History Main / OurNudityIsDifferent

8th Jul '17 4:23:59 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* Reeves are a race of mercenaries and warriors in the ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}}'' setting who are averse to anyone seeing their faces, including other reeves, keeping their faces hidden by helmets or veils. If anyone sees a reeve's face, the reeve becomes obsessed with finding and killing that person. (Although, enough dead reeves have been examined for their looks to be documented; they have four eyes, no hair, and pebbly skin.)
5th Jun '17 12:05:02 PM Occidensill
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* The degree of cover that is the norm in Islamic countries varies widely by history, geography, and economics. There is a general call to modesty in the Koran, but what meets that criteria is not defined. Most Muslim nations meet this with the hijab, a covering for the neck and hair, but several nations and cultures are more relaxed, such as Jordan and the Tuareg. In the Ottoman and Persian Empires and for thousands of years before them, the higher a woman's status the more she covered herself; wearing a veil generally indicated that a woman was high class, and hiding the eyes from view could indicate nobility. Some of their successor nations, particularly in the Gulf, have taken this to an extreme in part to emphasize their recent economic rise, in part due to conservative movements that have increased influence since the latter half of the 1900s. What is considered indecent continues to vary - one recent innovation is the burkini, which covers the hair, hands, and legs and includes a skirt to allow for modesty at the beach and in competitive swimming.
** Other conservative religious groups also include modesty among their strictures, but often attach indecency only to female compliance. Orthodox Jewish women wear head coverings, which can include wigs, while Christian groups often don't restrict headwear, but do generally emphasize form obscuring dresses.

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* The degree of cover that is the norm in Islamic countries varies widely by history, geography, and economics. There is a general call to modesty in the Koran, but what meets that criteria is not defined.defined (males are also instructed to be modest, but morality is typically not attached as it is for women). Most Muslim nations meet this with the hijab, a covering for the neck and hair, but several nations and cultures are more relaxed, such as Jordan and the Tuareg. In the Ottoman and Persian Empires and for thousands of years before them, the higher a woman's status the more she covered herself; wearing a veil generally indicated that a woman was high class, and hiding the eyes from view could indicate nobility. Some of their successor nations, particularly in the Gulf, have taken this to an extreme in part to emphasize their recent economic rise, in part due to conservative movements that have increased influence since the latter half of the 1900s. What is considered indecent continues to vary - one recent innovation is the burkini, which covers the hair, hands, and legs and includes a skirt to allow for modesty at the beach and in competitive swimming.
** Other conservative religious groups also include modesty among their strictures, but and also often attach indecency only to female compliance. Orthodox Jewish women wear head coverings, which can include wigs, while Christian groups often don't restrict headwear, but do generally emphasize form obscuring dresses.
5th Jun '17 12:00:59 PM Occidensill
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* Professional Australian swimmer Annette Kellerman was arrested at Revere Beach, Massachusetts in 1907, for wearing an indecent bathing suit. It looked like [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/54/Annette_Kellerman.jpg this.]]

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* Professional Australian swimmer Annette Kellerman was arrested at Revere Beach, Massachusetts in 1907, for wearing an indecent bathing suit. It looked like [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/54/Annette_Kellerman.jpg this.]]Here it is,]] covering her from neckline to mid thigh.



* Countries where the wearing of burqas and other forms of head scarves are expected for women causes the sight of a woman's hair or certain parts of her face to be deemed indecent in public.
* Conversely, in the Tuareg culture of North Africa men wrap a fold of their trademark indigo turban (Tagelmust) across their faces at all times while in public (to the point where their faces become permanently blue as the dye leaches into their skin, which is why the Tuareg are sometimes called "The Blue People"), but women do not cover their faces at all. A man baring his face in public is seen as shameful, as the wearing of the veil is a rite of passage into manhood.



* Ancient Minoan artwork depicts women walking around in outfits that cover their legs, but leave their breasts exposed.

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* Ancient Minoan artwork depicts women walking around in outfits that cover their legs, but upper body coverings leave their breasts exposed.



* Until the early 20th century, it was considered indecent for women to have their hair loose, and for men to go outside without a jacket or other profession-appropriate cover for their shirt. It was even considered inappropriate for men to remove their jackets when indoors, except for reasons like excessive heat.

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** Australia has a European perspective on beach wear. This [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Lx2ihpGbc commercial]] demonstrates the setting specific standards by showing the transition from normal male beachwear of briefs (togs) into indecent exposure (undies!) just by walking inland and boarding a bus, elevator, etc.
* Until the early 20th century, it was considered indecent for women to have their hair loose, and for men to go outside without a jacket or other profession-appropriate cover for their shirt. It was even considered inappropriate for men to remove their jackets when indoors, except for reasons like excessive heat.



