History Main / RealisticDictionisUnrealistic

14th Aug '16 9:39:05 AM Anddrix
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** For example, an early episode where Michael suddenly realises that Kitty is in the [[ItMakesSenseInContext conjugal trailer]] based on no observation other than the fact that George Sr's rambling excuse included him mumbling the word "repulsive" - the same word GOB had used ''sotto voce'' to described Kitty earlier in the day. Both deliveries of this key word

to:

** For example, an early episode where Michael suddenly realises that Kitty is in the [[ItMakesSenseInContext conjugal trailer]] based on no observation other than the fact that George Sr's rambling excuse included him mumbling the word "repulsive" - the same word GOB had used ''sotto voce'' to described Kitty earlier in the day. Both deliveries of this key wordword are so downplayed compared to the surrounding (and far less relevant) dialogue that it's easy to miss either or both the first time around.
** One side-effect of GOB getting upset or excited is that he loses all ability to form a coherent sentence. "You still mad me, Michael?" and "Look at banner, Michael!" have taken on MemeticMutation status as a result.
** At least a few times, the actors' stumbling over a line is left in. For example, Lindsay at one point is speaking quite quickly and reverses the object and subject in a sentence for no apparent comedic effect, which seems to be a genuine slip of the tongue by Portia de Rossi that just got left in there.
* Unsurprisingly for a Creator/JossWhedon project, ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is littered with BuffySpeak, especially from the younger characters such as Skye, Fitz-Simmons, Bobbi, and Hunter. Fitz in particular has a tendency to insert corrections, mutterings, and natural pauses into his dialogue, which is consistent with Creator/IainDeCaestecker's usual acting style.
** This trope even gets {{Exploited}} in Season 2 when Fitz is suffering the effects of brain damage, one of which is a bad case of nominal aphasia, and he frequently trails off in mid-sent... or struggles to find the, um, you know, the thing! For the thing! [[{{Angrish}} Argh!]]
** Simmons, especially in Season 1, had a tendency to occasionally let out a nervous giggle that either obscured or replaced the end of a line.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's ''Trapped in the Drive-Thru'' parodies the rambling style and interruptions of Music/RKelly's ''Music/TrappedInTheCloset'' by taking it UpToEleven. The narrator's wife mishears "delivered" as "liver" and they argue about it for several lines, a drive-thru employee zones out while the narrator asks for ketchup, and a mention of the name Paul sends the narrator off on a bizarre tangent about an unrelated guy named Paul that he used to know once.
-->I hopped up and said, "I don't know. Do you want to get something delivered?"\\
She's like, "Why would I want to eat liver? I don't even like liver."\\
I'm like, "No, I said delivered."\\
She's like, "I heard you say liver."\\
I'm like, "I should know what I said."\\
She's like, "Whatever. I just don't want any liver."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* Children in ''ComicStrip/ForBetterOrForWorse'' ''never'' say "and". They say "an'". Every bleeping time.
** They also have a habit of dropping the "g" from "-ing" endings.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roleplaying Games]]
* Although this trope tends to be played straight in ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', several characters do have very realistic dialogue, such as Keiji Tanaka (ShoutOut laden though it is) or Bill Ritch, both of whom tend to repeat themselves, as well as hesitate a lot, with the latter having quite the stammer.
* Many characters play this straight, but in the ''Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters'' roleplay, it's occasionally averted when many players mimic their original character's verbal tics and stammers. Most notable with a troper who mimics ''both'' [[WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty Rick and Morty's]] distinct speech styles.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stand-Up Comedy]]
* Creator/EddieIzzard uses a lot of placeholders and verbal stumbling in his stand-up delivery, though the routines themselves are pretty meticulously prepared. It works quite well.
* Creator/FrankieHowerd's stand-up/variety routine was full of very spontaneous-sounding oohs, ers, digressions and asides to his pianist, all painstakingly scripted.
* Creator/BillyConnolly once did a bit about a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycDDG0QyQ0 'Difficult Listening']] radio show that broadcast normal mumbled conversations that the audience couldn't hear properly.
* Creator/RossNoble spins out whole improvised ''routines'' based on his verbal slips or mis-hearing what the audience says.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]
* The play ''Theatre/ThePillowman'' gives characters realistic speech patterns to heighten emotion and dramatic effect. Particularly noticeable with the character Tupolski when he starts repeating himself, falling back on verbal tics, ("if I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'"... "did I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'") and saying rather odd things in an attempt to sound threatening. (This is even mocked by another character later.)
* ''Theatre/NoisesOff'' manages to work distraction, shaken confidence and a pathological stutter into the staccato rat-a-tat of a British farce. Garry, especially, who when not reciting lines never makes it to the end of a thought before forgetting what he was trying to say when he started it.
--> '''Garry:''' Lloyd, let me just say, while we're stopped; I've worked with a lot of directors. Some were geniuses. Some were bastards. But I've never worked with anyone who was so absolutely... I don't know.
--> '''Lloyd:''' Thank you, Garry; I'm touched. Now will you get off the fucking stage?
* Creator/HaroldPinter's works ''ooze'' this. Especially ''The Caretaker''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* Certain scenes in ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' were written to have more natural dialogue, particularly several scenes with Fei and Elly.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** In [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]], while the dialogue is generally proper, there are instances of mumbling and using filler, mostly during little lines - the ones that happen without the camera giving you a closeup of the characters' face. Generally the subtitles are grammatically correct, the actual line reads less so. Garrus stammers when saying he's never seen the Council in person before. Ian Newstead, fighting MindControl, slurs and babbles and drops words as he chants "[[MadnessMantra My mind is my own]]." Liara gets flustered and incoherent.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', Garrus says of Tali, "Tali's a welcome face around here... or... no. Well. A... a welcome face... behind the helmet. I guess." By the end they [[http://youtu.be/C2o_XUEfGeo may hook up]], and if discovered they both babble and stutter and in general deliver far less coherent versions of the lines in the subtitles. It is {{Adorkable}}.
