History Main / OmniscientDatabase

24th Apr '16 10:36:48 AM MarkLungo
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-->-- ''Webcomic/{{Slackerz}}'' [[http://theslackerz.com/index.php?nav=Comic&Page=26 making fun of]] ''Series/{{CSI}}''


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-->-- ''Webcomic/{{Slackerz}}'' [[http://theslackerz.com/index.php?nav=Comic&Page=26 making fun of]] ''Series/{{CSI}}''

''Series/CSIMiami''

24th Apr '16 10:35:12 AM MarkLungo
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Even in cases where there are well established databases, like criminal records, there are computer scientists who have dedicated entire careers just figuring out how to ''combine'' databases from various departments and institutions. When computers first started to be used for keeping criminal records, standardization was rarely considered, as they were for the use of that department alone, unless they were in a particularly forward-thinking county or large city where they shared records among local departments. It rapidly became apparent that this was a problem when departments began sharing records over the internet. One database may describe a criminal's eyes as "Light blue", another as "BL" and a third as "Lb". The same departments would describe another criminal's eyes as "Dark Brown", "[=BrD=]", and "B". This is after you manage to figure out which column denotes eye color, mind you. Even after the problem was discovered, change was slow because in some cases, such as New York and London, the same basic forms had been used for over 100 years, and had simply been transferred from index card to hard drive.

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Even in cases where there are well established databases, like criminal records, there are computer scientists who have dedicated entire careers just figuring out how to ''combine'' databases from various departments and institutions. When computers first started to be used for keeping criminal records, standardization was rarely considered, as they were for the use of that department alone, unless they were in a particularly forward-thinking county or large city where they shared records among local departments. It rapidly became apparent that this was a problem when departments began sharing records over the internet. One database may describe a criminal's eyes as "Light blue", another as "BL" and a third as "Lb". The same departments would describe another criminal's eyes as "Dark Brown", "[=BrD=]", and "B". This is after you manage to figure out which column denotes eye color, mind you. Even after the problem was discovered, change was slow because in some cases, such as New York UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and London, UsefulNotes/{{London}}, the same basic forms had been used for over 100 years, and had simply been transferred from index card to hard drive.



* Subverted in ''MrAndMrsSmith'': When the eponymous female character commands her subordinates to "search the database!", she gets rebutted with a snarky "For what? ''John Smith''?"

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* Subverted in ''MrAndMrsSmith'': ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith'': When the eponymous female character commands her subordinates to "search the database!", she gets rebutted with a snarky "For what? ''John Smith''?"



* ''LordPeterWimsey'' series: Wimsey is a living magical database. He also had a home-made "Who's Who" of the underworld, and once managed to identify the maker of a hat which had had its label removed, purely from the style. (Parker remarks that if he hadn't got the hatter, they'd have tried him on the man's dress suit, similarly de-labelled.)

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* ''LordPeterWimsey'' ''Literature/LordPeterWimsey'' series: Wimsey is a living magical database. He also had a home-made "Who's Who" of the underworld, and once managed to identify the maker of a hat which had had its label removed, purely from the style. (Parker remarks that if he hadn't got the hatter, they'd have tried him on the man's dress suit, similarly de-labelled.)



** The Archive in is a being that holds the knowledge of everything ever written down, ever, in the history of mankind. Her information is updated in real-time, a fact which Harry puts to good use in SmallFavor.

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** The Archive in is a being that holds the knowledge of everything ever written down, ever, in the history of mankind. Her information is updated in real-time, a fact which Harry puts to good use in SmallFavor.''Literature/SmallFavor''.



* In "[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality Under A Velvet Cloak]]", we find that Nox, the Mistress of Secrets, received a highly advanced database, which she always has with her. Since her Office receives all secrets, her database becomes this. In fact, it forms the basis for the all-knowing computer system seen in Purgatory.
* In ''{{Literature/Aristoi}}'', all human knowledge is contained within the Hyperlogos. The database is so big, in fact, that the Moon has been entirely converted into a dedicated server farm, and it's only one of many such farms throughout the known galaxy.
* This is more or less how the [[GreatBigBookOfEverything wizard's manual]] works in the ''YoungWizards'' series. It's a constantly-updating collection of knowledge spanning most of the known universe and several others besides. Every wizard has a copy, in formats ranging from SpellBook to [[MagicFromTechnology laptop]] to [[VoiceWithAnInternetConnection disembodied voice]], and the contents rearrange themselves according to the wizard's needs and talents.

