a game show before (specifically, the 2000-02 incarnation of ''Series/ToTellTheTruth''), so his experience in the role was enough for him to also get an intial thumbs-up from the fanbase. But some felt that he considered ''Feud'' beneath him, while others found him poor at reacting to off-the-wall answers.
** Even Steve Harvey (2010-) who has brought the show its highest ratings in years isn't immune. Harvey instantly gained fans due to his hilarious reactions to stupid answers. However, the producers decided to try enforcing Harvey's {{Wild Take}}s as often as possible, leading to a more sophomoric level of question-writing that baited contestants into giving lurid answers.
* Many long-time watchers of ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' were wondering "What were they thinking?" when the show decided to replace the retiring Bob Barker with Drew Carey as host. In Carey's defense, it would be hard for audiences to see ''anyone'' replacing Barker, since he had hosted the show for [[LongRunners an amazing 35 years]].
** This can also apply to the announcer's booth. After Johnny Olson's 1985 death, Rod Roddy's 2003 death, and Rich Fields' 2010 firing, the show tried out various guest announcers on-air before determining the successor. The substitutes are all victims of Replacement Scrappydom to some extent, but some of the more prominent ones include:

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** After the original Richard Dawson-hosted version went off the air in 1985, creator Creator/MarkGoodson launched a revival for Creator/{{CBS}} hosted by a young comedian named Ray Combs, which ran from 1988 to 1994. [[BrokenBase Depending on who is asked]], Combs is either a straight example, an inversion inversion, or an aversion. Those who prefer Combs generally feel that Dawson's (usually) off-camera clashes with the higher-ups outweighed the warmth and wit he (usually) showed on-camera, while the pro-Dawson camp tends to see Combs as cold and smug. [[TakeAThirdOption Still others feel]] that both brought their own styles to the table.
** Ironically, Dawson himself seemed to become one in 1994, when Goodson's son Jonathan (who took over his production company) saw that the show was sinking and decided to bring Dawson back. The years had not been kind to him, as the now 62-year-old Dawson was past his prime: he spoke slower and softer, he had gained a lot of weight, and his once-sharp wit was greatly dulled. The revived Dawson version lasted only a year.
** The current version, begun in 1999, originally went to comedian Louie Anderson. He was heavily panned for his weight, gravelly monotone voice, and supposedly bored demeanor.demeanor (the last of which was even mocked by ''Series/MadTV''). After he left in 2002, a pattern began where each successive host was considered an improvement at first glance, but then the cracks began to show:
** Richard Karn (2002-06) was initially given a pass because, while clearly inexperienced as a host, despite his obvious inexperience, he seemed to show as much be the complete opposite of Anderson in enthusiasm for and interest in the job as Anderson seemed to lack. Although he did show a brief period of competence, he eventually moved show. However, this quickly devolved into an extremely stiff, robotic repetitive manner of hosting which was highly dependent on him shouting {{Catch Phrase}}s ("[[MemeticMutation I'M DOUBLING THE POINTS!]]").
POINTS!]]"), with an almost ridiculous inability to ad-lib.
** John O'Hurley (2006-10) had hosted a game show before (specifically, the 2000-02 incarnation of ''Series/ToTellTheTruth''), so his experience in the role was enough for him to also get an intial thumbs-up from the fanbase. But some felt that he considered ''Feud'' beneath him, merely seemed to be going through the motions, while others found him poor at reacting to off-the-wall answers.
** Even Steve Harvey (2010-) who has brought the show its highest ratings in years isn't immune. Harvey instantly gained fans due to his hilarious reactions to stupid answers.answers, which (as in the prior incarnations) were usually organic, off-the-cuff reactions. However, the producers decided to try enforcing Harvey's {{Wild Take}}s as often as possible, leading to a more sophomoric level of question-writing that baited contestants into giving lurid answers.
* Many long-time watchers of ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' were wondering "What were they thinking?" when the show decided to replace the retiring Bob Barker with Drew Carey as host. In Carey's defense, it would be hard for audiences to see ''anyone'' replacing Barker, since he had hosted the show for [[LongRunners an amazing 35 years]].
years]]. Those who hate Drew criticize him for trying to inject humor at inappropriate times (most notoriously, his decision to incorporate TheAnnouncer into "comedic" showcases that generally elicited a DudeNotFunny reaction from the fanbase; to be fair, Drew got the message), fluctuating enthusiasm (he seems to act more placid when contestants are performing poorly), and [[MotorMouth talking way too fast]].
** This can also apply to the announcer's booth. After Johnny Olson's 1985 death, Rod Roddy's 2003 death, and Rich Fields' 2010 firing, departure, the show tried out various guest announcers on-air before determining the successor. The substitutes are all victims of Replacement Scrappydom to some extent, but some of the more prominent ones include:



*** Rod's increasing illness in the late 90s-early 2000s resulted in many fill-ins by former ''Arsenio Hall'' show announcer Burton Richardson, who also did the short-lived 1994 syndicated ReTool of ''Price'' and a few other game shows. Some fans consider Burton a solid announcer, while others think he sounds like an overblown parody of one who ridiculously over-enunciates his words (sometimes called the "puking" style).
*** Another fill-in during Rod's surgery was Paul Boland, who previously did the 1998 revival of ''Series/MatchGame''. While he has his fans, some felt he was [[NoIndoorVoice too enthusiastic]]. He ended up announcing only one week after refusing demands from ''Price'' staff to tone it down.

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*** Rod's increasing illness in the late 90s-early 2000s resulted in many fill-ins by former ''Arsenio Hall'' show announcer Burton Richardson, who also did best known for announcing ''The Arsenio Hall Show'' and the short-lived 1994 syndicated ReTool version of ''Price'' and a few other game shows. Some fans consider Burton a solid announcer, while others think he sounds hosted by Doug Davidson. He is sometimes criticized for sounding like an overblown parody of one who a game show announcer and ridiculously over-enunciates drawing out his words (sometimes called the "puking" style).
words.
*** Another fill-in during Rod's surgery was Paul Boland, who previously did the 1998 revival of ''Series/MatchGame''. While he has his fans, some felt he His main criticism was being [[NoIndoorVoice way too enthusiastic]].enthusiastic]], to the point that he once announced a container of cough syrup as if it were [[CatchPhrase a new car]]. He ended up announcing only one week after refusing demands from ''Price'' staff to tone it down.



*** Rich Fields himself started to become this over time, in part because he was picked over fan favorite Randy West[[note]](a genre veteran who had been a contestant on several shows before his announcing career, and is known for interacting well with the game show fan base as a whole; he was also close friends with Johnny Olson)[[/note]], and in part because many felt that Rich did not have a good voice particularly in later years, when he became increasingly [[NoIndoorVoice loud and grating]]. (Never mind Drew's short-lived decision to incorporate him into some downright humiliating "comedy" skits in the Showcases.)
*** After Rich was fired, the substitutes included Steve White and Brad Sherwood, both of whom were hated for their fake enthusiasm); former ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' host JD Roberto, who was considered SoOkayItsAverage (although he also got to announce the 2012 revival of ''Series/{{Pyramid}}''); and a rather close division among Jeff Davis, David H. Lawrence XVII, or [[Series/TheWeakestLink George Gray]], the last of whom became Rich's successor and is generally well-liked.