* Generally, everyone uses proper diction in ''VideoGame/HalfLife''. The G-Man, however, is consistently stuttering, pausing, and taking in deep breaths, all of which could be considered too much even for real life speech. It actually helps make him appear as... ''[[HumanoidAbomination something]]'' [[UncannyValley trying to appear human]], [[GlamourFailure and failing]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Gladius}}'' lampshades how unrealistic many RPG sidequests and rewards are with heavy use of awkward silences, stuttering, and conversations that just trail off.
* ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' has this through Wheatley, who (despite being a robot) frequently delves into this and BuffySpeak. Also applies to the damaged cores, who, due to faults, have unique/strange personalities which understandably cause tics and poor diction.
** The entire ending sequence is guilty of this, as it involves a collection of robots [[CharacterFilibuster rambling incessantly]] while you fight: there's the BigBad suffering a VillainousBreakdown; the "Fact Sphere" mumbling dubious facts; the "Space Sphere" jabbering obsessively [[ShapedLikeItself about space]]; and "Rick the Adventure Sphere" rambling about his (presumably delusional) adventures.
* Averted ''entirely'' by the Phone Guy in ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' during his recordings for the player. He stutters, hesitates, stumbles over some words, repeats himself, goes silent as if to think, trails off during sentences, offers random interjections of 'okay?', says 'um' and 'uh' quite a bit, and generally really does sound like some guy who's just recording a message for the player without a script and just going off the top of his head.
* Agent G. averts this in grindhouse parody ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', due to his "actor" being bad and forgetting the script:
-->"Ladies and gentlemen, the infinite tact of Isaac Washington. You do... Truly you do, use your tongue better than a... a $30 hooker. Can I say from the bottom of my heart... You truly are a shining example to us all... uh, Humanity I mean..."
** Of course, some cutscenes have he and others speaking [[SeinfeldianConversation pointless, flowery, smooth]], [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] dialogue, so it's more he does it [[RuleOfFunny when it's funny]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* Although ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' also applies for the first kind, other characters fit here. Tavros has a tendency to speak very awkwardly with lots of 'uhh's 'err's, to highlight his nervous, dorky personality, while Roxy is [[HardDrinkingPartyGirl perpetually drunk]] and has a tendency to make spelling errors she sometimes corrects. So what happens when [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=002999 the very awkward Tavros tries to troll the incredibly eloquent Dave?]] One of the most popular FunnyMoments in the entire series:
-->'''TG:''' no man
-->'''TG:''' look
-->'''TG:''' i just need to know when to be there
-->'''TG:''' when the stars come into alignment and your [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture flux capacitor]] lets you finally sate your meteoric greed for crotch-dachshund
-->'''TG:''' i wouldnt want to miss it and cause a paradox or something
-->'''TG:''' itd suck if the universe blew up on account of you missing your window of opportunity to help yourself to a pubescent boy's naked spam porpoise
-->'''AT:''' uHHH,
-->'''AT:''' oK, THIS IS SORT OF STARTING TO UPSET ME,
-->'''TG:''' jesus you are such a shitty troll
** Meenah also tends to misspell things, such as typing 'yea' instead of 'yeah', though in this case it's to indicate lack of care about such pretensions rather than accidents like it is for Roxy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''WebVideo/{{lonelygirl15}}'' gets this right... some of the time. Oddly enough, the more hectic "action" videos tend to be better at not sounding scripted, with characters scrambling and yelling over one another.
* Both ''WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool'' and ''WebAnimation/DrHavocsDiary'', as there are a lot of ThrowItIn moments on the spot.
* Even in scripted episodes of his show, WebVideo/{{Jontron}}'s speech features slight pauses. He often also says an odd throat-clearing bark sound, usually spelt as "ECH".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* The dialogue in ''WesternAnimation/CreatureComforts'' consists entirely of unscripted interviews.
* The shows of Adam Reed (e.g. ''WesternAnimation/FriskyDingo'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'') tend to have characters speaking with natural-sounding (and often realistically awkward) dialogue, talking over one another, etc.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. The show uses many situations in which characters break into very realistic and overlapping dialogue in ridiculous situations. Some viewers find this to be an OverlyLongGag, but others love it and would turn violent if it went away.
* It's one of the salient features of the titular characters in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'', and to a lesser extent other characters. Verbal tics, stammers, irrelevant tangents, and corrections are all over the place. (Not to mention Rick's belching in the middle of every other word.) Almost everything on the list at the top has happened at some point.
* Dialogue in early ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' cartoons was often ad-libbed by Jack Mercer (Popeye) and Mae Questel (Olive Oyl). Characters frequently speak a mile-a-minute, mutter random observations under their breath, and talk in [[{{Angrish}} confused gibberish]] when situations get hectic.
* ''WesternAnimation/DrKatz'' and ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'', in which a lot of the dialogue is ad-libbed.
* This commonly happens in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', being a DeconstructorFleet.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Miscellaneous]]
* Creator/DavidMamet is known for [[MametSpeak his signature dialogue style]], which manages to be very naturalistic and very stylized at the same time.
* UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} journalist Bob Greene once wrote a vicious column about Mayor Richard J. Daley which provoked a storm of controversy. It consisted of a verbatim, un-corrected transcript of one of the mayor's press conferences.
[[/folder]]
----
[[BrickJoke Repetition]]
14th Aug '16 9:27:48 AM Luigifan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Unfortunately, can lead people to assume HesitationEqualsDishonesty, never mind that hesitation is one of the most common things in realistic speech and can originate from ''many'' sources other than dishonesty (someone being drunk or high, absolutely terrified, wanting to make sure they ''are'' telling the truth) or from dishonesty unrelated to the issue at hand (e.g. someone lying that they weren't doing drugs in hopes of avoiding a drug charge doesn't mean they're lying when they say they didn't commit a robbery across town).