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* In "[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality ''[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality Under A Velvet Cloak]]", Cloak]]'', we find that Nox, the Mistress of Secrets, received a highly advanced database, which she always has with her. Since her Office receives all secrets, her database becomes this. In fact, it forms the basis for the all-knowing computer system seen in Purgatory.
* In ''{{Literature/Aristoi}}'', ''Literature/{{Aristoi}}'', all human knowledge is contained within the Hyperlogos. The database is so big, in fact, that the Moon has been entirely converted into a dedicated server farm, and it's only one of many such farms throughout the known galaxy.
* This is more or less how the [[GreatBigBookOfEverything wizard's manual]] works in the ''YoungWizards'' ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series. It's a constantly-updating collection of knowledge spanning most of the known universe and several others besides. Every wizard has a copy, in formats ranging from SpellBook to [[MagicFromTechnology laptop]] to [[VoiceWithAnInternetConnection disembodied voice]], and the contents rearrange themselves according to the wizard's needs and talents.



** In fact, it's when CSI avoids the trope that it can be jarring. A reoccurring scene is the local trace evidence guy naming a compound, and the CSI identifying the compound's common name, and its uses, including the more arcane (say, Jeweller grinder lubricant) on the top of their head. Said arcane use are always the key to cracking the case. This gets jarring because there ARE databases to identify the most common uses of chemicals.
** There actually are multiple shoe-print databases available to police. An episode of [[TrueCrime Cold Case Files]] discussed a murder case that was solved, thanks to a partial shoe-print on a piece of glass that matched the shoes of a person in the neighborhood, who was found to be the killer.
** The characters in CSI are also lucky that whatever sample of fabric or metal they find, there is always some unique element or polymer in it which is used by a single company in the world, and is located a short car drive away. Did we forget to mention that the magical database knows the exact 100% correct composition of everything you can buy?

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** In fact, it's when CSI ''CSI'' avoids the trope that it can be jarring. A reoccurring scene is the local trace evidence guy naming a compound, and the CSI identifying the compound's common name, and its uses, including the more arcane (say, Jeweller grinder lubricant) on the top of their head. Said arcane use uses are always the key to cracking the case. This gets jarring because there ARE ''are'' databases to identify the most common uses of chemicals.
** There actually are multiple shoe-print databases available to police. An episode of [[TrueCrime Cold the TrueCrime series ''Cold Case Files]] Files'' discussed a murder case that was solved, thanks to a partial shoe-print on a piece of glass that matched the shoes of a person in the neighborhood, who was found to be the killer.
** The characters in CSI ''CSI'' are also lucky that whatever sample of fabric or metal they find, there is always some unique element or polymer in it which is used by a single company in the world, and is located a short car drive away. Did we forget to mention that the magical database knows the exact 100% correct composition of everything you can buy?



* An OmniscientDatabase is often an implicit background element of investigations in all the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' series. Although they have used such databases for many of the same types of queries as in ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the database query itself is more often carried out off-screen, with a lab analyst mentioning that a fiber found at the crime scene matches a luxury brand of purse that is only sold in only three stores in New York City.
** On ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', they often query some supposed national database implied to consist of all sex crime reports recorded by all local precincts throughout the entire country. They also have Warner, whose mind occasionally acts as a virtual OmniscientDatabase.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': The franchise must hold the freakin' copyright on the OmniscientDatabase 'cause there are like 1500 of them in the series and movies.
** The holodeck can recreate any setting or fictional story known to Man and several other species. (In one of the books, the holodeck can even replay every Opera performance from 1400 to the year 2356. How they managed to record pre-Renaissance operas... best not to ask.)

