History Main / Qipao

1st Mar '17 3:41:56 AM Sabrewing
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* Shadow Yamato in the Sega CD version of ''VideoGame/EternalChampions''. She's a {{ninja}}, [[RuleOfSexy by the]] [[HighlyVisibleNinja way.]]

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* Shadow Yamato in the Sega CD version of ''VideoGame/EternalChampions''.''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' and its spinoff, ''VideoGame/XPerts''. She's a {{ninja}}, [[RuleOfSexy by the]] [[HighlyVisibleNinja way.]]
19th Feb '17 9:07:01 AM shawn_allen
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' episode "Slapsgiving III...", during the segment "The Cruel Tutelage of "Red Bird," Robin (CobieSmulders) wears a tight form-fitting dress with a Chinese design.
8th Feb '17 11:18:47 PM micucci
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The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to Orientalism, YellowPeril stereotypes and fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume use by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes -- making it a very heated issue.

to:

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to Orientalism, YellowPeril stereotypes and fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume use by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes -- making it a very heated issue.
1st Feb '17 2:41:49 AM JamesAustin
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* Nancy Kwan famously wore one in ''The World of Suzie Wong''.

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* Nancy Kwan famously wore one in ''The World of Suzie Wong''.''Film/TheWorldOfSuzieWong''.
19th Dec '16 3:57:54 PM Ebrbfureh
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The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to Orientalism, YellowPeril stereotypes and fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume use by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes - making it a very heated issue.

to:

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to Orientalism, YellowPeril stereotypes and fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume use by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes - -- making it a very heated issue.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' - Dr. Girlfriend wears one to pick up an on-the-prowl Rusty as part of a scheme of the Monarch's.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' - -- Dr. Girlfriend wears one to pick up an on-the-prowl Rusty as part of a scheme of the Monarch's.
10th Nov '16 10:49:44 PM Gamermaster
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* Ixpellia of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha'' has this as her most common outfit.

to:

* Ixpellia of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha'' ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' has this as her most common outfit.
25th Oct '16 6:13:39 PM chizo
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In popular culture, nothing spells "Chinese" like a ''qipao'', so if a native [[AnimeChineseGirl Chinese girl]] or a DragonLady shows up in a work (especially if it's a historical piece or a movie or animated short made back when Chinese women were stereotypically depicted as seductive, but dangerous), the chances are high that she'll be wearing one. The ''qipao'', or at least a dress cut like it, is also occasionally worn by non-Chinese women, as its tight fit and [[ShowSomeLeg slit up the side]] ramp up the sexiness of the character while still being relatively modest. Almost always used as {{Fanservice}}. However, many Chinese people disapprove of non-Chinese women wearing it unless they have specifically invited them to for a special occasion because it looks Orientalist.

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to YellowPeril stereotypes and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes - making this a very heated issue.

to:

In popular culture, nothing spells "Chinese" like a ''qipao'', so if a native [[AnimeChineseGirl Chinese girl]] or a DragonLady shows up in a work (especially if it's a historical piece or a movie or animated short made back when Chinese women were stereotypically depicted as seductive, but dangerous), the chances are high that she'll be wearing one. The ''qipao'', or at least a dress cut like it, is also occasionally worn by non-Chinese women, as its tight fit and [[ShowSomeLeg slit up the side]] ramp up the sexiness of the character while still being relatively modest. Almost always used as {{Fanservice}}. However, many Chinese people disapprove of non-Chinese women wearing it unless they have specifically invited them to for a special occasion because it looks Orientalist.

occasion.

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to Orientalism, YellowPeril stereotypes and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way use by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes - making this it a very heated issue.
25th Oct '16 6:10:33 PM chizo
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In popular culture, nothing spells "Chinese" like a ''qipao'', so if a native [[AnimeChineseGirl Chinese girl]] or a DragonLady shows up in a work (especially if it's a historical piece or a movie or animated short made back when Chinese women were stereotypically depicted as seductive, but dangerous), the chances are high that she'll be wearing one. The ''qipao'', or at least a dress cut like it, is also occasionally worn by non-Chinese women, as its tight fit and [[ShowSomeLeg slit up the side]] ramp up the sexiness of the character while still being relatively modest. Almost always used as {{Fanservice}}. However, many Chinese people disapprove of non-Chinese women wearing it unless they have specifically invited them to for a special occasion.

to:

In popular culture, nothing spells "Chinese" like a ''qipao'', so if a native [[AnimeChineseGirl Chinese girl]] or a DragonLady shows up in a work (especially if it's a historical piece or a movie or animated short made back when Chinese women were stereotypically depicted as seductive, but dangerous), the chances are high that she'll be wearing one. The ''qipao'', or at least a dress cut like it, is also occasionally worn by non-Chinese women, as its tight fit and [[ShowSomeLeg slit up the side]] ramp up the sexiness of the character while still being relatively modest. Almost always used as {{Fanservice}}. However, many Chinese people disapprove of non-Chinese women wearing it unless they have specifically invited them to for a special occasion.occasion because it looks Orientalist.
25th Oct '16 6:04:38 PM chizo
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The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to YellowPeril stereotypes and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes, making this a very heated issue.

to:

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to YellowPeril stereotypes and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War when Chinese women still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes, crimes - making this a very heated issue.
25th Oct '16 3:36:33 AM chizo
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The qipao was not originally Chinese, but introduced by the Manchu invaders who established the Qing Dynasty and implemented laws that required the populace to adopt Manchu clothing and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queue_(hairstyle) hairstyles]] instead of the traditional Chinese [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanfu hanfu]]. The qipao was originally loose-fitting; the high-slit, body-hugging dress with which the name is now associated was invented in Shanghai in the 1920s. In English, the same garment is often called a ''cheongsam'', a loan-word derived from the Cantonese pronunciation of the Shanghainese name for the dress. The qipao is a woman's dress; the male equivalent of the qipao is called Changshan (长衫).

to:

The qipao was not originally Chinese, but introduced by the Manchu invaders who established the Qing Dynasty and implemented laws that required the populace to adopt Manchu clothing and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queue_(hairstyle) hairstyles]] instead of the traditional Chinese [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanfu hanfu]]. The qipao was originally loose-fitting; the high-slit, body-hugging dress with which the name is now associated was invented in Shanghai in the 1920s. In English, the same garment is often called a ''cheongsam'', a loan-word derived from the Cantonese pronunciation of the Shanghainese name for the dress. The qipao is a woman's dress; the male equivalent of the qipao is called Changshan (长衫).
(长衫). Both of these are usually only worn for parties.



The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to YellowPeril stereotypes by the West and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War where the costume was strongly associated with Chinese women as it was still daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes. The qipao continue to be a source of FetishFuel in Japan making this a very heated issue.

to:

The "sex appeal" of the qipao has many UnfortunateImplications due to YellowPeril stereotypes by the West and is often used in a fetishistic CultureEqualsCostume way by non-Chinese people. The popularity of the dress in Japanese media stems back to the Japanese occupation of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War where the costume was strongly associated with when Chinese women as it was still used the qipao as daily wear. Chinese women were often the targets of mass rapes and made sex slaves by Japanese soldiers. They were [[VictimBlaming victim blamed]] for being hypersexual or accused of being temptresses to excuse these war crimes. The qipao continue to be a source of FetishFuel in Japan crimes, making this a very heated issue.
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