to:

Unfortunately, this can lead people to assume HesitationEqualsDishonesty, never mind that hesitation is one of the most common things in realistic speech and can originate from ''many'' sources other than dishonesty (someone being drunk or high, absolutely terrified, wanting to make sure they ''are'' telling the truth) or from dishonesty unrelated to the issue at hand (e.g. someone lying that they weren't doing drugs in hopes of avoiding a drug charge doesn't mean they're lying when they say they didn't commit a robbery across town).



See Also: BuffySpeak, MametSpeak, FunetikAksent.

to:

See Also: BuffySpeak, MametSpeak, FunetikAksent. Not to be confused with RealityIsUnrealistic.



** For example, an early episode where Michael suddenly realises that Kitty is in the [[ItMakesSenseInContext conjugal trailer]] based on no observation other than the fact that George Sr's rambling excuse included him mumbling the word "repulsive" - the same word GOB had used ''sotto voce'' to described Kitty earlier in the day. Both deliveries of this key word are so downplayed compared to the surrounding (and far less relevant) dialogue that it's easy to miss either or both the first time around.
** One side-effect of GOB getting upset or excited is that he loses all ability to form a coherent sentence. "You still mad me, Michael?" and "Look at banner, Michael!" have taken on MemeticMutation status as a result.
** At least a few times, the actors' stumbling over a line is left in. For example, Lindsay at one point is speaking quite quickly and reverses the object and subject in a sentence for no apparent comedic effect, which seems to be a genuine slip of the tongue by Portia de Rossi that just got left in there.
* Unsurprisingly for a Creator/JossWhedon project, ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is littered with BuffySpeak, especially from the younger characters such as Skye, Fitz-Simmons, Bobbi, and Hunter. Fitz in particular has a tendency to insert corrections, mutterings, and natural pauses into his dialogue, which is consistent with Creator/IainDeCaestecker's usual acting style.
** This trope even gets {{Exploited}} in Season 2 when Fitz is suffering the effects of brain damage, one of which is a bad case of nominal aphasia, and he frequently trails off in mid-sent... or struggles to find the, um, you know, the thing! For the thing! [[{{Angrish}} Argh!]]
** Simmons, especially in Season 1, had a tendency to occasionally let out a nervous giggle that either obscured or replaced the end of a line.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's ''Trapped in the Drive-Thru'' parodies the rambling style and interruptions of Music/RKelly's ''Music/TrappedInTheCloset'' by taking it UpToEleven. The narrator's wife mishears "delivered" as "liver" and they argue about it for several lines, a drive-thru employee zones out while the narrator asks for ketchup, and a mention of the name Paul sends the narrator off on a bizarre tangent about an unrelated guy named Paul that he used to know once.
-->I hopped up and said, "I don't know. Do you want to get something delivered?"\\
She's like, "Why would I want to eat liver? I don't even like liver."\\
I'm like, "No, I said delivered."\\
She's like, "I heard you say liver."\\
I'm like, "I should know what I said."\\
She's like, "Whatever. I just don't want any liver."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* Children in ''ComicStrip/ForBetterOrForWorse'' ''never'' say "and". They say "an'". Every bleeping time.
** They also have a habit of dropping the "g" from "-ing" endings.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roleplaying Games]]
* Although this trope tends to be played straight in ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', several characters do have very realistic dialogue, such as Keiji Tanaka (ShoutOut laden though it is) or Bill Ritch, both of whom tend to repeat themselves, as well as hesitate a lot, with the latter having quite the stammer.
* Many characters play this straight, but in the ''Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters'' roleplay, it's occasionally averted when many players mimic their original character's verbal tics and stammers. Most notable with a troper who mimics ''both'' [[WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty Rick and Morty's]] distinct speech styles.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stand-Up Comedy]]
* Creator/EddieIzzard uses a lot of placeholders and verbal stumbling in his stand-up delivery, though the routines themselves are pretty meticulously prepared. It works quite well.
* Creator/FrankieHowerd's stand-up/variety routine was full of very spontaneous-sounding oohs, ers, digressions and asides to his pianist, all painstakingly scripted.
* Creator/BillyConnolly once did a bit about a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycDDG0QyQ0 'Difficult Listening']] radio show that broadcast normal mumbled conversations that the audience couldn't hear properly.
* Creator/RossNoble spins out whole improvised ''routines'' based on his verbal slips or mis-hearing what the audience says.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]
* The play ''Theatre/ThePillowman'' gives characters realistic speech patterns to heighten emotion and dramatic effect. Particularly noticeable with the character Tupolski when he starts repeating himself, falling back on verbal tics, ("if I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'"... "did I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'") and saying rather odd things in an attempt to sound threatening. (This is even mocked by another character later.)
* ''Theatre/NoisesOff'' manages to work distraction, shaken confidence and a pathological stutter into the staccato rat-a-tat of a British farce. Garry, especially, who when not reciting lines never makes it to the end of a thought before forgetting what he was trying to say when he started it.
--> '''Garry:''' Lloyd, let me just say, while we're stopped; I've worked with a lot of directors. Some were geniuses. Some were bastards. But I've never worked with anyone who was so absolutely... I don't know.
--> '''Lloyd:''' Thank you, Garry; I'm touched. Now will you get off the fucking stage?
* Creator/HaroldPinter's works ''ooze'' this. Especially ''The Caretaker''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* Certain scenes in ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' were written to have more natural dialogue, particularly several scenes with Fei and Elly.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** In [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]], while the dialogue is generally proper, there are instances of mumbling and using filler, mostly during little lines - the ones that happen without the camera giving you a closeup of the characters' face. Generally the subtitles are grammatically correct, the actual line reads less so. Garrus stammers when saying he's never seen the Council in person before. Ian Newstead, fighting MindControl, slurs and babbles and drops words as he chants "[[MadnessMantra My mind is my own]]." Liara gets flustered and incoherent.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', Garrus says of Tali, "Tali's a welcome face around here... or... no. Well. A... a welcome face... behind the helmet. I guess." By the end they [[http://youtu.be/C2o_XUEfGeo may hook up]], and if discovered they both babble and stutter and in general deliver far less coherent versions of the lines in the subtitles. It is {{Adorkable}}.
* Generally, everyone uses proper diction in ''VideoGame/HalfLife''. The G-Man, however, is consistently stuttering, pausing, and taking in deep breaths, all of which could be considered too much even for real life speech. It actually helps make him appear as... ''[[HumanoidAbomination something]]'' [[UncannyValley trying to appear human]], [[GlamourFailure and failing]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Gladius}}'' lampshades how unrealistic many RPG sidequests and rewards are with heavy use of awkward silences, stuttering, and conversations that just trail off.
* ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' has this through Wheatley, who (despite being a robot) frequently delves into this and BuffySpeak. Also applies to the damaged cores, who, due to faults, have unique/strange personalities which understandably cause tics and poor diction.
** The entire ending sequence is guilty of this, as it involves a collection of robots [[CharacterFilibuster rambling incessantly]] while you fight: there's the BigBad suffering a VillainousBreakdown; the "Fact Sphere" mumbling dubious facts; the "Space Sphere" jabbering obsessively [[ShapedLikeItself about space]]; and "Rick the Adventure Sphere" rambling about his (presumably delusional) adventures.
* Averted ''entirely'' by the Phone Guy in ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' during his recordings for the player. He stutters, hesitates, stumbles over some words, repeats himself, goes silent as if to think, trails off during sentences, offers random interjections of 'okay?', says 'um' and 'uh' quite a bit, and generally really does sound like some guy who's just recording a message for the player without a script and just going off the top of his head.
* Agent G. averts this in grindhouse parody ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', due to his "actor" being bad and forgetting the script:
-->"Ladies and gentlemen, the infinite tact of Isaac Washington. You do... Truly you do, use your tongue better than a... a $30 hooker. Can I say from the bottom of my heart... You truly are a shining example to us all... uh, Humanity I mean..."
** Of course, some cutscenes have he and others speaking [[SeinfeldianConversation pointless, flowery, smooth]], [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] dialogue, so it's more he does it [[RuleOfFunny when it's funny]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* Although ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' also applies for the first kind, other characters fit here. Tavros has a tendency to speak very awkwardly with lots of 'uhh's 'err's, to highlight his nervous, dorky personality, while Roxy is [[HardDrinkingPartyGirl perpetually drunk]] and has a tendency to make spelling errors she sometimes corrects. So what happens when [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=002999 the very awkward Tavros tries to troll the incredibly eloquent Dave?]] One of the most popular FunnyMoments in the entire series:
-->'''TG:''' no man
-->'''TG:''' look
-->'''TG:''' i just need to know when to be there
-->'''TG:''' when the stars come into alignment and your [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture flux capacitor]] lets you finally sate your meteoric greed for crotch-dachshund
-->'''TG:''' i wouldnt want to miss it and cause a paradox or something
-->'''TG:''' itd suck if the universe blew up on account of you missing your window of opportunity to help yourself to a pubescent boy's naked spam porpoise
-->'''AT:''' uHHH,
-->'''AT:''' oK, THIS IS SORT OF STARTING TO UPSET ME,
-->'''TG:''' jesus you are such a shitty troll
** Meenah also tends to misspell things, such as typing 'yea' instead of 'yeah', though in this case it's to indicate lack of care about such pretensions rather than accidents like it is for Roxy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''WebVideo/{{lonelygirl15}}'' gets this right... some of the time. Oddly enough, the more hectic "action" videos tend to be better at not sounding scripted, with characters scrambling and yelling over one another.
* Both ''WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool'' and ''WebAnimation/DrHavocsDiary'', as there are a lot of ThrowItIn moments on the spot.
* Even in scripted episodes of his show, WebVideo/{{Jontron}}'s speech features slight pauses. He often also says an odd throat-clearing bark sound, usually spelt as "ECH".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* The dialogue in ''WesternAnimation/CreatureComforts'' consists entirely of unscripted interviews.
* The shows of Adam Reed (e.g. ''WesternAnimation/FriskyDingo'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'') tend to have characters speaking with natural-sounding (and often realistically awkward) dialogue, talking over one another, etc.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. The show uses many situations in which characters break into very realistic and overlapping dialogue in ridiculous situations. Some viewers find this to be an OverlyLongGag, but others love it and would turn violent if it went away.
* It's one of the salient features of the titular characters in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'', and to a lesser extent other characters. Verbal tics, stammers, irrelevant tangents, and corrections are all over the place. (Not to mention Rick's belching in the middle of every other word.) Almost everything on the list at the top has happened at some point.
* Dialogue in early ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' cartoons was often ad-libbed by Jack Mercer (Popeye) and Mae Questel (Olive Oyl). Characters frequently speak a mile-a-minute, mutter random observations under their breath, and talk in [[{{Angrish}} confused gibberish]] when situations get hectic.
* ''WesternAnimation/DrKatz'' and ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'', in which a lot of the dialogue is ad-libbed.
* This commonly happens in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', being a DeconstructorFleet.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Miscellaneous]]
* Creator/DavidMamet is known for [[MametSpeak his signature dialogue style]], which manages to be very naturalistic and very stylized at the same time.
* UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} journalist Bob Greene once wrote a vicious column about Mayor Richard J. Daley which provoked a storm of controversy. It consisted of a verbatim, un-corrected transcript of one of the mayor's press conferences.
[[/folder]]
----
[[BrickJoke Repetition]]

to:

** For example, an early episode where Michael suddenly realises that Kitty is in the [[ItMakesSenseInContext conjugal trailer]] based on no observation other than the fact that George Sr's rambling excuse included him mumbling the word "repulsive" - the same word GOB had used ''sotto voce'' to described Kitty earlier in the day. Both deliveries of this key word are so downplayed compared to the surrounding (and far less relevant) dialogue that it's easy to miss either or both the first time around.
** One side-effect of GOB getting upset or excited is that he loses all ability to form a coherent sentence. "You still mad me, Michael?" and "Look at banner, Michael!" have taken on MemeticMutation status as a result.
** At least a few times, the actors' stumbling over a line is left in. For example, Lindsay at one point is speaking quite quickly and reverses the object and subject in a sentence for no apparent comedic effect, which seems to be a genuine slip of the tongue by Portia de Rossi that just got left in there.
* Unsurprisingly for a Creator/JossWhedon project, ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is littered with BuffySpeak, especially from the younger characters such as Skye, Fitz-Simmons, Bobbi, and Hunter. Fitz in particular has a tendency to insert corrections, mutterings, and natural pauses into his dialogue, which is consistent with Creator/IainDeCaestecker's usual acting style.
** This trope even gets {{Exploited}} in Season 2 when Fitz is suffering the effects of brain damage, one of which is a bad case of nominal aphasia, and he frequently trails off in mid-sent... or struggles to find the, um, you know, the thing! For the thing! [[{{Angrish}} Argh!]]
** Simmons, especially in Season 1, had a tendency to occasionally let out a nervous giggle that either obscured or replaced the end of a line.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's ''Trapped in the Drive-Thru'' parodies the rambling style and interruptions of Music/RKelly's ''Music/TrappedInTheCloset'' by taking it UpToEleven. The narrator's wife mishears "delivered" as "liver" and they argue about it for several lines, a drive-thru employee zones out while the narrator asks for ketchup, and a mention of the name Paul sends the narrator off on a bizarre tangent about an unrelated guy named Paul that he used to know once.
-->I hopped up and said, "I don't know. Do you want to get something delivered?"\\
She's like, "Why would I want to eat liver? I don't even like liver."\\
I'm like, "No, I said delivered."\\
She's like, "I heard you say liver."\\
I'm like, "I should know what I said."\\
She's like, "Whatever. I just don't want any liver."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* Children in ''ComicStrip/ForBetterOrForWorse'' ''never'' say "and". They say "an'". Every bleeping time.
** They also have a habit of dropping the "g" from "-ing" endings.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roleplaying Games]]
* Although this trope tends to be played straight in ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', several characters do have very realistic dialogue, such as Keiji Tanaka (ShoutOut laden though it is) or Bill Ritch, both of whom tend to repeat themselves, as well as hesitate a lot, with the latter having quite the stammer.
* Many characters play this straight, but in the ''Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters'' roleplay, it's occasionally averted when many players mimic their original character's verbal tics and stammers. Most notable with a troper who mimics ''both'' [[WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty Rick and Morty's]] distinct speech styles.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stand-Up Comedy]]
* Creator/EddieIzzard uses a lot of placeholders and verbal stumbling in his stand-up delivery, though the routines themselves are pretty meticulously prepared. It works quite well.
* Creator/FrankieHowerd's stand-up/variety routine was full of very spontaneous-sounding oohs, ers, digressions and asides to his pianist, all painstakingly scripted.
* Creator/BillyConnolly once did a bit about a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycDDG0QyQ0 'Difficult Listening']] radio show that broadcast normal mumbled conversations that the audience couldn't hear properly.
* Creator/RossNoble spins out whole improvised ''routines'' based on his verbal slips or mis-hearing what the audience says.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]
* The play ''Theatre/ThePillowman'' gives characters realistic speech patterns to heighten emotion and dramatic effect. Particularly noticeable with the character Tupolski when he starts repeating himself, falling back on verbal tics, ("if I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'"... "did I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'") and saying rather odd things in an attempt to sound threatening. (This is even mocked by another character later.)
* ''Theatre/NoisesOff'' manages to work distraction, shaken confidence and a pathological stutter into the staccato rat-a-tat of a British farce. Garry, especially, who when not reciting lines never makes it to the end of a thought before forgetting what he was trying to say when he started it.
--> '''Garry:''' Lloyd, let me just say, while we're stopped; I've worked with a lot of directors. Some were geniuses. Some were bastards. But I've never worked with anyone who was so absolutely... I don't know.
--> '''Lloyd:''' Thank you, Garry; I'm touched. Now will you get off the fucking stage?
* Creator/HaroldPinter's works ''ooze'' this. Especially ''The Caretaker''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* Certain scenes in ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' were written to have more natural dialogue, particularly several scenes with Fei and Elly.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** In [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]], while the dialogue is generally proper, there are instances of mumbling and using filler, mostly during little lines - the ones that happen without the camera giving you a closeup of the characters' face. Generally the subtitles are grammatically correct, the actual line reads less so. Garrus stammers when saying he's never seen the Council in person before. Ian Newstead, fighting MindControl, slurs and babbles and drops words as he chants "[[MadnessMantra My mind is my own]]." Liara gets flustered and incoherent.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', Garrus says of Tali, "Tali's a welcome face around here... or... no. Well. A... a welcome face... behind the helmet. I guess." By the end they [[http://youtu.be/C2o_XUEfGeo may hook up]], and if discovered they both babble and stutter and in general deliver far less coherent versions of the lines in the subtitles. It is {{Adorkable}}.
* Generally, everyone uses proper diction in ''VideoGame/HalfLife''. The G-Man, however, is consistently stuttering, pausing, and taking in deep breaths, all of which could be considered too much even for real life speech. It actually helps make him appear as... ''[[HumanoidAbomination something]]'' [[UncannyValley trying to appear human]], [[GlamourFailure and failing]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Gladius}}'' lampshades how unrealistic many RPG sidequests and rewards are with heavy use of awkward silences, stuttering, and conversations that just trail off.
* ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' has this through Wheatley, who (despite being a robot) frequently delves into this and BuffySpeak. Also applies to the damaged cores, who, due to faults, have unique/strange personalities which understandably cause tics and poor diction.
** The entire ending sequence is guilty of this, as it involves a collection of robots [[CharacterFilibuster rambling incessantly]] while you fight: there's the BigBad suffering a VillainousBreakdown; the "Fact Sphere" mumbling dubious facts; the "Space Sphere" jabbering obsessively [[ShapedLikeItself about space]]; and "Rick the Adventure Sphere" rambling about his (presumably delusional) adventures.
* Averted ''entirely'' by the Phone Guy in ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' during his recordings for the player. He stutters, hesitates, stumbles over some words, repeats himself, goes silent as if to think, trails off during sentences, offers random interjections of 'okay?', says 'um' and 'uh' quite a bit, and generally really does sound like some guy who's just recording a message for the player without a script and just going off the top of his head.
* Agent G. averts this in grindhouse parody ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', due to his "actor" being bad and forgetting the script:
-->"Ladies and gentlemen, the infinite tact of Isaac Washington. You do... Truly you do, use your tongue better than a... a $30 hooker. Can I say from the bottom of my heart... You truly are a shining example to us all... uh, Humanity I mean..."
** Of course, some cutscenes have he and others speaking [[SeinfeldianConversation pointless, flowery, smooth]], [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] dialogue, so it's more he does it [[RuleOfFunny when it's funny]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* Although ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' also applies for the first kind, other characters fit here. Tavros has a tendency to speak very awkwardly with lots of 'uhh's 'err's, to highlight his nervous, dorky personality, while Roxy is [[HardDrinkingPartyGirl perpetually drunk]] and has a tendency to make spelling errors she sometimes corrects. So what happens when [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=002999 the very awkward Tavros tries to troll the incredibly eloquent Dave?]] One of the most popular FunnyMoments in the entire series:
-->'''TG:''' no man
-->'''TG:''' look
-->'''TG:''' i just need to know when to be there
-->'''TG:''' when the stars come into alignment and your [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture flux capacitor]] lets you finally sate your meteoric greed for crotch-dachshund
-->'''TG:''' i wouldnt want to miss it and cause a paradox or something
-->'''TG:''' itd suck if the universe blew up on account of you missing your window of opportunity to help yourself to a pubescent boy's naked spam porpoise
-->'''AT:''' uHHH,
-->'''AT:''' oK, THIS IS SORT OF STARTING TO UPSET ME,
-->'''TG:''' jesus you are such a shitty troll
** Meenah also tends to misspell things, such as typing 'yea' instead of 'yeah', though in this case it's to indicate lack of care about such pretensions rather than accidents like it is for Roxy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''WebVideo/{{lonelygirl15}}'' gets this right... some of the time. Oddly enough, the more hectic "action" videos tend to be better at not sounding scripted, with characters scrambling and yelling over one another.
* Both ''WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool'' and ''WebAnimation/DrHavocsDiary'', as there are a lot of ThrowItIn moments on the spot.
* Even in scripted episodes of his show, WebVideo/{{Jontron}}'s speech features slight pauses. He often also says an odd throat-clearing bark sound, usually spelt as "ECH".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* The dialogue in ''WesternAnimation/CreatureComforts'' consists entirely of unscripted interviews.
* The shows of Adam Reed (e.g. ''WesternAnimation/FriskyDingo'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'') tend to have characters speaking with natural-sounding (and often realistically awkward) dialogue, talking over one another, etc.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. The show uses many situations in which characters break into very realistic and overlapping dialogue in ridiculous situations. Some viewers find this to be an OverlyLongGag, but others love it and would turn violent if it went away.
* It's one of the salient features of the titular characters in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'', and to a lesser extent other characters. Verbal tics, stammers, irrelevant tangents, and corrections are all over the place. (Not to mention Rick's belching in the middle of every other word.) Almost everything on the list at the top has happened at some point.
* Dialogue in early ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' cartoons was often ad-libbed by Jack Mercer (Popeye) and Mae Questel (Olive Oyl). Characters frequently speak a mile-a-minute, mutter random observations under their breath, and talk in [[{{Angrish}} confused gibberish]] when situations get hectic.
* ''WesternAnimation/DrKatz'' and ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'', in which a lot of the dialogue is ad-libbed.
* This commonly happens in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', being a DeconstructorFleet.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Miscellaneous]]
* Creator/DavidMamet is known for [[MametSpeak his signature dialogue style]], which manages to be very naturalistic and very stylized at the same time.
* UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} journalist Bob Greene once wrote a vicious column about Mayor Richard J. Daley which provoked a storm of controversy. It consisted of a verbatim, un-corrected transcript of one of the mayor's press conferences.
[[/folder]]
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[[BrickJoke Repetition]]
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7th Aug '16 11:22:36 AM MarkLungo
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* ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' is peppered with these. It's particularly odd when MichaelCaine's Alfred, who speaks with a Cockney accent and is given to British slang and idioms, spontaneously breaks into one of these.

