History Main / ReliablyUnreliableGuns

29th Apr '16 2:51:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Film/SchindlersList'', Göth is about to execute one of Schindler's workers, [[SociopathicSoldier as he has done several times before already]], but his Luger jams. As his lieutenant tries unsuccessfully try to clear the jam, Göth takes out another pistol (a Browning Hi-Power) and tries to shoot him again... but the Browning also jams. Göth, after multiple attempts to shoot are foiled in this manner, eventually {{pistol whip|ping}}s the worker and then leaves in a huff.

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* In ''Film/SchindlersList'', Göth is about to execute one of Schindler's workers, [[SociopathicSoldier as he has done several times before already]], but his Luger jams. As his lieutenant tries unsuccessfully try to clear the jam, Göth takes out another pistol (a Browning Hi-Power) and tries to shoot him again... but the Browning also jams. Göth, after multiple attempts to shoot are foiled in this manner, eventually {{pistol whip|ping}}s the worker and then leaves in a huff.
29th Apr '16 2:49:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* The villain of ''Double Take'' [[spoiler:manages to dispatch himself this way]]; bragging about his shooting skills when about to kill the protagonists, [[spoiler:he ends up falling down a long flight of stairs with his gun going off several times. He hits the floor with a GoryDiscretionShot (pun unintended for once) with the gun clearly pointing at his head before the switch.]] One character comments: "He was right, he didn't miss ''once''!"

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* The villain of ''Double Take'' ''Film/DoubleTake'' [[spoiler:manages to dispatch himself this way]]; bragging about his shooting skills when about to kill the protagonists, [[spoiler:he ends up falling down a long flight of stairs with his gun going off several times. He hits the floor with a GoryDiscretionShot (pun unintended for once) with the gun clearly pointing at his head before the switch.]] One character comments: "He was right, he didn't miss ''once''!"
29th Apr '16 2:49:30 AM Morgenthaler
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** Somewhat TruthInTelevision, as the MAC-10 is a very simple, fairly light gun with an insanely high rate of fire, which fires from an open bolt, meaning that jarring the weapon ''can'' cause the bolt to unlock, slam home, and fire a round. If it was badly-maintained (a distinct possibility given the demonstrated lack of quality of the aforementioned {{mook|s}}) it ''could'' also be subject to a phenomenon known as slam-firing, where a gun, even a semi-auto, continues to fire without the trigger being pressed, until the magazine's empty or the mechanical issue (either the bolt failing to lock back, or the firing pin being stuck forward when the bolt closes, in a closed-bolt gun) that caused it resolves itself.
*** Given that Helen is, at that point, ridiculously civilian, it is completely possible that she'd drop the surprisingly recoil-heavy submachine gun, and it would discharge on striking the ground. The hilarious part is its effectiveness in clearing the room.
*** However, ''Series/MythBusters'' tried to replicate this one and couldn't get the MAC-10 to fire; for the scene in the movie they had wrapped a wire around the trigger to get it to continue firing.
* In ''Film/BackToTheFuture'', Marty is saved repeatedly from being shot by Libyans because their rifle jams. They are shooting an AK-47, which are famed for their reliability even under the harshest conditions. However, we do see them simply trying to clear the jam rather than abandoning the gun immediately.
** Could be an ammo problem, since a reliable gun means nothing if the bullet doesn't produce enough gas pressure to cycle in the next round.
*** This is TruthInTelevision, to an extent. Most of the ammo on the market for the AK-47 is military surplus, which has been surplussed because it's getting too old. Given that terrorists who want a nuclear bomb are not going to be state-supported (what government wants to be connected with a terrorist act that ''will'' get their capital vaporized once that connection is found?) they're going to have to get their ammo on the open market, and given that they come to kill Doc in a VW Microbus, they're obviously operating on a shoestring.