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*** Rich Fields himself started to become this over time, in part because he was picked over fan favorite Randy West[[note]](a genre veteran who had been a contestant on several shows before his announcing career, and is known for interacting well with the game show fan base as a whole; he was also close friends with Johnny Olson)[[/note]], and in part because many felt that Rich did not have a good voice particularly in later years, when he became increasingly [[NoIndoorVoice loud and grating]]. (Never mind Drew's short-lived decision to incorporate him into some downright humiliating "comedy" skits in the Showcases.)
grating]].
*** After Rich was fired, the six more substitutes included rotated until George Gray became the successor. Among the substitutes, Steve White and Brad Sherwood, both of whom Sherwood were hated for their fake enthusiasm); enthusiasm, and former ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' host JD Roberto, who Roberto was considered seen as SoOkayItsAverage but lost points for insulting a contestant (although he also later got to announce the 2012 revival of ''Series/{{Pyramid}}''); and a rather close division among Jeff Davis, David H. Lawrence XVII, or [[Series/TheWeakestLink George Gray]], the last of whom became Rich's successor and is generally well-liked.''Series/{{Pyramid}}'').



** Speaking of ''Card Sharks'', some fans of the show hate the 1986-89 revival on Creator/{{CBS}} due to the hosting of Bob Eubanks, who took the same sleazy style that he had honed so well on ''Newlywed'' to a show that some feel was a poor fit for it.

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** Speaking of ''Card Sharks'', some fans of the show hate the 1986-89 revival on Creator/{{CBS}} due to the hosting of Bob Eubanks, who took the same sleazy style that he had honed so well on ''Newlywed'' to a show that some feel was a poor fit for it. This was exacerbated by the show also having a concurrent run in syndication hosted by Bill Rafferty, whom many feel was a solid, underrated host who never got a big break.



** Sajak stepped down from the daytime version in January 1989 because he wanted to begin a talk show. Creator Creator/MervGriffin replaced him with Rolf Bernischke, a former football player who had no TV experience and was visibly out of his element; among other things, he had to admit on-air that he didn't know how to break a tie when one happened[[note]](to his credit, ties are extremely rare on ''Wheel'')[[/note]], and once had a contestant correct him on one of the game's rules... during a Teen Week. After only six months, the daytime version {{Channel Hop}}ped to Creator/{{CBS}} and replaced Rolf with the more seasoned Bob Goen, who was able to carry it for a three years (counting a hop back to NBC) before daytime game shows became DeaderThanDisco.
** M.G. Kelly, a Los Angeles deejay, announced both versions of the show from September 1988 to February 1989 (between Jack Clark's death and the return of original daytime announcer Charlie O'Donnell), except a two-week stint taped at Radio City Music Hall with Don Pardo announcing. Kelly is generally hated by the fanbase for a supposed lack of enthusiasm. Pat also thought that M.G. was a nice guy, but felt that he was not suited for the job, as he often screwed up prize copy and had to do multiple re-takes.
** A similar hatred came for those who filled in after Charlie's death in November 2010. Veteran announcers John Cramer, Joe Cipriano, and the aforementioned Rich Fields were generally hated for their own lack of enthusiasm (surprising, given Rich's aforementioned derision for the exact opposite problem on ''Price''), as was extremely obscure voiceover artist Lora Cain.[[note]](Johnny Gilbert of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', who had previously filled in for Jack in 1988 and Charlie in 1995, also did three weeks, but was obviously never considered for the job since he is considerably older than Charlie, who died at 78.)[[/note]] This put the fanbase almost unanimously in favor of the aforementioned Jim Thornton, who got the job in summer 2011.
** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many]] [[ComplexityAddiction unpopular changes]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.

to:

** Sajak stepped down from the daytime version in January 1989 because he wanted to begin [[Series/ThePatSajakShow a talk show.show]]. Creator Creator/MervGriffin replaced him with Rolf Bernischke, a former football player who had no TV experience and was visibly out of his element; among other things, he had to admit on-air that he didn't know how to break a tie when one happened[[note]](to his credit, ties are extremely rare on ''Wheel'')[[/note]], and once had a contestant correct him on one of the game's rules... during a Teen Week. After only six months, the daytime version {{Channel Hop}}ped to Creator/{{CBS}} and replaced Rolf with the more seasoned experienced Bob Goen, who was able to carry it for a three years (counting a hop back to NBC) before daytime game shows became DeaderThanDisco.
fell by the wayside.
** After [[TheAnnouncer announcer]] Jack Clark died of cancer in 1988, he was replaced by Los Angeles deejay M.G. Kelly, a Los Angeles deejay, announced both versions of the show from September 1988 to February 1989 (between Jack Clark's death and the return of original daytime announcer Charlie O'Donnell), except a two-week stint taped at Radio City Music Hall with Don Pardo announcing.Kelly. Kelly is generally hated by the fanbase for a supposed lack of enthusiasm. Pat also thought that M.G. was a nice guy, but felt that he was not suited for the job, as he often screwed up prize copy and had to do multiple re-takes.
re-takes. Kelly left the show in February 1989 when Clark's predecessor, Charlie O'Donnell, returned.
** A similar hatred came for those who filled in after Charlie's death in November 2010. Veteran announcers John Cramer, Joe Cipriano, and the aforementioned Rich Fields were generally hated for their own lack of enthusiasm (surprising, given Rich's aforementioned derision for the exact opposite problem on ''Price''), as was extremely obscure voiceover artist Lora Cain.[[note]](Johnny Gilbert of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', who had previously filled in for Jack in 1988 and Charlie in 1995, also did three weeks, but was obviously never considered for the job since -- in addition to still holding down the fort at ''Jeopardy!'', he is also considerably older than Charlie, who died at 78.older.)[[/note]] This put the fanbase almost unanimously in favor of the aforementioned Jim Thornton, who got the job in summer 2011.
** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many]] [[ComplexityAddiction unpopular changes]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 2003, and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.
20th Sep '16 9:57:27 PM KoopaKid17
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** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many]] [[ComplexityAddiction unpopular changes]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.

to:

** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many]] [[ComplexityAddiction unpopular changes]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.
20th Sep '16 9:36:00 AM KoopaKid17
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** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many unpopular changes]] [[ComplexityAddiction to the show]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.

to:

** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many unpopular changes]] many]] [[ComplexityAddiction to the show]] unpopular changes]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.
20th Sep '16 9:33:29 AM KoopaKid17
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** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many unpopular changes]] [[ComplexityAddiction to the show]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the Prize Puzzle in particular.

to:

** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many unpopular changes]] [[ComplexityAddiction to the show]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the aforementioned Prize Puzzle in particular.
20th Sep '16 9:31:08 AM KoopaKid17
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** Towards the end of Season 12 in 1995, Harry Friedman replaced Nancy Jones as producer. While fans claim the show's updates were consistent under Jones' tenure, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Friedman made many unpopular changes]] [[ComplexityAddiction to the show]] [[WereStillRelevantDammit to keep it fresh]] [[SeasonalRot starting in Season 14]]. Among his "contributions" were a single wheel template in use since 1996, Toss-Up puzzles in 2000, Prize Puzzles in 2003 and a $1,000,000 cash prize in 2008. In 2013, it was confirmed that he approves every puzzle that makes it onto the show and fans call him out for approving such low-quality puzzles, the Prize Puzzle in particular.
9th Sep '16 4:17:21 PM kquinn0830
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* Whenever a prominent/legendary athlete retires or leaves his longtime team via a trade or free agency, his replacement at that position is almost certain to become this. We say "almost", because the replacement could become legendary in his own right (see Steve Young replacing Joe Montana, Aaron Rodgers replacing Brett Favre, or Andrew Luck replacing Creator/PeytonManning, for instance). Usually averted only when there isn't even a candidate worthy of being considered a successor, even by a long shot. Some sports franchises go long periods of time without a "face of the franchise" type after the departure of a particularly memorable one. Fans of the Boston Celtics, Miami Dolphins, and Chicago Bulls, among others, should know all about this. More recently, the post-Jeter New York Yankees and post-Kobe Lakers seem likely to endure such a run, with little or no end in sight.