** The Western attitude to showing female hair from about 1600-1850 was... odd. Mothers (or women who'd been married for long enough that they were ''expected'' to be mothers), widows, little girls (and very small boys, who wore the same clothes as girls) and old maids (that is, single women over about twenty-five) wore caps. So did servants and nearly all working class women (being caught outside without one was a pretty sure indicator of a prostitute). But ''ladies'' -- those who were daughters or wives of the landowning class, that is -- didn't wear them with evening wear, and single young ladies who were 'out' -- that is, available and looking for marriage -- didn't wear them at all (Jane Austen's adoption of them at the age of twenty-three can probably be read as her giving up on men at this point). Over the 19th century they dwindled to being only for widows and servants, and that to only a kind of token headband by World War One.
** As for going outdoors, both sexes were expected to wear hats whenever they left the house until quite recently (the reason people stopped is thought to be the advent of cars). Men, however, were supposed to take them off when they entered a building -- especially a church -- to show respect, and by extension to briefly raise their hat as a respectful greeting (though this might have come from the fact that they would bow slightly at such moments until the early 19th century -- bowing would make your hat fall off). Women, however, would usually have their hat tied on or pinned to their hair, so they would only remove it when at home. (Hats also went on ''over'' the aforementioned caps.)



* The degree of cover required in Islamic countries varies widely by history, geography, and economics. There is a general call to modesty in the Koran, but what meets that criteria is not defined. Most Muslim nations meet this with the hijab, a covering for the neck and hair, but several nations and cultures are more relaxed, such as Jordan and the Tuareg. In the Ottoman and Persian Empires and for thousands of years before them, the higher a woman's status the more she covered herself; wearing a veil generally indicated that a woman was high class, and hiding the eyes from view could indicate nobility. Some of their successor nations, particularly in the Gulf, have taken this to an extreme in part to emphasize their recent economic rise, in part due to conservative movements that have increased influence since the latter half of the 1900s.


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* The degree of cover that is the norm in Islamic countries varies widely by history, geography, and economics. There is a general call to modesty in the Koran, but what meets that criteria is not defined. Most Muslim nations meet this with the hijab, a covering for the neck and hair, but several nations and cultures are more relaxed, such as Jordan and the Tuareg. In the Ottoman and Persian Empires and for thousands of years before them, the higher a woman's status the more she covered herself; wearing a veil generally indicated that a woman was high class, and hiding the eyes from view could indicate nobility. Some of their successor nations, particularly in the Gulf, have taken this to an extreme in part to emphasize their recent economic rise, in part due to conservative movements that have increased influence since the latter half of the 1900s. What is considered indecent continues to vary - one recent innovation is the burkini, which covers the hair, hands, and legs and includes a skirt to allow for modesty at the beach and in competitive swimming.
** Other conservative religious groups also include modesty among their strictures, but often attach indecency only to female compliance. Orthodox Jewish women wear head coverings, which can include wigs, while Christian groups often don't restrict headwear, but do generally emphasize form obscuring dresses.
** Conversely, in the Tuareg culture of North Africa men wrap a fold of their trademark indigo turban (Tagelmust) across their faces at all times while in public (to the point where their faces become permanently blue as the dye leaches into their skin, which is why the Tuareg are sometimes called "The Blue People"), but women do not cover their faces at all. A man baring his face in public is seen as shameful, as the wearing of the veil is a rite of passage into manhood.
* The Western attitude to showing female hair from about 1600-1850 flipped the general economic model. Mothers (or women who'd been married for long enough that they were ''expected'' to be mothers), widows, little girls (and little boys, who wore the same clothes as girls) and old maids (that is, single women over about twenty-five) wore caps. So did servants and nearly all working class women (being caught outside without one was a pretty sure indicator of a prostitute). But ''ladies'' -- those who were daughters or wives of the landowning class, that is -- didn't wear them with evening wear, and single young ladies who were 'out' -- that is, available and looking for marriage -- didn't wear them at all (Jane Austen's adoption of them at the age of twenty-three can probably be read as her giving up on men at this point). Over the 19th century they dwindled to being only for widows and servants, and that to only a kind of token headband by World War One.
** As for going outdoors, both sexes were expected to wear hats whenever they left the house until quite recently (the reason people stopped is thought to be the advent of cars). Men, however, were supposed to take them off when they entered a building -- especially a church -- to show respect, and by extension to briefly raise their hat as a respectful greeting (though this might have come from the fact that they would bow slightly at such moments until the early 19th century -- bowing would make your hat fall off). Women, however, would usually have their hat tied on or pinned to their hair, so they would only remove it when at home. (Hats also went on ''over'' the aforementioned caps.)
5th Jun '17 11:31:27 AM Occidensill
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* Many female specific variations begin as ways for upper class women to distinguish themselves and emphasize their status, then filter down as the economic conditions improve or modernize; more women no longer have to deal with physical labor considerations and begin emulating the wealthy.
* The degree of cover required in Islamic countries varies widely by history, geography, and economics. There is a general call to modesty in the Koran, but what meets that criteria is not defined. Most Muslim nations meet this with the hijab, a covering for the neck and hair, but several nations and cultures are more relaxed, such as Jordan and the Tuareg. In the Ottoman and Persian Empires and for thousands of years before them, the higher a woman's status the more she covered herself; wearing a veil generally indicated that a woman was high class, and hiding the eyes from view could indicate nobility. Some of their successor nations, particularly in the Gulf, have taken this to an extreme in part to emphasize their recent economic rise, in part due to conservative movements that have increased influence since the latter half of the 1900s.



