History Main / RealityEnsues

15th May '16 7:10:35 AM CountMontoni
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By definition, fiction is unrealistic. But most readers don't ask that stories be completely like reality; as long as things are kept [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]], the audience is [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief willing to go along with just about anything an author can create]]... [[RefugeInAudacity no matter how immoral or unhinged their more sympathetic characters might be acting by the standards of]] RealLife. For that reason, a creator can sometimes ignore or HandWave consequences of the real world in their stories. This trope, though, is about what happens when a creator chooses not to ignore said consequences, and even factors them in as part of the plot.

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By definition, fiction is unrealistic. But most readers don't ask that stories be completely like reality; as long as things are kept [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]], the audience is [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief willing to go along with just about anything an author can create]]... [[RefugeInAudacity no matter how immoral irresponsible, immoral, or unhinged their more likeable and sympathetic characters might be acting by the standards of]] RealLife. For that reason, a creator can sometimes ignore or HandWave consequences of the real world in their stories. This trope, though, is about what happens when a creator chooses not to ignore said consequences, and even factors them in as part of the plot.
11th May '16 10:16:55 PM TheWanderer
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* Many routine professional wrestling moves such as the power bomb, suplex and even DDT have proven to have very nasty effects when used in Shoot Fighting and MixedMartialArts, though they show up rarely rather than routine and almost always as counters than as offensive moves. Conversely, popular moves such as [[Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin the stunner]] and [[Wrestling/TheGreatMuta the various bridging submission holds]], while doable, [[AwesomeButImpractical tend to get shrugged off]]. The most popular pro wrestling move in combat sports is the plain old ankle lock. [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique Ankle locks are the dangerous move that gets on and off bans]], rather than the infamous pile driver (which tends to fall under "only as a counter")[[/folder]]

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* Many routine professional wrestling moves such as the power bomb, suplex and even DDT have proven to have very nasty effects when used in Shoot Fighting and MixedMartialArts, though they show up rarely rather than routine and almost always as counters than as offensive moves. Conversely, popular moves such as [[Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin the stunner]] and [[Wrestling/TheGreatMuta the various bridging submission holds]], while doable, [[AwesomeButImpractical tend to get shrugged off]]. The most popular pro wrestling move in combat sports is the plain old ankle lock. [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique Ankle locks are the dangerous move that gets on and off bans]], rather than the infamous pile driver (which tends to fall under "only as a counter")[[/folder]]
counter")
* This often happens when a champion from a past era makes a comeback in boxing or MMA and returns to the ring to challenge the new champion or highly ranked contender. These bouts are almost inevitably promoted as a battle between the ages, with the champ from the past talking about how much better the fighters from their era was, and how they'll be too smart or too tough for the young guy. Fans, maybe despite themselves, start to believe in the hype and want to see a storybook performance from their old favorite, so they cheer the old guy on. Then the fighters get in the ring and it seldom ends well for the old champion. Sometimes it's downright tragic.
[[/folder]]
8th May '16 8:19:05 PM Mooncalf
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* The swedish SCA-performed song "Hjältekvädet" ("The hero song") is about the noble "King Kaspian" riding into battle with his men, only to get killed by a stray arrow, because those things happen on the battlefield. Then the song writer realizes he's being paid for this and quickly retcons in a goose flying past and taking the arrow instead. Then King Kaspian gets crushed by a panicking horse (retconned; it fell in love with a passing elk), stabbed from behind by a common soldier (retconned; he was carrying a sack of potatoes for no explainable reason and it blocked the attack), and cut down by the enemy commander (retconned; he just wins). In the end, the writer complains about having to sacrifice his artistic integrity for money, and says that real kings bleed just as well as ordinary people.
7th May '16 5:23:53 AM CountMontoni
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By definition, fiction is unrealistic. But most readers don't ask that stories be completely like reality; as long as things are kept [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]], the audience is [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief willing to go along with just about anything an author can create]]. For that reason, a creator can sometimes ignore or HandWave consequences of the real world in their stories. This trope, though, is about what happens when a creator chooses not to ignore said consequences, and even factors them in as part of the plot.