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* ''Film/BackToTheFuture'':
** Somewhat TruthInTelevision, as the MAC-10 is a very simple, fairly light gun with an insanely high rate of fire, which fires from an open bolt, meaning that jarring the weapon ''can'' cause the bolt to unlock, slam home, and fire a round. If it was badly-maintained (a distinct possibility given the demonstrated lack of quality of the aforementioned {{mook|s}}) it ''could'' also be subject to a phenomenon known as slam-firing, where a gun, even a semi-auto, continues to fire without the trigger being pressed, until the magazine's empty or the mechanical issue (either the bolt failing to lock back, or the firing pin being stuck forward when the bolt closes, in a closed-bolt gun) that caused it resolves itself.
*** Given that Helen is, at that point, ridiculously civilian, it is completely possible that she'd drop the surprisingly recoil-heavy submachine gun, and it would discharge on striking the ground. The hilarious part is its effectiveness in clearing the room.
*** However, ''Series/MythBusters'' tried to replicate this one and couldn't get the MAC-10 to fire; for the scene in the movie they had wrapped a wire around the trigger to get it to continue firing.
* In ''Film/BackToTheFuture'',
Marty is saved repeatedly from being shot by Libyans because their rifle jams. They are shooting an AK-47, which are famed for their reliability even under the harshest conditions. However, we do see them simply trying to clear the jam rather than abandoning the gun immediately.
** Could be an ammo problem, since a reliable gun means nothing if the bullet doesn't produce enough gas pressure to cycle in the next round.
*** This is TruthInTelevision, to an extent. Most of the ammo on the market for the AK-47 is military surplus, which has been surplussed because it's getting too old. Given that terrorists who want a nuclear bomb are not going to be state-supported (what government wants to be connected with a terrorist act that ''will'' get their capital vaporized once that connection is found?) they're going to have to get their ammo on the open market, and given that they come to kill Doc in a VW Microbus, they're obviously operating on a shoestring.
immediately.
14th Apr '16 7:23:58 PM Jeduthun
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If the person is ''really'' TooDumbToLive, they may [[JugglingLoadedGuns look into the barrel to see why it isn't working]]. (If you have to be told why [[AndThatsTerrible this is a bad idea]], you should never touch a gun.)

Since this one's so common, it'd be easier to just list especially {{egregious}} examples and subversions. Also see RareGuns and ConvenientMisfire.

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If the person is ''really'' TooDumbToLive, they may [[JugglingLoadedGuns look into the barrel to see why it isn't working]]. (If you have to be told why [[AndThatsTerrible this is a bad idea]], [[RecklessGunUsage you should never touch a gun.gun]].)

Since this one's so common, it'd be easier to just list especially {{egregious}} examples and subversions. Also see RareGuns and ConvenientMisfire.
ConvenientMisfire. See RecklessGunUsage and JugglingLoadedGuns for when danger is caused by user carelessness or stupidity.
14th Apr '16 7:20:57 PM Jeduthun
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If the person is ''really'' TooDumbToLive, they may [[JugglingLoadedGuns look into the barrel to see why it isn't working]].[[note]]If you have to be told why [[AndThatsTerrible this is a bad idea]], you should never touch a gun.[[/note]]

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If the person is ''really'' TooDumbToLive, they may [[JugglingLoadedGuns look into the barrel to see why it isn't working]].[[note]]If (If you have to be told why [[AndThatsTerrible this is a bad idea]], you should never touch a gun.[[/note]]
)
21st Mar '16 2:16:25 PM nielas
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** The main reason for the Ross's poor performance was that it was adapted too close to the outbreak of the war and did not have a proper "shake down" period where flaws are discovered and corrected in armories by trained gunsmiths. In peacetime most of the really bad problems would have been quickly addressed as they came up but during wartime this was a much lengthier and complicated process. In addition wartime shortages meant that some rifle batches were produced with inferior steel which would wear out quicker than expected and cause the rifles to be even more unreliable.
27th Feb '16 2:57:04 PM Kadorhal
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* In the early "Kenny gets killed in every episode" era of ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', Kenny was once killed by a discharge by a guy who was quitting hunting and dropped his gun.
** Which happened to have run out of ammo not thirty seconds earlier.

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* In the early "Kenny gets killed in every episode" era of ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', Kenny was once killed by a discharge by from a guy who was quitting hunting and dropped his gun.
**
gun. Which happened to have run out of ammo not thirty seconds earlier.earlier, at that.




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* In the 1953 WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes short ''WesternAnimation/BullyForBugs'', the bull Bugs is fighting at one point ends up swallowing a rifle Bugs was planning to shoot him with. He very quickly discovers he can [[BulletSeed fire bullets from his horns]] by smacking the end of his now-rifle-shaped tail against the ground - but then after he runs out of bullets, he attempts to reload by swallowing a box of high-powered rounds, with [[ExplosiveOverclocking disastrous results]].
24th Feb '16 12:09:01 PM Kadorhal
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* The Nambu Type 94 Japanese issue pistol was notorious for firing if touched wrong (exposed sear). Japanese officers purchased their own guns, quite a few did not buy native[[note]]The most popular choices by Japanese officers were the German Mauser Models 1910 and 1914, American Colt Model 1903 and Belgian FN Browning Model 1910. Once the war started, though, the supplies of new pistols were cut off: Belgium was quickly conquered by Gemany, the US and Belgian government in exile obviously weren't exporting pistols to their enemy, and Germany was too busy making weapons for its own military.[[/note]]. Japanese [=NCOs=], on the other hand, had their pistols issued to them by the military.

