History Main / OmniscientDatabase

28th Jun '17 11:17:06 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Subverted in ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith'': When the eponymous female character commands her subordinates to "search the database!", she gets rebutted with a snarky "For what? ''John Smith''?"

to:

* Subverted in ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith'': ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith2005'': When the eponymous female character commands her subordinates to "search the database!", she gets rebutted with a snarky "For what? ''John Smith''?"
5th May '17 12:00:37 PM Paranoia
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Curiously averted, though, in a third-season episode in which Lilah Morgan has to dig through cabinets of files to find information on Angel.

to:

** Curiously averted, though, in In a third-season episode in which Lilah Morgan has to dig through cabinets of files to find information on Angel.Angel, it seems like the trope is being averted. At least until she's about to give up on finding the information she needs, at which point the clerk at the desk of the records room reveals ''herself'' as the example of this trope, able to magically access, search, sort, and recall all the information the firm has stored in their records. Lilah asks her a few simple questions and is immediately pointed to exactly the records and information she wants.
21st Apr '17 7:39:31 AM KayEss
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Sort of justified, as Batman owns a Cray. The specific model depicted in one comic has an amazing 8MB. For comparison: this very tvtopes page has about 1MB (including images). Well, on second thought, not justified at all. The Cray's power is number crunching, not database operation.
21st Apr '17 7:24:02 AM KayEss
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** That trope and its exploitation is the basic concept behind the show. Somewhat more [[JustifiedTrope justified]] than usual in that when Finch built the Machine, he was explicitly given access to every data feed the NSA could get its hands on (plus every electronic device the Machine itself hacked on the fly), and now that he no longer has such access he often has to resort to asking Carter or Fusco to look through the NYPD databases on his behalf, which quite frequently turns out to be a dead end. So while the ''database'' may be omniscient, the cast's ability to make use of its omniscience is surprisingly limited given the premise of the show. In fact Finch deliberately set things up so the government could not use the Machine as a omniscient database. The government gets warning of impeding threats but is otherwise locked out of the Machine's data processing functions.

to:

** That trope and its exploitation is the basic concept behind the show. Somewhat more [[JustifiedTrope justified]] than usual in that when Finch built the Machine, he was explicitly given access to every data feed the NSA could get its hands on (plus every electronic device the Machine itself hacked on the fly), fly, plus data from an ingenious invention of Finch called "social networks" (aka Facebook), where people would voluntarily enter all kinds data about themselves), and now that he no longer has such access he often has to resort to asking Carter or Fusco to look through the NYPD databases on his behalf, which quite frequently turns out to be a dead end. So while the ''database'' may be omniscient, the cast's ability to make use of its omniscience is surprisingly limited given the premise of the show. In fact Finch deliberately set things up so the government could not use the Machine as a omniscient database. The government gets warning of impeding threats but is otherwise locked out of the Machine's data processing functions.
21st Apr '17 7:17:22 AM KayEss
Is there an issue? Send a Message


No matter what sort of clue the Crime Scene lab has found (blood, wire, rope, oil, perfume, etc), ''somebody'' has manufactured a database designed to search through them all. Not only that, our heroes at the crime lab have purchased a copy of this software, the interface devices to input the data in question and have acquired the expertise to use this software (which has so far never been used in another one of their cases) with 100% accuracy on the first attempt.

to:

No matter what sort of clue the Crime Scene lab has found (blood, wire, rope, oil, perfume, etc), ''somebody'' has manufactured a database designed to search through them all. Not only that, our heroes at the crime lab have purchased a copy of this software, software[[note]]not necessarily needed,
if the FBI/CIA/NSA already has a copy of the database - these organizations can be hacked within seconds by the average crime lab nerd[[/note]],
the interface devices to input the data in question and have acquired the expertise to use this software (which has so far never been used in another one of their cases) with 100% accuracy on the first attempt.
18th Apr '17 3:28:25 PM Omegatron
Is there an issue? Send a Message



Not to be confused with the MagicalDatabase, which holds information on supernatural elements as well.