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* ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' is peppered with these. It's particularly odd when MichaelCaine's Creator/MichaelCaine's Alfred, who speaks with [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents a Cockney accent accent]] and is given to British slang and idioms, spontaneously breaks into one of these.



* The french ''ComicBook/AchilleTalon'' series features the eponymous characters who talk in a bumbling and very sophisticated french, known for having the biggest bubbles of all franco-belgian comics. This is, however, [[JustifiedTrope used willingly by the author]], both to show Talon's a scholar, and because, the series having no real fourth wall to speak of, it is often lampshade that the characters ''really'' talk in big, ''written'' bubbles, so there's no reason they should speak in an ''oral'' way. For that matter, and though Talon monologues more than the others, practically every character in the series talk in a rather sophisticated french, even more sophisticated than most written language. All that gives troubles to translators, along with many {{Pun}}s that the author likes to put here and there in the middle of some overly long bubbles just for the fun.

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* The french French ''ComicBook/AchilleTalon'' series features the eponymous characters who talk in a bumbling and very sophisticated french, French, known for having the biggest bubbles of all franco-belgian Franco-Belgian comics. This is, however, [[JustifiedTrope used willingly by the author]], both to show Talon's a scholar, and because, the series having no real fourth wall to speak of, it is often lampshade that the characters ''really'' talk in big, ''written'' bubbles, so there's no reason they should speak in an ''oral'' way. For that matter, and though Talon monologues more than the others, practically every character in the series talk in a rather sophisticated french, French, even more sophisticated than most written language. All that gives troubles to translators, along with many {{Pun}}s that the author likes to put here and there in the middle of some overly long bubbles just for the fun.



* The ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' books by Frank Herbert are populated with highly intelligent and intensely educated characters, products of various schools of human talent. Conversation between two or more such characters inevitably entails great attention to minutiae and nuance, sometimes resorting to exotic languages more suited to such subtleties. Monologuing isn't exactly infrequent. Special mention goes to Bijaz, a dwarf of uncanny charisma and sharp intellect, easily dismissed by most but [[spoiler: secretly a Tleilaxu master]], whose speech largely consists of word games with hidden meanings, crafted in real time. All in all, TropesAreNotBad.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' books by Frank Herbert Creator/FrankHerbert are populated with highly intelligent and intensely educated characters, products of various schools of human talent. Conversation between two or more such characters inevitably entails great attention to minutiae and nuance, sometimes resorting to exotic languages more suited to such subtleties. Monologuing isn't exactly infrequent. Special mention goes to Bijaz, a dwarf of uncanny charisma and sharp intellect, easily dismissed by most but [[spoiler: secretly a Tleilaxu master]], whose speech largely consists of word games with hidden meanings, crafted in real time. All in all, TropesAreNotBad.



* The poem ''Scots Wha Hae'' by Creator/RobertBurns purports to be the words of Robert the Bruce to his troops before the battle that would win Scotland's independence. Great poem. No way any general could come up with it on the spur of the moment. It's different enough from any normal speech that the Terrans use it as a post-hypnotic BerserkButton for their first batch of troops in ''The Forever War''.

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* The poem ''Scots Wha Hae'' by Creator/RobertBurns purports to be the words of Robert the Bruce to his troops before the battle that would win Scotland's UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}'s independence. Great poem. No way any general could come up with it on the spur of the moment. It's different enough from any normal speech that the Terrans use it as a post-hypnotic BerserkButton for their first batch of troops in ''The Forever War''.''Literature/TheForeverWar''.



* ''Literature/AtlasShrugged''. Big time. In fact, pretty much everything Ayn Rand ever wrote. As one critic put it "her characters don't speak, they orate".

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* ''Literature/AtlasShrugged''. Big time. In fact, pretty much everything Ayn Rand Creator/AynRand ever wrote. As one critic put it "her characters don't speak, they orate".



** Subverted in Virgil's ''Aeneid''. The more upset Aeneas gets while telling his story, the less his speech follows proper Latin grammar rules. This both shows Virgil's extraordinary wordcraft and frustrates the living crap out of students who have translated it.
* Assorted myths and legends from other nations, also. Whether it's one of Chretien de Troyes's Arthurian romances, or the ''Shah Nameh'', or a tale from ''The Arabian Nights'', nobody speaks in a naturalistic manner.

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** Subverted in Virgil's ''Aeneid''.Creator/{{Virgil}}'s ''Literature/{{Aeneid}}''. The more upset Aeneas gets while telling his story, the less his speech follows proper Latin grammar rules. This both shows Virgil's extraordinary wordcraft and frustrates the living crap out of students who have translated it.
* Assorted myths and legends from other nations, also. Whether it's one of Chretien de Troyes's [[Myth/KingArthur Arthurian romances, romances]], or the ''Shah Nameh'', ''Literature/TheShahnameh'', or a tale from ''The Arabian Nights'', the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', nobody speaks in a naturalistic manner.



* Pick any two characters from the EndersGame series. Any two at all, be they adults or children. They will instantly have a scathing battle of wits, no matter what. Partly justified in that most of the characters are either Battle School veterans, parents/relatives of said Battle School veterans, or government officials, but still rather jarring when two random people will start talking with each other and instantly engage in repartee.
* The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series tends to get worse and worse with this as time goes on. It's not really noticeable in the military parts, but when those same people are supposed to be sitting around just having a relaxed chat, it can seem very stiff. Especially if they're using large words people generally don't use conversationally in real life. Other characters of David Weber's in other books tend to talk less like an essay, by contrast. Have an excerpt from "War of Honor".

to:

* Pick any two characters from the EndersGame ''Literature/EndersGame'' series. Any two at all, be they adults or children. They will instantly have a scathing battle of wits, no matter what. Partly justified in that most of the characters are either Battle School veterans, parents/relatives of said Battle School veterans, or government officials, but still rather jarring when two random people will start talking with each other and instantly engage in repartee.
* The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series tends to get worse and worse with this as time goes on. It's not really noticeable in the military parts, but when those same people are supposed to be sitting around just having a relaxed chat, it can seem very stiff. Especially if they're using large words people generally don't use conversationally in real life. Other characters of David Weber's Creator/DavidWeber's in other books tend to talk less like an essay, by contrast. Have an excerpt from "War ''War of Honor".Honor''.



* Nearly every character in ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'' has a habit of executing long spontaneous monologues with no mistakes or inaccurate word choices even when speaking in a non-native language. J. Michael Straczynski defended his characters' eloquence by [[WordOfGod stating]] that trained eloquence and articulacy had become fashionably popular again in Earth culture at the time of the series. (It helps somewhat that many of the characters are diplomats by trade.)

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* Nearly every character in ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'' ''Series/BabylonFive'' has a habit of executing long spontaneous monologues with no mistakes or inaccurate word choices even when speaking in a non-native language. J. Michael Straczynski Creator/JMichaelStraczynski defended his characters' eloquence by [[WordOfGod stating]] that trained eloquence and articulacy had become fashionably popular again in Earth culture at the time of the series. (It helps somewhat that many of the characters are diplomats by trade.)



** Conversely, William Shatner's famous... tendency to speak with... pauses is an attempt by the actor to give the impression that his character is making it up as he goes rather than reciting memorized lines (another possibility, articulated by Shatner later in life, is that they were the result of receiving the scripts late - sometimes as late as the day of shooting - and being forced to recite his lines without sufficient rehearsal).