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* An OmniscientDatabase omniscient database is often an implicit background element of investigations in all the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' series. Although they have used such databases for many of the same types of queries as in ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the database query itself is more often carried out off-screen, with a lab analyst mentioning that a fiber found at the crime scene matches a luxury brand of purse that is only sold in only three stores in New York City.
UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity.
** On ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', they often query some supposed national database implied to consist of all sex crime reports recorded by all local precincts throughout the entire country. They also have Warner, whose mind occasionally acts as a virtual OmniscientDatabase.
omniscient database.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': The ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise must hold the freakin' copyright on the OmniscientDatabase omniscient database, 'cause there are like 1500 of them in the series and movies.
** The holodeck from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' can recreate any setting or fictional story known to Man and several other species. (In one of the books, the holodeck can even replay every Opera performance from 1400 to the year 2356. How they managed to record pre-Renaissance operas... best not to ask.)



** The Enterprise Main Computer carries all kinds of info like the launch codes to the Voyager probe built over 200 years earlier, or the command codes to every other Federation ship. And yet, when it would actually be useful for the computer to find a piece of obscure information, such as in 'The Naked Now' or 'Darmok', it takes hours. On the other hand, this matches real database performance - selecting a specific single record is far, far, FAR faster and easier than a complex query with plenty of cross-referencing, calculations on and parsing of retrieved data, and presumably multiple sources. 'Darmok' also contains more than a little Fridge Logic, in that the database actually knew the stories they were talking about, and yet nobody had made the link before.

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** The Enterprise Main Computer carries all kinds of info like the launch codes to the Voyager probe built over 200 years earlier, or the command codes to every other Federation ship. And yet, when it would actually be useful for the computer to find a piece of obscure information, such as in 'The "[[StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E2TheNakedNow The Naked Now' Now]]" or 'Darmok', "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E2Darmok Darmok]]", it takes hours. On the other hand, this matches real database performance - selecting a specific single record is far, far, FAR faster and easier than a complex query with plenty of cross-referencing, calculations on and parsing of retrieved data, and presumably multiple sources. 'Darmok' "Darmok" also contains more than a little Fridge Logic, FridgeLogic, in that the database actually knew the stories they were talking about, and yet nobody had made the link before.



** It might be more accurate to say that he has the internet in his head. For example, he doesn't know who Jack the Ripper was, but he knows all the theories on the subject.

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** It might be more accurate to say that he has the internet in his head. For example, he doesn't know who Jack the Ripper UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper was, but he knows all the theories on the subject.



* And similar to John Doe, there's Kyle, from ''Series/KyleXY'', who didn't know ''every'' trivial fact, only things like mathematical formulas. Well, until he spent a single day reading the World Book.

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* And similar to John Doe, ''John Doe'', there's Kyle, Kyle from ''Series/KyleXY'', who didn't know ''every'' trivial fact, only things like mathematical formulas. Well, until he spent a single day reading the World Book.



** The Doctor is a living OmniscientDatabase. For more recent incarnations, there isnít a single episode in the new or old series where he met an alien, visited a planet, or saw a piece of technology he hadnít seen, invented, or met previously (with extremely rare exceptions, which he rather enjoys). In the new series, when a bunch of alien cops threaten him and Donna, he easily understands and berates them in the same language. The man is awesome. But then who knows what anybody might know after traveling the universe for a thousand years...

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** The Doctor is a living OmniscientDatabase. For more recent later incarnations, there isnít a single episode in the new or old series where he met an alien, visited a planet, or saw a piece of technology he hadnít seen, invented, or met previously (with extremely rare exceptions, which he rather enjoys). In the new series, when a bunch of alien cops threaten him and Donna, he easily understands and berates them in the same language. The man is awesome. But then who knows what anybody might know after traveling the universe for a thousand years...



** The episode of the new series "Midnight" averts this somewhat. The 10th Doctor had no idea what the enemy was or how to fight it.

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** The episode of the new series "Midnight" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E10Midnight Midnight]]" averts this somewhat. The 10th Doctor had has no idea what the enemy was is or how to fight it.