* When the Spanish colonials tried to conquer the Araucanians in South America, the natives kidnapped many Spanish women; most were later returned in a peace deal, wearing native-made clothes and naked from the waist down. Actually a subversion, the Araucanians had the same understanding of nudity as Europeans, and were invoking this trope to mock the way the Spanish viewed their culture.

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* When A subversion: when the Spanish colonials tried to conquer the Araucanians in South America, the natives kidnapped many Spanish women; most were later returned in a peace deal, wearing native-made clothes and naked from the waist down. Actually a subversion, However, the Araucanians had the same understanding of nudity as Europeans, and Europeans; they were invoking this trope to mock the way the Spanish viewed their culture.culture and assumed NationalGeographicNudity.
26th May '17 6:12:46 PM pwiegle
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* In Kilgore Trout's ''Venus on the Half-Shell'',[[note]]"Kilgore Trout" was a fictional sci-fi writer invented by Kurt Vonnegut. However, ''Venus on the Half-Shell'' was actually ghostwritten by {{Creator/Philip Jose Farmer}}.[[/note]] an alien race known as the Shonks regard their faces as their private parts. Thus, they always wear masks in public, and arrest the space-travelling protagonist for indecent exposure.
16th May '17 10:31:00 AM alnair20aug93
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May Overlap with FantasticArousal. A SuperTrope of FullyClothedNudity, and SubTrope of YourNormalIsOurTaboo.

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May Overlap with FantasticArousal. A SuperTrope of FullyClothedNudity, and SubTrope of YourNormalIsOurTaboo.
YourNormalIsOurTaboo. See also OldTimeyAnkleTaboo, where it focuses on exposed ankles.
9th Apr '17 8:15:48 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* ''Webcomic/TheLeagueOfSuperRedundantHeroes'': Buckaress has such a {{Stripperiffic}} costume that she "feels naked" wearing [[http://superredundant.com/?comic=119-normal an ordinary sweater and jeans.]]
1st Apr '17 1:13:59 AM TheSinful
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** ''Fanfic/ChangelingCourtshipRituals'' has Queen Chrysalis questioning the point of strippers when ponies are usually naked anyway. Pinkie Pie explains that "it's not what they're not wearing, but how they take it off".
28th Mar '17 3:00:53 PM ErikModi
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': Ferengi culture dictates that females shouldn't wear any clothing (or do much else, for that matter). Quark is constantly embarrassed that his mother won't follow this norm. A running gag in one episode was for Ferengi seeing Quark's mother dressed to avert their eyes the way a human would upon accidentally walking in on a naked person.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': Ferengi culture dictates that females shouldn't wear any clothing (or do much else, for that matter). Quark is constantly embarrassed that his mother won't follow this norm. A running gag in one episode was for Ferengi seeing Quark's mother dressed to avert their eyes the way a human would upon accidentally walking in on a naked person. The metaphor is taken to its logical conclusion when Quark's mother asks Rom (Quark's brother) if he'd be more comfortable if she took her clothes off. He would indeed.
24th Mar '17 6:22:04 PM ZeroSD
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* Famously ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' has the Martians wear little to nothing save for harnesses to hang their weapons and pouches to carry other items, and the occasional jewelry. The artwork on covers and such that show them with loincloths and barely-there nipple coverings on women is ''adding'' clothing. Barsoom culture, simply does not care.
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