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** Conversely, William Shatner's Creator/WilliamShatner's famous... tendency to speak with... pauses in [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]] is an attempt by the actor to give the impression that his character is making it up as he goes rather than reciting memorized lines (another possibility, articulated by Shatner later in life, is that they were the result of receiving the scripts late - sometimes as late as the day of shooting - and being forced to recite his lines without sufficient rehearsal).



* In ''{{Series/Deadwood}}'' characters frequently lapse into soliloquies.

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* In ''{{Series/Deadwood}}'' ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'' characters frequently lapse into soliloquies.



** Neil Flynn as The Janitor improvises quite a bit of his dialogue, and goes off on some pretty in-depth and quite wacky/surreal stories of questionable authenticity. Of course, there's plenty of outtakes where, in his attempts, he just completely derails.
* The prosecutors, defense attorneys, litigants, and judges in every [[LawAndOrder Law & Order]] series. [[JustifiedTrope But then, they are lawyers and judges...]]

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** Neil Flynn NeilFlynn as The Janitor improvises quite a bit of his dialogue, and goes off on some pretty in-depth and quite wacky/surreal stories of questionable authenticity. Of course, there's plenty of outtakes where, in his attempts, he just completely derails.
* The prosecutors, defense attorneys, litigants, and judges in every [[LawAndOrder Law & Order]] ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' series. [[JustifiedTrope But then, they are lawyers and judges...]]



* ''DawsonsCreek'' is (in)famous for it's depiction of teenagers who speak far too well for their age, or better yet, how teenagers ''think'' they speak rather than how they really do.

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* ''DawsonsCreek'' ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' is (in)famous for it's depiction of teenagers who speak far too well for their age, or better yet, how teenagers ''think'' they speak rather than how they really do.



* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'' again, with several characters, although one of the most obvious is Bobby Jacks. This is inadvertently amusing if you consider that at least half of the time, he isn't saying these monologues to anybody but himself, effectively just vocalising his thoughts for no apparent reason.

to:

* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'' ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'' again, with several characters, although one of the most obvious is Bobby Jacks. This is inadvertently amusing if you consider that at least half of the time, he isn't saying these monologues to anybody but himself, effectively just vocalising his thoughts for no apparent reason.



* ''Creator/WilliamShakespeare'', being the most famous author of the English language, is perhaps the best known of anyone for characters giving long, eloquent speeches brimming with literary devices. Most characters in Shakespeare's plays speak entirely in verse, while commoners, stupid people and the insane ([[{{Hamlet}} or those posing as insane]]) speak in prose that is often littered with malapropisms.
** In between these two extremes, however, one will occasionally find short sentences that reflect casual, everyday English (such as "What's the matter?" in Act II of ''[=MacBeth=]'').

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* ''Creator/WilliamShakespeare'', Creator/WilliamShakespeare, being the most famous author of the English language, is perhaps the best known of anyone for characters giving long, eloquent speeches brimming with literary devices. Most characters in Shakespeare's plays speak entirely in verse, while commoners, stupid people and the insane ([[{{Hamlet}} ([[Theatre/{{Hamlet}} or those posing as insane]]) speak in prose that is often littered with malapropisms.
** In between these two extremes, however, one will occasionally find short sentences that reflect casual, everyday English (such as "What's the matter?" in Act II of ''[=MacBeth=]'').''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'').



* There's a running joke in ''Franchise/MetalGear'' fandom that there's only one character voice - HideoKojima's.
** Partially justified in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' where the most obviously poetic speakers are the President of the US, a previous President of the US, a boss regarded as an overbearing LargeHam InUniverse and a machine that 'was born in the crucible of the White House', and Raiden loses his track in monologues at times ('you need c-courage, or - or ideals, or... something like that -') but still extremely blatant. Similarly justified in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'' for the main villain, whose gimmick is that he has the power to give speeches - but definitely not for DoubleAgent Elisa who is a teenage girl (with psychic powers, admittedly) who talks in a similar manner.

to:

* There's a running joke in ''Franchise/MetalGear'' fandom that there's only one character voice - HideoKojima's.
Creator/HideoKojima's.
** Partially justified in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' where the most obviously poetic speakers are the President of the US, a previous President of the US, a boss regarded as an overbearing LargeHam InUniverse and a machine that 'was born in the crucible of the White House', and Raiden loses his track in monologues at times ('you need c-courage, or - or ideals, or... something like that -') but still extremely blatant. Similarly justified in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'' for the main villain, whose gimmick is that he has the power to give speeches - but definitely not for DoubleAgent Elisa Elisa, who is a teenage girl (with psychic powers, PsychicPowers, admittedly) who talks in a similar manner.



* The Portuguese dub of DragonBall has this a lot. Henrique Feist, the voice of Goku, said that they "were given the lines but, sometimes, the characters would go on moving their lips after [their] line ended", so they would keep talking general nonsense. [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the sense that, while the dialogue is sometimes inappropriate for the situation, it was always fluent, and featured very little actual stuttering.

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* The Portuguese dub of DragonBall ''Manga/DragonBall'' has this a lot. Henrique Feist, the voice of Goku, said that they "were given the lines but, sometimes, the characters would go on moving their lips after [their] line ended", so they would keep talking general nonsense. [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the sense that, while the dialogue is sometimes inappropriate for the situation, it was always fluent, and featured very little actual stuttering.



** ''Waiting For Guffman''

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** ''Waiting For Guffman''''Film/WaitingForGuffman''



* The films of Creator/RobertAltman are famous for their use of overlapping dialogue. This was [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcp8xjaFfb8 lampshaded by Meryl Streep and Lily Tomlin before presenting Altman with his lifetime achievement Oscar.]]

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* The films of Creator/RobertAltman are famous for their use of overlapping dialogue. This was [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcp8xjaFfb8 lampshaded lampshaded]] by Meryl Streep Creator/MerylStreep and Lily Tomlin Creator/LilyTomlin before presenting Altman with his [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward lifetime achievement Oscar.]]Oscar]].



* ''Film/IronMan1'' features many characters talking over each other at times and repeating what they'd already said. This was in part due to the script being left largely unfinished during filming, as the filmmakers had focused more on planning the action and the storyline. Jeff Bridges at one point said he had problems getting his head around this style of film making until he told himself to think of it as "a $200 million student film". In fact, director Jon Favreau acknowledged that improvisation would make the film feel more natural. The action scenes were pretty much the only things that had been thoroughly planned out, and the broadstrokes of the plot. Creator/RobertDowneyJr improvised a great deal of his dialogue, including Tony's entire Jericho missile speech.

to:

* ''Film/IronMan1'' features many characters talking over each other at times and repeating what they'd already said. This was in part due to the script being left largely unfinished during filming, as the filmmakers had focused more on planning the action and the storyline. Jeff Bridges Creator/JeffBridges at one point said he had problems getting his head around this style of film making until he told himself to think of it as "a $200 million student film". In fact, director Jon Favreau Creator/JonFavreau acknowledged that improvisation would make the film feel more natural. The action scenes were pretty much the only things that had been thoroughly planned out, and the broadstrokes of the plot. Creator/RobertDowneyJr improvised a great deal of his dialogue, including Tony's entire Jericho missile speech.



* ''Series/{{Reno 911}}'' is filmed largely like a {{mockumentary}}, with improvised dialogue and only the basic plot elements of the show being scripted.
** In an episode where the deputies work with FBI agents, they note that the agents "Speak in paragraph form", while they're more used to saying things like, "That guy was shot, like, ten times."

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* ''Series/{{Reno 911}}'' is filmed largely like a {{mockumentary}}, {{Mockumentary}}, with improvised dialogue and only the basic plot elements of the show being scripted.
** In an episode where the deputies work with FBI agents, {{FBI agent}}s, they note that the agents "Speak in paragraph form", while they're more used to saying things like, "That guy was shot, like, ten times."