** One episode puts a limit on Ziggy's database. Since Ziggy only has information starting from the moment Sam was born, when Sam and Al switch places, Al leaps into someone from within ''his'' lifetime, which is considerably longer than Sam's. Most of the episode is spent trying to download all the available data that would pertain to the person Al leaps into. In the end, it proves too late, [[spoiler:and Sam is forced to leap again to rescue Al]]. In another episode, Sam himself leaps into his ancestor, a Union Army captain during the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar. The same problem with the lack of available data crops up.
* ''Series/ERing'' had an example in the episode ''The General''. Said general is kidnapped in Spain. In order to identify his kidnapper, the main character asks to consult the ''Voice'' Database of the Spanish Government (which apparently includes voice samples of each of the [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 40 million citizens of the country]] and is [[FridgeLogic regularly updated]] to match voice changes due to aging, disease or plain mood swings), and then uses an experimental, [[AmericaSavesTheDay American exclusive application]] to compare its files with the record of the kidnapper's voice he has. This leads to the obvious question of why on Earth would a government keep a voice database of all its citizens if it had no way of consulting it.
* In an episode of ''Series/JudgingAmy'', the DNA identifying computer with a database of known criminals returned a result of... ''cat DNA''! Which actually justified. Its not that uncommon to stumble upon Animal DNA (Pets, Strays etc.) on a Crimescene so checking for the right number of chromosomes and some markers makes sense before you go onto a useless orgy of comparing datasets to a nonsensical sample.

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** One episode puts a limit on Ziggy's database. Since Ziggy only has information starting from the moment Sam was born, when Sam and Al switch places, Al leaps into someone from within ''his'' lifetime, which is considerably longer than Sam's. Most of the episode is spent trying to download all the available data that would pertain to the person Al leaps into. In the end, it proves too late, [[spoiler:and Sam is forced to leap again to rescue Al]]. In another episode, Sam himself leaps into his ancestor, a Union Army captain during the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar.UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. The same problem with the lack of available data crops up.
* ''Series/ERing'' had an example in the episode ''The General''."The General". Said general is kidnapped in Spain. In order to identify his kidnapper, the main character asks to consult the ''Voice'' Database of the Spanish Government (which apparently includes voice samples of each of the [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 40 million citizens of the country]] and is [[FridgeLogic regularly updated]] to match voice changes due to aging, disease or plain mood swings), and then uses an experimental, [[AmericaSavesTheDay American exclusive application]] to compare its files with the record of the kidnapper's voice he has. This leads to the obvious question of why on Earth would a government keep a voice database of all its citizens if it had no way of consulting it.
* In an episode of ''Series/JudgingAmy'', the DNA identifying computer with a database of known criminals returned a result of... ''cat DNA''! Which actually justified. Its not that uncommon to stumble upon Animal DNA (Pets, Strays etc.) on a Crimescene crime scene so checking for the right number of chromosomes and some markers makes sense before you go onto a useless orgy of comparing datasets to a nonsensical sample.



* David of ''{{Wishbone}}'' apparently has access to a database of dog breeds that includes things like their jaw measurements, for some reason. It has a very '90s aesthetic to it, like an over-the-top hacker-movie interface run on an old Macintosh OS.
* Series/{{Alcatraz}} has a database in their Bat Cave that can find, in seconds, a complete map of all private bomb shelters built in the 1960s by a company that went out of business decades ago.
* While it generally avoided this sort of thing, there was once an episode of ''Series/{{Babylon 5}}'' where they were able to look up the name of the person living at a specific London address nearly 400 years earlier and also the fact that the person disappeared the day after the last UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper murder.

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* David of ''{{Wishbone}}'' ''Series/{{Wishbone}}'' apparently has access to a database of dog breeds that includes things like their jaw measurements, for some reason. It has a very '90s aesthetic to it, like an over-the-top hacker-movie interface run on an old Macintosh UsefulNotes/AppleMacintosh OS.
* Series/{{Alcatraz}} ''Series/{{Alcatraz}}'' has a database in their Bat Cave that can find, in seconds, a complete map of all private bomb shelters built in the 1960s by a company that went out of business decades ago.
* While it generally avoided this sort of thing, there was once an episode of ''Series/{{Babylon 5}}'' ''Series/BabylonFive'' where they were able to look up the name of the person living at a specific London UsefulNotes/{{London}} address nearly 400 years earlier and also the fact that the person disappeared the day after the last UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper murder.