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By definition, fiction is unrealistic. But most readers don't ask that stories be completely like reality; as long as things are kept [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]], the audience is [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief willing to go along with just about anything an author can create]].create]]... [[RefugeInAudacity no matter how immoral or unhinged their more sympathetic characters might be acting by the standards of]] RealLife. For that reason, a creator can sometimes ignore or HandWave consequences of the real world in their stories. This trope, though, is about what happens when a creator chooses not to ignore said consequences, and even factors them in as part of the plot.
5th May '16 2:27:00 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' can be argued to be this. While the conflict between mystery and fantasy is an important aspect of the series, the real conflict is between mystery/fantasy and ''reality''. This can be easily be seen in Ep 2 with the [[LockedRoomMystery locked chapel]] where the real trick is[[spoiler: the simplest one, namely that Rosa lied (in accordance to Yasu's script) and it was never locked at all]]. It can also be seen in Ep 7 when [[spoiler: the adults find the gold and instead of showing a series of mystery/fantasy scenes we are instead shown what would happen in this type of family in such a situation: a lot of shootings and deaths]].

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* ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' can be argued to be this. While the conflict between mystery and fantasy is an important aspect of the series, the real conflict is between mystery/fantasy and ''reality''. This can be easily be seen in Ep 2 with the [[LockedRoomMystery locked chapel]] where the real trick is[[spoiler: the simplest one, namely that Rosa lied (in accordance to Yasu's script) and it was never locked at all]]. It can also be seen in Ep 7 when [[spoiler: the adults find the gold and instead of showing a series of mystery/fantasy scenes we are instead shown what would happen in this type of family in such a situation: a lot of shootings and deaths]].
12th Apr '16 5:01:13 AM Chilliwack
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This can sometimes be seen on the hard end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism, though it isn't necessarily so since realism, despite what many claim, is not the same as cynicism.

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This can sometimes be seen on the hard end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism, though it isn't necessarily so since realism, despite what many claim, is not the same as cynicism. \n There are many realistic stories that run on optimism.
26th Mar '16 2:09:48 PM marcoasalazarm
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Generally, this trope is not used in order to make fiction completely and entirely mirror mundane everyday life...except when it is. This is also surprisingly often used as a ComedyTrope. Contrast FantasyAllAlong, when reality ensues and immediately afterwards ''fantasy'' kicks in again.

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Generally, this trope is not used in order to make fiction completely and entirely mirror mundane everyday life...except when it is. This is also surprisingly often used as a ComedyTrope. Contrast FantasyAllAlong, when reality ensues and immediately afterwards ''fantasy'' kicks in again.
again (occasionally undoing the damage done by the "reality" moment).
4th Mar '16 5:46:34 AM GrigorII
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Note that, when we say "reality", we mean reality as in RealLife. We have "X happens" and "Y happens as a consequence of X"; the Y must not involve the fantastic in-story aspects of the work's own universe. For realistic consequences of unrealistic superpowers, see LogicalWeakness.
26th Feb '16 7:44:28 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpReQprVjag One depressing European ad against child abuse]] had a man [[AmusingInjuries beating a cartoon kid]] for a while before cutting to a real, unconscious kid on the floor and the caption "Real children don't bounce back".

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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpReQprVjag One A depressing European ad against child abuse]] NSPCC ad]] had a man [[AmusingInjuries beating a cartoon kid]] for a while before cutting throwing the kid down the stairs as we pan to see a real, real unconscious kid on the floor and the caption "Real children don't bounce back".



* A UK "Think!" anti-drinking advert that ran in the late 00s featured a crowd of people watching in awe as a Batman-esque superhero scaled a building scaffold dramatically and acrobatically to retrieve a lost balloon. When the hero reached the top, he slipped off of the pole on which is was precariously balanced and fell the entire height of the building. The audience is then treated to an unpleasant shot of the actually ordinary man, twitching blankly on the concrete floor as the narrator speaks the words "Alcohol may make you feel like a superhero". It was an effective advert.

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* A UK "Think!" anti-drinking British NHS advert that ran in the late 00s featured a crowd of people watching in awe as a Batman-esque superhero scaled a building scaffold dramatically and acrobatically to retrieve a lost balloon. When the hero reached the top, he slipped off of the pole on which is was precariously balanced and fell the entire height of the building. The audience is then treated to an unpleasant shot of the actually ordinary man, twitching blankly on the concrete floor as the narrator speaks the words "Alcohol may make you feel like a superhero". It was an effective advert.
31st Jan '16 3:48:47 AM Raiden616
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* A UK "Think!" anti-drinking advert that ran in the late 00s featured a crowd of people watching in awe as a Batman-esque superhero scaled a building scaffold dramatically and acrobatically to retrieve a lost balloon. When the hero reached the top, he slipped off of the pole on which is was precariously balanced and fell the entire height of the building. The audience is then treated to an unpleasant shot of the actually ordinary man, twitching blankly on the concrete floor as the narrator speaks the words "Alcohol may make you feel like a superhero". It was an effective advert.
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