* The DVD commentary for ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' mentions that they worked hard to get the dialogue to sound natural, even encouraging the actors to interrupt and talk over each other. The show includes a moment where one character mishears another due to pronunciation, and the conversation becomes derailed because of it. [[CatchPhrase Does that seem right to you?]]
* The first incarnation of the Doctor in ''Series/DoctorWho,'' whose speech pattern came from the fact that William Hartnell kept flubbing his lines and they didn't have the budget to do it over and over until they got it right.

to:

* The DVD commentary DVDCommentary for ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' mentions that they worked hard to get the dialogue to sound natural, even encouraging the actors to interrupt and talk over each other. The show includes a moment where one character mishears another due to pronunciation, and the conversation becomes derailed because of it. [[CatchPhrase Does that seem right to you?]]
* The first incarnation of the Doctor in ''Series/DoctorWho,'' whose speech pattern came from the fact that William Hartnell Creator/WilliamHartnell kept flubbing his lines and they didn't have the budget to do it over and over until they got it right.



* Chris Morris' comedy series rely heavily on realistic-sounding dialogue to contrast with the surreal concepts. Steve Coogan does it quite a bit too, especially with Alan Partridge, who was originally created as a bumbling sports commentator who ummmed and aahhhhed an awful lot.

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* Chris Morris' Creator/ChrisMorris' comedy series rely heavily on realistic-sounding dialogue to contrast with the surreal concepts. Steve Coogan Creator/SteveCoogan does it quite a bit too, especially with Alan Partridge, Series/AlanPartridge, who was originally created as a bumbling sports commentator who ummmed and aahhhhed an awful lot.



* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' has several characters who speak with a very natural sounding dialogue, like Sawyer. Ben's dialogue has been accused of being too formal and filled with correct diction, until one watches an interview with Michael Emerson and realizes ''he really talks like that''. Daniel Faraday's quiet, mumbling, stammering dialogue is both accurately and annoyingly realistic. Actor Jeremy Davies almost always performs like this, because he ''actually talks just like that''!

to:

* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' has several characters who speak with a very natural sounding dialogue, like Sawyer. Ben's dialogue has been accused of being too formal and filled with correct diction, until one watches an interview with Michael Emerson Creator/MichaelEmerson and realizes ''he really talks like that''. Daniel Faraday's quiet, mumbling, stammering dialogue is both accurately and annoyingly realistic. Actor Jeremy Davies Creator/JeremyDavies almost always performs like this, because he ''actually talks just like that''!



** ''KathAndKim'', too.

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** ''KathAndKim'', ''Series/KathAndKim'', too.



* ''Series/{{NCIS}}''' [=McGee=] has a very realistic way of speaking, explaining himself in technical terms that he can follow, stuttering and tripping over his words when he's nervous, stating the obvious when he doesn't catch subtleties, and even freezing up at times when he's put on the spot. Ducky's way of speaking is also realistic for someone who rambles on with stories and information on a regular basis--listen to old men swapping stories sometime, they can go for hours without slowing or flubbing a single word. Ziva, on the other hand, is supposed to be an Israeli and to "prove" this she makes the occasional misguided word choice (particularly in idiomatic phrases or slang), which makes the fact that she usually has very fluid delivery seem out of place. It's been hinted at that she does it on purpose to get people to underestimate her.

to:

* ''Series/{{NCIS}}''' [=McGee=] has a very realistic way of speaking, explaining himself in technical terms that he can follow, stuttering and tripping over his words when he's nervous, stating the obvious when he doesn't catch subtleties, and even freezing up at times when he's put on the spot. Ducky's way of speaking is also realistic for someone who rambles on with stories and information on a regular basis--listen to old men swapping stories sometime, they can go for hours without slowing or flubbing a single word. Ziva, on the other hand, is supposed to be an Israeli UsefulNotes/{{Israel}}i and to "prove" this she makes the occasional misguided word choice (particularly in idiomatic phrases or slang), which makes the fact that she usually has very fluid delivery seem out of place. It's been hinted at that she does it on purpose to get people to [[ObfuscatingStupidity underestimate her.her]].



* As is the far from refined cast of ''Series/RescueMe''. However the stuttering has become somewhat {{Flanderized}} on Tommy's part. This is what Denis Leary's stand-up is actually like.

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* As is the far from refined cast of ''Series/RescueMe''. However the stuttering has become somewhat {{Flanderized}} on Tommy's part. This is what Denis Leary's Creator/DenisLeary's stand-up is actually like.



* Unsurprisingly for a Creator/JossWhedon project, ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is littered with BuffySpeak, especially from the younger characters such as Skye, Fitz-Simmons, Bobbi, and Hunter. Fitz in particular has a tendency to insert corrections, mutterings, and natural pauses into his dialogue, which is consistent with Iain De Caestecker's usual acting style.

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* Unsurprisingly for a Creator/JossWhedon project, ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is littered with BuffySpeak, especially from the younger characters such as Skye, Fitz-Simmons, Bobbi, and Hunter. Fitz in particular has a tendency to insert corrections, mutterings, and natural pauses into his dialogue, which is consistent with Iain De Caestecker's Creator/IainDeCaestecker's usual acting style.



* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's ''Trapped in the Drive-Thru'' parodies the rambling style and interruptions of RKelly's ''Trapped in the Closet'' by taking it UpToEleven. The narrator's wife mishears "delivered" as "liver" and they argue about it for several lines, a drive-thru employee zones out while the narrator asks for ketchup, and a mention of the name Paul sends the narrator off on a bizarre tangent about an unrelated guy named Paul that he used to know once.

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* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's ''Trapped in the Drive-Thru'' parodies the rambling style and interruptions of RKelly's ''Trapped in the Closet'' Music/RKelly's ''Music/TrappedInTheCloset'' by taking it UpToEleven. The narrator's wife mishears "delivered" as "liver" and they argue about it for several lines, a drive-thru employee zones out while the narrator asks for ketchup, and a mention of the name Paul sends the narrator off on a bizarre tangent about an unrelated guy named Paul that he used to know once.



* Although this trope tends to be played straight in ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'', several characters do have very realistic dialogue, such as Keiji Tanaka (ShoutOut laden though it is) or Bill Ritch, both of whom tend to repeat themselves, as well as hesitate a lot, with the latter having quite the stammer.
* Many characters play this straight, but in the [[Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters City of Lost Characters roleplay,]] it's occasionally averted when many players mimic their original character's verbal tics and stammers. Most notable with a troper who mimics ''both'' [[RickAndMorty Rick and Morty's]] distinct speech styles.

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* Although this trope tends to be played straight in ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'', ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', several characters do have very realistic dialogue, such as Keiji Tanaka (ShoutOut laden though it is) or Bill Ritch, both of whom tend to repeat themselves, as well as hesitate a lot, with the latter having quite the stammer.
* Many characters play this straight, but in the [[Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters City of Lost Characters roleplay,]] ''Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters'' roleplay, it's occasionally averted when many players mimic their original character's verbal tics and stammers. Most notable with a troper who mimics ''both'' [[RickAndMorty [[WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty Rick and Morty's]] distinct speech styles.



* EddieIzzard uses a lot of placeholders and verbal stumbling in his stand-up delivery, though the routines themselves are pretty meticulously prepared. It works quite well.
* Frankie Howerd's stand-up/variety routine was full of very spontaneous-sounding oohs, ers, digressions and asides to his pianist, all painstakingly scripted.
* Billy Connolly once did a bit about a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycDDG0QyQ0 'Difficult Listening']] radio show that broadcast normal mumbled conversations that the audience couldn't hear properly.

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* EddieIzzard Creator/EddieIzzard uses a lot of placeholders and verbal stumbling in his stand-up delivery, though the routines themselves are pretty meticulously prepared. It works quite well.
* Frankie Howerd's Creator/FrankieHowerd's stand-up/variety routine was full of very spontaneous-sounding oohs, ers, digressions and asides to his pianist, all painstakingly scripted.
* Billy Connolly Creator/BillyConnolly once did a bit about a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycDDG0QyQ0 'Difficult Listening']] radio show that broadcast normal mumbled conversations that the audience couldn't hear properly.



* The play ''ThePillowman'' gives characters realistic speech patterns to heighten emotion and dramatic effect. Particularly noticeable with the character Tupolski when he starts repeating himself, falling back on verbal tics, ("if I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'"... "did I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'") and saying rather odd things in an attempt to sound threatening. (This is even mocked by another character later.)

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* The play ''ThePillowman'' ''Theatre/ThePillowman'' gives characters realistic speech patterns to heighten emotion and dramatic effect. Particularly noticeable with the character Tupolski when he starts repeating himself, falling back on verbal tics, ("if I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'"... "did I go with my eyes like, 'go ahead and say something'") and saying rather odd things in an attempt to sound threatening. (This is even mocked by another character later.)