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* The Nambu Type 94 Japanese issue pistol was notorious for firing if touched wrong (exposed sear). While Japanese [=NCOs=] had their pistols issued to them by the military, Japanese officers purchased their own guns, and quite a few did not buy native[[note]]The most popular choices by Japanese officers were the German Mauser Models 1910 and 1914, American Colt Model 1903 and Belgian FN Browning Model 1910. Once the war started, though, the supplies of new pistols were cut off: Belgium was quickly conquered by Gemany, the US and Belgian government in exile obviously weren't exporting pistols to their enemy, and Germany was too busy making weapons for its own military.[[/note]]. Japanese [=NCOs=], on the other hand, had their pistols issued to them by the military.



** The Type 14 Nambu itself was an ''adequate'' enough weapon, though wholly unremarkable. The 8mm round it fired was both underpowered and ill suited to the weapon, causing it to hiccup and jam after more then a few shots; otherwise it would have been a decent weapon. Oh, and the firing pin was also somewhat fragile...and instead of implementing Colonel Nambu's rather simple fix to this one, they just ''issued spare firing pins'', with the expectation that when one broke the soldier would ''disassemble his gun and replace the pin in the middle of combat''. Other weapons like the Type 26 revolver were just horrible in every way. Essentially a clone of a Smith & Wesson break action revolver with all the good parts removed, it fired a 9mm round that lacked any punch at all and was a proprietary round (it was similar to the weakest loads you can find of .38 S&W and almost exactly the same size, yet just different enough to not be interchangeable), making it difficult to supply in the field. Other distinct merits was its horrendous trigger pull (made worse by not even having the option of firing in single-action mode; despite the hammer being exposed it had no spur and could not be manually cocked) and an unfortunate tendency to have its barrel and chamber misaligned, causing a catastrophic misfire when doing so. If that wasn't worrying enough, a special tear gas grenade attachment was developed for it as well.
** The Japanese had also experimented with making a 7.7mm copy of the American M1 Garand, the Type 5. It ultimately ended production at about 250 units, none of them seeing service outside the ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series of video games and most of them not even being assembled, due to frequent jamming. Given the abysmal condition of Japanese industry in 1945, and the fact that the war ended before they had any real chance to work out the bugs in the design, this isn't surprising.

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** The Type 14 Nambu itself was an ''adequate'' enough weapon, though wholly unremarkable. The 8mm round it fired was both underpowered and ill suited to the weapon, causing it to hiccup and jam after more then a few shots; otherwise it would have been a decent weapon. Oh, and the firing pin was also somewhat fragile...and instead of implementing Colonel Nambu's rather simple fix to this one, they just ''issued spare firing pins'', with the expectation that when one broke the soldier would ''disassemble his gun and replace the pin in the middle of combat''. Other weapons like the Type 26 revolver were just horrible in every way. Essentially a clone of a Smith & Wesson break action top-break revolver with all the good parts removed, it fired a 9mm round that lacked any punch at all and was a proprietary round (it was similar to the weakest loads you can find of .38 S&W and almost exactly the same size, yet just different enough to not be interchangeable), making it difficult to supply in the field. Other distinct merits was its horrendous trigger pull (made worse by not even having the option of firing in single-action mode; despite the hammer being exposed it had no spur and could not be manually cocked) and an unfortunate tendency to have its barrel and chamber misaligned, causing a catastrophic misfire when doing so. If that wasn't worrying enough, a special tear gas grenade attachment was developed for it as well.
** The Japanese had also experimented with making a 7.7mm copy of the American M1 Garand, the Type 5. It would have been rechambered for Japan's own 7.7mm Arisaka cartridge, and rather than utilizing the unique but somewhat-temperamental en bloc clip it would be fed via a pair of regular stripper clips in the same manner as the British SMLE. It ultimately ended production at about 250 units, none of them seeing service outside the ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series of video games service, and most many more of them not even being assembled, due to frequent jamming. Given the abysmal condition of Japanese industry in 1945, and the fact that the war ended before they had any real chance to work out the bugs in the design, this isn't surprising.



** Most of these issues got worse with wear, so the gun tended to perform passably if recently refit, but degrade ''horribly'' over time; this was especially an issue for the [=M60E3=], which attempted to reduce the weight of the weapon, but succeeded at the cost of making it ''even less'' reliable. It's commonly said that an M60 would literally beat itself to death. So much so that even the ''receivers'' got labelled as replaceable parts[[note]]for context, a broken receiver on ''any other Army-issue weapon'' resulted in other working parts attached to it being stripped to replace the parts on other guns[[/note]] - only the trunnion was considered to be long lasting. Modern variants like the [=M60E4/E6=] and Mk. 43 have finally fixed the M60's issues for beating themselves to death, but save for the [=SEALs=] and the Coast Guard, almost every branch of the US military has abandoned it, either switching to the M240 or deciding reliability at the cost of no mobility is a fair trade, or looking towards the newer Mk. 48 (a 7.62mm version of the M249 that still manages to be lighter ''and'' more reliable than modern M60 variants).
* The MG 42 and its post-war progeny, as mentioned above, was primarily an excellent design, but there was one poor variant - the US military briefly experimented with MG [=42s=] converted to .30-06 Springfield following the war. In the same manner as one of the above-mentioned Chauchat's many issues, the design team failed to account for .30-06 being six millimeters longer than the original 7.92mm cartridge when converting them, thus failing to increase the length of the receiver for the new cartridge and making weapons that were completely incapable of properly cycling after a single shot.