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* Whenever a prominent/legendary athlete retires or leaves his longtime team via a trade or free agency, his replacement at that position is almost certain to become this. We say "almost", because the replacement could become legendary in his own right (see Steve Young replacing Joe Montana, Aaron Rodgers replacing Brett Favre, Cory Schneider replacing Martin Brodeur or Andrew Luck replacing Creator/PeytonManning, for instance). Usually averted only when there isn't even a candidate worthy of being considered a successor, even by a long shot. Some sports franchises go long periods of time without a "face of the franchise" type after the departure of a particularly memorable one. Fans of the Boston Celtics, Miami Dolphins, and Chicago Bulls, among others, should know all about this. More recently, the post-Jeter New York Yankees and post-Kobe Lakers seem likely to endure such a run, with little or no end in sight.
4th Sep '16 11:56:25 AM Twentington
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* Wink Martindale left ''Series/TicTacDough'' in 1985 to host his own creation, ''Series/HeadlineChasers''. Taking his place for the final season was PM Magazine's Jim Caldwell. While the show remained the same outside of a set change, Caldwell did not impress fans as host, and was often criticized for saying that he would explain the rules of the special red-box categories "when we get to them." Although he did improve toward the end of the season, the show's core fanbase had already left and were never coming back.
** The 1990 revival was critically panned (to the point of reaching MemeticMutation in the game show community), with one of the main points of contention being the hosting performance of Patrick Wayne (son of Creator/JohnWayne). Criticisms included Wayne's over-excitable hosting style (he would scream "YOU WIIIIIIIN!" after every win), several rule changes that cheapened the game, a TotallyRadical BonusRound, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and a weak]] Music/HenryMancini composition as the ThemeTune.

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* Wink Martindale left ''Series/TicTacDough'' in 1985 to host his own creation, ''Series/HeadlineChasers''. Taking his place for the final season was PM Magazine's Jim Caldwell. While the show remained the same outside of a set change, Caldwell did not impress fans as host, and was often criticized for his robotic hosting and always saying that he would explain the rules of the special red-box categories "when we get to them." Although he did improve toward the end of the season, season (to the point that he got another hosting gig on ''Top Card'' later in the decade), the show's core fanbase had already left and were never coming back.
** The 1990 revival was critically panned (to the point of reaching MemeticMutation in the game show community), with one of the main points of contention being the hosting performance of Patrick Wayne (son of Creator/JohnWayne). Criticisms included Wayne's over-excitable hosting style (he would scream "YOU WIIIIIIIN!" after every win), several Besides rule changes that cheapened the game, game (including a TotallyRadical BonusRound, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking rapping dragon in the BonusRound), Wayne was hated for his over-excitable hosting style, as he read the questions and RulesSpiel in a weak]] Music/HenryMancini composition as monotone, but would suddenly scream "YOU WIN!" or "YOU BLOCK!" if a contestant successfully placed an X or O on the ThemeTune.board. His hosting style gained MemeticMutation in the game show community for being one of the worst known hosts.
1st Sep '16 5:08:59 AM Abberline1888
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* A very vocal portion of the Music/{{KISS}} Army consider Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer Replacement Scrappies, despite having been in the band longer than the original members they replaced.
1st Sep '16 3:04:02 AM Abberline1888
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* ''Film/SupermanIII'':While viewers were looking forward to see how the story with Lois Lane, interstingly built for two movies, would go,her actress,Margot Kidder, argued with the production,which fired the previous director. As a result she was reduced to a cameo, and her role taken over by Lana Lang. Understandably, Lana did not returned for the fourth movie.

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* ''Film/SupermanIII'':While ''Film/SupermanIII'': While viewers were looking forward to see how the story Clark's relationship with Lois Lane, interstingly built for two movies, would go,her actress,Margot Kidder, develop, actress Margot Kidder argued with the production,which fired producers over the previous director. firing of original director Richard Donner. As a result she was reduced to a cameo, and her role taken over as Superman's love interest filled by Lana Lang. Understandably, Lana did not returned for the fourth movie.Lang.
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