* From the ''{{Jem}}'' episode, "In Search of the Stolen Album": Synergy, Jem's super-computer, is able to scan clues that "Misfits"'s treasure hunt joke on the Holograms in a matter of moments--and even the reasons behind the places.

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* From the ''{{Jem}}'' episode, ''WesternAnimation/{{Jem}}'' episode "In Search of the Stolen Album": Synergy, Jem's super-computer, is able to scan clues that "Misfits"'s the Misfits' treasure hunt joke on the Holograms in a matter of moments--and even the reasons behind the places.
23rd Apr '16 2:21:07 PM MarkLungo
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* In ''Anime/LupinIIIDeadOrAlive'', Lupin's computer is capable of analyzing "sand", and determining the atomic composition of {{Nanomachines}}.
* Inspector Runge from ''Anime/{{Monster}}'' keeps an absurdly expansive encyclopedia on practically everything in his head by constantly making a typing motion and saying that he's just calling up the memories as he needs them, or something along those lines.

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* In ''Anime/LupinIIIDeadOrAlive'', Lupin's computer is capable of analyzing "sand", ''sand'', and determining the atomic composition of {{Nanomachines}}.
* Inspector Runge from ''Anime/{{Monster}}'' ''Manga/{{Monster}}'' keeps an absurdly expansive encyclopedia on practically everything in his head by constantly making a typing motion and saying that he's just calling up the memories as he needs them, or something along those lines.



* Almost every depiction of Franchise/{{Batman}} has this, whether it's his own vast knowledge (a la Literature/SherlockHolmes), the Batcave computer, or a combination of both. In one JusticeLeagueOfAmerica issue, it is shown that Batman's database of fingerprints looks at the magical databases of the Batcave, the GCPD, AFIS, JLA Headquarters and Superman's fortress of solitude. This allows him to determine the identity of a ''31st century superhero'' because Superman had been friends with him in the past... err... future...
* [[VoiceWithAnInternetConnection Oracle]] has taken on the role of database for the hero community at large. She serves as information retriever and disseminator, as well as offering mission-specific hacking and guidance.

to:

* Almost every depiction of Franchise/{{Batman}} has this, whether it's his own vast knowledge (a la Literature/SherlockHolmes), Franchise/SherlockHolmes), the Batcave computer, or a combination of both. In one JusticeLeagueOfAmerica ''Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' issue, it is shown that Batman's database of fingerprints looks at the magical databases of the Batcave, the GCPD, AFIS, JLA Headquarters and Superman's fortress of solitude. This allows him to determine the identity of a ''31st century superhero'' because Superman Franchise/{{Superman}} had been friends with him in the past... err... future...
* Also in Franchise/TheDCU, [[VoiceWithAnInternetConnection Oracle]] has taken on the role of database for the hero community at large. She serves as information retriever and disseminator, as well as offering mission-specific hacking and guidance.



* ''TheFlash'': Impulse is the only Flash able to permanently remember what he reads at super-speed. Once, he read ''an entire San Francisco public library''. It came in less handy than you'd think.

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* ''TheFlash'': ''Franchise/TheFlash'': Impulse is the only Flash able to permanently remember what he reads at super-speed. Once, he read ''an entire San Francisco UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco public library''. It came in less handy than you'd think.
26th Mar '16 8:31:07 PM SSJMagus
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Added DiffLines:

** Abby often gets amazingly precise information about what type of gun was used in a murder from just the bullet retrieved from the victim. This is in part because an implausibly large percentage of the villains use rare or even custom-made guns; it's almost as if they're trying to get caught.
20th Mar '16 10:04:30 AM Duffan
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Added DiffLines:

** She does hit a wall at one point. In the episode "Fatal," she bemoans the fact that there's no database of people who wear hats.
16th Mar '16 4:35:42 AM lvthn13
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Narratively, there are two distinct (but related) uses of this trope:

*As a time-saving device. Real forensic work or database searches might take days or weeks, and involve dozens or hundreds of hours of mind-numbing desk work that makes for poor viewing. Judicious use of this trope can reduce that boring search to a perky geek girl pushing a button and giving you instant DNA results so your characters can get back to busting bad guys.