** This trope was lampshaded with:
-->"Can you believe someone put together a database of grille dimensions?"

to:

** This trope was lampshaded with:
-->"Can
in an early episode. Abby is matching wounds from being hit by a car grille to the car grille database, and asks Gibbs "Can you believe someone put together actually made a car grille database?" She then goes on to mention the database she used to find the car grille database-- a database of grille dimensions?"databases.
7th Apr '17 5:21:05 AM Cifer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** That trope and its exploitation is the basic concept behind the show. Somewhat more [[JustifiedTrope justified]] than usual in that when Finch built the Machine, he was explicitly given access to every data feed the NSA could get its hands on, and now that he no longer has such access he often has to resort to asking Carter or Fusco to look through the NYPD databases on his behalf, which quite frequently turns out to be a dead end. So while the ''database'' may be omniscient, the cast's ability to make use of its omniscience is surprisingly limited given the premise of the show. In fact Finch deliberately set things up so the government could not use the Machine as a omniscient database. The government gets warning of impeding threats but is otherwise locked out of the Machine's data processing functions.

to:

** That trope and its exploitation is the basic concept behind the show. Somewhat more [[JustifiedTrope justified]] than usual in that when Finch built the Machine, he was explicitly given access to every data feed the NSA could get its hands on, on (plus every electronic device the Machine itself hacked on the fly), and now that he no longer has such access he often has to resort to asking Carter or Fusco to look through the NYPD databases on his behalf, which quite frequently turns out to be a dead end. So while the ''database'' may be omniscient, the cast's ability to make use of its omniscience is surprisingly limited given the premise of the show. In fact Finch deliberately set things up so the government could not use the Machine as a omniscient database. The government gets warning of impeding threats but is otherwise locked out of the Machine's data processing functions.


Added DiffLines:

** Made full use of in the few cases the Machine's shackles are taken off, like [[spoiler:the second and fourth season's finale, Root's status as the Machine's Analog Interface and finally Finch's endgame in the last episodes of the fifth season]]. Full-scale AwesomenessByAnalysis usually follows, which is why the status of being helped/directed by the Machine is usually called God Mode in the series.
31st Mar '17 4:13:15 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In fact, it's when ''CSI'' avoids the trope that it can be jarring. A reoccurring scene is the local trace evidence guy naming a compound, and the CSI identifying the compound's common name, and its uses, including the more arcane (say, Jeweller grinder lubricant) on the top of their head. Said arcane uses are always the key to cracking the case. This gets jarring because there ''are'' databases to identify the most common uses of chemicals.

to:

** In fact, it's when ''CSI'' avoids the trope that it can be jarring. A reoccurring scene is the local trace evidence guy naming a compound, and the CSI identifying the compound's common name, and its uses, including the more arcane (say, Jeweller grinder lubricant) on off the top of their head. Said arcane uses are always the key to cracking the case. This gets jarring because there ''are'' databases to identify the most common uses of chemicals.
12th Dec '16 5:23:33 PM trentongm
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Often inverted in real life. Government agencies typically fail to communicate in non-emergency situations and sometimes have to use comically outdated methods of accessing information. For example, despite constant accusations by gun-rights groups, the ATF has no database of gun-owners.
19th Sep '16 9:39:38 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality Under A Velvet Cloak]]'', we find that Nox, the Mistress of Secrets, received a highly advanced database, which she always has with her. Since her Office receives all secrets, her database becomes this. In fact, it forms the basis for the all-knowing computer system seen in Purgatory.

to:

* In ''[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality Under A Velvet Cloak]]'', ''Literature/UnderAVelvetCloak'', we find that Nox, the Mistress of Secrets, received a highly advanced database, which she always has with her. Since her Office receives all secrets, her database becomes this. In fact, it forms the basis for the all-knowing computer system seen in Purgatory.
This list shows the last 10 events of 68. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OmniscientDatabase