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** Most of these issues got worse with wear, so the gun tended to perform passably if recently refit, but degrade ''horribly'' over time; this was especially an issue for the [=M60E3=], which attempted to reduce the weight of the weapon, but succeeded at the cost of making it ''even less'' reliable. It's commonly said that an M60 would literally beat itself to death. So much so that even the ''receivers'' got labelled as replaceable parts[[note]]for context, a broken receiver on ''any other Army-issue weapon'' resulted in other working parts attached to it being stripped to replace the parts on other guns[[/note]] - only the trunnion was considered to be long lasting. Modern variants like the [=M60E4/E6=] and Mk. 43 have finally fixed the M60's issues for beating themselves to death, but save for the [=SEALs=] and the Coast Guard, almost every branch of the US military has abandoned it, either switching to the M240 or and deciding reliability at the cost of no mobility is a fair trade, or looking towards the newer Mk. 48 (a 48, a 7.62mm version conversion of the M249 that still manages to be lighter ''and'' more reliable than modern M60 variants).
variants.
* The MG 42 and its post-war progeny, as mentioned above, was primarily an excellent design, but there was one poor variant - the US military briefly experimented with MG [=42s=] 42s converted to .30-06 Springfield following the war. In the same manner as one of the above-mentioned Chauchat's many issues, the design team failed to account for .30-06 being six millimeters longer than the weapon's original 7.92mm 8mm Mauser cartridge when converting them, thus failing to increase the length of the receiver for the new cartridge and making weapons that were completely incapable of properly cycling after a single shot.
15th Feb '16 9:30:17 PM Kadorhal
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* In ''Film/GetShorty'', Ronnie Wingate comes across Ray Barboni beating up movie producer Harry Zimm, who owes Ronnie (And his partner) money. Ronnie, who is experienced more with ''threatening'' violence than actually ''performing'' violence, threatens Ray to leave by revealing [[PantsPositiveSafety the gun tucked into his waistband]]. Ray, who is holding his gun in his hand at the time and is more used to violence itself, mocks Ronnie by pointing out that he would need to be a quick-draw artist for his gun to be any use in the situation. Ronnie (Visibly nervous) tries to bluff the situation by calling Ray's gun (An AMT Backup, a small but effective pistol) "a Wop 9? The Fiat of guns, always jammin' on you at the wrong time." In response, [[SubvertedTrope Ray promptly shoots him four times in the chest.]]

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* In ''Film/GetShorty'', Ronnie Wingate comes across Ray Barboni beating up movie producer Harry Zimm, who owes Ronnie (And (and his partner) money. Ronnie, who is experienced more with ''threatening'' violence than actually ''performing'' violence, threatens Ray to leave by revealing [[PantsPositiveSafety the gun tucked into his waistband]]. Ray, who is holding his gun in his hand at the time and is more used to enacting violence itself, mocks Ronnie by pointing out that he would need to be a quick-draw artist for his gun to be any use in the situation. Ronnie (Visibly nervous) (visibly nervous at this point) tries to bluff the situation by calling asking if Ray's gun (An (an AMT Backup, a small but effective pistol) "a Wop 9? The is a "Wop 9", calling it "the Fiat of guns, always jammin' on you at the wrong time." In response, [[SubvertedTrope Ray promptly shoots him four times in the chest.]]
14th Feb '16 4:47:36 PM shadowbeast
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* ''LiveActionTV/MissFishersMurderMysteries'' had Miss Fisher and Dot staying in a country hotel. Dot is unpacking, and wonders what to do with Phrynes [[BlingBlingBang gold-plated revolver]]. She picks the top drawer of the nightstand. Some prankster has concealed a live snake in there, causing Dot to scream and drop the revolver. It fires on impact, tearing a chunk out of the skirting board and causing Dot to scream again.


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[[folder: Web Video]]
* [[https://www.youtube.com/user/Iraqveteran8888 Iraqveteran8888]] once tried to make a video showing them shooting a Calico SMG with its unique helical magazine. What actually was posted was them showing you the fragments after thing blew, and injuries to Barrys hand.
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ReliablyUnreliableGuns