** In [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]], while the dialogue is generally proper, there are instances of mumbling and using filler, mostly during little lines - the ones that happen without the camera giving you a closeup of the characters' face. Generally the subtitles are grammatically correct, the actual line reads less so. Garrus stammers when saying he's never seen the Council in person before. Ian Newstead, fighting mind control, slurs and babbles and drops words as he chants "[[MadnessMantra My mind is my own]]." Liara gets flustered and incoherent.

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** In [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]], while the dialogue is generally proper, there are instances of mumbling and using filler, mostly during little lines - the ones that happen without the camera giving you a closeup of the characters' face. Generally the subtitles are grammatically correct, the actual line reads less so. Garrus stammers when saying he's never seen the Council in person before. Ian Newstead, fighting mind control, MindControl, slurs and babbles and drops words as he chants "[[MadnessMantra My mind is my own]]." Liara gets flustered and incoherent.



* Agent G. averts this in grindhouse parody ''HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', due to his "actor" being bad and forgetting the script:

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* Agent G. averts this in grindhouse parody ''HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDeadOverkill'', due to his "actor" being bad and forgetting the script:



** Of course, some cutscenes have he and others speaking [[SeinfeldianConversation pointless, flowery, smooth, Tarantino dialogue]], so it's more he does it [[RuleOfFunny when it's funny]].

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** Of course, some cutscenes have he and others speaking [[SeinfeldianConversation pointless, flowery, smooth, Tarantino dialogue]], smooth]], [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] dialogue, so it's more he does it [[RuleOfFunny when it's funny]].



-->'''TG:''' when the stars come into alignment and your flux capacitor lets you finally sate your meteoric greed for crotch-dachshund

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-->'''TG:''' when the stars come into alignment and your [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture flux capacitor capacitor]] lets you finally sate your meteoric greed for crotch-dachshund



* Chicago journalist Bob Greene once wrote a vicious column about Mayor Richard J. Daley which provoked a storm of controversy. It consisted of a verbatim, un-corrected transcript of one of the mayor's press conferences.

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* Chicago UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} journalist Bob Greene once wrote a vicious column about Mayor Richard J. Daley which provoked a storm of controversy. It consisted of a verbatim, un-corrected transcript of one of the mayor's press conferences.
6th Aug '16 11:32:08 AM MarkLungo
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* Creator/MarkTwain pioneered authentic regional and social dialects for all of his characters. However the [[FunetikAksent spelt-out]] slave patois (for example Jim in ''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'') is irritating to some readers. [[note]]Also see Zora Neal Hurston's ''Literature/TheirEyesWereWatchingGod''[[/note]]

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* Creator/MarkTwain pioneered authentic regional and social dialects for all of his characters. However the [[FunetikAksent spelt-out]] slave patois (for example Jim in ''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'') is irritating to some readers. [[note]]Also see Zora Neal Hurston's ''Literature/TheirEyesWereWatchingGod''[[/note]]''Literature/TheirEyesWereWatchingGod''.[[/note]]
6th Aug '16 11:31:16 AM MarkLungo
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** Also justified in that Dave and Dirk, two of the most eloquent characters, are freestyle rappers as a hobby, and Karkat is astonishingly verbally intelligent to the point where all of the other characters notice and comment on it. The characters who tend to be the most 'speechy' also have this as a character trait - Aranea can break out in eloquent description because [[MsExposition exposition is an addiction to her]], and Kankri has the speech quirk of talking like a preposterous {{Tumblr}} social justice post.

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** Also justified in that Dave and Dirk, two of the most eloquent characters, are freestyle rappers as a hobby, and Karkat is astonishingly verbally intelligent to the point where all of the other characters notice and comment on it. The characters who tend to be the most 'speechy' also have this as a character trait - Aranea can break out in eloquent description because [[MsExposition exposition is an addiction to her]], and Kankri has the speech quirk of talking like a preposterous {{Tumblr}} Website/{{Tumblr}} social justice post.



* An NPR story about a researcher who analyzes pauses and hesitation in human speech featured a number of audio clips where all actual words were edited out, and only the pauses, "umm"s and other space-fillers were left. Arianna Huffington was noted by the researcher as being an exceptional case in that she appeared to never insert filler sounds into her speech aside from outright pauses, and the accompanying audio clip was composed purely of brief inhalations and background recording hiss audible during pauses.

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* An NPR Creator/{{NPR}} story about a researcher who analyzes pauses and hesitation in human speech featured a number of audio clips where all actual words were edited out, and only the pauses, "umm"s and other space-fillers were left. Arianna Huffington was noted by the researcher as being an exceptional case in that she appeared to never insert filler sounds into her speech aside from outright pauses, and the accompanying audio clip was composed purely of brief inhalations and background recording hiss audible during pauses.



* The long defunct anime fanzine Protoculture Addicts once made a big deal about the amount of "uh", "er", "ah", "eh", "heh", and general grunting sounds in the dialogue of characters on {{Anime/Robotech}}. There was even an article called "Top Uh", where Rick Hunter got the top prize for the most "uh"-type sounds uttered. This is all probably due to the translation from Japanese to English and the attempt to match lip movements with the English dialogue. Also, the Japanese language does have a number of monosyllabic expressions that do sound like what English speakers would consider "filler" sounds.

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* The long defunct anime fanzine Protoculture Addicts ''Protoculture Addicts'' once made a big deal about the amount of "uh", "er", "ah", "eh", "heh", and general grunting sounds in the dialogue of characters on {{Anime/Robotech}}.''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. There was even an article called "Top Uh", where Rick Hunter got the top prize for the most "uh"-type sounds uttered. This is all probably due to the translation from Japanese to English and the attempt to match lip movements with the English dialogue. Also, the Japanese language does have a number of monosyllabic expressions that do sound like what English speakers would consider "filler" sounds.
5th Aug '16 8:20:37 AM SqualidHob
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/AaronAlexovich's works tend to present characters mumbling, ranting, stumbling over words, and interrupting each other's and their own sentences. Eloquence tends to be reserved for writing, rehearsed speech, and characters with well-structured thought processes that translate into well-structured sentences, such as Anya from ''Eldritch!'' and V from ''Serenity Rose''.
1st Jul '16 12:38:23 PM Anddrix
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Exceptions to this trope can come from works produced through improvisation, either live or as part of the writing process, and tend to appear a lot in indy films. On other occasions, stumbling or inarticulate speech will be used deliberately to suggest a character is dishonest or distracted, or may be used to make the character seem {{Adorkable}}. Aversions are often examples of NarrativeFiligree. Films that wholly avert the trope are sometimes termed "mumblecore". Averting this trope seems to be a BaseBreaker: either the dialogue sounding natural helps set the feel of the film and makes it feel more homely and, well, natural, or instead, it becomes difficult to understand what characters are actually saying and thus, ruining the experience of the film; so, basically it's the scripting equivalent of ShakyCam.

to:

Exceptions to this trope can come from works produced through improvisation, either live or as part of the writing process, and tend to appear a lot in indy films. On other occasions, stumbling or inarticulate speech will be used deliberately to suggest a character is dishonest or distracted, or may be used to make the character seem {{Adorkable}}. Aversions are often examples of NarrativeFiligree. Films that wholly avert the trope are sometimes termed "mumblecore". Averting this trope seems to be a BaseBreaker: divisive: either the dialogue sounding natural helps set the feel of the film and makes it feel more homely and, well, natural, or instead, it becomes difficult to understand what characters are actually saying and thus, ruining the experience of the film; so, basically it's the scripting equivalent of ShakyCam.
7th Jun '16 6:15:19 PM DoctorTItanX
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* The entire ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series (but especially the latter books) are chock full of multi page philosophical monologues by the heroes and villains

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* The entire ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series (but especially the latter books) are chock full of multi page philosophical monologues by the heroes and villainsvillains.
28th May '16 3:07:13 PM Kid
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Added DiffLines:

** They also have a habit of dropping the "g" from "-ing" endings.
28th May '16 3:04:55 PM Kid
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* Done well in ''Series/Outnumbered'', as the children mostly improvised their lines.

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* Done well in ''Series/Outnumbered'', ''Series/{{Outnumbered}}'', as the children mostly improvised their lines.
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