*As a work-saving device. Sometimes, writers just don't have time to come up with plausible ways to solve the convoluted plot they came up with this week. Maybe they're more interested in the detectives as characters than the police work itself, or maybe they just flat out [[CriticalResearchFailure didn't do the research]] and don't plan to start now. If you can't come up with a way for the protagonists to locate the bad guy realistically, the OmniscientDatabase is a cheap and easy way to gloss over that and advance the plot.
31st Jan '16 9:48:26 PM LeanneFryingPan
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Added DiffLines:

**In "The Good, the Bad, and the Baby," Castle and Beckett use a prison tattoo database.
17th Jan '16 11:32:34 AM nombretomado
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* An OmniscientDatabase is often an implicit background element of investigations in all the [[LawAndOrder Law & Order]] series. Although they have used such databases for many of the same types of queries as in ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the database query itself is more often carried out off-screen, with a lab analyst mentioning that a fiber found at the crime scene matches a luxury brand of purse that is only sold in only three stores in New York City.
** On ''LawAndOrderSVU'', they often query some supposed national database implied to consist of all sex crime reports recorded by all local precincts throughout the entire country. They also have Warner, whose mind occasionally acts as a virtual OmniscientDatabase.

to:

* An OmniscientDatabase is often an implicit background element of investigations in all the [[LawAndOrder Law & Order]] ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' series. Although they have used such databases for many of the same types of queries as in ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the database query itself is more often carried out off-screen, with a lab analyst mentioning that a fiber found at the crime scene matches a luxury brand of purse that is only sold in only three stores in New York City.
** On ''LawAndOrderSVU'', ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', they often query some supposed national database implied to consist of all sex crime reports recorded by all local precincts throughout the entire country. They also have Warner, whose mind occasionally acts as a virtual OmniscientDatabase.
20th Nov '15 10:46:22 AM Materioptikon
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* Patchouli Knowledge (It's ''[[MeaningfulName in her name]]'', duh!) of ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fame is an effective Human([[WitchSpecies oid]]) Magical Database, thanks to her decades of study and self-made GreatBigLibraryOfEverything (remarkably, aside from the normal mortals she's canonically fairly young for a youkai). In ''Subterranean Animism'', she is capable of spilling out the histories and powers of every {{youkai}} Marisa meets in her adventure... with the slight problem of taking until ''after'' the youkai was defeated to look up any relevant information.

to:

* Patchouli Knowledge (It's ''[[MeaningfulName in her name]]'', duh!) of ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fame is an effective Human([[WitchSpecies oid]]) Magical Database, thanks to her decades of study and self-made GreatBigLibraryOfEverything (remarkably, aside from the normal mortals she's canonically fairly young for a youkai). In ''Subterranean Animism'', she is capable of spilling out the histories and powers of every {{youkai}} Marisa meets in her adventure... with the slight problem of taking until ''after'' the youkai was defeated to look up any relevant information.
20th Nov '15 10:45:42 AM Materioptikon
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* Patchouli Knowledge (It's ''[[MeaningfulName in her name]]'', duh!) of ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fame is an effective Human([[WitchSpecies oid]]) Magical Database, thanks to her centuries of study and self-made GreatBigLibraryOfEverything. In ''Subterranean Animism'', she is capable of spilling out the histories and powers of every {{youkai}} Marisa meets in her adventure... with the slight problem of taking until ''after'' the yokai was defeated to look up any relevant information.

to:

* Patchouli Knowledge (It's ''[[MeaningfulName in her name]]'', duh!) of ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fame is an effective Human([[WitchSpecies oid]]) Magical Database, thanks to her centuries decades of study and self-made GreatBigLibraryOfEverything.GreatBigLibraryOfEverything (remarkably, aside from the normal mortals she's canonically fairly young for a youkai). In ''Subterranean Animism'', she is capable of spilling out the histories and powers of every {{youkai}} Marisa meets in her adventure... with the slight problem of taking until ''after'' the yokai youkai was defeated to look up any relevant information.
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